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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1938

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 t
BONFIRE
TOMORROW
®Ij_> _H.by013.eg
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
FROSH
THURSDAY
Vol. XXI.
VANOOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1938
No. 2
Governors Defer Decision on Report
FROSH DOFF
"THE GREEN"
AT RECEPTION
DANCE TO BE HELD
AT PALOMAR
Freshmen and freshettes, take
hope! Your trials and tribulations
are nearly over; no more shoe-shines,
no more fights—your turn comes
after Thursday night.
You will pass through one arch
In the center of the Palomar Ballroom, while Trevor Paige and his
band swings "Hall, U.B.C." Onoe
through there, you will have left
High School definitely behind you.
You may remove your placard and
your green hat, and your nail-polish
If you oan.
Then yon will pass through another orch nearby, and emerge full
and   accepted   undergraduates   ot
the  University.   You  will  be  congratulated by members of the Students' Counoil and members of the
Vacuity. And you will be free!
For the flrst part of the evening,
however,   you  must   mind   your   P's
and Q's. Sophomores have the privilege  ot  Cutting  In,  and  it  will   go
hard   with  you   if  you   dare   resist.
But you,  Freshettes  also will  have
your turn.
That big, handsome Scienceman
you've been dying to meet will be
under your control completely. All
you have to do la tell him that "This
Is OUR dance, please." And he will
be nice and amenable, and trip you
fantastically all over the floor.
NIGHT OF NIGHTS
Thursday Is the Night of Nights
tor all of you. Your flrst big Varsity function, your flrst taste of
the thrills to come. You will sing
songs and yell yells during the intermission, and sway sweetly for
the rest of the evening. And all
for the weorin' of the Green, and
the showin' of your pass.
Your hosts will be the Alma Mater
Society and the Freshman Week
committee. They expect you to arrive, dressed up in your best bibs
and tuckers, or whatever else you
may choose to wear, sharp at nine
o'clock, at the door of the Palomar.
Remember, you need not dress
formally: you'd look rather odd If
you did, as a matter of faot. Everybody else will be wearing sports
clothes. But, even if you haven't any
clothes, you still have last summer's
bathing suit, or whaddyaoalllt. Wear
that. Wear a barrel. Wear anything,
but come!
P.S.—AU upperclass students free
on students' pass, barrel or no
barrel.
VARSITY TIME
GOES ON AIR
NEXT JvJONTH
RADIO  PRODUCTION
ENTERS NEW ERA
THIS TERM
UNIVERSITY BAND
ANNOUNCES AWARDS
AND POSSIBLE TRIP
In a short address at Saturday's
Pep Meet, Arthur Delamont, U.B.
C.'s newly appointed bandmaster,
urged students to become Interested
ln  the University  band.
Mr. Delamont's presence should be
a great attraction to musicians of
every kind. His experience in training instrumentalists is varied, and
some of Vancouver's leading orchestra men were once members of
bands   which   he   conducted.
AWARDS.
Prospective band members should
be* Interested to know that this
year an award Is being planned
for work in the University Band. A
swcii ter or blaster bearing the
blocked letters of the unlveralty
should prove to be a worthwhile
Incentive.
Possibilities   thnt   the   hand   will
take a trip wtth one of the athletic
teams   are   now   under   discussion.
This will be possible, of course, only If stufticlent students turn out to
hand   practise.     "Tuum   est."
AU   laat  year's  members  are  asked
to   be   at     the    meeting    Wednesday
noon,  which  will  be held  in  Arts 206
at   12.40.     New   studenta   are   cordially   invited  to Join.
Out of the restless longing of
youth to make Its voice heard across
the undulating ether, there was created In days gone by a new Institution, "Varsity Time." 'Twbb feeble,
disjointed and primitive, and Its excessive waitings dspleased the gods.
Then came evoluton—the Insurgency of life which had already proved
Its power by replacing the slimy
amoeba by the supreme creation, the
Sophomore—this same evolution now
set to work on Varsity Time.
LESS PRIMITIVE
Gradually it became less primitive, less feeble, less disjointed and
the   gods   ut   times   tolerated   Ita
youthful babblings. Then oame the
revelation of De Vrles' theory of
"mutations" which states that the
long and weary process of evolution Is sometimes avoided by the   I
sudden   production   of   something
greatly advanced.
Hope for Varsity Time has grown.
At 8.15 p.m., October T, In the year
of our Lord  1988, marks the  beginning of a new Age in the history of
Varsity Time—the Ossydurkln Age.
On that night as the gods relax
In their Olympian chesterfields, holding between their Angers the knobs,
whloh in a flicker of time can cast
the' proffered gifts of man into oblivion—may sweet music echo in
their etherlal chambers, may entrancing drama and alluring enlightening items stay their hands.
Organizing   and   integrating   forces
are now at work to make this mutation a reality.
OFFICIALS
The appointments of Ossy Durkin   as  Producer,  Bob  Thompson,
as Script Director, Victor Freeman
as   Chief    Announcer   and   J.   D.
Macfarlane as Radio News Editor
have been made but there are still
vacancies in the clerical and acting
staffs.
Evolution  Is a  progress  in  discipline   and   co-operation    and    If   the
Ossydurkln Age  In Varsity Time la
to be successful it must have direct
assistance from many more persons
and    co-operation    from    all—Tuum
Est!!
IMPERIAL DEBATORS
STUDENT PROPOSALS TO BE
CONSIDERED BY COMMITTEE
Fred Thoneman (left) and Hugh Robaon (right) are the Imperial opposition
who will meet the U.B.C. team of Harold Rome and Alex Macdonald on
October 7 in the Asteo Ballroom of the Hotel Georgia.
Imperial Debaters To Speak
At Parliamentary Forum
Board of Governors' Final Answer to be Given
Within a Few Days
ONLY TWO COLLEGES
REPRESENTED BY
EXCHANGE^ STUDENTS
U.B.C.    welcomes   six    eastern   exchange students to the local campus
this  year;   these,   however,   are   representative  of only two universities.
From the U. of Western Ontario
we   have   with   us:   Anne   Carroll,
David  Atkins, James Moon, John
Newell   and   John   Robinson.   Dalhousle    University    has   one   lone
representative   in   the   person   of
Betty Sandall.
The   visitors   are   agreed   In   their
admiration      of     the     beauty      and
breadth  of our campus,  the  library
also getting Its share of praise. The
Western   students   approved   especially our  vigorous  frosh-soph  scraps,
Initiation     having     been     abolished
there   this   year.   They  likewise   concurred   in   disapproving   of   8.30   lectures.
The men students stated that they
preferred to wait awhile before expressing any opinion on our local
co-eds.
The visitors are all registered in
Arts and Science and speak highly
of the assistance they have received
from officials and professors ln arranging   courses.
ATTENTION
NEW   STUDENTS
Will all new students who
have not made their appointment for medical examination,
please do so IMMEDIATELY,
at the Health Service Office,
Auditorium Building, Room
306.
Debaters to Tour Canadian
Universities
"An Imperial debate on Ootober
7" Is the sudden announcement of
the Parliamnetary Forum. Starting
off to a record year, the Forum has
completed all arrangements for
Major Debate number one even before the flrst week of campus life
has  terminated.
The debate, which features U.B.C.
versus a combined team from the
Australian Universities of Melbourne and Sydney, will take place
In all formality at the Asteo ballroom of the Hotel Georgia.
The    reaolution    of    the    debate,
"Nationalism is the enemy of civilisation," will be upheld by UJB.C.'s
veteran debaters,  Alex Macdonald
and Harold Rome. The attack will
be led by Fred Thoneman of Melbourne University and Hugh Robson of Sydney University.
The   Australian   debaters   have   a
wealth of experience ln the Meld of
verbal   controversy.   They   were   selected   to   represent   Australia   by   a
oommittee    representing    all    major
Australian Universities.
Fred Thoneman has sharpened hia
debating wits In three Inter-University encounters, two of which he and
his partner were successful ln winning. The lnter-Unlverslty debates
are the major debates of Australia.
POLISHED ORATOR
Previous to his lnter-Unlverslty
experience, Thoneman led a oollege team at Melbourne University
for three years. He has been secretary and vice-president of the
Melbourne University Debating
Society.
Thoneman ia also a polished
orator. In 198B be received the
President's medal for highest honours in oratory.
Mr. Hugh Robson, Thoneman's
colleague on the Imperial Tour, ls
equally experienced. He won the
lnter-Unlverslty debate of 1936 for
Sydney University.
LAW DEBATER
In the same year he travelled to
Seattle, Washington to successfully
represent Sydney University.
Robson has been debating for the
Faculty of Law for three years ln
lnter-faculty debates at Sydney and
has been a member of Sydney's debating committee for four years.
TO   TOUR   CANADA
Thoneman and Robson are starting an Imperial Debate Tour which
will take them to all major Universities ln Canada. Vancouver is their
first  stop.
While in the city, they will address
many of the service clubs including:
The Board of Trade, The Woman's
Canadian Club, and The Kiwanis
Club.
The debate will commence at
8.15 p.m. on Friday, October 7. All
students holding passes will he admitted free.
Australians Puzzled by Our
Expressions
By IRENE EEDY
"What is a coed?" questioned the
English voloe of Hugh Robson, Australian debater from Sydney University when asked, in an interview
with the Ubyssey, how our coeds
.compared with theirs.
After   being   enlightened,   Hugh
stated with  due deliberation  that
they  "compared more than favorably with out Australlarf coeds, in
fact  they're magnificent."  To  this
his colleague, Fred Thoneman from
Melbourne University agreed heartily and added with a merry gleam
In his brown eyes, "We have very
little trouble with our coeds In Melbourne,   they   ore   very   pliant,   in
fact we call them 'students of matrimony' over there."
Both visitors were pussled by numerous   phrases   and   expressions   employed   by   university   students   here.
'Campus'   for   example,    Is    a    term
which does not exist In the Austral-
Ian   student's   vocabulary,   nevertheless  they "admired  the  approach  to
this  campus  Immensely,"
Tall, slx-foot-and-over Thoneman
Is a scienceman Interested mainly In
the field of physios. He hopes to continue his studies in Oermany and, on
that acoount, ls an ardent student
of the German language and literature.
Law Is the special study of the
Sydney graduate, who cryptically remarks that he ls not interested in
politics. However, he expects to learn
much concerning the political nature
of this province during his three
weeks sojourn In Vancouver before
proceeding on the debating tour
through Canada and the United
States.
BUILDINGS PROVIDED
BY GOVT.
University buildings are provided
by government and private endowment, and at present In Melbourne
there is an extensive new rebuilding
program going on, for a Union Building. In Sydney, there Is both a Women's and a Men's Union Building and
only on special occasions does one
group intrude upon the 'holy of
holies' of the other.
NO FRATERNITIES
Fraternities, as such, are not in
existence In their alma maters being replaced by various olubs and
societies similar to those under our
literary    and    scientific    grouping.
Social functions ore numerous and
favor   the   formal   with   white   tie
and  tails  in  preference  to  the  informal    dinner    jacket.    Prices   of
tlokets   are   approximately   fifteen
shilUngs.
One   group  which   deserves   special
mention   is   the   Sex   Equality   Club
at     Melbourne,    every     member     of
which, goes to functions 'dutch.'
By DOROTHY OUMMINOB
Last night nt thoir regular monthly meeting ,the Board of
(lovornork decided to refer the Campaign Committee's request for
suspension of payment of fees until nfter the fall session of the
provincial legislature, to a special committee.
The Governor's Committee will draft a reply to the proposals
submitted to them within a few days, it was announced by President Klinck.
■ FOUR  PROPOSALS
The  four proposals  whloh were
put before laat nlght'a meeting of
the board of governors concerned
not only the atudent campaign but
also a plan to supplement the stu-
den't financing of the Union building.  The flrst was a request for a
statement  ot the Governor's budget for the coming year and a oopy
of the budget for tho   year   Just
pasaed.   The Board haa ln the past
refused to publish Information concerning their proceedings.
The second request was that   the
Board ot Oovernora ask the Provincial  Oovernment   for  an   additional
grant of from $18,000 to $88,000 for
the term, 1938-89.    If this grant were
forthcoming  a  student   fee  ralae  of
910 would  bring ln  an inoome  even
larger   than   the   government   grant.
For this reason the committee feels
justified   in   asking  the   government,
by means of the Board of Governors,
to share  less than halt of the e$tra
university  expense.
In the event of the second proposal being accepted by the board the
committee was to request that the
date of payment of fees be postponed
until such time as the provincial
government can consider the proposal.
PLAYERS CLUB TO HOLD
ANNUAL TRYOUTS
SATURDAY
Sir Peter and Lady Teazle will
undergo their annual punishment In
the University Theatre next Saturday
when Frosh who yearn to play the
"drahma" try out for membership ln
the Players' Olub, stronghold of campus dramatic art.
As usual the aspirants will a.t the
famous quarrel scene from Sheridan's
"School for Scandal," each giving hla
own Interpretation and thereby revealing his possible value to the club.
The high standards of the organization have been maintained by granting membership only to those who
have shown real talent and enthusiasm for dramatics.
Applicants will meet Wednesday ln
Arts 100 at 12.30. Try-outs will start
the following Saturday at 12.30.
COMMITTEES TO BE FORMED
A  new  feature   of   the  olub  this
year will be the Permanent  Committee system; these committees to
consist    of    people    who    wish    to
specialise In one branch of theatrical art. They will handle make-up,
oostumes, lights, scenery, props and
play   reading.   Outside   authorities
will be Invited to lecture on these
different subjects.
New   production   director   for   the
club   this   year   ls   Sidney   Risk.   Mr.
Risk comes well equipped  to handle
this work since he has been producing ln London for the last five years.
He is a graduate ot U.B.O. and the
Players' Club.  Miss  Dorothy  Somerset,   who   has   been   associated   with
campus dramatics  tor  several  years,
is   now  with   the  Extension   Department of the University.
RHODES CANDIDATES
APPLICATIONS DUE,
APPLY REGISTRAR
Applications for the Rhodes Scholarship muat be made at the Registrar's office by October 31, where
forms may be obtained, or from
the Provincial Secretary of the
Rhodes Scholarship Association. W.
Tom Brown, 611 Rogers Building.
To be eligible candidates must be
between the ages of nineteen and
twenty-five, single, and have completed at least his sophomore year
In college. The applicant must also
have resided in Canada at least Ave
years with the intention of permanent  residence.
The   scholar   Is    chosen    by    the
Committee   for   Selection    of    the
Province not on a written examination but on the applicant's previous record.    It is necessary for all
candidates   to   be   Interviewed   by
the Committee and  If they  so  desire, an  essay  must  he   submitted.
The    scholarship    Is    worth    1'400    a
year for two yeara with an option of
a   third   year.      However     thia   third
year will only be allotted if the scholar   can   submit    a   definite     plan     of
study    for    that    period.      This    plan
must   be   satisfactory   to   his   College
and  to the Rhodes  Trustees.
FOR SUPPLEMENTARY FUNDS.
The fourth request which comes
from the Alma Mater Society rather than the Campaign Committee Is that the Board of Governors
provide the AJV1.S. with a grant of
83,800 for a period of ten years, to
total $88,000 in order to supplement funds already collected for
the Brock Memorial Union Building. The Alma Mater Society considers that this is a Justified request in view of the faot that the
sum involved is a small portion of
the total sum which has been provided by the students themselves,
and that no money for buildings
has been forthcoming from the
Board of Goovernors since the
University was flrst built. Likewise the students have, without assistance from the Board of Governors already completed an expensive building plan.
SECRETARY ELECTIONS
TO BE HELD
THURSDAY
Campaign speeches by the candidates for the position of A.M.S. secretary will be heard at a special
Alma Mater meeting in the Auditorium   at   noon   Wednesday.
So far. there have been three nominations, Qertie Pitman. Marion
Reid, and Marian Vance. The election is necessitated by Peggy Thompson's   "retiring"   from   the   position.
All nominatlonH must be ln by 5
o'clock today, each candidate having
at leaat ten nominations from among
the members  of the A.M.S.
Elections will start at 8.30 Thursday morning and will be conducted
In the A.M.S, Office. Jack Davis is
in  charge  of  the  polls. T"*o
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publicatipn Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office; 306 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 200
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mali Subscriptions, $3.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummlngs
SENIOR  EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
Friday
Robert King
Ossy
Van Perry
SPORTS EDITOR
Orme Dier
C. U. P. EDITOR
James D. Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Irene Eedy James Macfarlane
ASSOCIATE  SPORTS  EDITOR
Basil Robinson
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Durkin Jack Mercer Joyce Cooper
Lester Pronger Rosemary Collins
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
A POLITICAL ISSUE?
On tho recommendation of the Campaign Committee, we are
informed, Students' Council will petition the Board of Oovernora
to ask that the government grant to the University be increased
in the amount of from $15,000 to $35,000. At the same time,
according to this plan, the present $25 increase in student fees
would be reduced to a $10 increase, the students thus contributing
in toto approximately $20,000, or $5,000 more than the minimum
increase asked of Victoria.
The Ubyssey docs not wish to express any opinion whatsoever
regarding the financial aspect of the problem, bvit it feels very
strongly that the Students' Campaign Committee, speaking
through the executive body of the Alma Mater Society, has
exhibited more than a modicum of good sense in approaching the
Oovernment on this question through the constituted authority of
the University, namely: the Board of Governors.
Success met the Committee's efforts during tlie summer, and
the resulting removal of attendance limitations wns a very real
triumph for them. It is quite conceivable that similar success
would greet a direct overture from the Committee to the Oovernment with respect to the problem of increased fees. However, the
danger in pursuing such a policy too far—and we believe the
Campaign Committee fully aware of this danger—is that of
making a political issue of the nffnirs of the Committee in general,
and of the Alma Mater Society in particular.
In view of this peril, the Campaign Committee has taken the
highly sensible nnd far-sighted course of nppronching the financial
part of its programme through the body whioh controls the
finances of the University, and has in this way eliminated any
possibility of U.B.C. affairs becoming a political issue cither on
the campus or in the  Province  as a  whole.
• The Ubyssey expresses the sincere hope that tin' Committee
may carry on its campaign with the same fine regard for the ideals
of our University that it has shown by this step, nnd that its
efforts—and those of the Board of Governors—may meet with
every success.
THE BAND
Much credit is due Mr. Oz/.y Durkin for his recent successful
attempt to organize a university band on tlie campus. Building
on a rather small foundation of his last year's band Mr. Durkin
persuaded Vancouver's most famous band-lender, Mr. Arthur
Delamont to act as the leader and succeeded in an equally difficult
task of persuading the student's council to finance his endeavour.
Crowned with success in his two preliminary arrangements
Mr. Durkin called a meeting of all students interested in becoming
members of the band. Although the meeting was fairly well
attended there are not yet sufficient number of musicians to ensure
the success of the venture. The band will be without doubt of
very great benefit to the students anil it is the personal duty of
every musician on the campus to assist with the organization of
the Varsity Band.
S.C.M. EVENTS
BEGIN WITH
FROSHJ>ARTY
"Let's get acquainted!" ls the slogan of the S.C.M. Frosh Party to be
held at Killarney, tonight, Sept. 37,
at 8 p.m. ,
All Freshmen and Freshettes -wearing their regalia will be admitted
free of charge and upper classmen
may attend for the nominal fee of
twenty-five cents.
Dancing to the honeyed rhythm of
a unique feminine dance band from
9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; numerous novelty
entertainments, and non-beatable
nourishment will provide a gala
occasion not to be missed.
The S.C.M. ls an organisation open
to all students, which offers fellowship, open-minded discussion, definite purposeful activity and challenge. The Student Christian Movement, composed of members of various sects, races, and organisations,
has for its purpose the searching
for answers to the problems whloh
contemporary society faces; problems in the fields of psychology,
economics, politics, international relations, ethics, religion, etc.
While the initial Impetus of the
Movement springs from those who
have arrived at the conviction that
the Christ-way offers satisfaction to
our basic personal and social needs,
yet the S.C.M. has always consisted
of a large number of those of opposite opinions.
Call ln at Room 313 in the Auditorium Building for further Information.
Appointments Announced
At Wednesday Assembly
Twelve new professors and special
lecturers have been appointed for
the coming session. President L. S.
Kllnck announced Wednesday afternoon at the annual Oeneral Assembly  ln  the University Theatre.
From the staff of the University
of Illinois comes Dr. Ralph Hall,
professor of mathematics, and formerly U.B.C. winner of the Oovernor-
Oeneral's Medal ln 1030.
■ From the Carbo Ice Co., Toronto,
-comes Dr. Harold D. Smith, lecturer
in Physics. Dr. Smith is also a former U.B.C. --/inner of the Governor-
Generals medal  of 1037.
Addition to the staff of the Department of Philosophy is Prof. J. A.
Irving,  while   ln   the   Department   of
Bnglish the staff ls swelled by the
appointment of Edmund Morrison,
another U.B.C. graduate from the
professorial staff of the Southern
Branch of the University of Idaho.
Additional lecturers appointed for
the duration of the coming session
are Dr. W. Ivor Jennings, formerly
lecturer ln Kngllsh Law at the London School of Economics who takes
the place of Professor Angus; Dr.
J. A. Crumb, lecturer in Economics,
from Occidental College ln Los Angeles; Dr. A. W. Currie, lecturer in
Economics, on leave of absence from
McOlll University; John H. Crelgh-
ton, lecturer in the Department of
English,    from    Bennington    College,
make     WORLD WIDE NEWS
YOUR DOWN-TOWN HEADQUARTERS
FREE TELEPHONE to U.B.O. students
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STUDENTS EARN FEES
DURING SUMMER
AS MINERS
To all those who worked on land,
in the.air, on the sea. In mines . . .
and on ice-wagons, we wish a successful term.
U.B.C. students, ln their search for
ways and means of earning fees
cover all  these  fields  of occupation.
SURVEYS
To students ln applied science was
given the opportunity of getting
practical experience ln their own line
while earning their fees for the next
year. These men go out on surveys
which frequently continue until after
the fall term begins. Some of them
find places in research departments
throughout the province, while others descend to the murky depths to
fatten the perilous avocation of the
miner 'for a spell.'
FIRE-FIGHTERS
The    shutting    down     of    logging
camps this summer, due to fire has-
ards,   caused   the   unemployment   of
many   students,   although    some    of
them were employed fighting Are.
The  supervision  of  playgrounds
provided   an  opportunity    to   both
men   and   women   studenta   whose
future work will be connected with
physical education or teaching.
The B.C. Electric employed studenta  on  the  street  ocara and ln
their offloe and retail departments.
The C.P.R. hotels and summer resorts    provide    employment    for    a
considerable number of students, especially   girls,   who   find    the    work
very  pr6fltable  because   of  the  tips,
which are  plentiful  ln  the  more  expensive  hotels.
VERSATILITY
Tutoring and coaching were well
paid and excellent experience for
would-be teachers. A certain number of students And positions In
stores and offices in town, but this
year very few were able to get that
type of job.
Versatility is the keynote in students' summer employment . . . and
hard work.
Vermont; Dr, Kenneth C. Mann, professor ln Physics from the University of Toronto, and Fred Muir formerly chief draughtsman for the city
of Winnipeg in charge of municipal
improvements, waterworks, general
construction, etc., who will be lecturer ln the Department of Civil
Engineering.
Appointed head of the Department
of Physics to succeed the late Dr.
T. C. Hebb Is Dr. O. M. Shrum.
Resignations from the staff Include
Dr. W. A. Carrothers, who goes to
Victoria as chairman of the Coal
and Petroleum Board of B.C.; Professor Harry T. Logan, now principal
of the Prince of Wales Fairbridge
Farm School on Vancouver Island;
Dr. Wyman Pilcher, associate professor In Phychology and Education,
and Dr. J. O. Davldaon, who retires
after serving the University of B.C.
• since itn formation.
Mickl.es
AND
: Miuckles j
by Scotty  '■
V-—*
'Twos Friday noon and the Frosh
were scared. The most timid of the
flock took shelter mid the vacant
rows of seats in
PRIDE VERSUS the Auditorium,
PRESTIGE. and then to their
surprise a meeting started. The chairman was none
other than the red tied diplomat af
the campus. Suave and dignified he
carried the meeting through, without any undue disturbance from the
pit.
rfut as the meeting neared its
close the Frosh began to realise that
they had been the victims of a foul
and treacherous trick. The Sophs,
awaited them without; and at the
flrst sight of the foe pelted same with
well aged fruit.
The whole point of this yarn, however, ls that the Frosh turned the
tables on the self-confident Sophomores and defeated them, repelling
them In an Ignomlnous rout. Weel,
ye poor deluded second year olds,
what hae ye .to say for yoursel's?
The other point worth mentioning
about the same meeting concerns a
few  of  the   powers   that   be   in   the
so-called   major   clubs
MUSIOAL of   this   voluble  Cam-
VERBOSITY pus. The meeting waa
obviously to be a lengthy one, for some fifteen hearties
wished to lead the Freshmen Into their
respectful "clubbish lairs," by painting vivid and exaggerated pictures
of the benefits that are to be received
from joining this club or that one.
But lt was at this very gathering
that the President of the Musical
Society decided that the best policy
for his Club was to talk for so long
a time that no other club'could even
get an opportunity to tell of Its advantages. Not content with this
piece of verbal crime, the said president Included ln his speech certain
refrences to other musical clubs on
the Campus.
He pointed out that freshmen
could join one of these clubs, but
that If they wanted to learn music,
they should join the Musical Society.
Now we don't pretend to know a
frightful lot about music, but we do
know that the Musical Society not
only provides an incomplete musical
education, but also thinks too much
of what they have presented and do
present.
Which brings to mind the next
thing. Too many clubs on this Campus are inclined to think that two
years success or so is enough to warrant their scorning any other attempt to form another organisation
ln the same general field. Let them
look to their laurels, else they lose
all that sane members have built for
them in the past.
We  feel  that  the  prise   saying   of
the   week   was   that   of   an    ardent
student   who   desired    to    throw    In
hla   lot   with   those
GENEROSITY   of the Totem staff.
Says  he:   "I  have
a  camera."
Says the Totem staff: "Oood. Very
good.    Take  some  pictures  then."
Says he: 'Oh I can't. It's a movie
camera and  it's  in  Minnesota!"
Ah well, some people's minds work
in rtlfferent -ways, or what have you?
I j it was his cultural environ
ment when he  was a child.
Now we think it time to offer a
word of warning to all and sundry.
We feel that probably the end of
civilisation 1 s
THE RETURN OF at hand. What
BARBARISM. with swing mu
sic, and jitterbugs, and the Yam and things, we
have lost all hope. And to accentuate It all we went to the Canadian
football game at Athetotic Park the
other day.
To see about so many hundred
human beings sitting, or rather vibrating in an orgy of sadistic delight was sad—tragic. Each time the
Varsity heroes disposed of another
of the unfortunate opposing gladiators, the crowd gave a deep growl
of bloody thanks. The Freshettes
literally screamed with joy as their
favorite player became a little muddler. The scene did nothing but remind us ot scenes described In Roman history, where 'games' were provided for the populace. Yes, civilization must be on the decline.
OUTDOOR CLUB
Meeting, Wednesday, 12.30, Ap. Sc.
237, Members and all Interested.
TRANSPORTATION
Ride -wanted from 148 Clinton
Street, near Hastings and Clinton.
Doris Coffey, High.  317.
"Let me serve your car and your car will serve you"
"Frank" Ficke
U.B.O.   SERVICE   STATION
34-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 83
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Miss Helen Darling for reservations
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STUDENTS
re Sessional Fees*
1938-39
First term Sessional Fees are payable on or before October 3rd, 1938,
at the Bursar's Office in the Administration Building-. Cheques to be
made payable to "The University
• of British Columbia." It is recommended that cheques be mailed to
the Bursar. Consult your Calendar
where fees are set forth in detail on
pages 34 to 38 inclusive.
OFFICE HOURS 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 12 NOON.
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(Where the bus stops.)
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* fi * *i *i 1 * * 1 t ii i - i r Tuesday, September 27, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
PROF. DILWORTH TO BECOME
REGIONAL DIRECTOR OF C.B.C.
GRANTED   YEAR'S    LEAVE
OF ABSENCE TO TAKE
UP NEW DUTIES
Professor Ira Dilworth, U.B.C.'s
authority on poetry of the Victorian
age, has been granted leave of absence for one year by the University
in order that he may take up his
new duty as B.C. regional director of
the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Mr. Dilworth left Saturday evening
for Ottawa, where he will confer with
other regional directors regarding
policy ot the Corporation for the
coming year. Questioned by the
Ubyssey concerning his plans, Prof.
Dilworth intimated that he would be
returning to Vancouver after a month
ln the east, and would establish his
headquarters in this city.
Before joining the University staff,
Prof. Dilworth was principal of Victoria high school for a number of
years, and his "Anthology of Victorian Poetry" was the standard high
school text-book on the subject
throughout British Columbia.
LED BACH CHOIR
Mr. Dllworth's Interest ln the Arts
has not been confined to the works
of Tennyson and Wordsworth, however, for his enthusiasm for music,
more particularly the choral works of
Bach, ls no less avid than his taste
for literature. Since his coming to
Vancouver, he has directed the city's
celebrated Bach choir, and has been
aotlve on the campus in arranging
concerts from the Carnegie library of
music owned by the University and
in sponsoring extra-curricular lectures on the history and theory of
instrumental music.
Professor Dilworth will be greatly
missed by faculty and students on
the campus, where his close friendship with Mr. Oage has been spoken
of as U.B.C.'s  Damon  and  Pythias.
TEN DOLLAR PRIZE
TO BE GIVEN FOR
BEST SHORT STORY
Calling all writers! Starting today
a short-short story contest, sponsored by Varsity Time, in co-operation with the Ubyssey and the
Totem, will get under way with a
grand prize of $10 for the winner,
it was announced today by "Ozzie"
Durkin,  Varsity Time  Director.
The winning story will be produced over Varsity Time in a dramatized version during the spring
term, and will be printed in the
Totem. Runner's-up will be published
with all by-Hne formalities In the
Ubyssey from time to time throughout  the  year.
Stories will be judged on their appropriateness for dramatization as
well as for their Action and literary
qualities.
Contest closes November 31.
Deposit your entries ln the mall
box of the Publications Board
Office, Auditorium Building.
I. R. C. CLUB
"British Opinions and World Decisions" will be the topic of Dr.
W. I. Jennings' address to the I.R.C.
on Wednesday, September 28, at 8
p.m. at the home of Dean Bollert,
1188  W.   10th   Avenue.
Dr. Jennings, recently returned
from the University of London and
noted authority on government and
law, will speak on the men who
frame the momentous decisions
which determine for Britain and the
■World whether they shall have peace
or war.
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE ft STUART
00. LIMITID
Stationers and Printers
580  SEYMOUR  STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
_■■■«*»-. _*_-*-*_Ji*-.SM_».e*M*»-m*»gji.
DAILY  TRYOUTS  FOR
MUSICAL GROUP
ON CAMPUS
Another new session begins, another new crop of freshettes decorate the campus, and once more, for
old and new students alike, arises
the question, "What club shall I join?
Of what activity shall I become a
part?"
If you seek entertainment. If
you enjoy good music, or If you
would like to take part In a well-
known stage production, then
there's a oampus organisation
meant for you — The Musical
Society!
MUSICAL SUCCESSES.
Although founded primarily for
the pleasure and entertainment of Its
members, the Society has obtained
an enviable reputation in Vancouver
and Its vicinity for Its successful musical productions. Following "The
Mikado," "Robin Hood," and other
popular shows, last year's "Yeomen
of the Ouard" broke all records for
attendance and netted a profit of almost   $000.
With the popular preslderit,
Frank Patch, again at its head,
the executive Is busy planning a
full programme for the coming
season, and considering the suggestions of the musical director,
Mr, Williams, for the spring oper-
atta. Although It has been rumored that the Sooiety may produce one of Herbert's or Friml's
light operas, no decision on this
question has yet been made.
APPLICATIONS.
By popular demand, a fall dance
will again be sponsored by the Socle-*
ty towards the end of this month or
the first of October.
Tryouts for membership In the Society are now taking place daily in
the Auditorium. Students, whether
new to the University or not, will be
welcomed. Those Interested are urged to drop applications ln the box
in  Arts Building hall  immediately.
FRESHETTES ROMP
WITH BIG SISTERS
AT ANNUAL SUPPER
Freshettes last night doffed their
green regalia in favour of rompers
and imposing hair ribbons, when
they attended the Freshette Supper
held ln the University Orill.
The masquerading youngsters
were solicitously accompanied by
their "Big Sisters," who joined In
the evening's frolic as enthusiastically as did their charges.
Following supper, an impromptu
programme was conjured up, and
there was much hilarity over the
vaudeville efforts of seniors and
Freshettes alike.
Arrangements were In the hands
of the executive of the Womens'
Undergraduate Society, with Jean
Stordy, the President, as usual keeping her skilled and protective eye
on the proceedings.
FROSH TO BE SHOT
IN GYMNASIUM ON
MONDAY FOR TOTEM
Compulsory shooting of Freshmen
started ln earnest on Monday at the
Gymnasium. The gun was the camera of Artona s Studio, the reason,
The Totem.
For   the  benefit  of  Freshmen,  the
Totem ls the University Annual, and
it ls hoped by the editor thereof that
it  will contain   the  portrait  of  each
and every Freshman on this Oampus.
Freshmen must flrst make an appointment  at  the   Auditorium  Box
Office   for   a   time   to   have   their
photograph  token,  and  must  then
arrive at the studio, which ls situated at  the  North West corner of
the gymnasium.
The  total  cost  to each  student  ls
$1.28,  and  this  Includes,  in  addition
to  the photograph in the Totem itself, a large portrait in a frame, done
ln  the  traditional style of Artona.
A SMALL COMPLAINT
"Any complaints?" asked the orderly officer.
"Yes, sir," came the voice of Private Hugglns.
"Well, what is it?" asked the officer.
"This steak is underdone, sir," said
Private Hugglns.
"But I don't see any steak," exclaimed the officer.
"It's right here under this potato,"
walled Private Hugglns.
tea,
By PROXY
It is with no little trepidation that
I embark upon this, my first trip Into
the perilous realms of columnlstlc
Journalism. For the life of the average columnist ls fraught with apprehension. With the publication of his
flrst attempt he becomes a slinking,
dodging thing, hiding—whenever possible—behind trees and hedges and
nom-de-plumes and things.
This, perhaps, ls as it should be.
There ls a law which ostensibly permits a certain freedom of speech.
But to date I've heard of no law
which protects a poor, defenseless
columnist from being crushed beneath the outraged heel of some outraged heel.
Anyhow, here goes. May the brickbats fall where they will. The bouquets should take care of themselves.
* *      ♦
In racking my brain for an idea, I
remembered something that was said
not so long ago by one of our more
suave, better-looking members of
Council. During the summer, ln a
-letter to a friend, he made mention of
"that Intangible thing . . . Oollege
Spirit." We have been wondering ever
since Just how intangible college
spirit really ls.
In my humble opinion, spirit does
not He ln the murderous Frosh-Soph
conflicts, lt does not He in the physical aspects of the Bon-flre. Nor ls lt
to be found ln the superficial, frenzied rah-rahs which characterize our
athletic meets. It lies, rather, in the
timeless tradition of which these
things are the external indication.
For this reason, I was glad to hear
of the Bon-Are's revival. There Is
nothing, I think, which oould be more
nostalgic ln later years than the
memory of that Frosh Bon-flre. Scuffling figures in uncertain shadow . . .
towering flames giving off a flickering circle of light . . . the gradual
hush as Frosh and Soph forget their
rivalry and gather close about the
glowing embers, awed and united ln
the presence of Tradition . . . the
majestic rhythm of the college hymn
rolling slowly out across the darkened, autumn campus.
Our council friend was right. There
is something intangible about College
Spirit.*
* *      *
A bouquet to this year's energetic
Totem Editor, John Garrett. He is,
definitely, one of the 'chosen twelve.'
Almost before the green-hats have
straightened out their time-tables,
they are being bustled off to the gym
to watch the birdie. And some of
them still don't know where the gym
ls. Once the Frosh pictures are taken,
of course, the Totem ls praetically
finished. All that's needed Is a group
picture of the faculty and some kind
of binding.
With a little co-operation from you
Frosh, then, Johnny should have the
biggest and best Totem ln years ready
for sale ln a short time. He ls certainly going about it more methodically   than  any  Totem  editor  I  can
remember.
* *      •
This year's crop of misses ls about
the best yet, to my way of thinking.
Greetings, gals, but have a heart.
Don't snub a fellow Just because he
pounds a typewriter. There can only
be one Tommy Williams on the Campus at a time.
* *      *
And now I think I'll start dodging.
TRANSPORTATION  WANTED
Transportation wanted for ONE
from 41st Ave., and Trafalgar, for
8.30. H.  Skeldlng.  Arts  Letter  Rack.
UNIVERSITY LAW SOCIETY
The organization meeting for the
University Law Society oalled for
Tuesday at 12.4S, has been changed
to Wednesday,  12.45,  in  Arts  102.
FILM SOCIETY
UNDERTAKES
BIG PROGRAM
TEN  FILMS TO  BE SHOWN
DURING  YEAR
With two of the most successful
years behind lt, the University Film
Society has plans for the most ambitious program yet undertaken. The
proposals under consideration for tho
coming Session Include the production of a film, a monthly film review,
and evening film performances.
MEMBERSHIP.
The powers that be ln the Film
Club have decided that the desired
membership will reach a new total
of 750 students. Students will be
able to purchase one ticket that will
cover all the films to be presented
during the year. This scheme ls an
alteration from last year, when It
was possible to purchase one ticket
tor each term. Tickets for individual performances cannot be bought.
Some of the ten proposed presentations will be held in the evening
in the Auditorium, and the 'patrons'
will be presented with a monthly
Film Review. This publication will
be of inestimable value to students
and will act as a guide for them to
follow In choosing thetr cinematic
entertainment.
film-
as a new feature of the Club's activities on the Campus the weekly
broadcast of opera from the Metropolitan Opera In New York will be
reproduced in the Auditorium at
noon for students. The Carnegie
amplifier will be used for the purpose,
The film that has been suggested
for production on the Campus Is to
be a pantomimic fantasy, and will
take about ten minutes to show when
It Is Anally completed. Indoor sets
are to be used, and extensive experimenting will be tried with the
lighting equipment on the University stage.
MODERN  PRODUCTIONS
FEATURED.
Of the Alms to be shown, many
are modern productions of outstanding merit, and of particular
Interest to unlveralty students.
Films under consideration are:
That great epic of the West whloh
tells the story of the settlement of
this big land. "The Covered Wagon";
A   modern   film    describing   Skiing In'the Austrian Alps, "Slalom";
A    modern    Aim   written   round
the    great    Czeohoslovaklan 'Rob-
In  Hood,'   "Janoslk";
The magnifloent 1926 production
made privately by Mary Plokford
and Douglas Fairbanks to present
the Russian ballet dancer, "Pavlova."
The dramatic documentary Aim
of 1987, produced by the Film Security Bureau, with Pare Lorens
as director, "The River." It ts the
second of Lorens's flints, his other,
"The Plough .that Broke the
Plains," having been ahown by the
Film Society last year; and
The 1014 Philip Griffiths, Birth
of a Nation";
The flrst general meeting of the
Soelety will be held Tuesday next
week In Arts 100.
C.O.T.C. NOTICE
The parade that was to be held
In The Seaforth Armouries by the
C.O.T.C, Tuesday, September 27, Is
CANCELLED. The Drill Hall Is
not available on that date. Instead,
the parade wlU be held at the University, ln the Arts Building. Time
6,48 to 8.45 p.m.
Supper will be served ln the
Cafeteria for those members parading, at 8.00 p.m. sharp.
Supper tickets will be Issued
from the C.O.T.C. Orderly Room
on request up to 18.00 Noon, Apt.
27. No meals will be served with
out a ticket, definitely.
PUBLICATIONS  NOTICE
All members of the .Ubyssey
staff are requested to attend a very
Important meeting In the Publications offloe Tuesday at 18.45.
The teacher had been giving a
lesson on modern Inventions to his
class.
"Can any of you boys," he said,
"tell me of anything of Importance
which did not exist fifty years ago?"
"Me," exclaimed one of them.
897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
IOE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY, Arts '31
JAOK PARKER, Arts '30
Clearance!
16 ONLY
U.B.C. Blazers
Regular 13.73
$6.50
Don't pass up this final opportunity to got an offlolal
U.B.O. blaser at this olose out prioe. This will be your
last ohanoe as we are not stooklng them again.
NOTB—As these blasers are sold only to students and
graduates, please bring your student pass oard with
you as a means of Identification.
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
"Always the .Best at SpencerY'
AGRICULTURE
UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY
The flrst fall meeting of the Agriculture Undergraduate Sooiety will
be held in Aggie 100 at 13.80 noon
today for the purpose of discussing
finances, athletics, and programme
of activities for the fall term. Attendance of the fifty students registered in the flrst year Is particularly
requested by the oommittee.
NOTICE
Oeography 2 will meet in Ap,130
on Wednesdays and Fridays from
13.80 to 1.30 with the lab. on Mondays from 3.30 to 8.80.
REPORTERS   WANTED
Reporters are still needed on various departments of the Publications
Board. Applications reoeived daily at
the Publications Board office.
$10  Cash
For the best name submitted for
the "Mystery Cafe" — Salisbury
Lodgfe Annex.
Think up a name and send It ln—YOURS MAY WIN!
MAKE THE NEW OAMPUS OAFE
YOUR RENDEZVOUS
Lunch 25c
Dinner 35c
weatggsg» *' V * 4 . V * *-
*4w*>*****.*
^^^^^^^sapajs
>imto.w
Student   Savings   Accounts   welcomed   at
Canada's   Oldest   Bank.
MONTREAL
HEAD   OFFICE
BANK OF MONTREAL
BSTABUSH-DD  1817
'A  Bank where small Accounts are welcome."
Wtwt   Point   Orey   Brmxli :    SASAMAT   AND   TENTH
A.   11    HOOHH,   ManaK»r
Hi > II  1*1 I ' ' REORGANIZES  AWARDS, BIG BLOCK  CLUB
CLASS REPS MEET MAURY   ,
EVERY* MONDAY  FOR INTRAMURALS
<f* f p Q pj"T
••
ROWING   CLUB  PRACTISE
TOMORROW—NEW   BOAT   HOUSE
-_-=__VjE-_:                    m             ,           ■                                                                               _-_----_=,=--=_ss---Sga--_r y
Four
THS    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, 1938
Varsity Downs Kaycees on Last Play
BIG BLOCK
CLUB TO BE
REORGANIZES
DAVIS VISUALIZES A NEW
SERVICE CLUB GROUP
By BASIL ROBINSON
Radical reorganisation of the
Men's Big Blook Club along the
lines of similar bodies operating In
other large Universities, ls the
dream of Jaok "Spud" Davis, new
M.U.S. president.
According to Davis, who seems to
be fairly conversant with the situation, similar Athletic groups are acting as Service Clubs and meeting
with remarkable success In other institutions. Consequently he sees no
reason why the proud wearers of the
highest U.B.C. Athletlo awards
should not nil In similar capacities.
He proposes to launch the following reorganisation policy under
M.U.S. sponsorship.
(1) Big Block Club to stage money-
making sooial events. As the members of ths olub are well-known and
have a great influence and drawing-
power, the Men's Undergraduate
Prexy considers they are the logical
promoters of suoh functions, if their
success, especially In the financial
field, is to be assured. Prooseds of
suoh affairs would go to the Brock
Memorial Fund.
CHEER LEADERS
(3) The oonduotlng of all pre-game
pap meets and parades, tn this line,
the Big Blockers would be given
ample employment. Davis Idealises
under this heading a cheering section made up entirely of Big Block
Men and a Big Block cheer-leader
to lead the yells accompanied by the
proposed Varsity band. In this respect, the Athletic stand-outs would
largely take the place of the Pep
Club. In this way Davis believes a
better Varsity spirit could be aroused,
something which, it is rumoured, has
been noticeably lacking at University
functions so far.
(8) The maintenance of campus
discipline. Here again, it ls Davis'
very logical belief that more respect
is commanded by a Big Block Man
than by anyone else on the campus.
(4) The performance of other functions of a Service Club nature. Under this head the possibilities for
work available appear to be unbounded. It is the hope and intention of Davis that by the above-
proposed rejuvenation and reorganisation of the Big Block club, the
somewhat bitterly-expressed opinions
of certain professors with regard to
the Athletic heroes being, literally,
"big blocks" will be gradually reversed.
A general meeting for all members of the club for reorganisation
purposes will be held in the Gym
on Wedneaday at 18.80. A full turnout Is requested.
PREXY
GRASS   HOCKEY
Grass hockey, the game of swinging bludgeons gets under way next
Saturday when the Varsity squad
meets Vancouver Club at Connaught
Park.
Four teams are in the Vancouver
league this year, and a big season Is
looked for. First practise of a full
team is tomorrow noon, and all newcomers are welcomed with open
arms.
NURSES' SOCIETY
Nurses UndeTgaduate Society
meeting in Nurses Home V.E.H. October 3, 1938, at 7.45 p.m. Everybody
out;  eats, elections, etc.
Men's   Half   Soles
Men's  Rubber   Heels
Men's Leather Heels
Ladles'  Top  Lifts
Ladies'  Rubber  Heels
BBo
30c
40c
80c
25c
Heels
Full   Soles.  Rubber
nnd Shine $1.75
Shoes   Dyed   Black 40c
Work  Done  While You  Wait
HATS CLEANED & BLOCKED
—  Expert Work  —
Free  Pick-up  and  Delivery
Empire  Shoe  Rebuilders
712  Granville Trinity 4783
Spud Davis, A.M.U.S. president shown
above as a member of the Dominion
Basketball Champa In 1987, who has
Just announced radical changes In
the set-up of the Awards System and
the Big Block Club.
offside
—orme dier
Never has Varsity won a sweeter
victory than that glorious brawl
last Saturday afternoon. Never has
the blue and gold stock bounoed
higher than In the last thirty seconds
of the best grid game these crossed
old eyes have ever seen. And do you
want to know why the etudes brought
home the bacon? Then come all ye
faithful, and harken to a word from
the wise.
STRATEGY
You see that spry feller over yonder on the bench with the violent
Irish parka and the worried look In
his usually twinkling eye? That mine
enfant ls the man that scored the
touchdown ln hte second last play
of the game. Sure, I know he hasn't
packed the pigskin for nigh on five
years, but Just the same he put it
across the pay line last Saturday
Just as deftly as high-stepping Tommy Williams actually did.
You savvy little one, when Maury
Van Vllet, the master mind on the
Varsity board of strategy saw how
these Kaycees bunched up to hte
middle of the line to stop the last
ditch plunge of fullback Aub Grey,
he Just sent In a reserve with the
signal to sent Terrific Tom around
right end. You know the rest, and
when you atart to sing the praises
,of Williams, Grey, apRoberts, Pearson, et al, 'Just remember our good
friend the coach.
PRIMA DONNA'
And before we forget, did ever
anyone see a greater showman on
the gridiron than the aforementioned
Tommy 'Williams. After being held
down to only about fifty yards all
game, our Horatio Alger made the
fumble just at the end of the third
quarter that gav/ the Knights their
big chance, and boy! did they take
it for three points. But what Is three
points ln the life of a star like Sweet
"Williams? But next time, pray Tom,
watch the clock a bit closer before
you put on the big act, because you
know we have a weak heart, and
how were we to know that you had
that touchdown up your sleeve?
RUGGED  RUGGAH
Getting   around   to   the   ruggah
situation, the grapevine has it that
there   la   going   to   be   aome   sweet
trouble picking the two flrst teams
In the same league. Do you balance
them,  or  do you  put a  flrst team
on the Held and let It pick off the
bouquets   at   the   expense   of   the
second    team."   Tell   me    someone,
toute  do  suite.
Alao some one wantB to know why
the  manager has any say in  picking
the  players.  II  there  la a  coach   and
he   knows   his   stuff,   why   does   the
manager   worry   about   anything   but
his coming big block. And that crack
applies to all major, or what used to
be major sports on the campua.
There we go again, but thia isn't
the flrst time we have been bounoed,
so adioB.
Tom William's Touchdown
Sews Up  Grid  Thriller
By LIONEL SALT
Trailing on the short end of a 3-2 score with but two minutes remaining
to ful) time, Varsity's colourful grid squad pulled the game out of the fire
with a last minute touchdown that left the fans and the Kaycees, gasping
for breath.
It hod been a game featured by
the brilliant field-running of the
students against the educated kicking of the Irish, ap Roberts, Williams, and Joplln all pulled off long
gains but were constantly stopped
dead when pay-dirt was anywhere
near at hand.
Farina, at the quarter, handled his
team   with seasoned   Judgment, but
lacked ln the pinches often relying on
forward   passes   with   a   soggy ball.
Twice the Yaycees averted the threat
ot the Varsity grid men by intercepting long forward passes.
KICKING OAME
Johnny Pearson figured largely ln
the student attack, his punting accounting for points in the first and
third  quarters  when,  In  both these
periods, the Irish were rouged behind
their own line.
Going   into   the   third   period   two
points up the men of Oold and Blue
received a setback when a baokfleld
fumble put the Kaycees ln a direct
line with their goalposts. Lang kicked
the field-goal from thirty yards out
to give the Irish the lead 3-3.
From then on it was the fighting
of   the   students   for   the   equaliser
against the determined defence of the
Knights to hold their slim lead. The
fourth quarter was all but over before  the  Varsity  men  oould  get  to
within scoring distance. Farina, Varsity   quarter,   called   for   a   kick   and
Pearson   obliged   with   a   long   punt
across   the   Kaycee   line.   The   Irish
safety   man,   rushed   by   the   speedy
Varsity linemen was forced to try to
punt out of danger.
LAST  SECONDS
Varsity   hopes  rose  as   the  pigskin
Varsity hopes rose aa the pigskin
thwacked   against   a   Varsity   shirt.
The  Irish  recovered  on  their own
one-yard line but Interference ruling gave the ball  to the students.
Two minutes to full time were left
and It was do-or-die for dear old
"Alma Mammy."
It was real pressure on the Varsity
men   for   the   flrst   time   this  season
and they responded nobly to the task.
With   the   line  holding  firm   Farina
sent   Tommy   Williams   around  the
right   end   on   a   skirting   end-run.
Tommy plunged over with but inches
to spare as  the gun  went off. With
the game already ln the bag the students   hammered   another   nail  into
the Kaycee coffin with convert after
touch, Aub Oray doing the honours.
Sport-writers and fans alike hailed
the game as the smoothest and fastest   grid-opener   evep   viewed   in   the
Senior League. Close to four hundred
Varsity     rooters    yelled     themselves
hoarse  as  the  teams battled  for  the
spoils.
BASKETBALL NEWS
Basketball around the campus is
kind of a dead issue these days, but
things are simmering on the gym
floor Just the same.
Joe
»_.
place this year, but to date most of
the other faithfuls have turned up.
Matthison, Lucas. Straight, Matheson
and Turner are all back and rarln' to
go, and there are a couple of newcomers that are supposed to be plenty
good, so Just watch the Thunderbirds
again this year.
ROWING CLUB
OPENS HOUSE
TOMORROW P.M.
MAURY VAN VLIET AND
RANN MATTHISON
ENTHUSIASTIC
"Boys, you've got something
here." So remarked Physloal Education Director Maury Van Vllet
as Graham Darling and his rowing
cohorts showed the popular sporta
leader over the new boat house
•rooted on the Lower Fraser by
the Varsity Rowing Olub.
"Yeah, me too," ses my friend arid
yours as the addicts of the sculling
game demonstrated to M.A.A. Prexy
Rann Matthison the general idea of
geting over the water faster than the
next guy In the boat burrowing
through the aqua beside you.
So don't look now but if rowing
and auch Is added to the rest of the
sports on the Intra-mural program
within the near future, don't say we
didn't warn you. The way things are
shaping up now, this new sport Is
set to take the Varsity sporting fraternity by storm.
BOATHOUSE OPENS
The gala opening of the boathouse
is to take place tomorrow, Just after
the big meeting on the campus. The
flrst practise is set for tomorrow
afternoon also, so if you want a seat
In one of the two big eights or ln
the doubles,  Just drop around  early.
Another eights shell Is being arranged for, and then the Varsity
Rowing Club will be ready for that
big meet with the Husky Lightweights from Seattle near the end
of October.
OOLF MEETING
There will be a general meeting of
the golf club in Arts 108 on Friday,
Sept. 30. Election of officers, plans
for the first tournament to be held
shortly, and the forming of a women's section will be discussed. All
new and old members are requested
to attend, especially women.
ROWING CLUB MEETING
Important meeting of all members
or would-be members of the Rowing
Club to be held in Ap.Sc. 100 on Wednesday, Sept. 28 at 12.35 noon. Policy
of club to be announced as well as
practice schedules. This ls your opportunity to become acquainted with
a very worthwhile sport.
ROUNDBALLERS   PftEP
FOR SEASON
OPENING
The flrst soccer meeting last
Thursday noon brought tradltlortal
high hopes for the new season. It
was announced that Charlie Hitch-
ens would once more give the boys
the benefit of his experience as
coach.
Among those addressing the meeting were Hltchens himself, Manager
Norm Free, who is commencing his
second term as handler of the round-
ballers, and Doctor Todd, "who gave
a short summary of last year's
achievements.
TWO TERMS.
Plans for two teams follow the
former set-up. The senior team, bolstered by seven of last year's men,
has once again entered the First
Division of the V. & D. League. The
second team, tentatively entered ln
the Second Division of the same
loop, will get organized following
today's practice.
Returning to the senior fold are:
Goalie Irman Fiorillo; fullbacks,
Shaw Mizuhara and Alan Croll;
halfbacks Tooty Tod, Jim Robinson and Jack Rush; and forwards
Ben   Hard  and  Charlie   Howatson.
It is rumored that of the frosh
talent available, Sasaki from St.
Regis and Wallace from South Burnaby are the most promising.
All aspiring soccerites are reminded to be on hand today and Thursday when the first practices of the
season will bo  held.
TRACKMEN
Get details of track activities at
a meeting tomorrow noon at 12.40
in the gym. Everybody that can run,
Jump or throw things please turn
out. Thla means you, Froeh.
'';Si<%>.p*s i*,.
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CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
MMMIIMMIMHMIIIIIMHMMIIMIMIHIIIIIHHIIHMMMMmtlMIMII
With Saturday the day set for
the big double-header opening the
hookey  season,  the   co-ed  enthusiasts are out propping almost dally
for  the   momentous   occasion.   To
celebrate    the    event,    Con    Jones
Park has heen obtained and on admission fee will be charged.
Full  of  their customary  optimism
and nothing daunted by the thought
of   paying   spectators   the   girls   are
all  set  to go  to  town.  Their  opponents  for  the day will  be  the  Grand-
view Orads,  always  strong contenders   for  league   honours.   Play  starts
at 3 o'clock and will be followed by
a match between the "Touring Canucks"   and    the    Oeneral    American
eleven.
STRONG TEAM
The U.B.C. team, stronger than
ever this year, Is really going to
show the scoffers of girls' sports
that the men are not the orly ones
to bring back the silverware. With
but two of last year'a winning combination gone from our halls of
learning and with plenty of good
newcomers to All the vacancies, the
girls have reason for boasting.
The strong defence, back In full
force, has plenty of competition for
their positions. Club Prexy, Marjorie
Lean, is still ably goal-tending behind the almost Impenetrable fullback line of Betty Cole and Hortense Warne. In the centrehalf slot
again Is Betty Mulr, while trying
for the remaining half positions are
Ora Wright, Pauline Scott, Elizabeth Mclnnls, Elisabeth Norte, Betty
McCormlck, May McQueen, and
Betty Henderson.
The forward line, though hard hit
by the departure of Ellen Boving
and Frances Mair, will be strengthened by Freshette  Fay  Burnham,
JUNIOR GRIDDERS IN
NARROW DEFEAT
The fighting Varsity Junior Grid
Team was nosed out 8-1 ln a hectic
battle with Vanoouver College on
Saturday at the upper Aeld on the
oampus.
The Students held the edge ln the
play but lacked finish 'when the chips
were down. Kel Fleming's punt gave
the Point Grey boys a 1-0 lead at
half time, but the college from the
city came back strong to grab three
points with a rouge and safety touch.
Varsity showed plenty of power
and a few practices should put them
in running for the league title. Lots
of senior material was evident ln the
game and Maury Is expected to And
lots of reserves for his Senior Team
in the Juniors.
NOTICE
Hours for Strip Room: Daily, 12.45-
1.80 p.m.
Wedneaday, 1.30-3.30 p.m	
Saturday,  11.30-3.30 p.m.
Charge: $1.00, Including Insurance.
Anne Carter, who has before worn
the b'ue and gold, and Betty San-
dall of Dalhousle. Sheila Wilson and
Gerry Armstrong will again be starring In their wing positions.
The Varsity team Is still open and
all aspiring Freshettes are asked to
be on hand at the practice tomorrow
at 3.30. Equipment can be obtained
ot the gym then.
Managers wanted for hockey. Applicants see Marjorie Lean.
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