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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1959

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Full Text

 TH€ UBYSSEY
YOU CAN
BLEED
~s**s3S3ClXvh-
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1959
48
No. 9
urtains For
en Asia Goes Communist
'tween classes
V.O.C.
TUESDAY — Prospective
members are invited to the general meeting in Room 100 of
the Forestry and Geology Building today.
#    #    #
STUDENT WIVES' CLUB
WEDNESDAY—Wives of the
students on the campus will hold
their first meeting of the year
at 8:00 p.m., Wed. Oct. 14 in
the Mildred Brock. For further
information contact Mrs. J.
Armstrong, 4074 West 17th Ave.
The telephone no. is AL. 2288R.
¥    V    &
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
FRIDAY — Meeting for those
interested at noon on Friday,
Act. 9th in Buch. 223. Election
of executive and discussion of
coming year's program.
*¥•      SA      J£
SAILING CLUB
TUESDAY — Sailing Club
General Meeting scheduled for
today in Buch. 106 has been
rescheduled for today in Buch.
220. All members and interested
people please attend.
V V •!•
EL CIRCULO
TUESDAY — General meeting noon today in Buch. 203.
Election of the executive will
beheld and plans for thcyear's
activities will be announced; All
members and others interested
in taking part in the Spanish
weekenditafcbe held Oct. jo,; li
and 12 are requested to be
present.      -
•**    v    v
CURLING CLUB
WEDNESDAY — Prospective
curlers and members come to
an organizational meeting of
league play in Buch. 220 at
12:30, Wed., Oct. 11.
rp       •¥•        »p
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
TUESDAY — General Meeting in Buch, 217 today at noon.
Subject: Program of events.
Vr       •!•       v
M.A.A. MEETING
WEDNESDAY — Meeting
Wed. Oct. 7th in the Men's Club
Room of the Brock. All managers are urged to attend.
*v      *r      •*"
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
TUESDAY—Dr. Samuel Mik-
olaski will speak on "The Folly
of the Cross" today at noon in
Buch. 104.
FILM SOCIETY
TUESDAY — "The Desert
Fox" starring James Mason.
This is the story of Rommel's
campaign in North Africa. Today, Oct. 6th, 3:30 and 8:00.
Price 35 cents. Place, Auditorium.
•J*        «x« *j*
PLAYERS' CLUB
TUESDAY — General Meeting at noon today in Hut M10.
Guest speaker will be Prof. F.
G. C. Wood. New members are
urged to attend.
•j*     •¥•     v
ASSOCIATION OF
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
WEDNESDAY—Gamma Delta
will meet noon Wed., Oct; 7th,
in Buch. 227, Everyone welcome.
•j*     fp     «5p
CCF
TUESDAY -— Hazen Argue,
MP, youngest house leader ever
to sit in the Commons, will be
speaking ort "Canada's Role in
the World Today'-' at noon today in the Auditorium.
v    *fr    •*•
LIBERAL CLUB
TUESDAY — Meeting to be
held today at noon in Buch. 204.
Subject: Resolutions for B.C.'s,
Young Liberal Association Convention in Victoria. Members
are urged to attend.
COF CLUB
WEDNESDAY — CCF gener-
(Continued on page four)
General Romulo Asks If Doctrine
Of Equality Could Be Honoured
eral.
The west must prove to the world that it sincerely believes in the equality of man.
"Over one billion Asians do not side with us in this global struggle," stated the Gen-
Special Events Committee scores again by bringing General
Romulo to U.B.C. students. Photo by Colin Landie.
"Five million of these Asians
consider themselves neutral,
but neutralism, especially in
these new countries, should be
regarded as a minus, not a plus,
for our side," continued the
General. •
General Carlos Romulo,
speaking before students in the
Auditorium Monday, said that
we must show we believe this,;
not by mere lip service but by
implementing it into our daily
lives.
General Romulo, former president of the UN General Assembly, said that the survival of
our way of life depends on Asia.
"We should not make the UN
into a reformatory school,"
'stated General Romulo in answer to .a question on recognition of Red China and her entrance into the UN.
The General said that people
can have no faith in the UN
unless it respects certain moral
standards.
We cannot admit aggressor
nations, and still keep the respect of other nations of the
world, continued Romulo.
The General said Russia's
space control and other modern
i achievements symbolize to the
Asian countries the growth of
an underprivileged country into
a powerful nation under communism.
The dominated Asiatic countries see themselves as feudal
Russia of 40 years ago with the
potentialities of becoming major    world    powers,    patterned
Conservative President
Guest Of Campus Tories
Campus Conservatives hosted
their national president Friday.
Ted Rogers, national president of the Progressive Conservative Student Federation,
addressed the club on "The role
of P.C. Student Federation."
Rogers claimed young people
in the universities all over Canada take more interest in the
student federation than any
other political, party. The reason is that the individuality of
the student is  held in high  es
teem by the Progressive Conservative leaders in the government, he said.
"The members of the P.C.S.F.
are encouraged to develop
self-initiative, independence of
thought and action—they make
mistakes but learn," emphasized the president.   '."".".
Reviewing the progress of his
party, Rogers said that this
body has tripled in size in the
last three years.
; ."This tremendous growth di
rectly reflects upon the great
future of the Progressive Conservative party in Canada," Rogers added.
Rogers is touring the universities of Western Canada.
Contributions for Raven are
to be in no later than Monday-
November 2. All material
should be left in the Raven
office. Room C, upstairs in
South Brock.   .
"Last Minute Club" Offers Chance
To View "Famous Artists Series"
The Special Events Commits
tee has reinstigated a "Last Minute Club" which will enable students to attend the "Famous Artists Series" for the nominal
charge of 75c.
This means one may purchase
a ; ticket ranging in value from
$1.50 to $4.50 at this reduced
price.
Those students interested in
becoming members are asked to
sign their names on the "Last
Minute Club" list in the A.M.S.
office.
Vincent Price, first artist in
the* "Famous Artists Series," will
be a great -attraction for students interested in the arts. His
presentation is entitled "Three
Atnerican Voices" and includes
his adaptations and impressions
of the works of Walt Whitman,
NOTICE  TO PUBSTERS
Please don't forget the important meeting today at 12:30
p.m. in fhe Ubyssey offices.
All those who have worked
on the paper to date, those
who have hot yet been phoned,
and any new members are
urged to attend. The meeting
will be short, but vital to all
interested.
The newly appointed Editorial Board will be introduced
io.the sipff, party plans will
be discussed, and a few interesting announcements will be
tmade..   ,,....:. i
Whistler and Tennessee Williams. This event takes place
in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
on Thursday, October 8th.
' -.. Those interested "vinust obtain
a slip from the AMS office oh
Thursday, October 8th. These
slips will then be presented at
the box officeiof the theatre- not
later than, 8 p.m. that evening.
Please remember that there will
be a limited supply of tickets—
so "first come, first served."
Be o Bleednik!
If you haven't given blood
yet, you shQ,uld iiav&
You can bleed any day this
week at the Armouries from
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
after the USSR, said the General.
"Before World War II," stated
Romulo, "the Asian countries
believed the West to be superior. This fear kept Asia weak
and docile."
After Japanese power was
seen, the superiority of the west
was forgotten.
Romulo said that Russia's ambition of wOrId conquest began
to materialize immediately after
the last war when the USSR
refused to demobilize.
Russia started her empire and
the cold war with the defeat of
East European countries such
as Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and
Czechoslovakia, stated the General.
The USSR wanted Greece as
an outlet to the Mediterranean
and thus cut the western lifeline, according to General Romulo.
. Russia's tactics, he continued,
included the sending of guerilla
troops into Greece to start a
civil war.
When Greece saw that the
free world was interested in her
plight, they fought and they
won.     This,   Romulo said,   was
the West's first victory in - the
cold war. ' _  ■
General Romulo made several
comments on the strategy of
communism. He said Russia's
first big grab in Asia, the conquering of China, was a major
catastrophy. -.,■..,-.—;■
The General referred to Korea
and Formosa as major links in
our Pacific defence.
If one of them fell, all of Asia
would fall under communism. .
He said that Russia regarded
Korea as a global point from
which ihey could work southward.
"Korea," Romulo continued,
"is the heart of our perimeter of
defence."     i .,-■
General Romulo advocated the
people's support of Eisenhower's
policy to '-'support the defence
of Formosa to the lastditch".
He said that this is just an
incident in Russia's global strategy.
"The United States has had
world leadership for only 14
years and already it is being
seriously challenged," said Romaic
■ Historical world leaders have
often held supreme world power
for centuries.
Now You Kriow Where
Your Money Is Spent
The statement appearing on
this page is a combination of the
actual "income and expenditure
for 1958-59 as certified by the
auditors, and the proposed statement of A.M.S. income and expenditure for the coming year.
The difference in the proposed
budget between income and expenditure is the operating margin for: the year.
The allotments in the proposed budget are not based so
much on the relative merit or
importance of the activities as
on  the financial  assistance  re
quired to maintain a desirable
lev«l of pper&tion.
Each student pays $24.00 to
the Alma Mater Society, and
revenue from sports and activities adds a like amount. Even
without considering the out-;
standing bank loan for the construction of the Brock Extension, you can readily see that
the A,M.S. will be handling
nearly one half a million dollars
this year. I urge you to take an
interest in how it is handled.
',-' DAVE EDGAR,
Treasurer, ^    ";i:
Alma Mater Society.
ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 1959-60
INCOME ACTUAL
1958-1959
Student Fees |„._:.:„.':...'  $230,572.00
Other Income (Int. & Misc.)        1,254.58
College Shop, rentals, etc.        5,083.71
BUDGET
1959-1960
$242,600.1)0
1.500.00
4,400.00
$236,910.29       $248,500.00
EXPENDITURES
Administration —-. —
Undergraduate Societies ....;...	
*Wbmen's Athletics   ..., ...r
Publications   .... ....;,...— .: ~
Clubs - ..-, -
N.F.C.U.S .......:..._
*Accident Benefit  <. ,...'. >■
*Men's Athletics .-. ... ,.-...
*World University Service 	
*Brock Extension Payments	
*Brock Management ....+	
*Broek Art Fund	
Academic Symposium 	
Leadership Conference  t...
Frosh Retreat '..-	
Student Executive Programme   	
Conferences /....	
Special Events	
Homecoming ^	
Registration Photos :.... '.
Frosh Orientation ........
Radio Society	
'''Development Fund (Student Res.)
High School Conference ...„	
Other	
ACTUAL
1958-1959
$ 22,936.10
6,825.00
5,900.00
,20,913.45
4,497.87
3,426.64
6,344.00
40,544.70
11,596.50
47,732.50
4,714.50
1,414.35
461.84
1,106.91
124.91
1,643.95
3,722.00
(318.17)
1,993.99
(1,418.18)
1,250.00
48,450.00
100.00
315.85
BUDGET
1959-1960
$ 23,060.00
6,130.00
6;435.00
16,000.00
5,300.00
3,460.00
6,695.00
42,570.00
10,040.00
50,200.00
4,950.00
1,485.00
600.00
"900.00
375.00
125.00
1,725.00
3,000.00
2;350:00
1,000.00
50,900.00
200.00
Total Expenditures ,...  $234,278.71       $237,500.00
"'Allotments governed by rulings of the General Meeting
®r the Constitution.      • PA£E;TW@ /'"
.. .—, ■ - - ■ ■     —C__ , *frm ^sia-
THS
s, ' --..'.,.. ■''-        ■..'■"•
Authorized as second class1 mail by Post Office Department* Ottawa
- MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
'      Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITORIAL, BOARD FOR 1959-1960
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor _.. Elaine Bissett
Managing Editor _______,. I.  Michael Sone
Acting News Editor  ^____ Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor _■ __.__. '__. Irene Frazer
Club's Editor ■____ ___: Wendy Barr
Features Editor : Sandra Scott
Senior Editor ..__. Irene Frazer
Reporters and Desk:
Fred Fletcher, Alan Dafoe, Wayne Lang, Diane Greenall,
Pat McLean, Joan Hagge'rty, Alan Graves, Robert Sterling,
Sandy Scott, Garry Home, Mr. Comar.
On Natural Behavior
One of the most shocking features of the machine age
is the *lack of sensuality in the human species. Most
humans seems to expend little energy or time on anything
other than making themselves comfortable.
Consider for example the highly paid individual who
spends most o'f his hard earned cash on a house and car
which together cost him twenty thousand dollars more
than is necessary.    "   "       * —
If he had any vitality at all, I should think he would
be less inclined to keep up a superficial front and spend
his money on sexual gratification, beer, bad movies, night
clubs, horse races, and pocket books as fhe working classes
are wont to do.
It is illogical for one,. of course, to spend money he
will not have for twenty years. _ -_:—_
That is why Beatniks never buy anything.
—Wayne Lamb.
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October- 6, 1959.
LETTERS  TO THE  EDITOR
TOTEM
NEEDS
you r
i   ..-     ,   ■■■ ■
NO EXPERIENCE -NECESSARY
'i
A VARIETY OF INTERESTING
AVAILABLE
GO TO   ROOM  168
Brock Hall Extension
Today At Noon
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I found in last Thursday's
paper two letters attacking the
position I had taken in your
September ' 2,5 edition regarding amateur sports. I shall endeavour to answer Monsieur
"Le Compte's" letter first, as
his was by far the saner and
better written. The essence of
his message,, as I understand;:
it (he will no doubt correct me
if I am wrong) is that "The
only athlete worthy of his title
is he who loves sport for its
own sake. That he will take, a
third, second, or if lucky, a
first with a gracious 'It was a^
pleasure'."
This doctrine would imply
that a sprinter who trains for
months to-run 100 yards will
enter the race thinking "I hope
I win, but anyway it will be a
pleasure to run for 10 seconds."
■When he finishes the race last,
he may glow with pleasure, but
he will know that his performance was second rate. Mind you,
it may not have been physically
possible for him to have run
any faster, in which case he
need not be.ashamed, but HE
SHOULD NOT BE SATISFIED. Rather than shrug off
the ugly facts he should come
back and try again. Therein
lies the meat of the argument.
It is. easy to get used to coming second-, and to glow with
pleasure every time, in fact it is
much too easy. The case begins
to look more serious when one
wonders if this satisfaction
with second place is a reflection of national outlook. Will
we glow with pleasure if Rus.--
sia; wins a world war? It sounds:
ridiculous, and fortunately I
think it still is. I trust it will"
always be so. "
As regards the second letter, I find it very difficult to:
untangle much sense from Mri.
Ogilvie's "non-emoting" out?"
bursts. "First of all,"" he asksj,
"is a university, city,, province
or nation really any better
better place to live because air
(sic) handful Of its youth wins
an athletic event?" He doesn't:
bother to answer his question,-
but the answer is obviously
"NO". The relevance of this
query is, • at any rate, very
questionable, to say the least.
His second question concerns
the aims of competition. He
ends the paragraph with "But
if his (the • athlete's) best is,
however, insufficient, how can
one blame him?" How indeed,
Mr. Ogilvie? I should be the
last to blame him, provided he
did hot glow with pleasure and
feel SATISFIED. -     -,
In  conclusion I, should -like ,
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Oakridge
Park Royal
New
Westminster
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A
to thank Mr. Ogilvie for honouring me with the adjective
"educated", even though his
way of putting it infers that he
is deserving of the epithet
while I am not.
Yours truly, •'"
J. C. Madden
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
What's the difference anyhow?
A flag is Worth more than
the piece'of'cloth or the sheet
of paper on which it is printed.
People die for a flag, poets
write about a flag, and when
a sailor Or a soldier go on the
long journey home the comrades will show him the last
honour by covering the coffin
with a flag.
In Canada there are several
flags in use, and there is not
complete agreement between
the citizens which flag should
have the privilege to be called
the all-Canadian flag for Canada.
However, this is not the case
in most other countries where
the population will accept but
one version of their.flag.
A flag should be treated with
respect, and from what I have
observed, the Canadian flag is
treated with the honour that
one would expect from a people
who have not in recent years
been deprived of the privilege
of having a flag. Last year, in
the school where I was teaching, the flag was every/night
hung on the bannister in the
Wall, for next morning to be
hoisted by the cleaning woman
or somebody else without any
unnecessary ceremony.
On Club's Day the 'German
Club was-signing up new members in" a booth proudly decorated with Belgic flags.
I naust admit that there is a
similarity between the German
and the Belgie flags, but should
one riot expect that University
students who have a particular
interest in the German culture,
since they are taking the effort
of running the club, should be
able to know the flag of the
country which they are representing?
I pointed out the blunder to
the two girls behind the counter and they seemed to think
it the joke of the day. One does
not joke about flags, and ignorance is never impressive.
Kaare M. Hermanrud
3rd Arts
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
It was a sickening experience to read the guest editorial
in your paper of Friday,
October 2. The writer of this
article, Mr. Sinclair, is uninformed and unrealistic. I
might mention a few obvious
examples of ignorance.
Mr. Sinclair speaks of communism "as perverted to the
ends of the New Republic of
China". What could have been
a more glaring example of perverted western ideals than the
disease ,poverty, arid ignorance
of China just before 1949. It
is no hidden fact that socalled
democratic western capitalists
had invested much money in
China before the revolution
purely for their own profit. To
say that what obtains now in
China is somehow of^ what was
before is very odd.
Another point is that India
did not "sacrifice" Tibet. At
the time China put down the
rebellion there, India did not
recognize Tibet as belonging
to her.
Mr. Sinclair says, "most of
the , statesmen of today prefer
economic security" instead of
freedom. Surely the communist bloc would not be winning
the race for man's stomachs if
modern western statesmen
eared about economic security.
Furthermore, the U.N. investigations in Laos have shown
that Mr. Sinclair's noble Dulles, through mishandling of aid,
was mainly responsible for the
troubles in that state now.
Mr. Sinclair shows a lack of
judgment in disparaging the
desires of western countries to
promote good will and trade.
This is "suicidal," he says. If
this is suicidal, then putting' a
wall between ourselves and the
communist bloc is even more
"suicidal." It is literally suicidal.
-Mr. Sinclair talks of leading
the world back to decency.
Where? Baek to fascism, back
to the robber-barons of the
eighties and nineties, back to
the British Empire?
Mr. Sinclair's/article is poisonous arid irresponsible!
Yours sincerely,
Len Geddes, Arts IV
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I Was most'Interested in the
replies to my brother oarsman's article on excellence in
sport.
Both letters indicate that
loving a sport for its own sake,
not for winning, is the true
. object of participation. The expression "it's not whether you
win or lose, it'« how you play
the game" seems to be the
■kernel of their argument.
I do not wish to criticize
their sincerity, but in my opinion the love of a sport and the
desire to excel are objectives
that cannot be distinguished.
In other words, there is only
one way to play the game, and
that way is to play it to win.
Possibly the best way to explain my feelings on this subject is to compare .sport with
'a profession. A teacher, for
example, who loves his work
inevitably desires to do the
job to the best of his ability.
If he alnilost gets the message
across, arid yet fails, it is safe
to say that he will not be satisfied. The surgeon who loves
•his profession is riot content
with failure—he studies and
practices for years and years
so as to achieve perfection. A
lawyer is a third example. He
fights to win, not to come second. I am talking now of the
dedicated men, the men that
Mr. Madden's critics would
term men in love with their
work. It cannot be argued that
such men are striving merely
for the financial return.
So it is with sport. For those
who love their sport, the goal
is perfection. And this, in competitive sport, means winning.
Naturally, the athlete may fall
short of his goal; he may lose.
In which case it is his duty
to congratulate the winner,
and to take his loss as best he
can. But it is ridiculous to ask
him to like it.
Yours sincerely,
David Anderson
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Dear Disgusted Freshette;
In explanation of Screech Day:
There are all sorts of checks
on individuals and it makes
living so much less instinctive
and more systematic. To a
woman who, by compulsion, is
more civilized in behaviour
than in feeling, rationality is
irksome. Have you no hankering   after   a  more   instinctive
and passionate way of life than
that sanctioned by current
morals?
The purposes of the university arid you say "to uphold our.
dignity as serious and intelligent students" are enforced
upon us and we have acquired;
the habit of viewing our life;
as a whole, increasingly sacrificing our present to our future. But prudence may easily
involve the loss of some of the
best things in life. Enthusiasm
gives an intensity of feeling
Which prudence has destroyed
and without this element life
would be uninteresting.
You may  see  the need  for
enthusiasm   as  it  is   a  combi-
; nation of passion and intellect.
Simply Undisgusted
Editor, ,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Mr. LaCroix:
You certainly felt very smart
and spiritful writing your sarcastic letter, calling people
bleeting sheep and idiotic. I am
one of the idiotic bleeting
sheep. The Editor accepted my
letter in spite of being not
signed. He is not as wise as you
are. You are right. In this country free speech is the right of
every man. But there are Soviet agents and spies in this
country as well. If one of them
mails my article home, my relatives find themselves in a
concentration camp, if not
worse, and they will never
know why.
I do not want to get my relatives hurt. Not even for your
sake, Mr. LaCroix. I remain a
bleeting sheep for you. I am
much more polite than to write
what you are to me.
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after 6 p.m.
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PAGE THREf
Dean Gage Announces
$15000 In Student Awards
Awards of scholarships and
bursaries valued at more than
$15,000 were,announced today
by Dean Walter Gage, chairman
of the awards committee.
So far 205 students have received approimately $61,500 in
scholarships and . bursaries for
the 1959-60 session.
The following is a list of the
awards:
The British Columbia Electric
Company Limited Graduate
Scholarship (Arts and Science),
$250: Wayne Hans Nielsen, 4474
West 12th Ave., Vancouver.
The Delta Kappa Gamma Society, $250 (proceeding to certificate or degree in teaching):
Ethel Mary Sunderman, Pentic-
ton, B.C.
The British Columbia Telephone Company Scholarships in
Community and Regional Planning, $600: Thomas Jenkinson,
3345 West Broadway, Vancouver.
The Architectural Institute of
British Columbia Scholarship,
$250 (proficiency entering architecture): Anthony Bennett
Green, 2591 Newmarket Dr.,
North  Vancouver.
The Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship, $100,
Nursing (proficiency in all years
of course, proceeding to final
year): Deana Clancy, 5359 Lad-
rier Trunk Road, Ladner, B.C.
The Crown Zellerbach Canada    Limited     Scholarship     in
HANEY TROUPE
PLAYING HERE
A unique step in social work
will appear at the Auditorium
on Thursday.
The men from the Haney Correctional Institution are to perform in MaMry Chase's hilarious
comedy "Harvey".
This group of players appeared
here last year after having won
three awards at the greater Vancouver Drama Festival.
The Alma Mater Society Special Events Committee and the
other UBC clubs will sponsor the
play.
Strident tickets at 50c will be
on sale at the door of the University Auditorium from 7:30
p.m. Thursday.
Lost: Red Briefcase
A man's job depends on the
whereabouts of one red briefcase.
The briefcase was picked
up by mistake Sept. 26 from
the Main Mall boulevard near
the  medical  huts. ■
The case contains maps and
timber cruising data which are
valuable   only  to  the  owner.
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the briefcase is asked to contact Mr. Bradshaw
at Brock Hall as soon as possible.
University Housing
Accommodation
Available for Single Men
Students and Married Couples
Apply Office Housing
Administration - Room 205-A
Physics Building
Nursing, $500 (overall profici
ciency in academic and practical studie'sj proceeding to final
year): Anne-Shirley Gordon, 351
Murray Drive, Trail, B.C.
The Crown Zellerbacri Canada Scholarships in Teacher
Training, $400 a year for five
years (renewals): Elinor Patricia Parkin, Ladysmith, B.C.; Al-
wynn Elizabeth MacKay, 503
Fader St., New Westminster,
B.C.
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Graduate Scholarship, $500 (geology)
Donald William Hyndman, 4787
Cambie St., Vancouver.
The Hamber Scholarship in
Nursing, $300 (proficiency, proceeding to final year): Phyllis
Rosemary Calvert, 3107 Balfour Ave., Victoria, B.C.
The Mary Graham Holland
Scholarship in Nursing, $300
(proficiency, proceeding to final
year): Valerie Anne Squance,
R.R. No.  1 Royal "..Oak, B.C.
The Provincial Department of
Health and Welfare, Health
Branch' Scholarship, $100 (proficiency, proceeding to field of
public health): Ann Gilleland,
2441 Nelson Ave., West Vancouver, B.C.
The. University Nurses Club
Scholarship, $75 (overall standing and qualification, nursing):
Sheila Winnifred H'alpin, 2172
West   53rd  Ave.,  Vancouver.
The Flying Officer Reverend
George Roibert Pringle Memorial Bursary, $250: John Ernest
Henwood, 8680 Montcalm St.,
Vancouver,
The DuPont Company of
Canada (1956) Limited Scholarship, $2100 (graduate teacher
training course, sciences and
mathematics): William A. Kray-
enhoff Van de Leur, 2884 West
42nd Ave., Vancouver.
The Laura Holland Scholarship, $300 (Social Work): Shirley Florence Tomalty, Hut No.
47, Acadia Camp, UBC, Vancouver.
The United Jewish Peoples
Order Max Erensberg Memorial
Scholarship, $100 (proficiency,
proceeding to second year uni-
versity studies): Martin F. Kag-
VCF Out For
Thanksgiving
. "New Testament Christianity
in the Twentieth Century" is
the topic of this year's Varsity
Christian Fellowship Thanksgiving weekend camp.
The principal speaker will be
Earle Palmer. Palmer received
his B.A. from the University of
California and is now the youth
director of the University Presbyterian Church in Seattle.
Highlights of the weekend
camp on the Gulf Islands include hiking, canoeing, group
discussions and a Thanksgiving
dinner. Further information may
be obtained from the Varsity
Christian .Fellowship clubroom
behind the Brock or from V.C.F.
members.
rioff, ,3236 West 26th Ave., Vancouver:
The VanDusen Graduate Fellowships in Forestry, $750 each
(through the VanDusen Foundation a fund of the Vancouver
Foundation): Marcus A.M. Bell,
Victoria, B.C.; Slavoj Eis, 2547
Trimble St., Vancouver; Merl C.
Fisher, 3507 President's Row,
Vancouver; Joseph H. Huntley,
c/o Department of Forestry.
University   of B.C., Vancouver.
The British Columbia Electric
Company Graduate Scholarship
in Engineering, $500: Peter Noel
Brooks, 3731 West 6th Ave.,
Vancouver.
Rollinson
Appointed
kXfS
CX.F.'S HAIEN ARGUE
TO SPEAK AT NOON
CCF House of Commons leader Hazen Argue will be speaking
in the Auditorium noon today.
A graduate of the University
of Saskatchewan, Argue began
his political career at 24 as the
youngest MP in Ottawa, and
has continued his career to become the youngest party leader
ever to sit in the House of Commons.
Mr. Argue is especially well
versed in the problems of agriculture, but has an excellent
grasp of the other coricerns of
our federal  government.
The topic of Mr. Argue's lecture on Tuesday will be "Canada's Role in International Affairs."
UBCBehras
Show Well
UBC Sports Car Club drivers
made an impressive showing-in
the International Conference
championship races at the West-
wood Circuit Sunday.
In the class F production race,
Geoff Mptt drove his Triumph
TR2 to victory, for his fourth
win in this season's racing.
Bill Radelet drove his Morris
; 1000 to take third place in class
I production.
The third UBCSCC entry was
Diana McColl.
For the eighth time this season, Diana proved that racing
is not only a man's game. Driving her A-H Sprite very consistently, she placed well in the
hotly contended class H production race.
The highlight of the day's racing came in the last race.
Pat Piggot of Seattle drove
his two-litre Lotus 15 to victory
in the Castrol handicap race,
breaking the lap record, several
times. ■
He obtained an average speed
of 79 miles per hour which, for
a "tight" circuit such as West-
wood, is very fast motoring.
The next attraction at the
Sports Car Club of B.C.'s new
circuit is a full day of motorcycle racing  Oct.  18th.
The next sports car races are
on Nov. 1st.
NOTICES
MRS. KAY ROLLINSON
Newly appointed assistant to
'.he Director of "International
House is Mrs. Kay Rollinson.
Formerly secretary to the
Manager of Georgia Auditorium,
Mrs. Rollinson is well-known
among ;musical and arts groups
of Greater Vancouver.
She presently serves as secretary-treasurer of-the Sir Ernest
MacMillan Fine Arts Club.
Mrs. Rollinson served as choir
mistress with the Elgar Choir
for three months last summer,
touring France-, Germany, Holland, England, Ireland and Scotland. !
WAA To Meet
There will be a general
meeting of the W.A.A. today
in Buchanan 100 at 12:30
. ■ Claude Jodoin, president of
the Canadian Labour Congress,
will speak on Industrial Relations in Canada on Wednesday
in Buch. 106 at 12:30.
First General Meeting of the
Women's Athletic Association
takes place today in Buch. 100
at 12:30. AH wiomen on campus
are urged to- attend. Election of
the W.A.D. secretary will take
place.
NFCUS OUT
OF DEBT
For the first time since 1957,
National Federation of Canadian
University Students is operating
in the black.
President Mortimer Bistrisky
stated that as of August 31, 1959,
the travel department had an
operating surplus of- $172.08 as
opposed to an over-all deficit of
$4,463.29 in 1957-58.   .'
This deficit was offset by
money drained from the general fund.
Bistrisky stressed that "credit
for the improvement in the travel dept. should go to director
Jean-Pierre Jinchereau, who
dedicated •'himself to the task
of putting the department back
on its feet."
Last year the department was
operated on a trial basis, and
it was intended that it need
only break even. In future
years, Bistriski stated, indications are that its debts to the
general fund will be wiped out.
A challenge to air Students
living on campus.
Acadia Camp doth challenge
the residents of Fort "Camp ind
of the p~ermanent residences to
a contest. f ;   •    ;.
The residents of Acridia C£ttn#
claim they will donate more
blood, On a: percentage basis,
than the worthy residents rif the
above-mentioned residences;
•*•    v    v
 Commerce students, two hiUfc
died strong, are marching today
for the Community Chest/:
The goal this year is $1300.
This is^ the only organized
campus appeal for charity sup^
ported by the faculty and student body.
Everyone is asked to help out
when a Commerce student taps
you.
CLASSIFIED
LOST
WOULD the frosh who -picked
up the watch at-the hazing
please turn it in to the: EUS
office at 12:30. ]
■.   . LOST f.
REWARD — Briefcase lost on*
week ago on Main Mall.:; Contains maps, etc. Contact Mr.
Bradshaw, Brock Hall.  ;
FOUND
TWO pairs Of'slaeks in parking
lot. Please call AM 6-4051 arid
identify.
West Point Printer
And Stationers
Brief   Cases  —   Slide   Rules
Drafting Instruments^
4514 W. 10th AL 1245
ACCOMMODATION
Double Room, Twin Beds,
Bright, Warm, Nice View,
Private Washroom
Kerfisdale T;B.A.
AM 1-0751
theatre
4375 WEST 10TH
AL 0345
NOW SHOWING
The Comedy Program of
the Year!
The Captain's Table
Starring John Gregson
PLUS
Carry On, Sergeant
First Nighter's Review
' Every Monday, 8:15 p.m.
COMING SOON .  . .
"MADAME  BUTTERFLY"
The Most Beautiful  of  All
Lyric Dramas
Alt Bilt
(Architecture 53) says
SKI LOOS
My blue-print for
success is a planned savings
programme
.....iiNir
op
Bank of Montreal
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Bldg.
MERLE C. K.IRBY, Manager
a big step on the road to success is art early banking conhecfiori
^ ■       UI-S9
They're here... in fabulously smart, bright colours — the new lushly lined
cold-weather footwear in a wide range of styles and materials. Some to
wear over your shoes, some instead of shoes, that weigh next to nothing
on your feet. Look marvelous with pants — smart with skirts too. Keep
your toes warm as love all winter in ESKILOOS.
Available at all leading shoe and department stores.
Dominion Footwear
OF  UNITED  RUBBER PAGE FOUR
THE     U-BY'S S'E'Y
Tuesday,' October 6, 1959
Birds Out class (Sea rs
Take League Lead With
One-sided 3 6-13 Victory
-- By MIKE HUNTER
U.B.C. Thunderbirds showed their desire to take it all,
beating the Golden Bears 36-13 Saturday before a sparse crowd
of 2600 fans.
Henwood^ got two niore, the last-f*;
on  a screen pass from Morris.
The Birds were as brilliant
as' the' weather, amassing 22:
first downs and 425 yards total
offence. Jack Henwood led the
scorers with four first half TD's.
Dave Barker booted four converts and two singles, and Jon
Morris went seven yards for the
final major.
BEAR-LEAD
Alberta's George Stothard
shocked the Birds by breaking
clear to catch a pass for 85
yards' and a TD on the'first play.
The Birds came back, led by
Jon Morris, who threw to Osborne -for - 25, -handed to Henwood for 28, Olafsbn for 12, and
Henwood again for the TD from
seven yards out. Henwood capped another march from seven
yards away. Alberta QB Bryson
hit Vic Messier with a 27-yard
pass for the Bear's last score.
Jack had five Birds in front of
him, and he walked over untouched from, the 32.  -
BARKER BOOTS
Dave Barker impressed with
his kicking,  as did Jon Morris
at quarter. Morris kept the Bear
defenders on their toes, sending
ly. Beck, Donald, Hoar, Crawford and Joyce opened gaping
holes.   Defensive   stars    were
Denny Argue, Frank  Baillie,
Henwood   off   tackle   and   Roy
Bianco up the middle. Jim Olaf-
son ran the ends well averaging
8.4 yards per carry.
However, much of the credit
must go to the line. Offensive-
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside the gates
1 Brock Hall Extension-
' 5734 University Boulevard
IWEDOf
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE Ltd.
HOWE MU 3-2457
U of A FANS HEARD
CAME DIRECT
Football fans in Alberta
heard fhe broadcast of Saturday afternoon's football
game between the Thunderbirds and Golden Bears direct
from UBC Stadium.
Play - by - play announcing
was carried lo fans in Alberta
via an Edmonton station.
CKNW sportscaster Jim Cox
did the broadcast from the
stadium press box.
Arrangements io broadcast
the Bears' coast games in Edmonton were made last year.
UBC SOCCER ELEVEN
SCORE 4-2 TRIUMPH
. Varsity soccer eleven of the
Second* Division Mainland
League defeated Marshall-Pon-
t.iac 4-2 at Mclnnes Field Sunday afternoon.
Frank Harrop and Bill Wedley picked up two goals each
for the winners.
In another match, played at
McBride Park, Vancouver Irish
whitewashed UBC 7-0 in a Third
Division contest.
AIR FORCE
TRl-SERVtCE
U.R.T.R       R.0.T.R
*
(UNIVERSITY RESERVE TRAINING PLAN)
Flight Cadets (male and
female) are enrolled in the
Reserve Force—receive 16
days pay during the
University Term^-and have
a potential of 22 weeks additional paM employment
during summer vacation
months.
(REGULAR OFFICER TRAININS PLAN)
Flight Cadets (male) are
enrolled in the Regular
Force—during the University year are suhsidized
for tuition with a grant for
books and instruments-—
and receive pay and allowances throughout the
Whole year.
Openings now for Openings now for
TECHNICAL AIRCREW
„,wN0N-TECHNICAL . ■   AND TECHNICAL
OFFICERS. OFFICERS.
*Thisplan applies to the three Armed Services
Get full details at once so that you can take advantage of this
opportunity now, while you are still attending University. For
full information on requirements, pay and other benefits,
SEE YOUR  UNIVERSITY  SUPPORT OFFICER   (RCAF)
LOCATED ON YOUR CAMPUS
AF-S9-30
and Bruce McCallum. Gary
Bruce and Roy Bianco made
timely   tackles   in   the  secon
dary. Doug Mitchell set up a
touchdown with a blocked
kick in the second quarter.
i$y ®rw
Staff:   Ernie Harder, Ann Pickard, Mike Hunter,
Fred Fletcher, Alan Dafoe
1
*
4
&■*    •*
*.       *
J
<,    *•
*-   ■«**
«r*. m
4
*    "
. Jbhuh
*     *    '    *      " • * .* : -
tf
»   jt*
L>
««w.
Following The Birds
By ERNIE HARDER '
In the Birds' nest—handshakes and cokes for a crew that had
sewn up victory by halftime of Saturday's match with U. of A.
A compact commerceman named JACK HENWOOD limped
over to turn on the whirl bath. A gimpy leg had kept him out of
second half play, but it had not kept him from carrying the ball
11 times in the first half .scoring four TD's, gaining an average of
over 10 yards per carry in the process—and encouraging the witnesses to'forget about an ex-commerce mate named DON VASSOS.
FRANKIE WAS HAPPY
- Behind a newly-lit 25-cent cigar in a far corner of the dressing
room amiable chief Frankie airednothing but praise for his horses.
"The blocking .was terrific, the tackling was sharp. It was a
good game—the goodest they've played by far."
MR. GNUP-was obviously referring to the performance of fellows like BILL CRAWFORD and JIM BECK, whose weight, which
.between them averages more than 35 pounds heavier than the
Bears' 185 pound average line weight, helped break trail for Henwood in the first half—then BRUCE ALLARDYCE in the second.
MR,. GNUP was probably referring to the hard-rock tackles
of  a fearless  corner  linebacker  named   GARY   BRUCE, and  the
tremendous downfield blocking of speedy halfback BRUCE Mc-
CALLUM.
BIRDS BEST IN WEST?
Outside the stadium, shadows drew longer, engineers and
artsmen walked home together. There were no tumultuous celebrations—no tearing down of goalposts. They talked of Saturday
night's all-star hockey game on TV, the football. dance and the
World Series.
But before the season is over, number of students turning
out to support the Birds will double because, it sez here, we still
aren't aware that this POINT GREY is the home stomping ground
for one of the finest college football teams in the country.
—photo by Roger McAfee
4>   JACK  HENWOOD   dives  for^
TD number two in first quarter from seven-yard line. Hen-
WoqcL_Birh'p^   lip   four   touchdowns in UBC's 36-13 triumph.
Jayvees Edge Richmond 18 -12
UBC Jayvees edged a strong
Richmond squad 18-12 Sunday
at Richmond.
This was the fourth straight
win for the Jayvees. Previous
victories were at the expense of
Chilliwiack and Surrey (2).
-   Richmond's   offense   was   the
first to dent UBC's able defensive squad.
Next Sunday Jayvees take on
Richmond at home.
TWEEN CLASSES
al meeting will be held noon,
Wed. Oct. 7th in Buch. 208. All
members and CCF supporters
are invited to attend.
* *    *
AQUA SOC
THURSDAY — First general
meeting and theory lecture in
Buch. 217, noon Thursday. Prospective memlbers welcome. Pool
training will start Thur. 6:00
p.m. for members only. Bring
mask, fins, snorkle.
.    *    *    *
PRE-MED SOC
WEDNESDAY — Meeting on
Wed., Oct. 7th, noon in West-
brook 100. All members please
attend. Field trips to be organized and membership cards to
be given out. Film: "Bottoms
Up." Members free. Non-members, 25 cents.
%>    ¥    V
HIGH SCHOOL
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
WEDNESDAY — First meeting noon, Oct. 7th, in the Brock
stage room. All interested are
welcome.
•I*        *!• •*•
JAZZSOC
WEDNESDAY   —   Dixieland
jazz with   Lance  Harrison   and
his   band,   noon   Wed.   in   the
Auditorium. Admission 25 cents.
•t"    •¥•    •*■
JAZZSOC
TUESDAY—Panel discussion
of "Dixieland" today noon in
the clubroom, Hut B2. All welcome.
v     •**     •*•
SQUASH CLUB
TUESDAY — The general
meeting will be held today in
Buch. 202, noon. Please attend.
* # • *
CONTEMPORARY
DANCE THEATRE
WEDNESDAY — . The first
meeting of the Contemporary
Dance Theatre will be held on
Wed., Oct. 7th, in the Dance
Club, Brock Extension, at 5:30.
All interested please attend.
.if,    sf.    }{•
DANCE. CLUB
TUESDAY — Noon hour in-
SPORT'S
SHORTS
W.C.I.A.U. GOLF & TENNIS
The highlight of this week's
sporting activities will be the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Golf and Tennis matches, to
be played on the U.B.C. campus.
Prospects are for a good Bird
showing. In the women's section
highly rated Sue Butt and Sharon Whittaker will carry singles
honours.
Coaching this powerful team
is Canadian Davis Cup player,
Paul Willey.
Tennis matches against the
Universities of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan will go
Thursday and Friday on the
War Memorial courts.
The men's golf team will play
at the Capilano Club while the
women t-off on the University
golf course.
■ Socially, a banquet is planned
on Friday night for the presentation of prizes.
GENERAL MEETING
All women . . . first meeting
of the Women's Athletic Association will be TODAY at 12:30
in Buch 100. Nominations aire
open from the floor for a secretary of the association.
All co-eds are urged to attend,
VOLLEYBALL
First practice for all girls interested   in   playing   volleyball
will be  7:30 Thursday, Oct.  8,
in the Women's Gym.
Synchronized  SWIMMING
Organizational meeting for all
those interested on Wed., 12:30
in the Women's Gym common-
room.
BADMINTON
Practice for men and women
players at the Women's Gym,
6-8 p.m. Tuesday and Friday.
SQUASH
General meeting of the Squash
Club in Buch. 202 at noon today.
MEN'S GRASS HOCKEY
All men who have signed up
to play grass hockey are requested to turn up for a practice
on Thursday, October 8, at 12:30
at Chris Spencer Field, behind
Brock Hall.
struction will start today in the
clubroom.   It   will   be   open   to
both members and non-members.
■i*     H1     •*•
DANCE CLUB '
THURSDAY — The general
meeting of the Dance Club will
be held this Thurs. in Buch.
104. All members and prospective memlbers are invited.
•P    &    V
UBC MAJORETTES
WEDNESDAY — All girls
who signed up on Clubs' Day
for majorettes please meet in
the Booster Club office, Brock
Extension, Wed. noon.
GRADUATE  STUDENTS
WEDNESDAY — There will
be a meeting of all graduate
students on campus in Physics
200,  Wed. noon, Oct. 7th.
FILMSOCS
"THE DESERT FOX"
.       STARRING    '.
:    JAMES MASON
The Story of Rommel
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6
at 3:30 and 8:00 p.m.
AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION - 35c

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