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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, OCTOBER 21, 1920
Number 2
'Varsity Defeats
Rowing Club
PILE UP 15-0 SCORE
What's the matter with Hugh Ross?
He's all right!
These were the words that were
echoed by 'Varsity supporters when Ross
streaked over the line for the third try.
It was largely owing to him that the
game resulted in a 15-0 victory for us, as
he was in every play, both offensive and
defensive. Lou Hunter played a very
pretty game as usual, scoring twice, and
making things generally uncomfortable
for the Rowing Club three-quarters.
The game started with a 'Varsity rush,
but the Rowing Club recovered quickly
and carried the ball into our two-bit line.
Their success was short-lived, as they
were soon pushed back into their own
territory, and remained there until almost
the end of the half. Harold Gwyther
failed to convert, and the half-time whistle sounded with the Rowing Club on the
offensive. During this half 'Varsity was
guilty of several off-sides.
With the sun behind them, 'Varsity
resumed the attack after the five-minute
interval. Hunter and Ross again worked
the combination which had previously resulted in a score, and brought the count
up to 6-0. Gwyther was having hard luck
with his kicks and again missed the poles.
Our scrum was noticeably superior to
that of the Rowing Club, and was heeling
the ball out regularly. Bickle got hold of
the ball on the Rowing Club twenty-five-
yard line, and slid over for the third
touch, which was not converted. Rowing
Club was trying hard, but it was impossible to get through our defence. 'Varsity started a forward rush from the centre line, which swept everything before
it, Kenny Carlisle making the touchdown, which proved to be  the  final  one.
H. Gwyther was a tower of strength
on the 'Varsity defence, and Rex Cameron as half is the right man in the right
place. Both Poupore and Grimmett
played very fine games for the Rowing
Club.
'Varsity—H. Gwyther, Hunter, Ross,
Jones, Buchanan, Tiernan, Honeyman,
Cameron, Gross, Bickle, Gwyther,
Gregor,  Plummer, James,  Carlisle.
Players Choose
New Members
WILL  PRESENT FOUR PLAYS AT
CHRISTMAS
A group of very nervous people, assembled in the upper hall on Thursday,
October 14th, bore evidence to the fact
that candidates for the Players' Club
were going through their paces before the
three solemn and silent judges — Mr. F.
G. C. Wood. Dr. A. F. B. Clark and Dr.
Ashton. Out of the eighty-odd who went
through this ordeal, the following were
selected to fill the twenty-five vacancies
in the club:
Arts '23—Messrs. H. M. Cassidy, J. V.
Clyne, H. Grahm, A. Hunter; Misses M.
Bulmer, I. Elliot, M. Jackson, H. Kloeph-
fer, S. Murphy, G. Weld.
Arts '24—Mr. G. Livingstone; Misses
Abbott, J. Adams, E. Angell, F. Cowan,
F. Creelman, S. Connellan, M. Evans, I.
MacKinnon.'
Arts '22—Mr. G. Letson, Miss M.
Agnew.
Arts  '21—Mr.  F.  Pumphery.
Sc.   22—Mr. Wells Coates.
Sc. '23—Mr. N. McCallum.
Ag.  '23—Mr. A.  E.  Richards.
Partial—Miss   G.   Teeporten.
The following day, at noon, the first
general meeting of the Players' Club was
held. Miss Dorothy Adams, the president,
on behalf of the club, extended a hearty
welcome to the new members. Mr.
Wood, the honorary president, then gave
a brief outline of the four one-act plays
which are to be presented at Christmas.
These are: "The Tents of the Arabs,"
by Lord Dunsany; "Trifles," by Susan
Glaspell; "The Florist Shop," one of the
Harvard Dramatic Club productions;
"The Second Lie," by Mrs. Isobel Eccle-
stone Mackay. This will be the first time
this play by the local author has been
presented on any stage.
Subject to the approval of the Students'
Council, these plays will be presented in
three private performances to be held in
the auditorium on November 24th, 25th
and 26th.
Committees have been selected, and all
concerned are now busy preparing for
the Players' Club reception which will
take place in the auditorium to-morrow.
All told, the members of the club arc
looking forward to a very busy and
eventful year.
Dancing By
Numbers
AT FROSH RECEPTION
Did anyone say crowd? Oh, no!
Nothing like that! Only one had to be
rather careful about taking a foot off the
floor for fear of not being able to get it
down again. It was also advisable to
control one's facial expression more than
under ordinary circumstances; but, outside of a few things like that, everyone
had an evening of varied enjoyment.
The orchestra managed to make itself
heard, and was generous in the matter of
encores. One "extra" was granted. Mr.
Lord, on whom the burden of arrangements seemed to be resting, engineered
affairs with characteristic dexterity. A
vote of appreciation is certainly due to
him and to all the "Students' Council."
During the course of the evening, in
spite of heavy difficulties, nearly everyone managed to obtain some refreshments in the men's common room, where
a number of overworked people were desperately pouring coffee and cutting cake.
Dr. Davidson presented the ribbons
won at the track meet, to the various
champions, among whom there were
many too modest to come forward and
accept their laurels. The principal recipients were:
Senior Champions — Wolverton, with
D. Wilson second.
Junior Champions — F. M. Wallace,
with "Sy" McClane second, and H. O.
Arkley and Wier tieing for third, and a
number of others.
The  patronesses  for  the  evening  were
 ?    They may have been present, but
far be it from us to accept the responsibility of saying so. Miss Mclnnes was
observed at two different times during the
evening trying to look as if she were not
bored. Dr. Eastman was right in the
swim, having as much fun as the rest of
us. Mr. F. G. C. Wood kept his dignity
by standing clear of the crowd and sympathizing with a few groaning individuals
who  had tried  to do their duty.
However, we must conclude by saying
that we had a thoroughly good time, and
look forward to the next affair of the kind
with all the anticipation in the world.
TRACK    MEET    WEDNESDAY THE   UBYSSEY
October 21, 1920
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GEANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth Ave. and Willow St.
Where you meet your College friends
at lunch or tea time
LUNCHES, TEAS, ICE CREAM
CANDY AND TOBACCO
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
PRESCRIPTIONS A  SPECIALTY
We    carry    a    complete    stock   of
LOOSE-LEAF FOLDERS
LOOSE-LEAF REFILLS
EXERCISE BOOKS
WATERMAN PENS
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
MR. LARSEN ON CONTEMPORARY
POETRY
The Women's Lit. has unfortunately
lost its president, Miss Annie Smith, and
the first business of the meeting on Wednesday afternoon last was the election of
a new president. Miss Lila Coates, vice-
president, was unanimously elected to fill
the vacancy.
Mr. T. H. Larsen's lecture on "Contemporary Poetry' was very much appreciated. He spoke of the difficulty in
judging contemporary poetry owing to
the impossibility of getting a perspective
of it. He dwelt on the limitation in aim
of modern poetry and its general attitude. The poets of to-day have not the
heroic subjects to deal with; the novelist
has deprived them of many sources of
imagination.
The poetry of the modern Americans,
he declared, is not derivative, but has'
originality and is virile. The English
moderns are under the disadvantage of
having a tradition of 1,000 years behind
them. This acts as a restriction. Yet
their verse has vigor and vitality. The
tendency of modern poetry is an absorbing interest in life. The weakness is that
it lacks the power of seeing life as a
whole. It sees the ugly and the beautiful
at different times. It lacks the poise, the
calm and perfect repose of great literature, yet it has an element of permanence.
At the close of Mr. Larsen's lecture, a
dainty tea was served to the members
present.
FRESHETTES MEET PREFECTS
AT W.U.S. TEA
The Freshettes were entertained by the
girls of the third and fourth years at a
tea on Saturday afternoon. The primary
object of the affair was that each Fresh-
ette might meet the Senior or Junior
assigned as her prefect for the year. During the informal dance and chatting the
girls of Arts '24 had a better opportunity
to become acquainted with the girls of
the two upper years than the Freshettes
of any former class have had.
While dancing was going on in the
auditorium, refreshments were being
served from a laden table in Room X.
Miss Peck and Miss Gintzburger poured
coffee, while the executive of the Women's Undergraduate Society superintended the passing of cake and sandwiches.
This is the first prefects' tea that the
W.U.S. has undertaken, so that it feels
pardonably proud of the evident success
of the venture, and the praise accorded it
by the new members of the society.
Elect Officers
Arts '24 women held their election of
officers Thursday at noon. The following
were elected to the executive: Honorary
president, Miss Kathleen Peck; president
Miss Marguerite Gordon; vice-president,
Miss Bertha Coates; secretary-treasurer,
Miss Frances Cowan; class reporter,
Miss Helen Turpin; Literary representative, Miss Dorothy Taylor; Athletic representative,  Miss Dorothy Gillespie.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
WHY GO TO
CHINATOWN?
WE   ARE   NOW   SERVING
CHINESE   DISHES  UPSTAIRS
6 to 3 A.M.
DELMONICO CAFE
704 ROBSON STREET
Phone,   Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM   BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
Boys!
NOTE   OUR
NEW   ADDRESS:
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville
Yours for Service
Ben Petch
LIMITED
High-class Hats and
Furnishings October 21, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
OUR NEW PROFS.
University students have the pleasure
of welcoming several new professors,
whose appointments to Faculty positions
were announced during the summer holidays. Chief among these are Dean Coleman, Dr. Buchanan and Dr. Walker.
Dean Coleman is a well-known Canadian educationalist, who comes to U.B.C.
from Queen's University. Dr. Coleman
is a native Canadian, who graduated with
honors in Philosophy and English from
Toronto University. For the past seven
years he has been Dean of the Faculty
of Education at Queen's. His Ph.D. is
from  Columbia University.
Dr. Buchanan, also from Queen's University, has been appointed head of the
Department of Mathematics. He is also
a Canadian, who graduated in this country before continuing his studies in the
United States. Both Dean Coleman and
Dr. Buchanan will be greatly missed at
Queen's, if the sentiments expressed by
the Queen's students, who visited this
coast during the summer, be taken as any
indication of the general feeling in that
university.
Dr. Walker, who has been appointed
assistant professor of English, is a graduate of the University of New Brunswick. He is a Ph.D. of Harvard, and
comes to U.B.C. from Washington University, St. Louis. Dr. Walker saw service with the Canadians in France, having enlisted in the summer of 1915. He
held a position with the Khaki College
for a term.
Dr. Archibald, who was promoted
from the position of associate professor
in analytical chemistry to the position of
head of the department, succeeding Dr.
Mcintosh, has been the subject of congratulations from his many friends among
the student body. Dr. Hebb, who has
been made head of the department of
physics, has also been congratulated on
his promotion.
There are several new appointments to
the   Agriculture    Faculty,    among   them
SKATING
THE RINK HAS OPENED,
and thousands are taking advantage
of spending pleasant hours gliding
over the finest sheet of ice in
Canada.
To those who need new Shoes
and Skates, we may say that our
stock of high-grade Canadian-make
Skates and Shoes is complete and
reasonably priced.
We guarantee to give you perfect
fit and satisfaction.
The Complete Sporting
Goods Store
TISDALLS
LIMITED
618 HASTINGS ST., WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Professor H. M. King, -B.S.A., Guelph,
associate professor of animal husbandry
and acting head of the department. Also
Prof. R. L. Davis, assistant professor of
animal husbandry. He took his B.S.A.
at Boseman, Montana, and his M.S.A. at
Ames, where he was particularly concerned  with  nutrition  work.
Prof. N. S. Golding, B.S.A., Guelph,
formerly of the S. C. R. staff, has been
appointed assistant professor in dairying.
He has had wide experience in this
branch of agriculture, and was previously
connected with Iowa State College.
The vacancy in the Poultry Department is filled by Prof. A. E. Lloyd,
B.S.A. (Sask.), also formerly of the S.
C. R. staff, while Prof. F. E. Buck, B. S.
A. (McDonald), has been appointed assistant professor of horticulture. He has
been connected with the Dominion Department of Horticulture for many years.
Prof. Geo. Boving, another S.C.R. man,
has been appointed extension assistant in
agronomy; and Mr. A. Derrick has also
been  made assistant  in  this  department.
There has been one new appointment
in the department of chemistry. Dr. W.
F. Sayer, B.A., M.Sc, Ph.D., has been
chosen to fill the place as associate professor of chemistry.
Arts students welcome to their activities, in addition to Dean Coleman, Dr.
Walker and Dr. Buchanan, Mr. S. E.
Beckett, M.A., of Queen's, who has been
appointed lecturer in the department of
economics. Three graduates have joined
the department of modern languages as
instructors. These are Miss Margaret
Ross, Arts '19; Miss Pauline Gintzburger,
Arts '19, and Miss Marjorie Peck, Arts
'19. Mr. C. H. Mercer, the new appointment in that department, is a M.A. and
a Bachelor of Commerce of Manchester.
He is a well-known city tennis player.
Dr. R. H. Mullin, B.A., M.B., professor
of bacteriology, has been appointed to the
chair in Public Health and Red Cross,
and Dr. R. E. Coleman has been appointed lecturer in bacteriology.
A USEFUL TIP FOR NERVOUS
FRESHMEN
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid   Chairs
Re-tired
Charges  Moderate
Agent for
C.C.M.   "RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
PITMAN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Established 1898
Oldest  and  most reliable  Business
College in B. C.
AUTUMN  TERM  NOW   OPEN
As the method of instruction is individual, students may commence
at any time.
422 RICHARDS STREET
Cor.  bastings Phone, Sey. 9135
The Aggies will tender a banquet to
the members of their faculty, and their
wives, in the near future. This was decided by the general meeting of agricultural students at Braemar on Friday.
The annual dance will be held in the
auditorium on January 28th.
In the Freshman elections, Mr. H. C.
McCallum was elected president and Mr.
Eby secretary-treasurer. Mr. Chas. Hope
is representative to the Discussion  Club.
The Discussion Club executive met on
Tuesday evening, October 13th. Prof.
King, Dean Clement, Prof. Boving and
Prof. Moe, together with the old and new
executives, drew up amendments to the
constitution. Plans were discussed for
the coming year, and everything set for
the opening next Wednesday.
A NEW DEPARTMENT
It will be interesting to University
people to learn of the beginning of a short
course in Public Health Nursing under the
Department of Applied Science. This
course has been made possible through the
generosity of the B. C. Branch of the Canadian Red Cross society, and consists of
the History of Nursing, Medical Inspection of Schools, Child Welfare, Provincial
Health Legislation, Municipal Sanitation,
Modern Social Problems, and allied
branches of Public Health. Dr. Mullin
has been placed in charge of the course,
and anyone desiring to enroll may do so
immediately.
Dr. A. S. Lamb has been appointed Medical Examiner of students attending the
U.B.C.
Dr. C. McLean Fraser, B.A., Ph.D.,
F.R.C.S., has been appointed head of the
department of zoology, which has been
separated from the department of biology.
Rugby
Men
Quite a lot of the Rugby equipment    is    from    Lisle    Fraser.
It's good stuff. You'll like the
way it looks and plays the
game.
Skating Boots and Skates are
"in season" again.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granville Streets THE   UBYSSEY
October 21, 1920
THANKS,
EVERYONE
We were sincerely glad to
have you on Saturday last—
noise and all.
And we regret we do not
have seats enough to accommodate the whole student
body.
purby's
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
USE LOOSE LEAF
NOTE BOOKS
KEYSTONE LOOSE LEAF
COVERS are business-like
school books that hold sheets
as long as desired—open easily
for   removal   and   replacement.
They come in several sizes—
end or side openers.
Not  expensive — very  handy.
Insist on Keystone.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers   and   Wholesale
Stationers
VANCOUVER VICTORIA,  B.C.
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
AVENUE THEATRE
Oct.   27-Nov.   3 —Capt.   Plunkett's
MAPLE  LEAF   PARTY
in their  Overseas  Revue
Nov.  8-13—"GRUMPY,"  with Edwin
Lewers  and  an  all-English   Company.
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
f A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors \S.  M. Scott
I Miss R.  E. Verchere
Chief Reporter A.  F.   Roberts
rMiss A.  Anderson
J.   C.   Clyne
Reporters < Bert   Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
I Miss  P.  Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss   K.  M.   Portsmouth
r •*             c.,.. (A.   L.   Stevenson
L.terary  EdUors -j G   G   Coope
BUSINESS  STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
/D. A.  Wallace
•     . t     . J Wm.  McKee
Asslstants IP. V. McLane
1 H. G. Scott
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor  for  the  Week  . S.   M.   Smith
PAST AND FUTURE
The bronze memorial tablet which has
been placed in the vestibule should recall
to us a duty which we, as a University,
owe to the boys who represented us at
the front, and to the University of the
future. This is the duty of preserving in
the annals of the University the story of
the share which U.B.C. has borne in the
war.
The 196th Battalion are fortunate in
having official nominal rolls and records
which are accurate up to a certain stage
in their history. We believe they are
endeavoring to complete these records.
The University is not so fortunate. Its
members left at different times and with
many units. We have a nominal roll,
which may, or may not, be complete.
During the war an attempt was made to
secure a record of the units with which
these men fought, their decorations, engagements and wounds. This story is
our first tradition, and its details ought
not to be lost. We believe that in future
years the University will consider it of
great value. English universities, and the
older ones in this country, have taken
great care to collect it. Our own attempt
was abandoned just at the time when it
should have started in earnest. That
time was the opening of the last session.
This year it will be twice as difficult. Two
years hence it will be impossible. The
University of British Columbia will have
no account of the war activities of its
members other than that certain of its
members enlisted, and, of these, certain
ones failed to return.
This is not a question for any one
group of the student body. It properly
falls within the jurisdiction of the Students' Council. We suggest that that
body should appoint a committee to collect the information. This committee
should represent all groups in the University. It should work in co-operation
with delegates from Faculty and from the
Alumni, and should be of a permanent
character. It should be prepared to confront a laborious task, and to overcome
many discouragements.
THE SUN
Last year -the attitude of the morning
"Sun," in discussing student affairs in the
University, was far from generous. This
year it threatens to be no more favorable.
News articles, while containing no direct
criticism of those whose activities they
report, are so phrased as to create an unfavorable impression of the student body.
This is particularly noticeable on the
sporting page. So frequently is this the
case, that, were it not for the absence of
any possible motive, we should be obliged
to believe that this was the deliberate
policy of the "Sun" towards University
affairs. We cannot fathom wherein we
have erred so deeply as to earn the disapprobation   of   the   morning   newspaper.
The student body would be sorry to
lose the support of any portion of the
Vancouver press, and is still willing to
believe that it has not done so. The "Sun"
knows best whether it can afford to forfeit the good-will of a large and growing
University.
BY THE WAY
Our first correspondent objects to our
making use of the president's name twice
in one column of our first issue. He suggests that, since many students have had
too close acquaintance with the klinck in
past years, the use of the word should be
discontinued.
Why do the girls choose the narrowest
places in the corridors and stairs for their
longest and most absorbing exchanges of
gossip?
Our sympathy goes out to the unfortunate student who did not discover, amid
the 157 notices on the bulletin boards, the
one which cancelled his eight o'clock lecture on Saturda3' morning.
We hope to run an Announcement
Column, starting next week. Send us
notice of your meetings before Monday
night.
The general meeting of the Women's
Undergraduate Society was held at noon
on Wednesday, October 13th. The president, Miss Kilpatrick, outlined the work
for the present session, and welcomed the
new members.
One of our brightest and most illustrious (?) freshmen is reported to have
performed the following stunt: When he
heard that he had to get a padlock for
his locker, he purchased a shiny new lock
with two keys. He carefully opened the
lock, put the tongue of the padlock
through the hole in the keys and closed
the lock, so that he would not lose the
keys. Brilliant trick! We'll say he will
never lose those keys.
She—Oh, George! Don't you love to
sit here in front of the fireplace, listening
to the logs crackling? They seem to be
singing a tuneful melody to us.
George G.—Well, yes; a sort of logarithm, I suppose, October 21, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
r
(Samfipanfrnr?
"^
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I fear that I lack tact, but I
have a grievance. What is the advantage ot
our university co-educational system if not
to promote a cleanly feeling of comradeship
between our young men and women? Is it
fair that a young woman, simply because
she is not particularly alluring in appearance, should feel ostracized at her very entrance into such a university?
"Tuum est" is our vaunted motto, and we
have heard a great deal about its significance in the past few years. Now when
corresponding numbers were allotted to men
and women at the Freshie reception, on Friday last, was it not pairing off freshies with
old-timers, to the end that each should feel
that our motto was applicable to him (or to
her) in so far as a friendly interest in the
other's comfort and enjoyment for the evening were concerned? What is to be said for
those men who simply "found" their partners, and then "cleared out"? The only
possible excuse that they' can voice under
the circumstances would be that the partner
in question failed to interest them. It is all
very well for the men, who can pick and
choose their dance partners and effect an
introduction where they will with tolerable
ease. But what of the poor freshette, say,
from out of town, who knows not a single
youth likely to give her a passing thought- -
doomed at the very outset of the evening to
be a "wallflower" (most odious of positions,
heaven preserve me!) at the reception given
in her honor?
Surely I do not presume too much in suggesting that the Freshie reception was,
above all, instituted to make these shyer,
more retiring, and even perhaps less attractive personalities feel that they, too, are
a part of our U.B.C, and not just hangers-
on.
"Tuum est" surely ought to be felt to be
equally applicable to each member of our
A.M.S., and not only applicable to those
who have a little more, shall I say, "milk of
human kindness"—or simply common courtesy?
My object in writing this letter is to lay
.before the University this crying need for a
little thoughtful courtesy on the part of
some of our more "discriminating" men, or
perhaps the need of a little fuller realization
of just what "Tuum est" means, or may
mean,   to  each  individual  member  of  U.B.C.
I do not speak of one unfortunate, isolated
case, Mr. Editor. I speak of a group of
cases,  and I  know whereof I  speak.
Naturally, therefore, must I inscribe my-
seI, J' "ANONYMOUS."
EXIT THE SHORT TROUSER
Last year the Students' Council voiced
an objection to faculty with respect to the
rule concerning the non-admission of students under sixteen years of age. They
claimed that this rule was not being enforced. The object'on, however, was received too late in the term to be put into
effect, and the matter was laid over.
This year the factulty committee on admission was instructed to enforce the ruling. So the policy was adopted that those
students under sixteen years of age who
made application would not be admitted
unless their matriculation record was free
of supplemental, and only in the case of
those whose parents or guardians lived in
this city. The students of the University
will be pleased to hear that this ruling has
at last been brought into effect, for it has
been a matter of adverse comment for some
years.
WILL HOLD SMOKER AND
CONCERT
Tne University Service Club will open
its winter programme with a smoker and
concert to be held in the near future. The
committee, under Mr. E. Stuart Davidson, are gathering musical and entertaining talent from all four quarters of the
city, and prospects are looking bright for
a rousing informal evening, with lots of
smokes and a copious supply of the mug
that cheers but only very rarely inebriates.
A recent gift of $200 has brought the
paid-in subscriptions to the Leroy Memorial Fund very close to the $2,500 mark,
with another $1,000 or so promised for
payment in the near future.
The club will hold a memorial service
on Sunday, October 31st, in memory of
"their comrades who have fallen. The
service will be held in St. George's
Church, Thirteenth Avenue and Willow
Street. Rev. M. H. Jackson, who served
overseas both as a private soldier and as
a chaplain, will give the address.
The date for the Arts dance has been
fixed as November 12th, the place as
Lester Court, and the hours from 9 to 2.
Mr. John Ridington left on Thursday
last for Ottawa, where he will attend the
Dominion Council of the Red Cross.
While in the East, our librarian will take
steps to complete broken lines in departmental publications. He will also visit
the Universities of Toronto and Michigan, and the various libraries of Chicago.
Mr. Ridington will be absent for a
month.
JUST PUBLISHED
30th   ISSUE
The Canadian
Customs Tariff
Showing List of Articles Subject to
Luxury Tax,  etc.
Price, $2.75
We have it.    Get yours to-day.
• Stiff.
Ollark? $c Stuart OIn.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3
©RPHEUM
Week Commencing
Monday, October 25th, 1920
"THE SPIRIT OF
MARDIGRAS"
A   Musical   Revue  Extraordinary
NATE LEIPSIG
Celebrated  International   Card   Expert
MARIE GEO.
SABBOTT & BROOKS
A   Terpsichorean   Cocktail   with   a
Dash  of Mirth
GUY FLORES
WEADICK AND LADUE
In  "ROPIN'  AND GAB"
CLAUDE &  MARION
"With   Their  Argument   Still
Unsettled"
WILLIE HALE & BRO.
In   "Bits   of  Vaudeville"
BERT BAKER & CO.
In a One-Act Farce Entitled
"PREVARICATION"
By Bert Baker
British  Weekly Concert Orchestra
PREPARE
for the  world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course  in  the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy,
Day  and  Evening  Classes
Phone,  Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPROTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
Vancouver
Citizens' Club
(Non-Membership)
UNDER  THE  BIG   CLOCK
We serve a 60-cent
MERCHANTS'   LUNCH
TABLE  D'HOTE  DINNERS,   $1.50
SUPPER  PARTIES  and   BANQUETS,
with  private  rooms,  our  specialty
SUPPER   DANSANT   Wednesday   and
Saturday evenings,  from 9 to 12, $1.00
Phone, Sey. 796
A. WATTS, Mgr. THE   UBYSSEY
October 21, 1920
CAPS YOUNG
MEN APPROVE
HERE THEY ARE in great
variety — the greatest assortment
we have ever shown or is to be
found in any store hereabouts.
One-piece tops, also four size and
eight-piece tops, in greys, browns,
greens, Donegals, etc., that we
could find in a search of the best
manufacturers. And you are apt to
pay a lower price for them at
Spencer's
$2.00 to $5.50
DAVID    SPENCER
LIMITED
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of -
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
'VARSITY WILL NOT COMPETE
FOR McKECHNIE CUP
Rugby enthusiasts of the University
find it rather hard to understand the
position taken by the Vancouver Rugby-
Union when they refused to allow 'Varsity
to compete for the McKechnie Cup without withdrawing from the Miller Cup
series. To withdraw from the Miller Cup
series would practically mean to withdraw from the Rugby Union. A meeting
of the club was. held, and it was decided,
on a motion by Mr. Lord, that the University remain in the same relation to the
Vancouver Rugby Union as formerly.
Mr. Honeyman moved that a letter be
written to the union, protesting against
the stand they have taken with regard to
our request to play for the McKechnie
Cup.    This motion  was  carried.
ON THE SIDE LINES
University supporters strongly deprecate the Rowing Club s action of dirtying
Lou  Hunter's new socks.
Freshettes would like to know if Dr.
Sedgewick found it comfortable sitting
on Usher's knee.
We all regret that "Pinkie" Morrison
will not be with us on our line-up this
year, but urgent private reasons are
keeping him out of the game.
STUDENT-FACULTY  TENNIS
Singles—Prof. Mercer beat McDougall
6-2, 6-3; Munro beat Prof. Angus 6-1, 6-2;
Prof. Todd beat Baker 6-4, 6-2; Prof.
Boggs beat McLean 3-6, 6-4,.6-2.
Doubles—Prof. Mercer and Angus beat
Munro and McDougall 6-2, 4-6, 6-1;
Baker and McLean beat Prof. Boggs and
Todd 0-6, 6-2, 9-7.
Summary:    Faculty, 4;  Students, 2.
SCIENCE WILL HOLD ANNUAL
SMOKER
Science men will commence their real
serious work for the session on Saturday
night. Rumor says the smoker this year
will eclipse all past records. There is a
splendid programme arranged, including
boxing, cabaret acts and hypnotism.
The Science Jazz Band will be on hand,
and the inner man will not be neglected.
"Bring your own."
SCIENCE '24
At a meeting held early in the month
Science '24 elected their class executive.
Dr. Davidson was chosen as honorary
president. The executive is composed of
A. B. Macpherson, president; J. M. Wolverton, secretary-treasurer; K. N. Carlisle, Athletic representative, and L. B.
Stacey, class reporter.
"Why do you always carry your umbrella?" asked the bore.
"Because," moaned the victim, "my
umbrella can't walk."
A SAVINGS
ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We   welcome   small   accounts.
The Canadian Bank
of Commerce
Sarah Felix
Toilet
Preparations
Powders
Fougere, Ambree and Poudre des
Fles, in Blanche, Flesh or Rachel,
at       $1.50
Rouge
Andalou-Clair shade at    75c
Vanishing Cream
Creme des Fles at  $1.25
—Main Floor
■tyhcfa^ffi
MITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET October 21, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville  Street
CLOTHES  FOR  YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Foster
Limited
WE   SELL   CLOTHES   FOR   YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For    Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS
We carry a large assortment of
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Fillers, Waterman Fountain Pens, and all requisites to complete your records in your
studies.
tbe Uancvuw Stationers Dd.
SOCIETY STATIONERS AND
PRINTERS
683 Granville St.    Phone, Sey. 5119
FRICASSED FICTION
THE FRAUD SLY WAY
By JEFFERY SARGOL
Chapter I.
Concerning Felicity, Feet and Fisticuffs.
As I walked past a stile, a rough voice
hailed: "Cats' meat! Cats' meat!" A
little red-nosed man was  the speaker.
"Why do you pursue your vocation so
cheerily?"   I   demanded.
"I'm a profiteer, mister. I read in the
noospapers of a cats' meat shortage in
the country districks; wherefore I started a travellin' business, an' charge 'igh
prices."
"You have my admiration," I responded. "I also am, a wanderer, but I envy
your wealth. Though heir to a million
pounds, I have not a penny to buy a
dram."
He hummed a bar from a Handel oratorio. "Them's jazzy socks o' yourn, by
cripes! Would you take sixpence for
'em, mister?"
"Done with you."
I whistled joyfully as I sought the
"Green Swine' tavern. I ordered six
glasses of ale, which foamed deliciously
down my dusty throat. Then I heard a
scream, and a beautiful maid, rushing in,
hid under the bar. A tall fellow in purple
breeches followed with raised whip.
"Control  yourself,   sir,"   I   said,   calmly.
"Who   the    •    are   you?"
His face was distorted with passion.
"Blister Pibert, at your service," and I
struck him full on the chin. As he fell,
four other "corinthians," two postilions
and a professional pugilist rushed upon
me, and for a moment my fists were
busy. Then I kicked the eight bodies
aside, and looked under the bar. There
lay a gold wrist watch and a note, saying,
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
C U S I C K
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make  sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
One Beauty of Our Shoes
Is their perfect comfort. Built, as they are, in the latest models, with every
attention to style detail; nevertheless, comfort has not been sacrificed in the
slightest degree.
Our new Winter Footwear is smart, indeed, yet as comfortable and long-
wearing as shoes can be made.
Their prices represent the Biggest Shoe Values in Town.
THE INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
SIX-SIXTY-SIX GRANVILLE ST.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
"You may wear this about your neck
and remember the gratitude of Quarm-
ian."
Chapter II.
In Which More  Blood Is Shed
The morning broke fair, so I tramped
several hundred miles, and about noon
paused at a smithy. "This is just the
job for me;' I remarked to the huge,
swarthy smith; "will you make me your
senior  partner?"
He raised his hammer with a growl of
fury. My fist reached his nose very precisely, and the gore flowed. As I followed up the attack, I tripped over the
anvil, and he struck my pate with the full
force of his hammer.
Slightly dazed, I stepped out of the
building. A travelling carriage stood on
the road, and beside it a lovely woman,
holding some sticking plaster and a bottle of embrocation. "Oh, Blister, my
gallant defender," she murmured, rubbing my head, "that man you struck
down was the Prince Regent. The others
were two marquises, a viscount and a
baronet."
"Quarmian," I exclaimed, "you are
more gentle than the lovely Magenta, of
whom the poet Scrattius wrote 'de gusti-
bus non est disputandum.' "
She pulled my hair playfully. "What
did that old dodder know about woman?
Have you  no experience to quote from?"
"None," I replied. "I am destined to
marry Lady Sofa Cushion, an old crone
I have never seen, and on that condition
I am to inherit a million pounds. For
that reason I have fled and become a
tramp. I intend to open an up-to-date
blacksmith establishment here. Will you
be my wife?"
"What about the fortune?" she queried,
in her delightfully inconsistent, incomprehensible manner.
"That may go to my cousin, when he
marries Lady Sofa."
"That's me," she said, in her golden,
tender tones.
Amazed, I sought to clasp her in my
arms, but she boxed me on the ears. "Go
get a wash, and—here's a shilling—buy
some socks. I shall meanwhile call on
the vicar, and make the necessary arrangements."
Wi-out Bein' Pairsonal
Complaints had been made at a village
kirk of the discomfort caused by dripping
umbrellas in and outside the various
pews. To remedy the nuisance, a member of the congregation presented the
kirk with a large umbrella-stand, which
was fixed up in the lobby of the building.
After the service, on a certain Sunday,
one of the elders remarked:
"Ye'll nae doot ha'e seen the splendid
umbrella-stand that Mr. Gillespie has
praesented tae the kirk. Noo, umbrellas
are umbrellas, and human nature is human nature; so yell nae think it wrang
o' me if I ask those who sit near the pulpit, and canna leave the kirk so soon as
the others, tae bring their oldest umbrellas, and, wi'out bein' pairsonal, I may say
that we should all feel a heap easier if
Donal' Tamson would take up a sitting a
wee bit farther frae the door."—The
Comrade. THE   UBYSSEY
October 21, 1920
MERTEL AND JOE
Deer Mertel:—
They was the first soshul funkshun of
the yr. in this University last Fri. nite,
witch I am a regular sosiety line and am
rite at home on a dance floor Mertel and
had a grate time. They was a hole lot of
lost peeple, Mertel, witch coodnt find
there partners or let on they coodnt but
I found mine Mertel witch she was a cute
little girl but not so good looking as you.
I danced a hole lot of dances with her
Mertel but you neednt be jelus becus no
freshet is anything in my life. I tryed to
act like the sofomores did last yr. but I
gess I overdid it becus she sed My it
must be nice to be a Senior. It flattered
me Mertel but I will have to leern to act
like a sofomore but I gess I am already
prepared for my 4th yr. You no what I
am Mertel, I beleeve in preparedness. I
took her into one supper, witch I had
four of them Mertel becus they let you
eat between dances for quite a wile and
I was satisfied and next time I am not
going to spend anything for food befor a
dance.
Well by the time you reed this it will
be all over and we may be dry witch I
hope we arnt, Mertel, not becus I drinke
liker but becus I met a fello and he sed
how are you voteing and I sed dry and
he sed if this province goes dry I will
beet the tar out of you witch I dont want
him to do Mertel becus he is bigger than
me. You no what I am Mertel, caushus,
and I want to keep my personal buty.
The teem from this University played
Rugby on Mon. and made a lot of other
fellos look fooleish. They play again on
Sat. against another bunch and I am goe-
ing to bet too bits on them. You no
what I am Mertel, always redy to take a
chance.
JOE.
CAN YOU SING?—NOT THAT IT
MATTERS
Under the baton of Mr. Parkin, the
Musical Society is rapidly getting down
to work. The turnouts to the first two
Glee Club practices were promising, in
spite of the fact that they clashed with
other organization meetings. But this
difficulty .is now past, organization of the
different societies being for the most part
complete.
So come along with us to the auditorium Wednesday and Thursday, at noon,
a 1 you who have a voice at all, and get
some of the dust and cobwebs out of your
throat and lungs. Whether you are experienced singers or not, there is nowhere you can get better training, particularly in chorus work, than right here
in our own home.
The orchestra meets for practice every
Friday noon in the church and Saturday
noon in the auditorium, and here again
we would like to see a bigger turnout of
all who can play an instrument and are
interested in the best class of music.
This invitation is extended particularly
to Arts '24, of which a few members have
come boldly forward but many have
looked timidly in upon us, and hastily
retreated.
The orchestra at present is much in
need of more "bass," particularly a viola,
and also drums.
The Barron Hotel
and
Restaurant
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2011
Bridgman s Studio
ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE ST.
gfafllpon - (Eraft
Quality Clothes
FOR YOUNG MEN
STYLISH
GUARANTEED
The Shop of Fashion-Craft
Thos. Fofter
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.
GOLD STUDS AND
YELLOW SHOES
It's as well to be particular. It you're not,
you're liable to be talked into something—like the
man who was persuaded to buy gold studs to
match his yellow shoes. Mr. Clelland's a man you
can go to without feeling that you're going to be
talked into buying.
You just go up and look over his new range of
Fall patterns and models. They sure are the
greatest  things  we've  seen anywhere yet.
Young fellows are agreed that the made-to-
measure suit is the only thing if a man wants to
look his best. And Clelland's not expensive, either;
that's saying a whole lot; and, by the way, he is
now making a special reduction on the extra pairs
of pants that most of his customers are ordering
with their suits.
You ought to make sure of seeing Clelland's big
range of Overcoating. The models are the last
word in style.
The express elevator takes you right up to
Clelland's room in less 'n a minute.
He stays open till 6 o'clock on Saturdays.
James Clelland
1225 Standard Bank Bldg.
510  Hastings Street,  West Vancouver,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 7280

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