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The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1921

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Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 27, 1921
Number 11
THE   BLUE   AND    GOLD
Where   wrapped   in   mist   by   sea-clouds
kissed the watchful Lions frown,
And 'thwart the gray of English Bay the
sunset lights flash down,
Laughing  and young and  eager-eyed,
Heart  that   beats   to  the   green   sea's
tide,
There curving lies, 'neath Western skies,
our own Vancouver Town.
Tis  there  the  sheen  of  Stanley's  green
bends to the ocean's blue,
When skies are gray, the whitecaps play,
and seagulls flash to view;
But here's to those we love the best,
Colors that wave o er all the rest,
I hold a toast—no empty boast—to thrill
the hearts of you.
God   Save   the   King!   we   gladly   sing
whene'er the flag's unrolled;
Tho' words are brief, The Maple Leaf
brings fire to young and old;
And after these the toast I bring
Ranks next to' Country and to King—
Stand up! a cheer! I give you here our
college  blue and  gold!
No stately halls or college walls as yet
as ours we claim,
A campus wide to aid our pride is still a
wistful name;
But we've got men and we've got will,
And college spirit's with us still—
So here's to you, the gold and blue, we'll
carry you to fame.
S. M.
FEMININISM IN LITERATURE
Miss Mclnnes gave a most interesting
address to the Women's Literary Society
on "Femininism In Literature" at the
meeting held on January 19th. The
speaker traced the development of the
feminist movement from its real origin
in the renaissance period to the present
day, particularly stressing the three great
impulses given to the emancipation of
woman: the realization by women of
their rights as human beings, the effect
of the industrial revolution upon women's
employment, and the upheaval in religious and scientific thought in the
1860's and 70's, which forced women, as
thinking beings, to face their position
fairly and squarely.
In literature the feminist movement
has had many able exponents and supporters: such writers as Mary Wollston-
craft, Saint Simon, Ibsen, Charlotte
Bronti, George Sand, and many others.
The drama, in particular, has been the
barometer of woman's social status from
Shakespeare's time to the present.
'Varsity Meets
Double Defeat
GET  MINORITY  VOTE IN INTERNATIONAL DEBATES
A double defeat fell to the lot of our
inter-collegiate debaters on Friday. In
the first international debate of the year,
the University of Washington was victorious both on the K. E. H. S. platform
and at home. In both cases U. B. C. put
up a good fight, and secured a minority
vote in the decision.
The subject, "Resolved that the Anglo-
Japanese Alliance is a menace to British-
American relations," was interesting and
timely. The wording, however, was
vague and unsatisfactory, lending itself to
various interpretations, and resulting in
the presentation of much irrelevant matter. The question, as phrased, lent itself
to treatment rather as a matter of opinion
than of fact. Authoritative opinion was
invoked to a greater extent than usual,
and we suspect (though be it whispered
softly) that many of the authorities were
as little known to the judges as to ourselves.
Our home team, consisting of Mr. T.
P. Peardon and Mr. W. E. Graham, was
opposed by Mr. Edward Blaine and Mr.
Harold Raines, and argued for the
affirmative. The history of the Anglo-
Japanese relations was sketched to show
that their effect was to give Japan a free
hand in the Far East. Japan had used
this privilege to violate fundamental
doctrines held by the United States.
Britain was considered by Americans to
uphold these violations, and thus hard
feeling arose between the two Anglo-
Saxon countries. This constituted a
menace. Practical evidence of this menace existed in the present United States
naval programme.
The negative maintained that the treaty
was strictly defensive, and that arbitration treaties secured America from unpleasant complications. Great Britain
and America were bound by the strongest
natural and commercial ties, and the
friendliest feeling existed between them.
Jingoism .and German propaganda were
responsible for any impression that might
exist to the contrary. The treaty recognized and accepted this friendship and
had never endangered it. The treaty was
necessary to prevent world domination
by   a   German-Russian-Japanese   alliance.
Both sides supported their arguments
by exhaustive quotations and, in the case
of  the Americans,  by profuse  and quite
(Continued on Page 7)
THE    SCHOLARSHIP
"They willingly left the unacknowledged purpose of their lives in order that
all life should not be wrenched from its
purpose, and, without fear, they turned
from these gates of learning to those of
the grave."
Quoting the words used by Kipling at
the University of Edinburgh, Dr. Mack
Eastman made an eloquent appeal at a
student mass meeting on Monday for cooperation of all men and women in the
University in an attempt to found a suitable memorial in honor of our men who
have fallen. A ready response has been
made to the appeal. Announcement had
scarcely been made that the president
would award a flag to the class first
gaining its quota in the Leroy Memorial
Scholarship drive when the team from
Science 21 came to claim the prize. This
class is smaller than most, and its work
was thus facilitated; but early figures indicate that other classes are not far behind.
The University has still to win the flag
to be awarded for the first of the three
teams to reach its objective. The other
contestants in this race are a team from
the University Alumni and another from
the Universities Service Club covering
the down-town district. Response from
the business men of the city has so far
been very gratifying.
DEBATERS  ARE  ENTERTAINED
The visiting American debaters were
royally entertained during their short
stay with us. On Saturday they were
the guests of honor at a luncheon in the
Citizen's Club; in the afternoon they
motored around the city, and out to Point
Grey to see the prospective University;
then they attended the tea dansant in the
auditorium; and in the evening they were
entertained at an informal theatre party.
The tea dansant was held under the
auspices of the Women's Literary Society. Mrs. Coleman and Miss Lila
Coates received the guests at the door,
and the other patronesses were Mrs.
Sage, Mrs. Wood and Mrs. Sedgewick.
The committee had erected a large
American flag in the auditorium, and, although it looked lonely without a British
ensign to keep it company, it seemed to
cheer our American visitors. They appeared to enjoy themselves, and were introduced to all the notables. THE   UBYSSEY
January 27, 1921
Clothes with
a "Rep"
for Style
and Pep
There's a certain unusual Class
in Semi-ready clothing that appeals
to the young men who strive for an
ultra-smart appearance.
THOMAS
& McBAIN
LIMITED
655 GRANVILLE ST.
The Palm Garden
Corner Tenth and Willow
*?ou need some relaxation about 4
o'clock in the afternoon. Tou can get
it over the tea cups at the "Palms."
Bring  your friends.
We serve good Lunches, too; and
our Candy is top-hole.
C LUFF'S
PRE-INVENTORY
Shoe Sale
JANUARY 15th to 31st
Will save you money on all lines of
Fine FOOTWEAR
Cluff Shoe Co.
Limited
649 HASTINGS STREET, W.
LOSE TO TOWERS
In spite of the counter attraction of
the Washington debate, the 'Varsity turnout at the hockey game was quite good.
Although a bigger crowd might have attended, those who were there evidently
had leather lungs, and so the result was
the same. It was unfortunate that the
team could not come through with a win,
but the only reason for our defeat of 5-2
was the all-round excellence of the Towers. However, as soon as our fellows
develop their latent ability to shoot, we
will have a team which will certainly be
in at the finish.
The first period started off at a pace
which would have done credit to any
professional game of hockey. Needless
to say, this speed was kept up throughout the game. Lou Hunter immediately
stepped into the limelight by scoring just
after the puck had been centred off. With
characteristic confidence, the 'Varsity
crowd settled themselves down to watch
the slaughter, but Allen Fellowes took
the joy out of life right away by scoring
also. After this, Plummer and Shields
kept up a series of rushes, one of which
culminated in a goal by Shields. Plummer is getting better and better every
game, while Shields is so good that he
doesn't need to get better.
When the teams came on for the
second, not even the most pessimistic of
us would have prophesied the forthcoming disaster. The Towers simply ran
wild, scoring two goals in a very short
time. Broadfoot's playing was again
spectacular, and he saved many shots
which looked like sure goals. For some
reason or other the referee didn't seem
to be enjoying Ternan's company, and,
while he was off, the Towers scored another goal.
Although the Towers tallied again in
the third period, the play was, on the
whole, fairly even. Wilson, Morrison and
Hunter showed some very pretty combination, but no goals were forthcoming.
McPherson and Wolverton were allowed
to dress up and skate around the ice for
a while, but neither of them had a chance
to show his ability.
'VARSITY WINS AT SOCCER
The 'Varsity soccer team fooled the
jinx on Saturday afternoon when they
trimmed the West Vancouver squad 8-0.
The scoring started as soon as the
whistle blew; 'Varsity carried the ball to
the Dundarave goal, and H. Cant scored.
The opposing team was never dangerous,
and the 'Varsity boys scored almost at
will. Especially was this the case during
the first half, when the U.B.C. team was
shooting down-hill. During this half the
Blue and Gold men ran up a score of
seven goals.
In the second half the 'Varsity squad
slowed down, having been given orders
not to score any more than was necessary. The forward line was brought back
to defence and the defence men played
forwards during this half. Contrary to
orders, Rex Cameron scored on a lovely
shot from the wing. During the remainder of the game the Blue and Gold
squad loafed around, kicking at will.
Stan Say made his debut as a member of
the squad, and made a good impression.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602
649 GRANVILLE STREET
wi^iv^!^^i^MW'.v?yivi/ivvav»^wxvvi\»»,\
AFTER THE SHOW
Try the
JL/eln^oi>*co Oa]f4
704 ROBSON STREET
PHONE.
Seymour
6632
BIG TAX I  SIX
Day and Night
SERVICE
Ask   for
V.  YOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmuir Street
The Lids Off, Boys
Special this week only—
Felt and Cloth Hats
regular to $9.00;
Sale Price
$5.00
Ben Petch
LIMITED
898 Granville Street
Cor. Smythe and Granville January 27, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
PROFS. MEET DEFEAT
FACULTY YELLS
Exemplary  propriety,
Compulsory sobriety,
Combine in the staff of U.B.C.
Remarkable  ability,
Phenomenal agility,
Basketball team of the Facultie.
Milk and water, bread and tea;
Oh, my goodness, who are we?
We are the gents of the  Facultie!
(In times of stress)
Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
Help  the brains  to  beat the  brawn!
Reading   room,   library,   caution   money,
fees,
Lab. regulations, breakages for sprees,
Registrar,  Bursar,  President,  Dean,
Guaranteed machinery to pluck  the  student clean!
Faculty!
'Varsity basketers and basketball fans
spent a most enjoyable evening on Thursday last when we won two games and
lost one. The feature of the evening was
the match between the Students' Council
and the Faculty. The former were very
fortunate to win by the narrow margin
of two points, the final score being 19-17.
Dr. Boggs and Prof. Harry Logan were
the shining stars for the Faculty, netting
sixteen points between them. They
played an excellent combination game,
and at one time threatened to pile up a
lead that would be disastrous.
Dr. Sedgewick led the rooting for the
profs. The yell which they seemed to
favor most was the one whose refrain
was, "We 11 get you get."
THE LINE-UPS
Faculty—Forwards, Dr. Boggs (10)
and H. T. Logan (6); center, Allardyce;
guards, Angus and Davis (1).
Students' Council—Forwards, Sid Anderson (8) and J. Lawrence (6); center,
Art Lord (2); guards, Kingham (2),
Banfield and Whitley  (2).
The 'Varsity intermediates are now
camped on top of the City League by
virtue of their win over the Kitsilano
Community Club on Thursday night.
The game was a league fixture, and for
the greater part of the first half looked
like a close battle. The fast-stepping
U.B.C. intermediates, however, hit their
stride just before the whistle went for
half time, with the result that the first
period ended with our squad seventeen
points up.
During the second half the intermediates continued the good work, with
the result that the final score was 50-23.
This decisive victory places the U.B.C.
squad first in the City League, with six
wins and one loss against them.
The intermediates play an excellent
combination game, and each man knows
.the game quite well. With only a few
more games to be played, the intermediates are strong favorites for the
champion position of the league.
The seniors failed to put up as good
an exhibition as the intermediates, going
down to defeat at the hands of the Kitsilano Community Club seniors, 38-27.
The seniors are an eccentric squad, sometimes playing in top form and at others
being away off. Thursday was their off
night, and the Kitsies had no trouble in
winning the game, holding the lead all
the way.
NEW YELL LEADERS
Phone, Seymour 7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
■;%K.$$f;'-f:-
U.B.C. Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS BLOCK, 464 GRANVILLE STREET
FOOTBALL EQUIPMENT
Rugby and Soccer teams will find that this store has the largest and best assorted
stock of Football equipment in Western Canada.
Jerseys, in all color combinations, in pure wool and cotton, priced from $2.50 to
$10.00 each.
Footballs, for Soccer and Rugby, priced from $3.50 to $11.00 each.
Boots, $9.00 to $12.00 per pair.
Pants, $1.50 to $3.50 per pair.
Leg Guards, 75c to $3.25 per pair.
"Special Discounts to Clubs."
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
"Meek," "Jimmie" and "Mickey" — in
other words, Mr. Andrew Gordon Meekison, Mr. James Reid Mitchell and Mr.
Wilfrid Robinson McDougall — were the
choices of the electorate on Friday for
the heavy and onerous duties as yell
leaders in the University of British Columbia. Without casting any aspersion?
on the ability of the other candidates who
tried out on Thursday, we might say that
these three men won their positions by
the able manner in which they handled
the "mob" at the try-out. Ernie Clark,
Joe Gigerich, Bill McKee, Brick Anderson and Harry Caccidy all tried out for
the positions, but the superior experience
of these three was the deciding factor.
Hereafter, one of these men will be at
each college function to lead the rooting.
"Jimmie" Mitchell got to work on Friday
evening at the debate, while Meekison
and "Mickey" McDougall led the supporters at the hockey game.
The senior squad are now tied for
second place in the City League, having
won three and lost two games. On Monday afternoon of this week Al Buchanan
and George Gross were chosen captain
and vice-captain, respectively, to fill the
positions vacated by Cliffe Mathers and
Kenny  Carlisle.    The team:
Forwards, MacLeod and Fisher; center, Buchanan; guards, Gross and Carlisle.
The senior ladies continued their usual
high-class performance in the first game
of the evening when they downed the
Normal quintette 30-12. Eve Eveleigh
again starred for the ladies, dropping the
baskets in fine style. This team plays
remarkably good combination, and is by
far the best team in the city. The line-up:
Forwards, E. Eveleigh and Bea
Pearce; center, Gladys Weld; guards,
Marguerite Gordon and Dorothy Gillespie.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.   J.   SPBOTT,   B.A.,   Manager.
MCDONALD'S
eHeeouiTEs
Have you had a box of Chocolates
yet from McDonald's new store?
Gee!  it's a lovely place!
888 Granville Street
(One block south of old store,  corner
Robson Street) THE   UBYSSEY
January 27, 1921
WHEN YOU'RE
GIVING CANDY
If you take a happy young
thing a box of candy and it
has Purdy's on the cover, she
knows before the silk ribbon is
off that you have bought the
best chocolates obtainable.
purby's
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
COMING! COMING!  COMING!
FOUR   DAYS
Commencing  Wednesday,  Feb. 2
Matinees Thursday and Saturday
Capt    M.   W.   Plunkett   Presents   the
"DUMBELLS"
In their Second Edition of
BIFF!   BING!!   BANG!!!
AN   ENTIRELY   NEW   REVUE
"prices"
Evenings—$2.20,   $1.65,'  $1.10   and   85c.
Matinees—$1.65,    $1.10,    85c    and    5oc
Sale opens Friday, January 28
TREFOUSSE    GLOVES
Famous on account of their excellent
style, superior fit, finish and durability. The best of all Christmas Gloves,
in kid or suede.
—Trefousse Fine French Kid Gloves,
oversewn seams, two-dome style with
fine stitched points; shades of brown,
tan, grey, navy, beaver, green, champagne, and also black or white. Sizes
5% to 8, at $4.50 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Pique Sewn
Gloves with fine stitched points, perfect fitting; shown in brown, tan,
grey, navy, green, purple, wine, beaver, champagne, white or black. All
sizes, $5.00 a pair.
—Trefousse Extra Quality Gloves,
pique sewn and having two pearl
dome clasps and heavy embroidered
points. These are finished with band
at wrist. Grey, navy, brown, tans,
champagne.    All sizes, at $5.50 a pair.
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,   $2.00 per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.   A.   Webster
[A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors IS.  M. Scott
V Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief  Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
/*Miss A.  Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Reporters -< Bert  Sweeting
Cliffe  Mathers
I Miss P. Stewart
Exchange   Editor Miss   P.   I.   Mackay
Literary  Editor. j &  J,  St™
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising   Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
1 D.   A.  Wallace
Assistants J H.   C.   Scott
I M.   A.   Dyce
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor  for   the   Week .- S.   M.   Scolt
ADVERTISING
Did you ever stop to think how the
"Ubyssey" was financed? You probably
heard all about it at an Alma Mater
meeting some time or other, and you
have quite as probably forgotten all about
it since. That is quite natural, and provides us with an excuse to state some
facts. The finances of the "Ubyssey"
come from two sources: the Alma Mater
grant, which is equivalent to a subscription fee from each student, and the advertising accounts. The advertising receipts from any one issue pay about 70
per cent, of the cost of getting out that
issue. So you see that your subscription
pays only about one-third of the cost of
publishing the paper. This shows what
an important factor is the advertising in
the financing of the publication.
"It pays to advertise" is an old saying.
That is true, on the whole. But all kinds
of advertising are not profitable—particularly advertising in small publications
with a limited circulation. "The 'Ubyssey' is in this class," say many business
men of Vancouver; "therefore it will not
pay us to advertise in it. Much as we
would like to help it along, we do not
consider ourselves justified in undergoing
the expense it would entail." These men
forget some of the advantages of
"Ubyssey" advertising; but there is undoubtedly much reason for the stand they
take.
This brings us to what we, as students
of U.B.C, can do. We can support our
advertisers first, last and all the time.
The advertisers are all reliable — the
"Ubyssey" guarantees that. They are
supporting our college paper; it is up to
us to support our college paper, too. One
of the most effective ways is to patronize
the firms whose advertisements appear in
the columns of the "Ubyssey." We are
very proud of the new college spirit of
our University. Here is a chance for it
to evidence itself. And next time we
have a haircut, or buy a shirt, or invest
in a new powder-puff at the establishment of one of our advertisers, let's not
be afraid to tell the clerk that we come
from the 'Varsity. The advertising staff
will be soliciting advertisements for the
Annual soon, and it will mean a gneat
deal to them if they can tell the prospective advertisers that the students of
U.B.C. are solidly behind their publications.
After all, the "Ubyssey" is an advertisement of our college. So are all of
us from the 'Varsity. We are working
together to make a bigger, better University. Here is one very real way in
which each one of us can help. Even
the newest Freshman can do a great
deal by PATRONIZING OUR ADVERTISERS.
OUR REPORTERS
The reportorial profession is an ancient
and honorable one. With it are associated privileges equally ancient and honorable. We feel that our "Ubyssey"
reporters, while not in all cases ancient,
are nevertheless entitled to -these privileges, especially to that of free admission
to social functions and activities which
they have been assigned to report. University organizations are therefore requested to forward to the Chief Reporter
two tickets for any event which they
wish to see reported in the columns of
the "Ubyssey." In this, we are asking
no more than is accorded, without question, to the daily newspapers and in other
universities to the college periodicals.
LETTER MEN
In most colleges it is considered a
conspicuous honor to be a Letter man.
Such recognition is valued as a badge of
faithful service and real accomplishment.
In our own University Letters are given
to those who have played for a season
on the first team in one of the major
sports. But how often do we hear students referred to as Letter men? Is it
not true that the term means very little
to the average person at the present
time?
In our opinion the remedy lies in
broadening the whole basis upon which
the distinction is bestowed. Why confine
the practice to athletics alone? Surely
this would provide a splendid .means of
doing honor to those who have served
the U.B.C. on the Students' Council, in
inter-collegiate debates, or in other prominent branches of University activity.
At Oregon, for instance, the yell leader
is a Letter man. We are not attempting
to present the details of any specific
scheme, but merely to suggest a general
principle which might well be considered
by those who are in a position to act.
There is much that might be written
regarding the advantages of having one
common means of recognizing outstanding leaders in student work. If Letters
were presented, with wise discrimination,
in some such manner, they would soon
come to be valued by those who received
them and to be honored by every member of our Alma Mater. Who would not
cherish, until his dying day, an old
sweater containing the golden letters of
the U.B.C? January 27, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SUB-FRESHMEN
We cannot claim authorship of this
etymological hybrid. Possibly the Eastern college paper in which we first noticed it may take the responsibility of
god-parent. In that university, at any
rate, the term is pretty generally understood to include all senior high school
students, and anyone else who may be
expected to have aspirations college-
wards but has not yet entered university. • Our exchanges show that sub-
freshmen are receiving attention in many
colleges, both in the United States and
Canada. The idea is, first, to make sure
that no one liable to be benefited by
higher _ education should fail to enter
university because of lack of realization
of these benefits; and, second, to see that
those who have decided to continue enter the faculty and departments best
suited to their peculiar capacities and
future plans.
This is done partly by deans of the
various faculties visiting the high schools
and addressing the students, partly by
circularizing them with printed literature. The University of Washington this
week has invited all sub-freshmen to
spend a day in the university grounds.
The whole working of the university
system will be explained to them by
heads of departments and student leaders.
Another Canadian college sends its college paper into the high schools. An
Eastern American university throws open
its first year lectures at various times to
sub-freshmen.
The question is of less importance to
U. B. C. than to some universities.
Probably our executive officers are less
concerned with increasing the size of the
student body than with providing suitable
accommodation for what we have now.
Nor. is the choice of faculties, or even
departments, so multifarious that the
average freshman cannot find his own
way to his degree, even though the
"faculty advisor' provided in the Calendar proves to be a purely mythical character. Yet it is possible that some attention to the sub-freshman problem might
both improve our standard of scholarship and quicken public interest in the
University.
There is another phase of sub-freshman
activity which may not impress us so
favorably. The Oregon Daily Emerald
advises its athletic director to keep in
touch with promising athletes in prep,
schools, with the idea of inducing them
to attend that university, and thus improve its chances in inter-collegiate contests. The editorial, which is quoted at
length (though without comment) by the
University of Washington Daily, explains
that this has become a regular custom in
many American universities. We trust
that the University of British Columbia
will not find it necessary to resort to such
methods, which approach too closely to
professionalism.
BY THE WAY
The Literary department in the University of Alberta is receiving practically
no grant from the Students' Council this
year. Proceeds from "Lit" nights, together with the performances of the Dramatic Society, which is incorporated with
the Literary department, are expected to
make these activities self-supporting.
Kla-how-ya Week has passed into history, but the spirit goes marching on.
We owe it to our Alma Mater to get
behind the drive this week.
Theatre    party    is    next   on    the    programme.
If there is any danger of the "Ubyssey"
going broke, we can always pawn our
contribution box. It would never be
missed.
What is there in the rumor that buttermilk, instead of punch, will be served at
the Aggie dance?
The "Sun" has announced a student
competition in editorial writing. It promises to pay five dollars for the best article
each week. You had better practice on
the "Ubyssey." First attempts will be
received gladly.
Allan Hurst (from the roof of the Vancouver Block)—Well, this is the first
time that I've had a chance of looking
down on the C.P.R.
Magistrate Shaw (at the debate)—It is
easily seen that our University is overcrowded when it is necessary to squeeze
seven men into a quartette.
I We have been requested to contradict
the report being circulated to the effect
that a fourth year man by the name of
Conn has obtained an injunction restraining any of his professors from giving him
less than second class honors in any subject at the final exams.
Holy Smoke!
There was a smokestack in B. C,
Which   was   smoky  as   smoky   could   be.
When the householders asked,
"Have we got to be gassed?''
We replied, "Only temporally!"
Overheard at the Stanford Game
First Stude—Awfully muddy playing!
How will they ever get clean again?
Second Stude—What do you suppose
the scrub team is for?
READ THE ADS., TOO
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
©RPHEUM
Week  Commencing
Monday, January 31, 1921
ANNETTE
KELLERMAN
Star of Stage and Screen in her latest
"REVUE  DE  LUXE"
"A BIT O' EVERYTHING"
Assisted by
WALTER HASTINGS and
ALTON & ALLEN
FLO and OLLIE WALTERS
Two Sunbeams
TUSCANO  BROTHERS
Skilful Wielders of Roman Axes
STUART BARNES
Favorite   Singing  Comedian
Have a Smile in  Paris with
VOKES & DON
Who  crossed  the  Ocean   because  it  is
"WET"
THE   RAMSDELLS   and   DEYO
BESSIE and  WILLIAM ALICE
Presenting a Series of
Dance  Novelties
"Parlez Vous Francais?"
JANET OF FRANCE
and  CHARLES  W.   HAMP
In   a   Piquant   Musical   Play,   entitled
"SONG SHOPPING"
British  Weekly Concert  Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF   BOOKS,    Etc.
Clarke Sc Stuart (Eo.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
January 27, 1921
Famous ,
Pride of the Weft
Hand-Knit
Coats
Regular $11.75 for
$8.75
Medium  heavy   weight   coats,   with
shawl    collar,    in    emerald,    khaki,
maroon,    fawn,    brown,    grey   and
olive.    Sizes 34 to 44.
Sale price
$8.75
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM  BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY, WEST
WHERE ARE
THE AD. MEN?
Either the U.B.C. men do not
read their paper, or they do
not care to become advertising
men.
I think perhaps we had better
include the young women. I
really need some copy.
A 3-lb box of Sapp's Chocolates
for the best advertisement, or
series of them, sent through
the "Ubyssey."
Robt. Sapp
CANDY MAN
814   ROBSON   STREET
DISCUSS RECIPROCITY
The Freshmen had charge of the
meeting of the Agriculture Discussion
Club on Wednesday last, and the upper
years were entertained to a very lively
debate on the much-discussed reciprocity
question.
Mr. G. Howard took the lead for the
affirmative. He clearly demonstrated
that the idea of reciprocity was to equalize tariffs and effect a satisfactory exchange of products, and further pointed
out that these two great countries would
be brought together more closely commercially. In closing, he proved that the
tariff has, throughout history, held peoples and nations down, and that the advise of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, who declared
that reciprocity was "a sound policy,
sound economically, and for the good of
the  country,"  should be followed.
The leader for the negative, Mr. E.
Langston, proved himself a most capable
speaker, and showed how unsatisfactory
the former reciprocity treaty had worked.
"It is only since the termination of this
treaty that Canada has been enabled to
lay the foundation of her ever growing
industries," he declared, "but even yet
Canada is in but the embryo stage of industrial expansion, and, like all embryos,
must be protected."
The supporter of the affirmative, Mr.
A. H. Plummer, made out a very strong
case in favor of reciprocity, taking England for example, whose workers are the
highest paid in Europe, and where commodities are cheapest.
Mr. H. E. West, the second speaker
on behalf of the negative, strongly emphasized protection from the agricultural
viewpoint, and, among many other examples, quoted the case of milk, which is
to-day being shipped across the B. C.
border to the detriment of our own producers.
JUNIOR EC. CLUB
Some of us had very vague ideas as to
what a "Free Port" was before we went
to the meeting of the Junior Ec. Club on
Wednesday night last. It was at Ye
Little Brown Inn, and there was a very
good attendance. Mr. H. H. Stevens,
M.P., the speaker of the evening, took as
his subject, "Vancouver as a Free Port."
SAMUEL BUTLER
A meeting of the Letters Club was held
on Tuesday, January 18th, at the home of
Dr. S. D. Scott. "Samuel Butler" was
the subject of the paper by Mr. L. McLennan. Following this, the audience
discussed the works of modern Canadian
authors.
STUDENT SERVICE
Dr. J. Williams Ogden, F.R.G.S., was
the speaker at the annual student service
at Chalmers Church on Sunday evening
last. There was a large attendance of
University students and friends, and
several young men of the 'Varsity "Y"
made excellent ushers in the U.B.C. reserved section. "Experience the Final
Test of Faith" was the topic of the
address.
SECOND WEEK
Students' Cafeteria
Candies.   Stationery,   Tobacco
Lunches,   11.30   to  2
9 to 3
We hope you think our service has
improved and we are doing better
every day. We do catering of every
description, and would like to quote
for your next class supper. Our hall
at 641 Granville Street will accommodate 60 couples for dancing, whist
drives,  or  smoking  concerts.
The more money we take at the
Cafeteria, the more profit for the Students' Council, as we return a percentage.
Proprietor, The Tally Ho, 1013 Rob-
Kon Street, and The Old Country Tea
Rooms, 641 Granville Street (upstairs).
A. WALTER. Phone,  Sey. 2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two Blocks from Vancouver Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville  and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W.  D.  Wood Limited
MAURICE  PERRIN,   Manager January 27, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR YOUNG MEN
Glad   to   show  the   new  models.
They are entirely different.
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Foster
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAT YOUNG
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
-of-
"The Ubyssey"
for  1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment.
INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES
(Continued from Page 1)
unnecessary statistics. The negative
challenged the value of their opponents'
authorities, notably in the case of the
Hearst papers and the New Republic. In
rebuttal, all arguments were denied
seriatim.
As to delivery, the visitors appeared to
better advantage. Peardon proved up to
the standard we have learned to expect
from him, and was only rivalled by
Blaine, the second Washington speaker,
whose manner is forceful and slightly
dictatorial, and whose speech is clear and
fluent. His facts are well marshaled, except in rebuttal, but are presented with
a rapidity somewhat bewildering. Raines
(Washington) is a younger man, less
ready in his diction, though without nervousness. He speaks with remarkable
freedom from notes. It is in this point
that Graham, our second speaker, is
weakest. Too much reading and an appearance of nervousness marred an excellent speech and a rare gift of turning
his opponents' arguments against themselves.
The single brilliant flash of the evening, however, was the last rebuttal. It
is in impromptu debate that Peardon
shows to best advantage a quick perception of fact and the value of fact, and a
graceful delivery enlivened by a certain
caustic humor, and unmarred by any
trace  of self-consciousness.
In Seattle Mr. James Lawrence and
Mr. George Clarke lost by a two-to-one
vote to Mr. Marcus Abelset and Julian
Mathews. Our boys report that they were
royally entertained in the American city,
and were informed that they were the
first visiting team to get even one vote
against Washington in many years.
CLASSICS CLUB
The success of the opening meeting of
the Classics Club on January 19th augurs
well for the future of this infant society.
There was a large attendance of members, and, while those of the male
persuasion were in a decided minority,
they were reinforced by a full turn-out of
the faculty of the department. The ancient civilization of Crete, as pictured by
Prof. Robertson, proved to be a fascinating subject, and provoked considerable
discussion.
THE GREAT WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which   matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The.cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A  SAVINGS  ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the h'abit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
TO REASONABLE
FOLKS
If each citizen in the Province
would make it a personal matter
to buy only made-in-B. C. goods,
we would have no closed factories
and basic industries, nor would we
have an unemployment question.
You can get made-in-B. C. School
Supplies  and   Personal   Stationery.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturing  Stationers
VANCOUVER  AND  VICTORIA,   B.C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
January 27, 1921
IN OTHER COLLEGES
By  EXCHANGE
With pleasure we acknowledge the
Christmas numbers of our various exchanges—The Brandon College Quill,
McMaster University Monthly, Mount
Allison Argosy, The Gateway, The John-
ian, The Puget Sound College Trail, The
Washington Sun-Dodger, Acadia Athenaeum, and the McGill Daily, 'Varsity, and
Washington Daily.
Occasional use of our name and frequent quotations of our special brand of
humor indicate the presence of "The
Ubyssey" on the files of these exchanges.
Oxford this year has thrown open its
doors and entered the list of "Co-ed"
colleges. But how could a mere woman
get away with the "Oxford manner"?
In our American friend, "The Trail,"
of Puget Sound College, is an advertisement for "The Candy with a Concience."
We suppose that refers to Plymouth
Rock candy.
* *      *
From the McGill Daily: Class Stones
—Freshman, Emerald; Sophomore, Blar-
neystone; Junior, Grindstone; Senior,
Tombstone. And, for fear they should
feel left out, we hasten to add: Faculty,
Scarab!!
* *     *
"The 'Varsity," Toronto, has a recent
editorial headed, "That So-Called College
Spirit." The ambitious Freshman, w£
are told, applauds the spirit in "a flash of
color, a blast of jazz, which makes everybody tingle." This is perhaps spirit, but
rather well diluted. "The point is, we
are building a medium to express a spirit
of which we do not possess even the
glimmerings. . . . Fundamentally, we need
to become social. Until we feel an interest for the man in Classics and History and Science, and want to mix with
him and exchange ideas, we can have no
objects in common. Dealing deftly with
your own and another man's ideas and
delighting in it, wanting to draw a person out and test your own ideas when
under the attack of his, is the dawn of
college spirit, the type that we need."
* ■ *     *
Poor little freshettes,
Always  downtrodden;
Moaning their luckless lot,
All  tear-besodden.
Nothing disturbs  the  sophs.,
Juniors don't care;
Only the freshettes go
Tearing their hair.
Siy .Senior!
Freshie—I need $5 for my caution
money, and I have only four.
Senior—That's"-e_asy. Pawn the $4 for
three and sell the^pawn ticket for $2.
^"Why do they call the baby 'Bill'?"
"He   was   born   on   the   first   of   the
month."
"Awgwan!"
By P.I.N.S.
Examination results at the University
of California show that the average
woman student has greater literary possibilities than has the average man student.
* *      *
In the University of Michigan only 20
out of 453 students read "serious magazines." Thirty-two read the Atlantic
Monthly, and 270 the Saturday Evening
Post.
* *     *
The Faculty of the University of California took exception to jokes appearing
in the college paper. It cost the publication $200 to make the necessary corrections.
* *     *
The season's profits of the Oregon
Agricultural College football team
amount to $12,500.
A constitutional amendment to the
effect that the editor of the University
of Washington Daily be chosen by a
press council instead of by general elections was passed with a majority of over
a thousand votes.
The University of California is to be
presented with a silver football as winner of the California-Ohio football game.
Each member of the team will receive a
small gold football.
Dr. J. S. Plasket, director of the Dominion Observatory at Victoria, gave an
address last week at an assembly of the
students of Washington University on
"Modern Ideas of the Universe." A suggestion for our A.M.S. meetings-to-be.
University of California, Berkeley:
"A new magazine of student opinion will
be published on the college campus next
month. The magazine will be of the
'liberal' type, and has faculty sanction so
long as the criticism does not become
personal."    And  how long will that  be?
Count Ilza Tolstoy, the son of the
great Russian, has been lecturing
throughout the States. This month he
has spoken at Stanford University, the
College of the Pacific, and the Oregon
Agricultural College. His subject at the
last-named college was, "The Truth
About Russia.' The truth about Russia
ought to be worth listening to.
Freshmen at Columbia will receive
Freshmen Activity buttons for participation in college activities.
During the past 20 years the Faculty
of the University of California have had
no occasion to interfere in the self-government of the student body.
When Wanting Nice
Things to Eat
CUSICK
CAN   SUPPLY   YOUR  WANTS
From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cuslck.
Cor. Heather and Broadway, West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
Serge
Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
jfaglpott - (Kraft
Thos. Fooler
& Co., Ltd.
ONE STORE ONLY
514 GRANVILLE ST.

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