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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1960

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 _>
THE USYSS
Vol. Xtlll.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER  18,   1960
McConnell   Frosh
Prostitution Foils
Le Carabin s Staff
QUEBEC   (CUP)—Laval University  will  meet   with its
students' association to consider student rights following the
expulsion of three campus editors by the university and the
dismissal of the whole staff by the association.
The Association Generale des
i2 kMp:
Etudiats de Laval asked for an
arbitration committee Thursday
night after three students had
been expelled by the university
for permitting publication of an
article describing a scene in a
prostitute's room.
Friday the association said it
considered action against the
editors immediately after the
publication of the article Oct.
6, and had informed the university of its intention.
University rector Msgr. Louis-
Albert Vachon met the AGEL
executive Friday afternoon and
agreed to creation of the committee "after a reasonable delay."
The AGEL indicated that if
the committee does not succeed
in its deliberations, the association may dissolve itself. There
is word that there may be a general strike, although nothing
definite has been decided by
the council.
In a five-hour meeting held
the day after the expulsion, the
AGEL by a vote of 23 to 2
with five abstentions asked:   ,
• for the nine-man arbitration committee composed of
three members of the unversity
council, three members of the
professors association and three
AGEL members,
• that the students be allow
ed  to stay  in  school  until  the
committee has met,
• that the university recognize the right of the AGEL and
the statuses of its various committees.
The paper Le Carabin is a
committee of the AGEL.
Believng that the article was
inappropriate for a campus
newspaper, the association dismissed the staff. It pointed out
that any censuring should be
done by the AGEL and not the
university.
Deposed editor Pierre Mi-
gnault declared that the dispute article was not considered obscene when it was printed,
rather it was thought some moral conclusion should have come
from  it.
He added that he now sees
the article offers a large area of
interpretation, and since it
does, it should not have been
published.
Before the association met
Thursday night a spokesman for
Le Carabin said:
"It seems that the articles
have been the occasion of a
trial of the general outlook of
the newspaper and the trail of
the individuals that head the paper."
Previous to the article of Oct.
. (continued on page 3)
See   "LAVAL   EDITOR"
%>^vtt
F BI Investigate
Student Loyalty
BETHLEHEM P.A. (UPS)—A chance subscription to the
Soviet magazine USSR by a junior student at Lehigh University
has touched off a thorough investigation by the FBI into his
background.
The junior, who applied for
(entrance in Advanced ROTC
said that the magazine is considered by the FBI to be subversive and a general source of
Communist   propoganda.
In Canada most university
student unions and campus
newspapers receive the magazine which ranges in content
from trade unions to postage
stamps.
The story began two years
ago when the student entered
the library and picked up a
copy of the New York Times,
and read an article about the
Soviet exposition in Moscow.
He then found a copy of the
USSR on the magazine rack
next to  Life.
On the inside cover he observed that the magazine is published by reciprocal agreement
between the United States and
the Soviet Union, calling for
publication   and  circulation   of
USSR and the magazine Amer-
ika in the Soviet Union.
He came across an editorial
in the Soviet magazine concerning the Moscow exposition. Intrigued by the distinct differences between the articles, he
decided to explore further the
different ideologies of the two
countries. And so, he subscribed
to the USSR for six months.
This year he applied for entrance into the ROTC. A standard form, given all Advanced
ROTC candidates contained one
section which listed proscribed
activites rangng from membership in the Comimunst party to
subscrption to magazines such
as the USSR.
He indicated he had been a
subscriber to the USSR and the
investigation began. He was
questionedd by several agents
of the FBI and asked to write a
five page typed explanation of
why he subscribed to the magazine.
Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny . . .
"FERTILITY" WAS DRESSED and placed in front of the Library
Monday. The crusader left his pick behind with this sign
attached: "Sinners, Elmer Gantry is coming."
Fifty Per
Cent Vote
A record vote by the Frosh
sent Bob McConnell into Prexy
position.
Thirteen hundred students
turned out to the polls as compared to last year's 800. Enthusiasm was shown all throughthis——~„
election with the campaigning
and  a   number of participants.
Last year there were only 16
candidates as opposed to 35 this
year.
Seven of the eight memlbers
put on the FroSh Council are
from Vancouver. Pres. McConnell and Treas. Draeseke are
both from Magee High. Three
members are  girls.
PRESIDENT
McConnell 625
Foster    471
Coleman      187
Gavin        U
VICE-PRESIDENT
Owen    547
Hager  232
Goepel    207
Siddall      143
Black      106
Hill     88
SECRETARY
MacFarlane    600
Nichols    507
Clarke    334
Rella     138
TREASURER
Draeseke    646
Sandquist    249
Bodner      127
Faulafer      105
BOYS' SPORTS
Nichols 352
Harrison       76
Westhore        21
GIRLS' SPORTS
Rae 263
Medland     149
Longmuir   .._     90
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Richmond 636
McDell    405
Calamitsis        86
EXEC MEMBER
Burnett 601
Roberts 315
Wilkie   106
Fofonoff   __.     93
Home Coming '60
Fabalous Gateways To Headline Dance
By MIKE SONE
The Gateway Singers are
the  greatest.
This was agreed on by
Homecoming Chairman Alan
Cornwall and I after we
caught the famous folk-singers' early show at a downtown
supper club.
The Gateways headline the
Homecoming Dances October
28 and 29, so we went downtown to take in the show as
their guests.
Running the gamut of folksongs from the sea shanty
"A-Roving" to the popular
"Oleana," the foursome staged a fast-moving show spiced
with occasional outbursts of
humor aimed mostly at themselves.
Most of the bantering centred around their self-appoint
ed spokesman and banjo-
player, Jerry Walter. The
other males in the quartet
are guitarists Marc Richards
and Adam Fredericks.
"Tarrytown" featured the
rich contralto voice of Elmer-
lee Thomas, the only woman
in the group.
After a rocking version of
the old favorite "Town-O,"
the Gateways warmed up the
patrons with an audience participation tune, "Down by the
Riverside."
After taking a second curtain-call, and kidding themselves in the process, the
quartet topped the show with
the ever-popular "John B."
I chatted between shows
with Marc, and with Jerry,
who insists that he's no comic.
Said Jerry, "There are a lot
of folk-singing groups coming
up who take everything too
seriously. I'm not a comic,
but I heckle the group to show
that we don't take ourselves
too seriously."
Speaking of their last appearance at UBC, he said:
"I still remember that one.
There were props and stuff all
over backstage, and in front,
the place was absolutely jammed.
But we enjoyed every minute of it.They (the students)
were a marvellous audience."
"We're lookng forward to
playing at UBC," added both
Marc and Jerry, "because we
know that a college audience
appreciates us more than do-
commercial club patrons.
"We'll be seeing all of you
at Homecoming." Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1960
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial. opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports), 14 (Editor-inChlef), 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chiet: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
CUP Editor Diane Greenall
Photography Editor Ray Grigg
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter .
Layout: Nick Close and Fred Jones
Acting News Editors: Denis Stanley and Keith Bradbury.
News: Sharon Rodney, Donna McAllister, Kitty Watt,
Sharon McKinnon, Dick Arkley, Dick Climie, Coleman
Romalis, Jerry Pirie, Fred Jones, Derek Allen (who
didn't do a Hell of a lot), Missinformation, Orwell Childs,
Mike Sone, Cornelius Glick, Ian Brown.
We Don't Need One
This university recently acquired a Director of Student
Activities.
Such a title is enought to bring revulsion and fear to
the heart of any autonomy-loving student.
In the U.S. they have Directors of Student Activities.
These people, usually alums, perform the functions
that Student Council performs at UBC. In short, they control student activities.
Here at UBC, we have a long tradition of student autonomy. We don't want a Director ©f Student Activities;
and we don't need a Director of Student Activities. We run
our own affairs. And we're proud of the fact.
The man who holds the new position, John Haar, asserts that he does not intend to usurp any of our student
autonomy. He is to be a liaison between the administration
and our student government, he   says.
If this is the intent of the appointment, why does not
the title of the post convey this information?-
Either change the name to suit the position, or-change
the position to suit the name. But, remember, we will use
our every resource to ensure the continued existence of
student   autonomy.
&H&M Jo Jk& fcditoh
But We May Be Stuck
"We must get busy ©n stud*Hfc govenfanent or the students won't be running the goverament," said John Haffic
at Leadership Conference;
A remark like this, when made by the administration's
man in student affahrSKBriu«t be token seriously. It is possible to imagine that, in the darib-ef nigfet* ihe A&mis&igtiSi-
tion is plotting- to have studfen* ^werianent failj, so that
our new Director of Stttdeht Actirotks.-could step in and
take over.-
We don't believe that the atdjasaaaistcation is doing this,
or that John Haar wants- the headaches of student government, but it eould be an omen.
In the past few years, Student Council has been
worried about the state of student government. Interest
has lagged, and Councillors have been called upon to perform complex administrative functions with little training
and without pay.
It has been clear for some time that student government needs revision. Three years ago the Brawner Committee wen* to work on the problem and submitted a report.
It was referred to Jairus Mutambikwa, then AMS vice-
president, for further study.
Last year, we had the Haskins Commission, which also
produced a report.
This year, we understand, Stan Mader and his committee are investigating the possibilities of implementing
the report.
All the while, Student Council goes on its merry
administrative way, doing, nothing to change the structure
of student government, but ordering innumerable studies.
Meanwhile, Mr. Haar tells us that student government
is creaking, rickety, on the verge of collapse.
Action is what is required. Surely, sufficient information is available from past studies to enable Council to
make a decision. Studies are lots of fun, but they don't
produce results if they are not implemented.
We consider Mr. Haar's suggestion of a hundred
member assembly totally impractical, but we feel that
something must be done. And it must be done soon.
Failure to solve present problems might very well
result in the administration taking over the running of
student activities.
Sinclair Mourned
The Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I was very surprised to read
that Mike Sinclair is leaving
the Critics page. He cannot be
serious about it. He loves his
work which, is obvious in his
columns. I know that it can
•be a trying experience to write
a column, sit back, and receive either indifferent or uneducated criticism from readers.
To drop out at this time, I
think, is ia serious mistake. It
is to admit defeat, and to admit that to try to do a good
job was not important. Surely
in a populace of 11,000 on
campus there must be somebody who "would come and
press some interest in doing
something other than destructive to the page" and o f f e i
"some fresh, directions".
Mike is doing a good job
and if he leaves, Ubyssey will
never be the same. Nobody
but nobody will be able to
take his place.
Your truly,
Larry Wong
Arts II.
Empty Lots?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
What's all this nonsense
about parking- conditions being
so good! Good for whom?
While we're parking out by
the Aggie Barns and walking
about % mile to tiie campus
in the rain, the parking lots by
the Education Building and between Wesbrook and Biological Sciences are 9/10 vacant.
(And don'V eorrect this iitgure
to suit your own imrpose*4—it's
quite- accurate.)
Just why shouldn't this space
be allotted to the students
who are presently toaving to
park furKher awiay- now than
they ever nad to.
Thsgs aaaalgrkey printed in October 7 Ubsrssey is a pretty
crummy con Job.
"Pharoh"
J. L. Cooper
Arts III
P.S. The AMS people should
have attended to this long ago
instead of strutting around in
their new blazeus and res-ting
on laurels which don't exist.
Praises Bleeders -
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
On behalf of the Fall Blood
Drive Committee we wish to
express our gratitude to all
those students who so willing-
Ay gaive of thettr time and
energy in order that the Fall
Blood Drive could be successful.
Although the attendance at
the Armouries fell somewhat
short -of our expectations, the
donations on the whole weire
adequate to meet current Red
Qroas 'commitments and the
student body is to be commended.
In particular we render sincere appreciation to the members of the Filmsoc, Radsoc,
and the Utoyssey staff for their
tremendous support of the
campaign.
Yours   truly,
M.   Touzeau,
C.   Cameron,
Co-chairmen,
Fall Blood Drive.
Students Thanked
(Ed.   Note:   This  letter  was
given   by  Mr.   Edgar   lo  The
Ubyssey   for   publication.  He
expressed the opinion that its
contents   apply   to  the   entire
student  body.)
J.D. Edgar, Esq.,
President,   Students   Council,
University of B.C.
Dear Mr. Edgar,
Mrs. Lett and I would be
obliged if you would be good
enough to convey to the Students Council our grateful
thanks for the honour they accorded us in naming the new
Student Residence far us. We
appreciated it very much indeed, as we did the ceremony
of opening it and the opportunity of meeting you and
other memibers of this year's
Council.
Would you also kindly convey to the students, when an
opportunity occurs, our commendation of their generosity
in providing funds for the
building. It is most satisfactory to see the students maintaining the tradition of unselfish assistance to new generations   of  students.
Yours   sincerely,
Sherwood Lett.
DefendsIFC
I'Sciitor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I doubt whether the recent
IFC article 'was trying to justify the existence of fraternities. It stated, quite accurately,
it seemed to me, what fra
ternities are.
Perhaps if you were to tin-
jaundice your eye a moment
you would see that so-called
smoke  screen.
As the writer said, the primary function of fraternities
is a social one. No fraternity
member would deny this. This
function in itself sounds like
a pretty good reason for existence. But ignore it if you like,
fraternities do happen to have
other functions. Some groups
may stress these more than
others, but the promotion of
tacholarsibJip, participation in
intramural sports and campus
activities in general, are most
certainly a part  of fraternity
life.
If  this is   what you  call  a
smoke screen I doubt whether
many fraternities will be putting out the fire.
Art Hughes,
Beta Theta Pi.
(Editor's Note: It is a journalistic principle of long stand
ing that the most important
fact in a story is placed at the
top.)
On ISC . ..
Dear:
Kyle Mitchell, Ed Lavelle,
Stu Robson, Don Robertson,
Eric Ricker and Pete Sheperd,
Pardon   my   ignorance,   but
I'm just a "dumb bewildered,
mixed-up"   Frosh.    Could   you
PLEASE tell me what ISC is?
Frigidly,
I.M.   Lost.
V    3r    *t*
Mr.  Frederick  J. Fletcher,
Editor-in-Chief,
The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir,
The Organizational Committee of the ISC wishes it
known that the recent letters
appearing in your paper were
not submitted with the sanction of this committee.
The 'letters, misleading as
they were, were the products
of some of our more radical
members wiho sought unwanted publicity for our organiza-
tion,^ still in its embryo stage
on campus.
These members have been
summarily expelled from the
organizational committee in
keeping with the Regulations
and Orders of Procedure of
ISC.
We must stress, and will do
so again, our organization requires and desires no publicity at our present stage of
development.
Any and all information
from our organization will be
released only through our public Relations Office.
ISC apologizes for the misuse of the names in which the
letters 'were written; none are
or remain members of ISC.
By   Authority,
ISC     Organizational
Committee.
Frat Man Missed Point
It is unfortunate that last
Friday's indignant defense of
fraternities, under the heading
"Frat Man Replies," missed the
point entirely.
Very few students, if any,
would deny frat men the right
to have "fun." No o n e will
deny them the right to organize their fraternities. No one
will insist that they justify
their activities. They will be
left alone to have their fun,"
so long, that is, as they stay off
campus.
What our fraternity friend
seems to forget is that organizations on this campus have
more to do than merely stick
to the law of this province.
They have to prove that their
organizations provide a worthwhile contribution to campus
life, and they have to stick to
the spirit of university life.
According to the rules of the
Alma Mater Society, organizations under its jurisdiction
have to leave their membership open to all comers who
will obey the constitution of
the organization. And this is
where the fraternities obviously fail.
The very essence of fraternities and sororities is the principle of exclusion. Certainly
they want to have fun. But
they want their fun with inside
a carefully guarded group. The
principle of exclusion has blossomed forth in the shape of
many ceremonies centered
around this process of selection.
For this reason, fraternities
are not under the jurisdiction
of the AMS. But all the same,
they make extensive use of
facilities which are provided
through this student organization. This, it is rightly felt in
many quarters, is a deplorable
state of affairs.
Let the fraternities continue
their search for "fun" if they
feel so inclined. But it is time
that they either stuck to AMS
rules and regulations, or else
move from the campus. Either
they open up their membership
to all who wish to join, or they
start practising discrimination
off campus without the aid of
AMS facilities.
—Bill Piket
Arts III. Tuesday, October  18,  1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
Russians
To Visit
Campus
Russian student leaders will
visit UBC at the end of November.
They will arrive in Montreal
Oct. 30 to begin a month-long
tour of 18 Canadian universities.
Upon arrival they will travel
to Ottawa before leaving for
Halifax to visit Kings College
and Dalhousie. From here they
journey westward until they
reach Vancouver Nov. 28.
The delegation is composed of:
Boris Ponomarev, vice-secretary
of the Youth Organization Committee; Vladimir Beloussov, a
post-grad student at the Moscow
Architectural Institute; Arkadi
Sossine, a member of the Soviet
Student Presidium; Alia Tsut-
arova, of the Karcov Medical Institute; and Emmanouil Equi-
zarov, post-grad student at the
Moscow Foreign Language Institute, and a member of the
youth committee.
EXCHANGE
A similar delegation of five
Canadian students will visit the
Soviet Union sometime in May,
1961 under a reciprocal agreement between NFCUS and the
Students' Council of the USSR.
Initial arrangements for the
tour were made at the 1959
NFCUS Congress during the
visit of Igor Buirikov, the vice-
president of the Russian students' council.
The Canadian part of the exchange is -financed entirely
through student funds. Universities which receive the delegation
•■■-will pay more towards the cost
»f their transportation, in ratio
to their population.
COVERS CANADA
Today Bruce Rawson, NFCUS
president said that although the
tour covers almost all of Canada
in a short space of time, the
country "is so large and diverse
economically and culturally that
we have arranged a comprehensive program in order to give as
complete a picture as possible
of Canadian student life. In addition it allows as many students as possible to talk to the
Russians."
Commenting on the tour the
Soviet council pointed out that
because of the present system
of education in the Soviet Union
many students came from
plants and factories, which puts
the average age above those of
their Canadian students. Therefore the members of the delegation may be older than the age
proposed by NFCUS.
SOLiD MEMBERS of Jazzsoc are asleep, sent,. and sprawled out on the pads in the atmospheric clubhouse hut behind Brock Hall. Jazzsoc has about 220 members even though the
"pads" are hard on the long-legged sect.
Jazzsoc: Cool and Solid
No Beatniks Here Man
Max Roach Plus Four's "Ezz-Thetic" pierced the quiet of
the room.
It might have been Thelonius Monk, Gannonball Adderly
or Charles Mingus.
They, in case you're not solid,
are progressive jazz artists—the
grooves of the field—and the
place was azzsoc's hut any noon
hour.
"The grooves", as they are
referred to by Jazzsoc public relations manager Gary Keenan
play daily at noon via long play
jrecordin^js to the rhythm of
students  eating   lunches.
But, although the music is
solid and the decor modernistic
Jazzsoc has no beatniks and
wants none.
"Far from it," said vice-president Gavin Walker. "Just because the beatniks happened to
pick jazz as their type pf music,
anyone who likes it is branded
as a beatnik."
About 220 students belong to
Jazzsoc, one of the campus's
oldest clubs.
Their clubhouse, hut B-2 behind the Brock, looks exactly
the same as the rows of huts beside it from the outside.
But inside the change is unbelievable.
Orange and black walls, lights
muted by long opaque tubes
around them, windows blocked
by masonite  with long narrow
slits in it, set the atmosphere.
And in the corner a twelve-
inch woofer on top of a three-
inch tweeter (speakers to those
who aren't solid) booms the beat
to the members sprawled on
pads about the fringes of the
room.
Jazzsoc has about 100 long-
playing records by some of the
world's best jazz artists and
holds concerts on campus periodically when local, and sometimes international, stars are
available.
AMS CAKDS
must be picked up this week.
Every day this week they will
be issued in the  North end
of Brock from, 11:30 to 4:30.
Late registrants and retakes are now ready. Other
retakes will be announced
this week.
i         "      i ~     a              a
— presents —
Harry Adaskin's Wednesday Noon-Hour
Concert
(Duo Piano Music)
Hindemith's Sonata for Two Pianos
Marshall Sumner and Robert Rogers
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19      BU 106      12:30 NOON
-
From Page 1:
LAVAL EDITORS
6 Le Carabin had run an article
on the controversial novel "The
Insolence of Brother So-and-So"
and a story of a little boy who
went to confession without being conscious of evil.
Students in many faculties
took a strike vote n the event
that the university refused the
formation of an arbitration committee. AGEL vice-president
Gilles Blais was threatened with
expulsion by the Dean of his
Law faculty if he did not stop
distribution of this week's paper, a special edition which
brought out the background of
this and other clashes.
Faculty Members
Receive Honours
Dr. A Forward
Metallurgy head Frank A,
forward wall recieve a 1960
John Scott Award of the City of
Philadelphia today.
The award will be given for
his invention, the Forward process of extrcating metals from'
ore concentrates.
His process has provided a
unique method of extracting
nickel from sulphide ore deposits.
Prof. Forward will be presented with a copper medalion
and $1,000 at a fellowship dinner of the Metallurgy Society
erf tihe American Institute of
Mining, Metallurgical and Petro-
lium Engineers in Philadelphia.
| He is the second Canadian
to receive this award.
American Students
Petition Against
Communist Ban
i DETROIT (UPS) — The re-
I scinding of a 10-year ban on
| communist speakers at Wayne
I State University met with oppo-
I sition when aroused Michigan-
. ites initiated a petition protest-
I ing the ban's removal.
The ban was lifted by the
Board of Governors, acting on
recommendation of faculty
groups.
The petition, drafted by adults
in the area, has received little
student support, but the petitioners hope to have 25,000 signatures by Oct. 15.
Among the signatures so far is
that of Governor Nelson Rockefeller who signed when he was
campaigning in the Detroit area
two weeks ago.
The movement to re-establish
the ban is being led by Anne
Byerlein and Donald Lobsinfoer,
neither connected with Wayne.
"It is not necessary to taste
poison in order for it to kill
you. Communism should be
treated like bubonic plague, for
the more-contact you have with
it, the more your immunity is
worm down," said Miss Byerlein.
"We are not students at
Wayne, and we don't really care
what the students there believe," added Lobsinger, "but
we are voters of the state and
the Board is responsible to us."
Wayne is a state supported institution.
Varsity
Theatre
4375  West   10th
CA 4-3730
Oct. 18th - 22nd
JOHN O'HARA'S
Best Seller Novel
'From The Terrace'
starring
Paul   Newman  -   Joanne
Woodward
7:00 and 9:30 p.m.
RESTRICTED—No admittance to Persons under 18
FIRST  NIGHTER'S   PREVIEW
MONDAY 8:15 P.M.
Starts Tuesday, Oct. 25th
THE CHAPLIN REVUE"
President MacKenzie
Sentimental reasons spurned
Dr. Norman MacKenzie to be:
come director of the Bank of
Nova   Scotia.
Although his rule has been
to devote all his time and energy
to being a university president,
he made an exception in this
case because he's from Pictou
County, N.S.
"It's like a smalltown boy
making good," Dr. MacKenzie
said. "I feel proud that they've
honoured me in this way."
Men's Hush Puppies
and
Country Lane
"For girls that
are going places"
TOTEM SHOES
4550 W. 10th CA 4-1810
Beauty Clinic
by
ZSA-Z
SA
We are now open for business and look forward to
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NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665 Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Octo
AT LAST ..... MONEY!
Our  Budget  for  1960-1
The allocations are not based so much on the size of
the organization or importance of the activity, as on the
financial assistance required to provide a desirable level
of operation. The number of students to be affected by a
grant has also been a consideration in weighing the applications, and activities with a wide appeal are generally
given priority over those involving the participation of a
limited number of students. Organizations which fall into
the latter classification and which have special earning
power are asked to make reasonable use of it, and are encouraged to be self-supporting, where this is possible.
It should be recognized that the figures shown represent the next expenses, and that the many sports and activities which we support bring in and spend almost $200,000
in addition to the income provided by our A.M.S. Fee.
You will see, then, that the A.M.S. will be handling
almost one half million dollars this year. I urge you to take
an interest in how this money is handled.
RUSS ROBINSON,
Treasurer. Alma Mater Society.
NET COST OF
ACTIVITIES
Approx. %
of Budget
AMS Administration (Schedule  I)  9.0
Publications    6.9
Undergraduate Societies (Schedule II) — 2.0
Clubs      1.4
Brock Extension Payments    20.3
Development Fund Payments  20.5
Men's Athletics  17-2
Women's Athletics :  2.6
World University Service  4.0
Brock Management Fund _  2.0
Accident Benefit Fund  2.7
Brock Art Fund  0.6
NFCUS   ~ -„  1-5
Campus Events {Schedule III)  2.8
Conferences ■--- • <--- 0.9
Registration Photos and Cards -------  06
Operating   Margin  5.0
1960-61
Estimate
$24,700
19,015
5,500
4,000
55,625
56,250
47,300
7,150
11,125
5,500
7,315
1,650
4,000
7,700
2,370
1,600
13,700
100.0%    $274,500
The Winki-Doll
Is At The
$129
Where $ Come From
Statement of proposed income for
year ending May 31, 1961
DIRECT:
Alma Mater Society fees   $268,000.00
Rental Income  2,500.00
Interest Income  1,500.00
Sundries    100.00
$272,100.00
INCOME FROM SUBSIDIARY ORGANIZATIONS:
College Shop $ 20,000.00
Publications Sales   ___       15,900.00
Publications Advertising       18,400.00
Men's Athletics       19,000.00
Undergraduate Societies       35,000.00
Clubs           60,000.00
Campus Events „-       15,000.00
$183,000.00
$455,400.00
Where $ go	
Statement of proposed expenditures
for year ending May 31, 1960
College Shop $ 17,600.00
AMS Administration  24,700.00
Publications    53,315.00
Undergraduate Societies    40,500.00
Clubs      64,000.00
* Brock Extension Payments  55,625.00
Development Fund (Student Residences)  56,250.00
Men's Athletics     66,300.00
Women's Athletics  7,150.00
World University Service-  11,125.00
Brock Management Fund    5,500.00
Accident Benefit Fund  7,315.00
Brock Art Fund __,  1,650.00
NFCUS  _.L  4,000.00
Campus Events  22,700.00
Conferences  __...__■  2,370.00
Registration Photos    1,600.00
Radio  Society           	
Operating  Margin     13,700.00
$455,400-00
*  Allotments governing by rulings of the General Meeting
or of the Constitution.
Non-Discretionary  Allocations
Allocations No. Students Amount
Per Student
Brock Extension Payments $5.00
2.50
Development  Fund     5.00
Men's Athletics        4.30
Women's Athletics       .65
World University Service     1.00
.50
Brock Management Fund       .50
Accident Benefit Fund          .65
Brock Art Fund       .15
Affected
11,000    $
250
11,250
11,000
11,000
11,000
250
11,000
11,250
11,000
55,000
625
56,250
47,300
7,150
11,000
125
5,500
7,315
1,650
$191,915
Analytical
* The operating margin
budget) is constitutionally s<
treasurers "safety factor," all
tingencies, unexpected items, i
grant and faculty editions wi
margin.
* Undergraduate Society
est point in three years, $5,50
and $6,130 in 1959. This is th
sufficiency that has been char;
societies in the past few years.
* Many of the increased
Benefit fund, and NFCUS are
enrollment. The NFCUS Semi
NFCUS fees were also a cai
NFCUS membership.
* Club grants have also
1958 $<
1959     i
1960     <
It is indicative of the increa,
clubs; a policy favored by AMJ
ing power of the clubs through
they are limited interest orgai
* The Development Fui
No doubt, the students will 1
in the AMS fee so that the
employed in other areas. The r
ed towards the construction o
Union Building, but activitie:
creasingly higher, e.gr athletics
five dollars. Let's hope that th
dom, will allocate the total sur
ings rather than to athletics,
the total budget.
* All students pay $4.31
tendance at games indicates tha
to throwing away their suppo
* Figures in contrast:
Total budget for 192S
196(
'SOMETHING TO 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
61: A Study in Inflation
ment
700 <5%   of the  total
%.   It   represents   the
im to  cope  with  con-
payments. The Frosh
out of the operating
re down to their low-
i from $6,825 in 1958
of the increased self-
of the undergraduate
itures WUS, Accident
:ct result of increased
i here and a raise in
he increase  spent  on
irkedly decreased . . .
sufficiency of campus
j of the potential earn-
:ship, and the fact that
ation  ends  this  year.
to leave this amount
lars involved may be
til probably be allocat-
h-needed new Student
cost is becoming in-
like some share of the
ts, in their voting wis-
erection of new build-
bqeady assumes 1/5 of
to, athletics. Poor at-
tudents are indifferent
ard-earned" money.
..$ 14,628.06
— 455,400.00
Ed. Lavalle
Features Editor
n
' W/TH"
OPZRBWC
asz**^
THE BREAKDOWN
ft
Schedule I
ADMINISTRATION   EXPENSES
Office Salaries $ 15,000.00
Students'  Council   Expenses     1,800.00
Stationery &  Office  Expenses  900.00
Honoraria,  Gifts, & Donations  2,000.00
Insurance     400.00
Telephone & Telegrams    2,600.00
Postage  150.00
Audit and Legal    800.00
Bank Charges  25.00
Public Relations Expenses  475.00
Depreciation  450.00
Repairs and Maintenance  100.00
$ 24,700.00
Schedule II
UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETIES
Agriculture    $
Architecture    	
Arts & Science	
B. Comm. & CA. Students  	
Commerce	
Education     k	
Engineering  1'. ,	
Forestry   	
Frosh    	
Home  Economics  	
Law    _	
Medicine    	
Nursing     '	
Pharmacy     	
Physical Education     ~	
Social Work	
Sopron	
Undergraduate Societies Committee  	
Associated Women Students  	
Graduate Students  	
300.00
200.00
85.00
650.00
800.00
1,200.00
140.00
225.00
500.00
500.00
150.00
200.00
65.00
150.00
335.00
$    5,500.00
500.00
Schedule III
CAMPUS  EVENTS
Academic Symposium  — $
Frosh  Orientation '— 	
Frosh Retreat    900.00
Grey Cup Float    100.00
High School Conference  100.00
High  School Tours      350.00
Homecoming     (1,000.00)
Leadership Conference   850.00
NFCUS  Committee     250.00
NFCUS Seminar  500.00
Open House  1,000.00
Special Events  4,000.00
Student Executive Conference     150.00
$    7,700.00
This page is the Ubyssey's offering to Commercemen
and potential financiers. However, it is hoped that all students will take a greater interest in how their money is
spent. They can do so by memorizing to rote the information compiled on  these pages.
The cartoons, done by Vern Simpson, provide a graphic
illustration of the proportion of the budget spent on some
of the major campus activities.
Basically, it is designed for those who cannot read.
The budget clearly indicates the spiralling inflation
facing the campus. Monies amounting to $455,400 show it
to be the largest budget in AMS history.
J
5ROCK
KTEA/6 AW-
MDERGffflQ
SOC.
QE\/£L0PM£/VT
FUND,
STUDENT
RESIDENCES
Making up the AMS budget is no easy task. Treasurer
Russ Robinson had many problems to surmount.
Everybody wanted more money this year, but the
revenue from increased enrollment was eaten up by Open
House.
When everyone's requests had been totalled, Robinson
found that he was $14,000 short of being able to meet
them.
Clubs felt the slice most. In keeping with the policy
set last year by Dave Edgar, little consideration was given
to organizations that had independent sources of income.
This hurt many clubs. The result was that University Clubs
Committee's total budget was cut nearly $1,500 from last
year's  expenditures.
Other people had nopes dashed also. Publications got
almost $4,000 less than they asked for. Players Club was
up to Council the other night, looking for sympathy because the UCC treasurer had told them they were getting
only one-third of their budget request.
Robinson has bursitis in one shoulder from the dampness caused by having dozens of treasurers cry on his
shoulder.
Few people realize that of the $250,000 that comes in
from fees, Robinson has only about $80,000 to allocate. This
is shown clearly on this page.
The fixed grants create something of a problem. The
Accident Benefit Fund, and to some extent the Brock
Management Committee are getting more than they need
this year. At the same time, other organizations are starved
for funds.
The sad part of the whole thing is that there is little
Robinson can do about it. The grants are set by constitution.
So are the big checks carried off by Men's Athletics,
World University Service and the Brock Extension and
Development Fund payments.
Few would deny their right to the money, but its another big chunk of cash the treasurer never sees.
These are only a few of Robinson's problems. They
teach a moral lesson: no matter what happened to your
organization, don't be too hard on the treasurer.
FRED FLETCHER,
Editor, Ubyssey
IN DANGER OF BECOMING A
PIGEON-HOLED EXPERT?
TRY PAMPERING THE 'TOTAL MAN'
Make a date with a friend to see the
continuous Hi Fi Show in our West
Broadway showroms Friday evening
and every day of the week.
Of Particular interest to students is our
Hi Fi Stereo component and
do-it-yourself department
Tell your friends you bought it from the store that expects
you to make an intelligent choice!
The finest tapes and records are featured and of course
. a 10% discount to all U.B.C. Students
hi fi sales
LTD.
2714 W. BROADWAY
RE 3-8716 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, I960
ONE BRIGHT SPOT
Jayvees Take
Valley Crown
UBC Jayvees provided the only bright spot in a dismal
weekend of UBC sport.
The Jayvees edged the Surrey Rams 13-7 to capture the
Fraser Valley Junior Football
League title Sunday.
It was the Jayvee's sixth
straight win without a loss in
the  1960 campaign.
Earlier in the year, Jayvees
had handed "Surrey their only
loss of the year, a 13-9 squeaker.
In Sunday's game, played in
Cloverdale, JV's Ron Kincade
broke loose on the first play of
the game and galloped some 70
yards for  the score.
Kincade later scored the winner on another long ramble.
The Jayvees will now meet
the winners of the Junior Big
Four League,' either Blue Bombers or North Shore, for the B.C.
championship.
The JV's "will have a week's
rest, while iJhe Big Four finalists bruise  each other up.
Last year, the Jayvees were
declared ineligible for the B.C.
playoffs although they won the
Valley crown. This year they
were thwarted in an attempt
to join the Big Four, so they
will really be fighting for prestige when the, big day rolls
around.
The winner of the B.C. title
meets the Alberta winner in the
Western   Canadian   playdowns.
Grasshockey Splits
Weekend Games
UBC Grasshockey teams provided two of the victories that
UBC managed over the weekend.
The "B" Division Blues wfhal-
loped India 7-1 Saturday, and
the "A" Division Varsity team
edged  Cardinals 2-0.
In other "B" Division action,
Spurs defeated UBC Golds 4-k
Hawks Whipped UBC Pedagogues 2-0 in "C" Division action, also played Saturday.
GIRL'S BADMINTON TEAM
Girl's Badminton Team practices Tuesday Oct. 18 from 6-8
p.m. in  the Women's  Gym.
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
Oct. 17th to 22nd
Monday to Saturday
THE MOST ACQUIMEO BALLET OF ALLTIME PEfffORSJED
w the BOLSHOI BALLET
TSCWIKWSKY'S
Lavish ttittMi COLOR • NUitartmJ b» Cthmtit Actum'
ADDED
"The Golden Fish"
Academy Award Winning
Featurette
Adults $1.00, Students 50c
ONE COMPLETE SHOWING
8:00 p.m.
Doors 7:30
SPORTS
SHORTS
SOCCER
UBC Jayvees defeated Kings-
way Merchants 1-0 Sunday at
Killarney  Park.
UBC's only score came on a
penalty shot  by  Brian   James.
Outstanding for the Jayvees
were Otto Reich and goalie Bob
McMartin. McMartin made two
tremendous saves on penalty
shots by the Merchants.
In First Division action, Canadians defeated UBC's Varsity
team  4-1.
Birds played a strong first
half and held highly-rated Canadians to a 1-1 deadlock. The
Birds only goal was a penalty
shot iby Frank Harrop. ,-,
Birds now have a record of
one win, one tie and two losses.
St*    •*•    v
M.A.A.
An MAA General Meeting
will foe held Wednesday in Buchanan 221  at  12:30  noon.
;   Ai}l  [managers ajnd   captains
please attend.
Sf.Sf.Sf.
GIRLS'   RULES
BASKETBALL
The first practice of the Girl's
Basketball team - will be held
Tuesday at 4:30 in the Women's
Gym. All those interested please
attend.
* * *
GRASSHOCKEY
The Varsity Women's Team
won their first league game
Saturday, defeating North Van
2-1. The Varsity goals were
scored by Barbara Hay and
Jocelyn Searle.
DOUG MITCHELL
. . . First string lineman with
the football T-Birds last year,
played his second standout
game in a row in a B.C. Lion,
uniform.
WEST POINT PRINTERS
AND STATIONERS
4514 West 16th Ave.
"Closest to Campus"
CA 4-7818
For all your printing
requirements
BILL CRAWFORD
. . . Another standout lineman
With Frank Gnup's Birds last
year, is the ^irst Canadian college player to graduate to
U.S. pro ranks. Crawford is
now playing for the New York
Giants of the National Football League.
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
We carry everything
,a Student needs
5754 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
"In The Village"
AUSTIN A55
A fully equipped compact car with
room for 5 adults and their luggage
TWO    LOCATIONS
10th & Alma
Vancouver
RE 3-8105
Marine & Bowser
North Vancouver
YU 7-8121
FOR THE'BIRDS
By MIKE HUNTER
Welcome to the morgue.
Nice day, isn't it? UBC teams managed to lose three-quarters of their games this weekend.
Foremost of the mishaps was the mauling of the football
team by the Alberta Golden Bears. Scratch one WCIAU championship.
Golfers and tennis-ers were edged out by the same University. Scratch another  title.
Rugby teams failed to succeed in five matches. Scratch one
jugular vein.
Grasshockey won three of five games—one by the Women's
team. Scratch one head. It is another example of Classic coaching, I guess.
And the Jayvee football team wrapped up the Valley
Junior League laurels.
Perhaps we just can't win the big games. We seem to do
better when it comes to the more obscure campus sports.
Shaggy Manager Story
And for World Series boosters and gamblers, we have a
horsey story. It seems that a certain minor-league manager
was very short in bench strength. In the late stages of a game,
he suddenly needed a third baseman.
He looked down the bench to the only player he had left—-
a horse named Charley. Charley was put in, and played sensationally at third. He caught a sizzling liner and started a
double play in his first inning on the field.
In the next inning, Charley was shifted to the outfield,
where he threw two runners out at the plate from deep centre
field.
Charley came to bat with two out in the bottom of the
ninth, and a man on second.
He hit the first pitch for what looked like a sure inside-
the-park-homer, but as his teammate headed home with the
winning run, Charley was still standing at the plate. The ball
was retrieved, and Charley was thrown out without even try*
ing.
—o # o—
And good morning to butchers who got caught in their
meat grinders and got a little behind in their orders.
GIRLS
WITH
THE
RIGHT
FASHION
ANSWERS
KNOW THE
STYLE QUOTIENT
OF A
GLENAYR
Maybe you don't rate "A-plus" in math . . . you'll still
create a fashion furore in this exciting "girl-on-the-go"
Kitten jumbo-knit "Shetlantex" Shetland and mohair
. . . grand for sports car jaunting, wonderful for
weekend skiing, fabulous, on or off campus.
Coiffure-protecting hood forms cowl collar when down ...
vibrating young colours ... silhouette relaxed and
easy as fashion dictates, for Fall and Winter.
Sizes 36-40 .. . $14.95
8 Without this label \/3Jffii£&l it is not a genuine KITTEN Tuesday, October 18, 1960
T Mi     ««YSS!Y
Page 7. '
Alberta
Tennis'
Nemesis
Although   bringing back two '
trophies, the UBC golf and tennis squads failed to gain a first
class team total.
The   University   of   Alberta
swept both the golf and tennis
events.
GOLFERS SECOND
UBC's thjree-man golf team
shot a close 466 compared to
Altoertat's winning total of 464.
In tennis, the local players
were again second-best to the
Albertans.
Gary Puder shot a 74 Friday
and a 75 Saturday to gain low
medalist honours in the men's
golf event. Other team, members
were Gord Robinson and Ron
Irish.
A UBC women's team was not
entered.
UBC's other cup came from
the mixed doubles tennis team:.
ELIGIBILITY  HURTS
The UBC teams were hurt by
the present eligibility rules held
by the university. They are
stricter than the WCIAU rules
which the other teams have.
Don Griffiths and John Curl,
rated one-two on the golf team,
were unable to play because of
ineligibility.
Ed Vlaszaty, last year's singles tennis champ, also suffered
from the  "doubtful  eligibility"
tag.
COULD BE REMOVED
This situation could be remedied when the reccommenda-
tion for WCIAU conformity of
elii£jiib,iyty is put before the
senate.
AWhouigjh} tjhere can be no
denial that Alberta dominated
the competitions, the title was
be no means a give-away. Even
in the women's tennis matches,
Where UBC placed third, each
match went the full three sets
before the winner could be decided.
This is no mean feat when
its is realized that the local tennis girls played in this competition for   the first  time.
The men's single championship was an all-Alberta show.
Their top two players fought it
out to the third game. Cal Dag-
leish finally downed Lance
Richards 6-3, 3-6 and 6-2.
Black Weekend For Sport
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
Cornette Beauty Salon
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ELLA   CHAMBERS
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4532 West 10th Avenue
For  appointment  call:
CA  4-7440
DOUG BE NIMBLE
UBC's Doug Piteau hurdles two Alberta tackders in the most
exciting play of the afternoon. Piteau stood out for 'Birds
as Alberta won 20-6.
—Photo By George Fielder
UBC Rugby Records
Its Worst Weekend Ever
By CHRIS FAHRNI
Max Howell's Thunderbirds, in defeating the best Japan
ese team, had hit a new high in TJBC rugby.
Optimistic followers were see
ing V-J Day (Thursday last) as
the genesis of a fruitful rugger
era for the university. The Yawata game represented the first
Bird win over a touring international team.
Come Saturday afternoon,
WHAM! Not only the Birds, but
also the Braves, the PE Majors,
the Frosh A team and the Frosh
B team were turned under by
five unsporting city teams.
It was the worst rugby weekend ever encountered toy UBC
teams..
Showing a complete reversal
of form from Thursday, a spiritless Bird side crumpled before
the onslaught of the bigger Trojans by 8-3. The Birds lacked
oomph in the loose scrums—
they were given the "serum's
rush".
Oddly enouight, this is where
they excelled on V-J Day; the
forwards constantly on the ball,
heeling and packing, and the
overeagerness of UBC forwards
necessitated on many occasions
VANCOUVER FILM GUILD
presents
The 1958 Russian production
of Shakespeare's
Twelfth Night
(Color - Subtitles)
This Sunday, October 23
Hollywood Theatre
3123 West Broadway
Tickets at H. Kaye Books
750 Robson Street
Owl Books
4560 West 10th
or admission by "donation"
at the door
the reforming of scrums by the
referee.
The Thunderbirds had trouble
clearing the ball from the scrum
to the three-line Saturday. They
played most of the game without their regular wings* Howard
was injured on Thursday, Dubois, early in the game, picked
up a 15-stitch gash which will
keep him out of action for two
weeks.
The Birds played the remainder  of the   game shorthanded.
UBC Braves managed to score
the most UBC points, six. But,
they were also the most scored
upon, Meralomas tallying sixteen.
PE Majors were shut out toy
the Kat's seconds 8-0, as were
the Frosh A team by Ex-Gladstone. Frosh B eked out three
points against Ex-Byng, who
scored   eleven.
All in all, a sad weekend.
T-Birds Dethroned
By Hustling Alberta
By BERT MacKINNON
Playing for the Rainbow Trophy and the WCIAU championship, the T-Birds were unable to find an offense and lost
to the University of Alberta Golden Bears.
Alberta gained the title with
a 20-6 win.
On their first down of the
game the Birds came out in
their new formation, the short
bunt, and quarterback Knight
tossed a long pass.
The Bears intercepted and
mounted their first offensive
drive. The drive culminated in
a plunge over tackle by Ernie
Takass for the T.D.
BEARS SCORE EARLY
The convert was blocked by
Ken Lee and with 7 minutes to
go in the first auarter the score
stood at 6  to  0.
The Birds received the kick-
off and had their second chance
to make some yards, but due to
poor blocking, they were forced
into a punting situation.
On the next series of Alberta downs, the UBC star of the
same made his first move.
Bruce McCaUum crashed in
from defensive end to recover
an Alberta fumble
BRYSON THROWS
On the first play after fhe
punt, Bear quarterback Bruce
Bryson unleashed a long pass
and run play that went to the
Bird three-yard line. This would
have been a touchdown except
for a fine taokel by Tom Andrews, a defensive standout
throughout the game.
On the next play Frechette1
carried between tackle and end'(
for Alberta's second touchdown
of the quarter. This time the
son vert was good and at quarter
time the score stood at 13-0 in
favour of Alberta.
Jim Olafson fumbled on the
first play of the second quarter
and the Bears took aossessien
of the ball.
ANOTHER   T.D.
In three plays the Bears completed three passes in a row lor
45 yards. Alberta went on to
score their third touchdown.
At the half the score stood
at 20-0 for the Bears.
In the second half the Birds
came to life and for the first
time looked like a ball club.
The defense was tackling
crisply and the offense started
to make some yards.
After exchanging punts with
the Bears, Birds drove to the
Bear's 20-yard line as the third
quarter   ended.
Again it was MeCallum who
provided the spark, by combin- :
ing with Piteau on a fine pass
and run play for 20 yards and
lhe touchdown. The convert
attempt was blocked and the
score was 20-6 in Alberta's favour.
In the dressing room, Coach
Gnup was unhappy.
When asked what the reason
was for the loss he snarled,
"What can I say? We weren't
ready. They just weren't up for
the :game and I don't know
why."
Concerning   the  standouts of
the   game,   Piteau  and   MeCallum,    Gnup   had   nothing   but
praise.
PITEAU  PEAISED
"Piteau is our best prospect
we've had in years," he said.
"He may be quarterbacking in
-he very near future."
"McCaUum is all heart," he
said. "He never stops trying."
BEST BIRDS INCLUDED
Mike Williams and Tom Andrews were continually breaks
ing up Bear plays and Tonis
Tuttis managed to toe where the
Alberta men didn't want him
to be  .
But five good men can't win
a gaane and this was shown on
Saturday.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS1:   -
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
-   9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by   .    ,    .
THE UNIVERSITY OF BC
Football
tures
First Downs
Yds. Rushing
Yds. Passing
Pasees Tried
Passes Comp.
Penalties...
Yds. Pen.
Alberta
17
158
177
18
13
7
70
UBC
5
55
39
14
3
7
80
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Third annual UBC International Totem Rally to be held
Sunday, October 23. Details in
sports page Friday.
BADMINTON
'The first Men's Badminton
practice will be held 4:30 Wednesday in the Women's Gym.
Anyone wishing to play Badminton this year please ■ come
out.
SKIERS!
Large cabin for rent in
Grouse Mountain Ski Village. Oil heat and good cooking facilities. $200 or best
offer for season. Call Bob,
YU. 5-4297.
ELVIRA'S
Pol ma de Mai lore a
Special selection in
IMPORTED GIFTS
from Spain, French Morroco,
Italy, etc.
"And for the the women who
has Everything," Beautiful
Pearls, Broaches, and Sparkling Amber Necklaces from
Spain.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 18, 1960
'tween classes:
Many Activities To
Use Precious Time
SCM
Worship every Wed. morning
8:00 in the Hut.
•I*    •»•     •*•
PEP  BAND
First rehearsal in Hut L6,
Thursday noon. All old and new
memlbers please   attend.
•**    *X*     V
ELCTRCULO
General elections. Slides of
Spain.
•I*   *r   •*•
STUDENT   CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Important speaker on Africa,
Fri. noon.
FLYING SAUCER CLUB
General meeting Wed. noon,
Bu 223.
MARKETING CLUB
Dr. Gordon Chapman speaks
on "Problems in Present Day
Retailing" Wed. noon, Bu 2244.
NEWMAN CLUB
Talent    night,    Friday,    8:00
p.m., in St Marks Lounge.
Refreshments.
Sf.Sf.Sf.
(CHINESE   VARIETY
General meeting Wed. noon
Bu. 203.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting Wed. noon,
Bio. Sci. 2000. Final short long
hike plans.
* *~ *
MUSIC
Tomorrow noon concert. Duo-
Pianists Sumner and Rogers.
Works of Bach, Hindenmith and
Mendelssohn.
•J*     *fr     T"
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
j La'CReuhion du groupe de
JconversaHion (Commencements)
auro lieu aujourd'hui dans la
salle 222 du Batknent Buchanan
a'   12:30.
* *  *
PHYSICS SOCIETY
Lecture Wed. at 12:30, in Rm.
201 in the Physics  Bldg.
Council Flashes
•————■
New Proposals
Come Forward
A move to allow inter-fraternity council and Pan Hellenic
Society to have voting power on
USAC was discussed in student
council Monday night.
USAC — Undergraduate Societies Committee—is an organization created on t h e recommendation of last year's Haskins' Commission. It will be an
important part of the proposed
new system of student government.
A decision will be made on
the proposal next week.
POLITICAL CLUB
A new political club has arrived on campus.
Student council Monday night
passed a constitution of the Allied Integrity Front, a political
club dedicated to the re-estab-
Hshment of integrity in Canadian politics.
Other objects included in the
club's constitution are: To further interest of intelligentsia in
Canada and to seek membership
in model parliament.
The group was originally
formed as a Clubs' Day stunt.
UBC FENCING CLUB
All fencers come to new Education Gym, Wed. Right next
to the Campus Cupboard.
* *   *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Mr. Pat Dyer speaks on "The
Origin and Development of the
Calypso" Thur. noon, Bu 203.
* *   *
JAZZSOC
Panel discussion at noon today in Bu. 202.
* *   *
SCM
Today, Bu. 217, Dr. J. Conway speaks on "Does History
Make Sense." Tomorrow Rev.
J. Bishop speaks on "God, Sex
and  Marriage."
•*•     •**     *T"
ARTS AND SCIENCE
UNDERGRADS
Grad class photos must foe
taken before Nov. 15. Krass
Photography Studio Ltd., 569
Granville St.  9-5 anytime.
T    T    T
PREMED  SOC
Film "Birth of Quadruplets
by Caesarean Section" tomor-
T|»dw ;noon in Westbrook 100.
Dance   Friday.
* *   *
GOOD SCOUTS
Scoutmasters and assistants
needed for 34th Troop. Meet
every Wed. 3:00-4:30. Contact
Rev. Parrot,  AM 6-2485.
* *   *
COMMERCE  MEN
A general meeting, tomorrow
noon in Aud. Dean Peny to
speak and introduce new faculty.
CLASSIFIED
WILL SELL '49 Sunbeam Talbot, 6 tyres, trunk-full of
spare parts. Must go. Best
offer taken. Phone John Wil-
mot or Joan Hastings, CA
4-9953 after 6.
LOST. Would the person who
accidentally picked -up the
wrong brief case from the library on Tuesday call Roy
at CA 4-3760.
LOST. Would whoever got the
wrong rain coat in the gym
Friday noon Oct. 14, please
phone YU 8-7764. I have
yours.
WANTED. Ride from Br. Properties for 8:30 lectures. Will
pay or drive one day a week.
Phone  Doug,  WA  2-5598.
LOST. Multicolour Eversharp
pencil with the name "Venning" stamped on it. Please
phone HE 4-2364 and ask for
Judy.
LOST. Will the girl who took
my beige car coat after Thursday afternoon's Zoology Lab,
please phone Parn CR 8-1629.
I have yours.
WANTED. Ride to leave UBC
at 3:30. Vicinity 37th and
Arbutus. AM 6-0617.
FOR SALE. Car radio. For
slight extra charge will throw
in rest! of car. '52 Meteor
makes excellent container for
radio. Contact Bob Speers,
Acadia Camp, Hut 72, Rm. 12,
AM 4-9953.
LOST. Would the girl Who took
the wrong beige coat from
Brock basement at the dance
Saturday    night    (Oct.     15)
please phone Lynn, LA 1-2275.
FOUND.   Ladies   watch.   Main
Mall  Friday a.m. Phone TR
6-6239.
Frosh's Parents
To Visit Campus
Parents of Freshmen are in
vited to the second annual "University Day" this Saturday.
This occasion is designed to
acquaint parents with the conditions under which their children live and work at UBC and
the services available to them.
The program includes an assembly in the auditorium at
9:30 a.m., at which President
MacKenzie, Dean Gage, John
McLean, director of student
services, and David Edgar,
president of the student council,
will speak; tours of the campus
at 11:00 a.m. and a buffet lunch
in Brock Hall at 12:30.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 19*
5 or
More
Morz&Wozny
548 Howe St.     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breased suits
modernized in the new
single breased stules.
Special Student Rates
Note Selling Legalized
ANN ARBOR, Michigan  (UPS) — A student organized
note-taking service designed to provide students in large lecture
courses with mimeographed lecture notes, gets underway at
the University of Michigan this week.
Two lecture sections, Zoology
I and Anthropology 31 are
currently covered by the plan.
Students in those courses will
be furnished a free set of notes
for the week's lectures and
given the opportunity to subscribe for further coverage.
Ultimately   the   organization,
known as   the  University   Stu
dent Service, hopes to offer
notes for about 10 large lecture
courses. A spokesman said that
prices will probably run from
15 to 20 cents a lecture.
The dean of the Literary College last week decided to permit the operation with the discretion of the instructors. He
called it "lecturing at its worst."
It takes a PRETTY HEAD to catch an eye
FOR HAIRDOS "ON THE GO" FOLLOW
"THE    LEADER"
PRICES   SLASHED!
25% LESS ON ALL THE FOLLOWING SERVICES
PERMS - TINTS - BLEACHES - TONERS - SCALP TREATMENTS - FACIALS
EYEBROW ARCHING and STAUFFER RELAXATION
Hurry While It Lasts
STUDENTS SPECIAL ONLY 50% ON ALL PERMS
LEADER BEAUTY SALON
4447 W. 10th AVE. CA 4-4744
NOW   PLAYING!
Dirk Bogarde — Leslie Caron — Alastair Sim
"DOCTOR'S DILEMMA"
7 and 10:45
The Wit and satire of Bernard Shaw
plus
Carol  Baker and  Vittorio Gassman  in
"THE   MIRACLE"
Filmed in stunning color in Spain — One showing at 8:45
DOORS 6.30
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3123 W. Broadway RE. 8-2311
"Only the choicest
Virginia Tobaccos
are used in
du MAURIER
says FRED DAVIS
TV's top panel moderator
"There's something extra special about a
du MAURIER cigarette; two things, in fact.
One is the choice Virginia tobacco. The other is
the "Millecel" super filter. Together, they give
you the best cigarette ever."
du MAURIER
a really milder high grade Virginia Cigarette
VB-71

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