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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1938

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 PIANO RECITAL
AUDITORIUM
MONDAY
(_Jlj_> H&byiBBvyi
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
GORDON MANLEY
PIANIST
MONDAY
Vol. XXI.
BRILLIANT LOCAL PIANIST
TO PLAY HERE ON MONDAY
Gordon   Manley  First   Pass
System   Attraction
This  Year
First pass system presentation
sponsored by the Student's Council
vill be a recital by Gordon Manley,
eminent young Vancouver pianist, in
the Auditorium on Monday noon.
STOJOWSKI.
After studying in Vancouver, Man-
ley went to Seattle where he continued his work under Slgismund
Stojowski at his summer school in
the Washington centre. While there
the young Canadian exhibited such
talent that he won the much-coveted
Stojowski Student Scholarship for
summer tuition.
Following   a   second   session   of
study,  a  series  of  Canadian  stage
and    radio    presentations,    Gordon
Manley will leave for New York for
further studies under Stojowski.
In the Empress Hotel and Victoria
High School held In the capital city
on Thursday, September 33, he gave
his  flrst  recitals of his present  tour
and    was    enthusiastically   received.
The Times, under the comments ot
G. J. D., offered this tribute:
"He came with a message superbly exemplified, and Is a young man
at the threshold of a promising future with those essentials that reach
to high places. He has an astounding technical equipment,  temperament, musicianship, and vision. His
tone is full and of singing quality,
and he appears to bave an ample
supply  in  reserve  to meet  the  resources of the modern pianoforte."
First movement of the Sonata ln A
major by Mozart, a group of Chopin,
the Etude in E major, Valse in B flat
and Scherzo in B flat minor will open
the University recital. Other numbers
on the program will Include Godow-
sky and Stojowsky and two Spanish
numbers.
AGGIES PLAN
FULL SEASON
Annual field-day, banquet at the
Commodore, and the Major social
function of the fall semester, the
Arts-Aggie ball are occupying the
spare time of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society executive this week,
according to A.U.S. president Jack
Gray, who presided at the first meeting of the society on Tuesday. Dates,
places and other particulars of the
functions will be published in the
Ubyssey.
Doug.    Dougans,    treaaurer,    informed the gathering that the deficit   of   $3.58   sustained   on   operations  of  the  1037-1938 session  had
been magnanimously wiped off the
books    by    Students'    Counoil,    In
order   that   the   present   executive
might budget more accurately.
The    meeting    was    Informed that
plans   were   under   consideration   to
revive   the  ancient  custom   of  Aggie
pep-meetings, and  Doug. Taylor athletic   representative,   gave   a   preliminary purvey of proposed intra mural
programme.
At a special meeting of the
senior class In Agriculture on
Thursday, Jack Campbell was
elected president, Stan Weston,
treasurer, af Agriculture '39. It
was announced that Junior and
Sophomore class elections will take
place at noon today and tomorrow
respectively.
PEN POUND
A    black    fountain    pen    has    been
found near the Fire Hall. Owner may
have same by applying there and giving  description   of same.
NOTICE
The Biological Discussion Cluh
meet* Monday, Oct. 3, ut' 7.30 p.m. nt
the home of Dr. C. McLean Fraser at
»r>8.*>  W.  0th   Ave. I
Ail those interested please turn out. i
TWO HUNDRED
FROSH TOTEM
PHOTOS TAKEN
The photographs of the Freshmen
that are being taken by Artona Studios for the 1038-39 Totem reached
the astounding total of two hundred
odd as the fifth day of shooting
started. But there still remain aome
two hundred unphotographed students ln the Freshmen class.
It is understood that the majority
of those taken, however, are of the
female variety. It is hoped that the
males will rally round and support
the ardent Freshettes. It ls not the
desire of the Totem editor to have a
Freshmen section that looks like a
series of pages from a Yearbook of
a Womens' College!
Appointments can be made at the
Auditorium Box Office any day from
11.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m., and thereafter
at the office of the Ubyssey. Photographs will continue to be taken at
the Gymnasium for a few more days,
but not Indefinitely.
MAD DOGS, ENGLISHMEN GO OUT IN THE
NOON-DAY SUN
Lovers, and all other would-be
promenaders   in   the   noon-day   sun.
It has been reported to the Provincial Inspector of Police ln Vancouver that students insist on walking on Marine Drive with their backs
to the oncoming traffic.
An inconvenienced motorist suggests to the Inspector that students
might conduct their perambulations
on the left hand aide of the road
facing the oncoming traffic.
"Professor of Law on the Outside"
Constable BUI Orchard nays he thinks
this is a good idea, and asks that
students co-operate by walking on
that side of the road which makes lt
possible to see the coming traffic and
thus to keep out of the way of mad
gas wagons.
PLAQUE SUGGESTED
IN COMMEMORATION OF
STUDENT COMMITTEE
Some suitable recognition of the
work done during the summer of 1038
by the campaign committee should
be made by the Alma Mater Society,
it was decided at a meeting of Students Council Monday night. The
council thought it flt that the work
of these men, many of whom have
since left the University, should be
commemorated.
It vwas suggested by Evan ap Roberts that the memorial should be a
brass plaque which would be hung in
the Union Building. The exact nature
of the memorial has not yet been
definitely decided.
PHRATERES TEA
Phrateres is starting off the new
term with a tea in honour of its
new members. All Phraterians are
invited to 3776 Kingston Street on
Saturday,, October 1, between 3.30
and   8.00.
Sheliah Hutchinson and Biddy McNeill aie in charge of arrangements.
All   out  to  get  acquainted!
LOST
Undergrad gown labelled "Whlt-
hrrk". Finder please return to Council   Office.
A black diamond from ring. Bob
Pavidson,   Arts   Letter   Back.
VANOOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1938
EVENING ADULT EOT
CLASSES BEGIN SOON
No. 3
Evening classes in the Adult Education division of the University of
B.C. Department of Extension will
begin tomorrow evening with the
opening of a series of 24 lectures in
general botany, to be given every
Tuesday in the Applied Science
Building on the campus from 7.30 to
0.30 p.m.
On Oct. 12, Prof. F. G. C. Wood of
the Department of English, will give
the first In a series of 16 lectures on
playwriting. The classes will be held
in the Arts Building every Wednesday from 8.00 to 0.00 p.m. and will
be limited to twenty-flve members.
Additional courses which will be
given in the Provincial Normal
School will include "Twentieth Century Voices, a Survey of Modern
Literature," beginning Oct. 18, by
Mrs. John Crelghton, on Tuesdays at
.00 p.m.; English Composition by Dr.
Thorlelf Larsen, beginning Oct. 17 at
3.00 p.m.; and Amateur Gardening by
Prof. A. F. Barss, commencing Oct.
18 at 7.30 p.m.
OTHER COURSES.
Enquiries are invited regarding
Study Groups. Short Courses, Radio
Programs, Library Lists, Lantern
Slides and Correspondence Courses.
Other courses will be added if the
demand warrants it.
Students wishing to attend these
lectures may register at the offices of
the Department of Extension at the
University or in the lecture rooms to
be designated. There are no requirements other than ability to pursue
the work with profit.
Governors Decide To
Maintain Status Quo
SCHOLARSHIP
STUDENTS
Scholarship cards are ready
at  the  Registrar's  Office   and
students are requested to call
for them as soos  as possible.
PERSONALITIES
SOUGHT BY
VARSITY TIME
RADIO     FEATURE     NEEDS
ACTORS,     WRITERS
AND    STOOGES
FORRESTER TO SPEAK
TO V. C^U. TUESDAY
Mr. Jbs. Forrester. B.A., of Queens
University, will speak to the Varsity
Christian Union on "The True Wealth
of Nations" at their flrst lecture of
the season to be held on Oct. 4th, at
12.49, in Arts 206.
Mr. Forrester is famous throughout
Canada for his ability as a speaker.
For two years he was President of
the Political and Debating Union,
three times winner of the Thorburn
Prize and Champion Debater of Eastern Canadian Universities. At present
Mr. Forrester is Field Secretary for
the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship.
LOST
Lost, stolen or strayed from a table
in   the  Caf.,  a  navy  blue  lunch  kit.
Please return to Marlon Grlffths.
With the flrst Varsity Time program exactly one week in the offing,
Anal plans are rapidly getting under
way for the fall schedule.
STOOGES  WANTED
Ossy Durkin Program Director, ls
busy scouring the campus for
"stooges." The dramatic and musical
east haa not yet been chosen, and a
secretarial staff of script readers and
typists ls needed Immediately.
There are still some openings in
the announcing itaff, according to
Victor Freeman, chief announcer.
Actors, writers, musicians, technicians and thoae who merely want
to say "Hello, folks," over the air
should be at the organisation meet-
*lng today, Friday, in Arta 104,
sharp at  13.40.
AUSTRALIA CAN HANDLE
40.000 SETTLERS A YEAR
—Debator
"That Australia is capable of taking from 30,000 to 40,000 suitable
Immigrants annually, is a general
opinion in that country," said H. R.
W. Robson, Imperial debater, before
the civic bureau of the Board of
Trade on Wednesday afternoon.
However, these Immigrants must
be capable of assimilation he added.
Consequently, a White Australia policy has become almost a religion
among the Australians.
Robson's colleague, F. Thoneman,
is also speaking before major service organisations ln the city. Thoneman and Robson will debate Rome
and Macdonald of U.B.C. one week
from today at the Hotel Georgia.
Torches flame, Burn F rosh
And Discredit Bonfire
By VAN PERRY
Freshmen and sophomores at the
traditional initiation bonfire Wednesday night proved the wisdom of the
governors in banning such affairs altogether from the campus when one
first-year student was burned about
the face and arms with flaring gasoline.
Fortunately his Injuries were not
serious, but Gordon Dowding, freshman, can thank his stars today that
the gasoline which fell on him during the course of a major attack on
the Are was Just a light spray, and
not some of the heavy drops your
correspondent   saw   flying   through
the air.
Firemen  who  treated   the  boy  said
it   was   very   lucky   for   him   that  he
was not permanently blinded ln one
eye at least. As it was, their prompt
treatment    made    almost    superficial
what   might   have   developed   into   a
serious case of burned epidermis.
NO  ACTION  TAKEN.
Members of the Initiation Committee did not take action against the
tactics of the sophomores when they
became excited, and made their desperate dash to light the pyre. Gasoline-soaked torches, instead of holding their flames, threw flaring drops
far and wide over the heads of the
struggling mob, constituting a menace to sight, and even life.
I  heard  exclamations  from  certain
members of the Committee, when the
blue drops swept wickedly through
the air, but I did not. see any action
taken by them to tone down the persons responsible for the incident. Had
they taken action immediately, there
would have been little possibility of
such a near-tragedy as occurred.
Fruit and eggs which also flew
thick and fast during the melee did
little or no damage. Momentarily
painful or embarrassing thwacks were
received by many, but no one was
taken to the hospital from their
mental or physical sufferings in that
line.
The scuffling which took place resulted ln the odd blackened eye:
bloody nose, and cut hand or head,
but those who took part must have
been prepared for such an eventuality. Otherwise, why did they turn out
to the affair?
Ripping off clothing, which was
both frequent and violent, did not
cause any particular damage other
than to the sensibilities of some of
the onlookers, who weren't invited to
the party anyway. But the gasoline
did, and could have done worse, had
the supply not run low.
Now, who was right, the Governors in banning all forms of initiation, or the Committee in reviving
it for purposes of "University
Spirit"?
Campaign    Committee    Proposal    Regarding
Brock   Building  Will  Be
Considered   Later
Tho Hoard of. Governors will in no way change their position
on the mutter of increased fees, it wus stated in nn official press
report issued to Corson MeOuire by Mr. Sherwood Lett, Tuesday
morning. This statement was issued in answer to Campaign Committee requests put before the Board by its committee.
Following a oonferenoo between representatives of the
Student Campaign Oommittee and representatives of the
Board of Oovernora a proposal was put before the Board at
their meeting Monday night. The proposal requested the
Board to ask the Provincial Oovernment for an additional
grant sufficient to return student fees to their former level, or
for a grant suffloient to make a raise of fees of only $10 necessary.
In the event thot the Board accept this proposal the studenta
further requested that the date of payment of fees be postponed
until such time as the Provincial Government would have considered the request.
The Board considered it inadvisable to aooept the students' flrst suggestion and consequently the seoond was not
considered. The proposals were put before the Board of Oovernora by a oommittee under the chairmanship of Mr. Sherwood Lett, wbo conferred with representatives of the student
campaign oommittee.
"UNDER CONSIDERATION
The plan proposed by the Students'
Council whereby the Board of Governors would assist the students in
the paying of a bond Issue, floated
for the purpose of constructing the
Brock Memorial Union Building, has
not yet been considered by the
Board. The Governors, under this
plan, would grant the students a
sum of $28,000 In ten yearly payments. With this grant and money
available from the students' three
dollar building fee, the Union Building could be constructed within the
next year.
A committee Is atlll investigating
this matter and It la hoped that
the plan will be presented for the
consideration of the Governors In
the near future. Thla plan Is one
of a number of money raising
schemes, on whloh a Union Building Committee of Students' Council are working.
ap ROBERTS FATHERS
BROCK BALL SCHEME
The dote has been set for the
most brilliant social function ever
to be held hy a university organisation. Mr. Evan ap Roberts Is
working on a plan for a social
function, to take place on the last
night of the spring examinations.
This function will take the form
of the money raising cabarets often sponsored on this date by one
of the oampus sororities.
This funotion is only one of the
schemes for raising funds to construct the Union Building, under
the consideration of a committee,
of whloh Mr. ap Roberts Is an enthusiastic member. The Studenta
Counoil may authorise the use of
the university crest on several
commercial articles used by the
students, part of the proceeds from
which will be presented to the
building   fund.
S. C. M. HOLD CAMP
ON GAMBIER ISLAND
"Present Imperative" is the theme
of the S. C. M. annual Fall Camp
to be held this year at Fircom, Gam-
bier Island, from Oct. 8 to  10.
Guest speakers will include: Mr.
F. C. Boyes who has gained wide
recognition for his outstanding work
as principal of the Boys' Industrial
School, Mrs. V. Osterhout, and Messrs. RoWrt McKenzie, Robert McMaster, and Robert Tillman.
The cost for the three days will be
only $2.50, including a fifty-cent registration fee and transportation.
Special arrangements will probably
be made for those who would be unable to go to Gambler until Sunday,
Oct. 9.
Students should register as soon as
possible at the S. C. M. Room, 312.
Auditorium Building.
OARTON STUDENTSHIP
FIVE DOSES OF PEP
NEEDED BY PEP CLUB
Applications should be made immediately for membership in the
Pep Club. Functions of the club include poster work, cheer leading at
all games, Caf announcing, and in
general, promotion of Varsity spirit.
Most important activity ia the presentation of Pep Meeta. Former high
school cheer-leaders and show card
men are especially advised to apply.
For further details see any of the
membera at the Club table In the
Cafeteria  at   noon.
As only Ave new members can
he uccepted eurly application Is
lid vised to I'ep Cluh, Men's Arts
Letter   Rack.
The Trustees of the Oarton Foundation Studentship, on the advice of
their Board of Examiners, have elected Mr. John Howard, B.A., B.LItt.,
of  Magdalen  College,  Oxford, to the
Studentship of 1038. The Studentship,
founded in 1028 by the late Sir Richard Oarton, is Intended to assist students of proved capacity to devote
themselves for a year or more to the
study of social or economic problems
of fundamental Importance. Ordinarily offered in alternate years, it is of
the annual value of £400. The universities of the Empire are invited
to make recommendations for the
award. The present Trustees are
Lord Baldwin (chairman). Professor
N. F. Hall, Dr. T. Jones, Sir Henry
Mlers, Sir Arthur Salter, and Lord
Stamp.
TECHNOCRACY SOOIETY
LEOTURE
An open meeting of the Technocracy Society will be held ln Arts
101 at 12.30 Tuesday, October 4. Paul
J. Sykes will lecture on "The Collapse of the Price System." Students
desiring to find out "What is Technocracy?" are welcome. Membership
in the Technocracy Society is open
to   first   Year   students. T"-o
THE    UBYSSE Y
Friday, September 30, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 306 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 206
Campus Subscriptions. $1.50 Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
Friday
Robert King
SPORTS  EDITOR
Orme Dier
C.  U.  P. EDITOR
James D. Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Irene Eedy James Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS  EDITOR
Basil Robinson
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ossy Durkin Jack Mercer Joyce Cooper
Van Perry
Lester Pronger
Rosemary Collins
a_s___-B----*s
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All .-.-Jverttsing handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Oo.
Editorials
OAMPAION OOMMITTEE
The students' council's decision thnt some sort of memorial
should record the names of those who worked on the Students
Campaign committee is an expression of appreciation felt by the
entire Alma Mater Society. These men, and Mr. Onrson McGuire
most particularly, gave up more of their spare time than any
student realizes, scheming and planning to introduce a progressive policy in university affairs.
They have not achieved their goal as yet hut they are still
working, as persistently as they did during the summer months,
nnd have visualized a plan of action along which they are progressing. In any case the victory they gained earlier in the year,
when limitation was withdrawn, is sufficient pledge of good faith.
It has been suggested that the memorial he a plaque which
will be hung in the Union Building.
ELEOTION SPEECHES
It would seem from the audience gathered in Arts 100, Tuesday at the noon hour for tlie purpose of hearing by-election
speeches that the students had taken a final stand in their lack of
interest in such meetings. Meetings for this purpose are traditionally poorly attended but Tuesday's meeting reached an all-time
record in absurdity. The candidates and their seconders spoke to
an audience of not more than forty people, all of whom were sorority sisters of the candidates with the exception of one or two of
their would-be escorts. Surely, if the students are so uninterested
in campaign speeches the council members in charge of elections
could relieve the candidates of the burden of having to speak.
INITIATION
For several years, ever since the Board of (iovcruors abolished
initiation hazing on this campus, a large body of students have
demanded some sort of organized initiation. These demands became so insistent that this year the initiation committee included
a Frosh Bonfire in the men's program. The actions of the students
attending this affair have proved to the authorities that any sort
of initiation, organized or unorganized, is more than inadvisable.
The matter in which the Frosh Bonfire was carried out proves for
all future time that the students should not be given an opportunity for a similar demonstration.
LOST
Leather loose-leaf. Will the Under
please return to the Pep Club Table,
from which it disappeared between
1.20 and 3.00 p.m. Wednesday? Failing that, at least return the papers
and   material   contained.
PLAYERS' CLUB
There are a number of applicants
for the Players' Club who have not
yet obtained their try-out parts. They
must come up to the Green Room
(Auditorium Building) before Friday,
3.30 p.m., and get them if they wish
to try out.
BIO BLOOK OLUB
All Big Block Club members are
asked to be present at a special
dinner in the Caf. next Tuesday
night at 7.30 where the committer
appointed to look Into the reorganization program will present Its
findings.
Every member is requested to attend, and each and every one of the
stalwarts ls asked to sign the notice
at the bottom of the Caf. stairs to
that  effect.
Come one, come all, and hear
what Is going to happen to the
Club.
from . . .
THE OUTSIDE
. . by Darby
mare     WORLD WIDE NEWS
YOUR DOWN-TOWN HEADQUARTERS
FREE TELEPHONE to U.B.O. students
867
Granville
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. the Bus Depot
l.eaving university, they tell
its when we receive a Latin
scroll, is one of life's great
transitions. He thut as it may,
anybody who has spent four or
move years within the confines
of the campus can not get his
mind immediately adjusted to
the fact that he isn't there any
more. And so, after writing a
weekly bit called Around the
Campus for this paper for three
years, it is only natural that I
should petition madam editor
for the privilege of returning to
these columns every now and
then.
The Ubyssey has had ox-student columns before. With that
precedent established I feel safe
in venturing to express a few
opinions, "i'fom the outside."
The above is introduction:
What follows might be classed
as thinly veileil invective, with
a purpose.
Four years ago this month,
as a freshman, I attended u miniature riot known then as the
annual Frosh Bonfire. It was a
polite affair at which some two
or three hundred dollars worth
of old clothing: was destroyed,
and a half dozen students received scars that they were to carry
for a few months as visual proof
of their proper initiation into
the hulls of higher learning.
Following this bonfire of four
years ago, initiation, in tho old
sense, was outlawed by the
Hoard of (iovcruors—to remain
outlawed until 1938. True, there
were snake parades, strictly unofficial, hast year's parade promised to be the last for a number of reasons.
Biggest reason was a mass
meeting that ruled against snake
parades and appointed a committee to look into possibilities
regarding some sort of initiation ceremony that could be held
on the campus, and yet be exciting enough to take the place
of down  town  festivities.
This did not mean a bonfire.
Yet this year's council approved a bonre, and the result is
known to all British Columbia.
To those who went through
the last bonfire experience, the
action of the committee on freshman reception is hard to understand. If there is a reason, by
all means let's have  it.
The bonfire of Wednesday
night not only inured students
bodily—it injured a reputation
for student common sense that
the A.M.S. was beginning to
reap the benefits of, No amount
of excuses can be used to alibi
the university's name out of
the responsibility for the incident. As a member of the Student Campaign Committee I anticipate thut that group will
have some difficult explaining to
do when next we meet with government officials. The bonfire
this week has given the lie to
arguments which we put before
the provincial cabinet earlier
this month—arguments for the
sanity of the 1938 student body. •
lOven if the bonfire has no direct result upon the progress of
the student campaign, there remains the fact that it i.s leaving
an unpleasant memory in the
back of the minds of many who
could help our cause.
Blame for allowing the bonfire
to be held'can be placed on the
shoulders of student officials who
tlid not pause to consider the
results of their decision. The
Hoard of (iovcruors could not be
blamed now for moving to abolish initiation in all forms, for
ever.
Perhaps this blast and ones
that are sure to come from other sources could have beeu
avoided if those in charge had
stripped to consider the past.
There are lessons to be learnt
from history, even in the matter
of student government. What
seems to be needed is some system of acquainting student leaders of today with the decisions
of those of yestef'day—not in order that changes shall never be
made, but to assist in avoiding
making  mistakes a second  time.
U.B.C. NIGHT
AT ORPHEUM
OCTOBER   7
Coming to the Orpheum Theatre
the week commencing October 7 on
the stage in person the sensation of
Chicago and Los Angeles, the world's
champion ship swing dancers. Get
set for the hottest "jive" and "Jam"
session in America. It's the amazing dance sensation that ls sweeping the country, the "Jitterbug" Jamboree. Sixteen of the world's champion swing dancers will be presented
on  the  Orpheum stage.
See them do the shag, llndy hop,
Susy Q, Randy Swing, the Yam,
and many other dance sensations.
Also they will be accompanied by the
Jitterbug Swing Band, playing the
hottest of music. Also featuring the
world's champion trumpeter, Billy
Blake, and other outstanding Fran-
chon and Marko vaudeville attractions.
Friday night, Oct. 7, has been res-
Ignated as U.B.C. night. The special feature attraction on the screen
ls the college picture "Hold that Co-
Ed," starring Joan Davis, Jack Hea-
ly, Marjorie Weaver. An all college
show.
Track Stars
Wanted t
TRIALS WEDNESDAY
FOR PRAIRIE
TRIP
Now is the time for all good men
to come to the aid of the party. Now
ls the time, in fact, that all would-be
track stars and even those who are
casually Interested in the good old
game of tearing wildly around a
track should get into condition sta-
tim.
For on October Sth, next Wednesday, If you are a bit hazy on
dates, is the time set for the big
trials In the Stadium to pick the
men to uphold the honor of the
Blue and Gold at the Western
Inter-Collegiate Track meet to be
held on October ISth in Edmonton.
And if newly-appointed track manager Sam Wolfe is speaking the gospel, everything from the dash to the
two mile is wide open, so come on
out you  Frosh  and get  in condition.
VETERANS OUT.
Just at present things don't look
any too bright for the boys of U.B.C.
to bring home much silverware from
the prairie city, since the latest report has lt that all-star Howe McPhee will not be able to make the
trip. And since distance man Ward
De Beck is not back from the little
city of Victoria, across the sound,
there ls not a man of last year's
mighty team left on the campus.
A couple of newcomers are touted
as being hot stuff, but track coach
Maury Van Vliet is a confirmed sceptic and he says the man that runs
the fastest and jumps the farthest
next Wednesday Is a cinch to make
the trip.
This track trip will not be in conjunction with the Canadian Football
jr.unt to the prairies, and for that
reason lt ls not likely that Tommy
Williams will turn out, and ln that
case big Alex Lucas ls the only veteran that looks certain for the little
Journey.
Remember next Wednesday anyway, and if you want to visit yo'ur
friends in Aberhartvllle, come on
out.
R. H. Mallow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2157.
WRESTLERS
Wrestlers . . . pachyderms or what
have you . . . Take notice that on
Wednesday at 3.30 Maury Van Vliet,
Jack of all Sporting trades will be
on hand to coach ydu in THE GYM.
"What's the good news from Phyllis?
S00 Sweet Caps I"
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can be $moked"
lllllltlltlMllllllltltlttt1llltllttftl«ttttltttHt»lllllllllltl»tlttlttltllllttttllltt|tlllltllltt(ltlllMIIIIIMMIIIIIIIMItlllllllllllllllHIHIII
Smart - - New - - Colorful . . .
are Autumn's Accessories
BIRKS display an intriguing selection of
COSTUME JEWELLERY
and
HANDBAGS
BIRKS
Vancouver, B. C.
MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMHinillllMIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIiMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII
.........I*.   *,****
i * * v if * a * * >
NOTICE TO
STUDENTS
re Sessional Fees.
1938-39
First term Sessional Fees are payable on or before October 3rd, 1938,
at the Bursar's Office in the Administration Building:. Cheques to be
made payable to "The University
of British Columbia." It is recommended that cheques be mailed to
the Bursar. Consult your Calendar
where fees are set forth in detail on
pages 34 to 38 inclusive.
OFFICE HOURS 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 12 NOON.
A. MacLUCAS,
Bursar.
LOST
Pair of chamois gloves in or near
Caf. Please return to K. Skae, or
Mr. Home's office.
HOTEL
GEORGIA
We again "bid you" for your Social Function?,
Luncheons, Teas, Dinners and Dances! Our
Maitre d'Hotel will offer you the fullestt cooperation.
E. W. Hudson, Mgr.
I
MMI.IMIIIIIIIII,|MIIIMM*IIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIItMIIMMIIIt,Mt.lMMU
MANUSCRIPTS   TYPED 1
Manuscripts wanted for typing. 1
Work  done quickly and  accur- |
ately.   Rates   reasonable. |
MISS V.  ELDER f
Bay, 3289-R 1
2570 Hemlock Suite 118 |
lltltHIIIIIIHMIHIIHIIIIHmMIHIIiHHMHHMHIIIHIMIMIIIHlTi
IHIIIIIIMIIItimuHIIMIIIIimilllHIIIIIMMIMIIIIMMIMMIIIIIMIHIIMHIIIIIIIIIHlll((ll«llll(Ml ll ,,,,,HI • iMIIIIHItlHHHMMIIIIMIHJ
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 0 a.m. to noon
LOOSE   LEAF  NOTE  BOOKS,  EXERCISE  BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper, ALL YOUR
Loose   Leaf   Refills,   Fountain   Pens   and   Ink      BOOK SUPPLIES
and Drawing Instruments.
SOLD   HERE
c
ftttlllHHItHlltllHHII.MllHlltllHHimi.llHIMI. lllllltlHHIlllll tIMItllHIIIIIIIIIIII ■•< llllllll till till Mill I HI •■ H Ml HHHHH1111111111 Friday, September 30, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
PETER'S PERIL
OR
CHANG SUEY
AT THE PEARLY GATES
HERE'N' THERE
with th*
Exchange Editor
AU the character* and events In
this story are entirely fictional,
and any similarity to actual people,
either living or Freshmen, Is just
sheer luck. The trained seal mentioned ln chapters 13, 60 and 577
waa kindly loaned by the "Ve Olde
Trained Seala Kennels").
Read Chang Suey and SmeU Nice
AU  Over!
CHAPTER ONE
The Dirty Nine.
The mighty hall was at last dark
and quiet. Even the muffled shuffling of Who's Who's had ceased. A
moon-like moon shone fitfully on the
cold, stone walls, revealing Simon
Fraser and his friends flipping nickels. At the end of a long table, a
lone figure sprawled. It looked dead,
but lt was only a Freshman, fallen
asleep over his simplified Instructions on the use of the Library. He
moaned softly. As though ln answer, four dummy Greek encyclopedia slowly, smoothly, and noiselessly slid inward, to be replaced by an
evil-looking puss with slanting, jaundiced eyes. The puss disappeared
with a giggle, and promptly reappeared, accompanied by eight similar pusses. Jumping blithely to the
Waterman-dappled floor, the Dirty
Nine went Into a huddle. Suddenly,
Chang Suey reared his ugly head Into that atmosphere of learning. _
"Funny smell," he hissed darkly.
"It's O.K., Chief," whispered No.
7. "Two Freshmen were writing out
experiments at this table, today, and
the smell of their cooking ls still
around."
Chang Suey grunted some foul
oath, and replaced his four wing-
jlngs ln their hiding-places. Disappearing as swiftly and silently as
caution money, the Dirty Nine slithered down the glittering bannisters
to the entrance hall, and vanished
into the card catalogue.
Murder????
A night-watchman padded by the
Library on the half-run, his be-mlt-
tened hands clasped in prayer. Far
off in Forestry Project No. 3, a sophomore was howling for Its mate.
From the bus stand came the muffled burping of a disconsolate bus.
But suddenly, these natural night
sounds were broken by a drawn-out
shriek of fiendish laughter, followed
by a terrific crash. In their dingy,
sub-librarian cavern, the Dirty Nine
looked up, counted noses, and went
back to their Plck-up-stlcks. The
night-watchman was passing through
Cloverdale at an excessive rate ot
speed. But ln the wreckage of her
car lay a very stout lady from Nebraska,  who  was quite  defunct!
Was the fat lady from Nebras-
ca   murdered ?
Wtll Blue Boy win the Fourth?
Read next episode, and see If
you find out!
By J. D. MACFARLANE
Remarkable tld-bit for sophisticated young moderns. . . . Prof. Irving,
formerly of Princeton, and now cajoling Psychology into the cranlums
of U. B. C. students, says, "If anyone
tells you that you have repressions,
he is saying, in effect, that you ought
to be ln a psychopathic ward."
Having taken a good look at some
Infants around here we have decided
that Mr. Irving ls blessed with wisdom. Repressions abound around this
campus but we had not been able to
figure out what to do with them
before this.
Speaking of repressions, we suspect
that this year's sophomores have acquired some since their more active
freshmen days. At the frosh bonfire
Wednesday night only some twenty
odd sophs turned out to match almost 200 freshmen, and it was not
until a few people got busy on a
chain telephone call that the rest
were persuaded to come out.
That does not necessarily go to say
that sophomores should be confined
to a psychopathic ward for falling to
turn out, but we do think that some
of them should be confined to an
institution after the way they handled their firebrands on the fateful
Wednesday evening which sent Gordon Dowdlng to the General Hospital.
Spraying   flaming   gasoline   over
the  heads of massed  fighting students  isn't  quite  the  beat  way   to
christen newcomers to  the University.
Actually   we   think   the   bla> .e   for
such   dangerous   proceedings   should
be   placed   on   the   shoulders   of   the
organizing committee. It would have
been much more effective if the pyre
had  been sprayed with gasoline and
oil, and a rule Instituted that the fire
might  not  be  lit by  anything other
than  matches.  Having  had  occasion
ourselves    to    light   several    gasoline
soaked bonfires ln water-parades, we
know  that  this ls a  highly  effective
method.
It might interest some people on
this   campus   to   know   that   local
newspapers received a police report
on the affair at 11 o'clock that evening.
The bonfire may be a good institution,   but   the   present   methods   employed are not the best for the good
reputation of the university, especially at a time like this when U. B. C.
students are  fighting  for public  recognition.
#      *      *
We think that the Film Society
deserves more than a modicum of
praise for their new plans this year
which will bring the weekly broadcast
Horn the stage of the Metropolitan
Opera in New Vork to the campus.
We, for one, highly appreciate being
able to hear the opera. In past "years
lt has always been a great regret to
us that .because of campus activities,
we have not been able to get homo
and tune ln. The opera is a feature
which cannot be surpassed either ln
its educational or Its entertainment
qualities.
Soccer Men Prepare For
Season; Veterans Return
Campus Clothes
for
CAMPUS MEN
DOCKER'S
Men's ^X^ear
807  GRANVILLE   (at Robaon)
See   campus   representative
— Herb Burke
"—»
Have you chosen a
name for the new
cafe yet?
$10 CASH PRIZE TO
WINNER
Contest Closes Fri.,  Oot. 7
I    Drop  in  and  see  the  new
| Lunch Counter
| j
Soccer aage Charlie Hitohena haa
onoe again  made  ready  to  repair
the   extensive   damage   of   the   annual shake-up. —
This   year,    the   team    suffered    a
major blow in the loss of industrious
Dan Quayle, a high scorer and  general    favourite;    of    Basil    Robinson
and Art Chapman, also forwards, and
of   Bob   Klrkpatrick,   half.   However,
Chuck    Howatson,    Rod    MacMIUan,
and   Fred   Sasaki,   frosh   acquisition
from St. Regis, should fill the breach.
Again the outlook under the heading   of   competition   is   considerably
brighter.  Revamping of the Vancouver and District loop shows that Services    have    been    promoted    to    the
Mainland   League,  and   that   Vikings
have    dropped    out,    while    various
other promotions and relegations are
also favourable.
MANAGER WANTED
Norm Free gave notice that he
was prepared to relinquish his managerial duties to some young hopeful, desirous of a combined course in
campus politics, economics, lawing.
and suchlike. Having started the
season, Norm sends an S.O.S. for
two new managers to get in touch
with   him  immediately.
Everybody should be out to-day
at 3.30, as arrangements have been
made for two practices this Saturday with leading city teams.
HOPPINO
with
MARY ANN
Indian summer will soon reach the campus and every co-ed
should have a stock of deeper shades of stockings, to match their
autumn outfit. Phoebe Hosiery Shop has the ideal pair for you which
will stand the wear and tear of a delightful walk through the botanical gardens or along the trail past the stadium.
Not only have these stockings that miraculous lasting quality
which endures hard wear but the price is extremely reasonable at
$1.00 per pair and may be purchased in the many popular wine shades,
most delightful of which is brandy wine.
Red clay may be obtained also, like the pair a young Alpha Gam
was wearing .... incidentally said sorority lass is organizing a triangle club of her own, with seasonal membership; a freshman for the
summer and a Beta for the winter . . . but back to the crepe miracles
again, you may buy them at 71} Dunsmuir Street. . . ,
fi fi fi
Afternoon teas are besieging the young coed during these fall
days and her attention just naturally turns to the most important
feature of her wardrobe . . . shoes. These are of the most colorful
nature ranging from midnight black to rich burgundy chartreuse,
and rust in fashion's popular all-suede or suede with soft leather trim.
. .We must tell you what we have just heard. ... It seems that two
students were practising the art of holding hands in the back row of
a psychology lecture. Evidently they were not experts, and were
advised to practise it in church 1 ... if and when she does go to church,
and being a coed, she will undoubtedly match her sophisticated taileur
or naive dirindl with a dainty pump with the high-cut gore effect,
which may be obtained reasonably at Raeson's Budget Shop ,at 644
Granville Street, for a price as low as $6.95 and $7.10. So just slip
down before this afternoon's tea and make this last addition to your
smart ensemble.
fi fi fi
She wore a most distinctive frock of smart suede-taffeta in black.
Tiny bows of contrasting purple and cerise formed the color note in
her chic outfit. Yes, it was a Lora Lee Dress . , , right from their
selective shop at 2814 Granville Street . . . and if it hadn't been for
her green nail polish he would never have guessed she was a freshette
. . . incidentally one rugby player is a little puzzled. He would like
to know if freshettes are just dumb or exceedingly wise.
After last Saturday's game he approached an agreeable looking
freshette and in an introductory sentence asked her how she enjoyed
the game. With an air of sweet finality she replied, "It was just
line.    Were you there?" . .
At any rate our young freshette whom we were just raving
about has all the wisdom of a Solomon in her choice of apparel. . . . We
forgot to mention too . , , that the dress only weighs as much as two
feathers put together . . . and the tricky stand-out sHirt . . . well
words fail us so go and see for yourself. .  . .
fi fi fi
When sports are mentioned all the little badminton players prick
up their ears for this is badminton season and many enjoyable hours
will they spend in the gym. To be completely sportslike they will
all turn out in outfits of English make, the very cream of which are
the white garbardine shorts in four styles, Hawaiian, full length
zipper and the pleated mode.
And thinking about sports . . . who is the little Alpha Gam who
dutifully wraps up her Ubyssey each week and sends it to her basket-
baller-minister in Braclotnc?
Getting back to sports togs, if you really want a pair of unshrinkable ankle socks to match your fine ribbed boat-neck sweater, you
may get them all, at-Fred Holmes on Granville Street, and the number is 2 845. . . . We almost forgot the delightfully cool white linen
mesh shirts We'll see you across the net. . .
of _f e#
Hawaii will make its appearance on the campus in the new shade
of Aloha tan which may be obtained in hosiery of all weights for all
purposes, tea dance, lecture room and informal occasions.
All sophomores will delight in the new vivacity shade which will
tone beautifully with their black afternoon frock as well as the gorgeous chiffons in chateau wine. Call in at the Lingerie Shop, at 2793
Granville Street, and see their smart new hosiery with mesh toe and
heel which has been decreed fashion's newest and gayest of styles.
MARY ANN
Hurry Fellows!
Saturday is the Last Day of
The  Bay
Basement  Store's
Money-Saving Sale of
TUXEDOS
$15
95
BUDGET PLAK
Down Payment $6.80
October    2Bth   $6.60
November 89th $4.90
You'll need one of these correct Tuxedos for Fall formal*.
They're meticulously tailored
from genuine English Vicuna
and Barathea cloths — materials found only In higher-
priced suits — by one of Canada's best known manufacturers. Finished with hand-
rolled satin-faced lapels, and
fine quality art satin Unlng.
Single and double breasted
models in regular, natural,
conservative and drape cuts.
8h.es 34 to 46.
LOUNOE SUITS
A good assortment of smartly-
styled suits tailored from suit
ends of higher-priced Imported
and domestic woolens. Models
to suit all men, shown In the
newest patterns and colors.
—Men'a Clothing, The Basement Store al THE BAY,
INOOMMMATIS   1*» MAY l«»0
**.I *■**■* + . ***¥'!
n^e... .*^*****o****i*4mi
THE DOLPHIN
Friendly place for luncheons and dinner parties
SPECIAL RATES FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS
Relax looking over the sea
Miss Helen Darling for reservations
DOLPHIN TEA  HOUSE
>iMm
NOW, WHILE YOU ARE AT COLLEGE
and in future years when you enter business
or professional life, you will find a connection with Canada's oldest bank of real value
to you.
BANK OF MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED  1817
West   Point   Qrey   Branch:   SASAMAT   AND  TENTH
A.   B.   MOORE,   Manager
IT  f*1'H«""
Intramurals
Get
Hear ye all muraliata. Our genial
specialists of all sporta Maury Van
Vllet   has   outlined   a   bigger   and
better    intra   mural   aeaaon    than
ever.
No time or effort has been  spared
in   an   attempt   to   produce   competitions in which everyone will be able
to compete.
A huge chart will mark the progress of the various classes throughout the season and competitions
should be keener as a result ot this
thermometer.
VOLLEYBALL   STARTS
Volleyball will be the flrst activity
on the long list and exponents are
urgently requested to be prepared
for the opening games next Wednesday.
On Monday, Director Van Vllet
will have a schedule drawn up for
the   coming contests.
On the completion of volleyball;
basketball ■will hold sway or if necessary the sports will run concurrently.
Due to the variety of activities it
is Maury's intentoin to run off all
indoor sports in the fall and 'wait
until spring for the ovitdoor competitions.
JUNIORS PLAY
"A clean sweep" will be the Varsity  football   slogan   for  Saturday
aa the students are out to treat the
Meraloma grid aquad like a gang
of 'S8 Sophomores.
The Junior pigskin tote is will sock
it  out  on   the   upper  field  while   the
Senior   game   ls   in   progress   at   the
Stadium.
They showed up well ln a scrimmage with the "big shots" and are
really confident they can waltz
through those Meralomas. Maury
Van Vllet is getting a bit anxious
about the reserve strength of his
Seniors and since he is likely to
bolster the squad by drafting several promising Juniors on short
notice, the boys are fully determined
to come through with their initial
win.
Call in at the
VARSITY
BOOKSHOP
A largo selection
of University Books
on hand
4521 W. 10th Ave.
(Where the bus stops.)
897
GRANVILLE
(At Smythe)
IOE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY, Arts '31
JACK PARKER, Arts  '30
TVMOXWrVf £T£< PEPEI0
00 ?wp£f> acHr may
Don't take ohanoes on so precious
a thing as eyesight. Nave plenty ot
light to study by, to read or plan by.
Send for  the girl with  the Sight-Saving
Kit.   Phone  B.C.  Electric,  Seymour  5151
l_ aPIO-37 VARSITY - U.B.C*   CLASH IN RUGGER  OPENER
WATCH  THUNDERBIRDS
STADIUM
SATURDAY
WATCH  THUNDERBIRDS
BROCKTON POINT
SATURDAY
Pour
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 30, 1038
'Birds Tackle Meralomas Tomorrow
CAREYMEN IN
CIVIL WAR
AT BROCKTON
By ORMY HALL
Coaeh   A.   B.   Carey's   pre-season
plan to enter two University teams
ln the flrst division of the Vancouver  Rugby   Union   will  be  realised
with but one reservation tomorrow
at   Brocftton   Oval   when   a   team
bearing   the   traditional   "Varsity"
name will battle U. B. C, alias the
"B's", to open the 1038 local rugby
season.
The only change ln Carey's original
plan ls that one side—"the Varsity"
—will be the strongest team the University can muster   while   the   "B's"
will  definitely  be  more  or  less  of  a
training ground and a source of reserve material.
However, the overdose of exceptionally fine rugger material on the
campus this fall has made it possible
to field two very fine sides and Varsity will have no picnic against the
"B" 's on. Saturday.
LUMSDEN BACK
Although the "Big" team Is pretty
much the same as last year's "wonder team" Carey has made one or
two vital changes. Most startling of
the ex-navy man's moves has been
in converting Harry Lumsden from
a three-quarter man to a full back.
Lumsden will replace Ernie Teagle
at the last post while the versatile
Teagle will move up into the scrum.
Teagle ls no novice ln the pack, however, as he played two seasons as a
forward on a Victoria high school
team.
The Three line will be almost the
same as last year's, winning combination with the exception that
Will College, out all last season with
a bad knee is back again at inside
three. They will line up with Ted
McPhee leading the attack at five-
eighths, Waddle Robertson—-In place
of Howie McPhee who ls working
Saturday—and College at the Inside
berths with Todd Tremblay and
Captain Strat Leggatt on the wings.
Diminutive Sandy Lang won the half
back spot after a terrific battle with
Basil Robinson.
Fast rather than heavy the Varsity scrum will be composed of
Noel Harrison, McLaughlin, Tommy Robson, Vic Moore—a 300
pound newcomer from Victoria —
Al Gardiner, Jim Harmer, Ranjl
Mattu and versatile Ernie Teagle.
WEARIN' O' THE GREEN
The U.B.C.'s will be for the most
part green to senior company but
have a very imposing three line
sparked at five-eighths by Junior
Lamb, last year's King Ed. high
school star. Others catching a berth
in the backfleld are Ian Richards, Wilf Stokvis, Bob Smith and
Hall. Paul Griffin is slated to patrol the fullback region while Basil
Robinson will direct proceedings
from  the base  of the  scrum.
Fraser Sheppard, Andy Jenkins,
Jim Murray, Dave Bone, Fred Billings, Evan Davies, Fred Taylor and
Uruquhart will make up the U.BC
Bcrum.
DANCE TON IT E
ITM
WED.   -   FRI.   -   SAT.
Trevor   Page's   Orchestra
IIMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIItMIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIMIMIIIMIIMIM
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
IHIHMIIIIIIIIMIIIIHIHIIIIIHMHmilHIIIItlltMIHIimiHMHHMI
Varsity's famed basketeers at last
seem C te to change their usual act
of playing an almost scoreless game
as a large and enthusastic—and
good—turnout greeted Coach Bob
Osborne when he ventured out to the
gym Monday.
Yes, the co-eds are going to do big
things this year—they even plan to
win a game or so. But all Joking
aside, the girls should have much
better teams than usual. Why the
remnant of last year's Senior "A"
squad will actually have to work for
a  berth  this season.
As Miss Moore has kindly consented to the hoopettes using the gym
from 8.80-0.30 Monday mornings, the
girls will be starting the week off
right with figure eights, shooting and
passing practice.
HOCKEY HOT
Tomorrow Is the big day for hockey as the league gets under way
with a double-header with U.B.C.
playing Grandview Grads in the
opener at 3 p.m. at Con Jones Park.
Toami Wilson, Burnham, Armstrong, Scott, Norle, Wright, Mccormick, Warne, Cole, Lean, Spare,
McQueen.
There will be a practice today
with Miss Horn, our competent
new coach, supervising. Newcomers ore especially welcome and are
asked to meet In the gym at 8.40,
AU outtll
INTRA-MURALS.
Witht games commencing next
week, this year's mural maidens are
busy lining up teams ln basketball
and volleyball, the latter games to be
played Monday and the former on
Tuesdays. Freshettes desirous of
playing for '42 are asked to sign up
with Nellie Trapp, petite blonde who
can be found most any lunch hour at
the Kappa sorority table.
Arts '41, '40, and '30, along with
Aggies, Nurses, and Education, are
to be in the gym on Monday, Oct. 3,
when their representative teams will
be chosen for volleyball, and the following day, for basketball.
ARCHERY.
This year's Inter-Collegiate Archery meet played on several Canadian
campuses with scores registered by
telegraph, will take place Oct. 17-22.
It will be a Junior Columbia round,
each round to consist of 24 arrows at
30, 40, and 00 yds. Contestants for
places on the eight man team are
busy prastislng now.
RIDING.
As nearly one hundred women have
registered their interest in riding,
Miss Moore has procured exceptional
rates for lessons.
Rides may be arranged for the
morning, afternoon, or evening for
1-1V. hours, in groups of six, at 6
rides for $5.00, between October and
Christmas.
Please go to the gymn office before Friday to say who you want
to ride with and what hour. Also,
fees must be paid before your flrst
ride.
TED McPHEE
WANTED
Junior  Manager  needed   to  handle
minor     basketball     teams.     Aspiring
Frosh   see   Maury   Van   Vllet   in   the
Oym.
GOLF MEETING
There will he a meeting of the
Golf Club In Arts 108 today at
12.45. This is the most Important
meeting of the year, and so It is
essential that all Interested turn
out and help the dlvoters off to a
good start.
IMMIMMOMIIIt.lllMIIMIIIIIllllllllllllltltdlllllll
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
IF   ITS
■ A   SLICE
9    V   HOOK
■ 1'OPPING   VOL
BALL
a couple of lessons will fix lt.
Hal Rhodes Goll School
1135 W. Pender Street Seymour 5233
IIMIMM1IIMII1IIIIM(IMIIIIMIIIIMtlltll**ltlllllllllMtt«lll*IIIIUIIIIIIIIIItlttllllllll
IIIHIIIIIIHIIIIMIHHMIHIIIIHtHllllltMHlMHIIIIIIHMIHIIHttlHtHtHMIIMI
K  tiT
"Men of Maury Open Stadium
With Promise of Second Win
By LIONEL SALT
Varsity's glittering new stadium gets Its first going over of the term
as the high-flying Varsity Thunderbirds tear into the tough Meralomas
In the third game of the Big Four schedule tomorrow afternoon starting
at 3.80.
i The strong team fostered by the
University has already been tested
this year and gave the fans one of
the best opening games on record.
As was to be expected many minor
weaknesses were present but diligent work by Maury Van Vllet and
his cohort Neil Watson has tended
to Iron out these, and to date the
students plan to flaunt an even
greater team in front of the 'Lomas
than was in evidence last week.
STRONG  DEFENCE
Indications from the front offloe
are that the smashing drives of the
backfleld   of  apRoberts,   Williams,
and Grey, whloh showed so splendidly In the first gome will -play an
even   greater  part   In   the  offence
launched at a somewhat unseasoned Meraloma line.
Lack  of proper time  In  which  to
season   his  team  has,  Van  Vllet  figures,  slowed  up the  development of
a  strong  defensive  system,   and   an
efficient forward passing attack, but
practises held during the past week
have   revealed   a   maturing   defence
both in the line and ln the backfleld
calculated to stop even the heaviest
of linemen dead ln their tracks.
'Tis rumoured that the youthful
Meraloma squad will have its fangs
bared in readiness for the line-plunging of such hopefuls as apRoberts
and Williams. If so, It would be best
to point out to the 'Lomas that a
stone-wall forward line crouches ln
readiness to cut them in half should
they attempt to approach too close,
and a well-oiled interference screen
has to be met with should they manage to sneak past the linemen.
STRONG   INTERFERENCE
From all observations the students
have the best screening In the
league. The coaching of Van Vliet
who understands better than anyone
in the city the principles of official
interference, is proving invaluable to
the efficiency of the whole offence
machine.
It was noted that at the flrst
game of the season, when Varsity
trimmed the Knights of Columbus,
only four hundred Varsity students
were present to cheer on the Blue
and Gold. Suoh a disturbing thing
should never happen, and, It ll
hoped It will be remedied tomorrow when at leaat a thousand
studes turn out In full force at the
Stadium at 2.80 to wave the blue
and gold bunting of the Varsity
to an overwhelming victory over
the Meralomas.
Above you'll And one half of the
McPhee clan, and the only half that'll
see action In the Initial Varsity U.B.C.
Rugger thriller. Ted's the lad that
sparks the Wonder team three line
on its devastating attaching route to
victory. Tomorrow at Brookton Oval,
this swivel-hipped speedster will old
his Varsity mates in showing their
superiority over the supposed second
squad—U.B.C.
BASKET BOYS PREPARE
FOR WINTER
Fall Is the time when all the
young 'una trip blithely back to
school, but out where the west begins on Point Grey, fall Is the time
when the patter of basketball shoes
echoes through the silent peaceful
air ot the gym.
Things are still simmering on the
basketball front, according to the
latest reports from Manager Alex
Charters, and unless the gym burns
down or the profs, turn on the heat
too much. Varsity should be right in
the flght for the coming winter wit;h
the usual three teams ln the Intercity League and the Community
League  respectively.
Senior "A" practices are scheduled
to get away this week with the aspirants for first string berths looping
the little sphere around the gym on
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday nights at 4.30. Other practice
nights are posted on the notice boarc
in  the gym.
Prospects for the big boys of the
campus on the basketball floor look
pretty fair from this distant point,
and in spite of the loss of Joe Pringle
to the minstry, Pat Flynn to the outside world and Ted .Pallas to the
halls of learning, the Blue and Oold
should go places this year.
Newcomers that cast their shadows
before include Chapman of Prince
George and former Thunderbird Doug
Gross who last year did duty with
Westerns. Detwlller and Mitchell may
also turn out and in that case, Coach
Maury Van Vllet will have little or
nothing to worry about.
ltlllll*tMlllHtlllllllimilllll**UI*MIIIIIIHIHI|t
GRASS HOCKEY—
Captain-manager Archie McCau-
ley of the Men's Grass Hockey Club,
is getting mildly hot under the collar these days as the flrst game
looms closer and closer and a full
experienced team looks farther
away than ever.
Most of last year's high class turf-
pounders  went the way of all  grads,
and so this semester Mr. Mac is faced
with the task of welding a brand new
machine   to   function  under   his   deft
hand. A couple of East Indian  chaps
are  shaping   up  well  on  defence,  but
the   forward   positions   are   the   ones I with   some  talk   of  including  rowing
Rowing Going to
Town, Board the Boat
With a grand turnout of 60 hopeful   members  the  Varsity   Rowing
Club    Wednesday    Sept.    88    commenced churning the waters near
the newlV erected boathouae on the
Lower   Fraser   under   the   capable
coaching  of  Fred  Brand.
Enthusiasm for the sport is shooting skyward. With the kind co-operation of the Vancouver Rowing Club,
"water-slapping" is destined  to  be   a
big drawing card, Already shells are
being   moved    from    the   Vancouver
Rowing Club in  prep,  for the  forth- \
coming practices.
SEATTLE   MEET
With Messrs. Darling and Brand
at the helm of the fast growing Rowing Club we're all pulling for the
"aqua slicers" to put the U.B.C. on
the map as far as rowing goes. And
as rowing goes you can bet your
last shoelace that those broad shouldered boys can handle a mean "baton."
While the sculling men prep for
the opening meet with the Seattle
Husky  Lightweights  tn   October   and
»e*/tf'"W.*VT_K0 .eft
on side
-basil robinson
Even writing aa we do from the
serene and dlssy height of a Junior, we carry with us a full realisation of the possibility of challenge
where the title of this column is
concerned.
And now with a benevolent sentiment uppermost in our heart, we
pause 'to sprinkle a couple of bouquets from the sports staff in general.
No. 1 recipients are the enthusiastic
rowing addicts, who have at last succeeded ln securing the wherewithal to
erect their crewhouse, opened yesterday.
And next to the ever-organizing
Jack Davis, who has come up with
another of his practical brainstorms.
It is a welcome idea—this one of the
Big Block group being put to practical advantage, and this time it looks
us though the Lettermen are behind
It to a man.
HAIL  U.B.C!
Certain to gain his place tn the
Varsity Rugger side tomorrow at
Brockton Point, stocky Harry Lumsden became the hard-luck man of
the hour Wednesday p.m., when he
received a bad crack on the knee cap
at practice, which will prevent his
turning out.
And when you read about the
two oampus squads opposing each
other In the season opener tomorrow, don't let yourself be convinced
that the 'Varsity' bunch will have
a soft touch on their hands. The
U.B.C. lads may be young, but most
of   them   know   their   way   around,
MHIItMHIIIIIIMIIIIMHIItlllHIIHIIIMIIIIItlttHtlMIIIIMIIHIIM
* Have a real
HOME-COOKED   MEAL
with Mr. and Mrs. Thomson at
THE   GABLES  INN
lllllllllll«IIIMIIII|||lll(|lltlllllMIIIII*llll(tllllMIIIIIMMII*llll7l
BEST WISHES TO THE U.B.C.
Marguerite Shoppe
8.   Stclnliiti'f-
LADIXS'    READY TO WEAR
GENTS'   rURKISHINOS
3784 W.  10th Ave. B»y. 7979
that need help.
First   game
s    tomorrow    af    Cott
on   the   intra-mural   programc   here's
one   sport   that's   going   to   make   one
naught Park  where the Varsity squad! bis   splash!!    (Heh!   Heh!)
hooks   up  whh   the   Vancouver  or, fit. I
—COHEN
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing1 and Engraving
Our Specialty        .   •
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,    'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
GEHRKE'S
586   Seymour
and they would dearly love to upset
their favored colleagues.
GRIDIRON ORIT.
Another hardluck story was disclosed yesterday when It was found
that Brian Martin, outstanding
Thunderbird lineman, had developed
water on the knee. And another still,
Lee Straight has a broken nose, sustained this week in practice. The latter is expected to be ready to go in
the Stadium opening, nose-guard and
all.
DOUBLE  DOSES.
And all this talk about "ruggah"
and Canadian football reminds us of
something which might be described
as an unwelcome Innovation. We refer to the discontinuation of the policy of staging doubleheaders on the
Stadium. Surely with all the careful
treatment the hallowed turf reoelves,
it would not be a frightful imposition
to require lt to tolerate two successive
games in one day.
Besides, it makes all  the difference to old  Henry  Spectator from
town   If   he   realises  he'll   get   two
games for his money. And not only
that, but, Isn't it within the bounds
of   possibility   that   more   students
would be attracted to the Stadium
by    the    prospect    of    having    two
games to witness, than If only one
collection of Thunderbird gladiators
was  on  show  for  them  to scream
at?
And before we close let us remind
you secretly and of course with absolutely   no   malice   aforethought,   that
the conclusions arrived at ln the column  which  appears  alternately with
this   one.   are   unavoidably,   but   unquestionably   offside,   as   its   heading
implies.
IMIIIIIMIItltMlltllHHtMIMIIMtlHHIHIIHIHHIMMMIIMHHU
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT  THE  GATES"   ■
"OUR   SERVICE   MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
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mour  St. i    1
Men's   Half   Soles 65c
Men's  Rubber   Heels 30c
Men's  Leather Heels 40c
Ladles'  Top  Lifts 20c
Ladies'   Rubber   Heels 25c
Pull  Soles.  Rubber  Heels
and Shine 81.75
Shoes   Dyed   Black 40c
Work  Done  While  You  Wait
HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED
—   Expert   Work   —
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Empire  Shoe  Robuilders
711   Gramme
Trinity  4733

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