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The Ubyssey Dec 1, 1961

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 RESTRICTED^
■»
SHE'S NOT
FOR YOU.,
•
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   FRIDAY,   DECEMBER   1,   1961
No .34
Busters   car   towing   soars
above   university   average
50 times more
in single year
Busters two trucks towed more than 50 times as many cars
last year than are towed on the average North American
campus of UBC's size in a year.
And errant parkers paid up to eight times as much for
third ofences as on other campuses.
The fi<mrps wee revealed in
an eigbt-t>a<?e purvey of University r>arkin^ prob'ems complete^
by the Engineering Undergraduate Society.
The report, which was submitted to student council showed:
• 1,800 automobiles were
Impounded on UBC campus last
year compared to the average
11.000 — student university's
total of 35.
• UBC students were fined
on a sliding scale of $5, $10 and
$25 for three offences compared
with the almost standard scale
of $1.50, $3 and $5.
""A   hundred   students   could
have   received    $100   bursaries
with what we paid Buster's last j
year,"   said   Ron    Pssker,    En-j
'ar to the $25 Guarantee students
in residence post each year to
cover damage, to cover three
fines per year. Money not used
by fines would be returned to
the students at the year's end.
It proposed students be fined
on a $5, $5, and $10 scale.
The report also suggested that
individual students pay for their
towing charges.
The bookkeeping for the deposit system, the report proposed .could adequately be looked after by five students, on a
part-time basis, at a cost annually of $2,000.
This would save the student
body $8,000 at least, the report
concluded.
Council has formed a parking
committee  to examine and  im-
gineering 3,   who  was   head  °* j plement the EUS survev.
the committee studying the park-	
St. Francis
boycott
stopped
THE UBYSSEY EDITORS and staff wish you a Merry Chrismas
and a Happy New. Year. And good luck in your exams. Since
this is the final edition of the paper this term, the staff seems
to have rebelled against writing the usual material. Beware.
Anything you read may be used against you! (And us!)
ing problem.
The study compared UBC with
56 other North American uni-
versies.
"UBC's parking policy has
been like Topsy," said Parker.
"It just grew. No definite policy
was ever formulated.
"The whole thing mushroomed
into what we've got now."
The survey suggested that a
five-man appeal and policy
board be set up to deal with written appeals and suggest policy
to the administration. A faculty
chairman, a faculty member, an
administrator and two students
would make up the board.
It also suggested that students
in future pay a $20 deposit, simi-
Former B.C. lieutenant-governor
leaves $1 million to University
The University of B.C. has received $1.1 million.
This is the bequest made in
the will of former lieutenant-
governor Charles Arthur Banks
which  was published Thursday.
The money will be used to set
up a Charles and Jane Banks
foundation to aid needy students.
Banks died Sept. 28 at the age
of 77. He served as lieutenant-
governor of British Columbia
from 1946 to 1950.
University officials said, "Mr.
Banks has been a generous
friend of the University in the
past and this is evidence of his
interest in University affairs.
"In recent years, larger numbers of students have been entering the fields of science and en-
ginering. We are very happy to
know that more funds will be
available for distribution to students who need money to get
through."
The Salvation army will receive one quarter of the $2.2
million estate.
The bequests are subject to a
life interest in the entire estate
for Bank's  widow,   Jane   Charlotte Banks.
Vancouver foundation received
$10,000 and Central City Mission received a similar amount
from the Banks' estate. The bulk
of the state is in securities.
ANTIGONISH, N.S. (CUP) --
A two-day boycott of classes was
called off Thursday at St. Francis Xavier University after agreement over a dispute was reached
between student officials and
the university administration.
The strike, approved in a university-wide referendum, Monday night, was called after
negotiations with the university
officials failed and a five-day
extension on the annual Christmas leave was refused.
A meeting of the general student body was called after a
meeting of the 30-member student legislature voted unanimously to hold a referendum on
the boycott.
The meeting, attended by more
than 100 students, fully supported the legislatre's decision
with only 11 students voting
against the motion and one ab-
stension.
When the strike vote was
called for, Student Legislature
members had virtually given up
hope of getting the required extension. They called the strike a
"moral victory."
The student government has
been dissatisfied with the treatment received from the administration for some time, and many
student leaders called the walkout "the exploding point" in a
long series of grievances.
The strike action started Nov.
19 when, at the regular SL meeting, members started to complain about the length of the
mid-year vacation. Later in the
week, the SL inner executive
met with members of the university administration but they
refused to consider any extension.
Two more to retire
UBC to lose two distinguished Deans
By MIKE GRENBY
Two more of the University's leading educators will
retire at the end of the current school year,, it was
learned by The Ubyssey
Thursday.
year,  it  was learned  by  the
Ubyssey Thursday.
They are Dean S. N. F.
Chant, dean of Arts and
Science, and Dean E. D. Mc-
Phee, Assistant to the President and Dean of Administrative and Financial Affairs.
*      *   •■*■'■..
President Dr. Norman MacKenzie has struck' committees to advise him concerning
successors  for the  two  men.
Earlier  this  week,   it   was
announced that Dr. MacKenzie would retire July 1 of
next year. He will be succeeded by Dr. John B. Mac^
donald, 43, of Boston, a Harvard professor of Microbiology.
*       *       *
Dean Sperrin Noah Fulton
Chant, 65, dean of the faculty
of Arts and Science, professor and head of the Department of Psychology, came to
UBC in 1945 and was appointed Dean of the Faculty
in 1948.
Born in St. Thomag, Ont.,
he received his BA. from the
University of Toronto in 1922
and   his   M.A.   in   1924.   He
taught psychology there from
1922 to 1945.
Dean Chant was appointed
chairman of the Royal Commission on Education for
British Columbia whose controversial "Report on Primary
ami Secondary Education in
B.C." was released in December, 1960.
*       *       *
A veteran of both world
wars, Dean Chant was
awarded an O.B.E, He has
published about 80 articles in
psychological journals and
books, and is a past president
of the Canadian Psychological
Association and the Vancouver
Institute.
Dean Earle Douglas MacPhee, 57, former dean of the
Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration, is
now Assistant to President N.
A. M. MacKenzie and Dean
of Administrative and Financial Affairs.
He was born in Lower Mill-
stream, N.B., and received his
M.A. and B.Ed, from the University of Edinburgh in 1920.
In 1955 he was made an Honorary C.A., and in 1961 was
awarded an Honorary LL.D.
at UBC.
*       *       *
He was professor of psychology at Acadia University
and the Universities of Alberta
and Toronto. He came to UBC
in 1950.
Dean MacPhee served in the
First World War and has
spent 20 years as Managing
Director or Senior Executive
ih a variety of industrial and
commercial organizations.
*       *       *
Both Dean MacPhee and
Dean Chant are married. Their
retirements become effective
at the end of the current session.
Dr. John Gordon Andison,
64, head of the Department of
Romance Studies, will also
retire in 1962.
Dr. Andison came to UBC
in 1949. Page  2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, December  1,  1961
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C-
u Friday, December 1 ,1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Drift
WORDS
ByMIKEGRENBY
The sirens se^t their wailing
crescendo over the city a few
minutes after nine on Christmas morning.
They   were   silenced   when
-the bomb fell 10 minutes later.
It wasn't a direct hit but
everything was quiet as if in
symipathy with the nearby
devastated area.
*   *   it
The Family had a fallout
-shelter.
Just a week before the bomb,
Mother had put a few of the
prescribed essentials into the
shelter. She hadn't had any
premonitions, any hunches —
"only a spare afternoon and.
that Civil Defence booklet
with all the cheerful instructions.
When the sirens had started,
the whole Family was at
home. Son turned on the radio.
" . . . not a false alarm. Take
-cover   immediately,"    an   announcer repeated in a nervous,
worried voice.
The Family went into the
shelter.
When   the   explosion   came,
Mother and Daughter jumped
a little. The shelter shook and
a cup fell to the floor, shatter-
^ing.
Father switched on the small
transistor radio. The sudden
burst of static made him start.
"Now what?" asked Daughter.
"Guess we just sit it outv"
Son said.  "It'll only be for a
couple  of days,  won't  it,  Farther?"
ik   ■&   -fr
Christmas Day dawned clear
arid cold.
But this Family didn't know
it was • Christmas. The bomb
had made them forget all
about Christmas.
Mother was the first one to
get sick.
"My stomach must be nervous, too;" she had laughed ft
off.-But the attacks had become more frequent and when
she started to vomit blood, the
rest ol the Family realized
what was happening.
, Mother was still barely conscious when Father and Daughter began to have fits of diarrhoea  and vomiting.
Somehow Mother lingered
on as Father and Daughter
were dying, but at almost the
precise moment that Son felt
the first nauseous tremor pass
through him, Mother gave a
convulsive  shudder  and   died.
Between spasms Son stood
and stared unbelievingly at his
Family, lying in the shelter,
strangely unreal in death. For
some reason he turned on the
little transistor radio. Static
still crackled out of the speaker.
Three violent attacks one after the other left Son crumpled
on the floor.
As if in reverence for the
moment the static. suddenly
stopped, and through some
trick of the. atmosphere, a
Christmas carol sang into the
silent shelter:
"Hark the herald angels sing,
Glory to the new-born king;
Peace on earth  .   .   ."
MISS STUDENT BODY, Mary Christmas, is testing a hypothesis. She heard a Classic's professor make the classic statement that the Art's Undergraduate Society could bring itself
recognition by parading nude. Being an Arts student, she
came down to The Ubyssey and offered her services. How
do you like this? (for more of her see pages 12, 13, 14,
15 and  16.)
Famous red denied
financial backing
By REI© N. WHEEP
Finance committee Tuesday refused to grant S. Claus funds
for a goodwill tour,of the university.
Beasons given for the decision
Goodies for
all from
Ubyssey
1. For Council members copies
of the book entitled "How
To Eliminate Unnecessary
Motions."
2. For Rad Soc, a year's.subscription to The Ubyssey so
their news will be up to
date.
3. For Malcolm Scott a sense
of humour.
4. To the Ubyssey photography
staff a year's supply of reminders to take the lens caps
off their cameras.
5. For the Engineers. 40 flat
beers.
6.. For the AUS a list of non-
controversial topics suitable
for debate edited by Council. 	
7. Consciences  for   the   petty
■   thieves on campus.
8. For Phil Gaglardi a clean
traffic record.
9. For my professors the grace
to know when to end a boring lecture:
10. Bicarbonate of soda for
those who intend to drown
their sorrows during the;
Christmas holidays.
PGZAFM
HAPPY
e x.a ni s ! W e
would -like to wish you all ojir
deepest resai-(l.s foj- the eominq'
period of misery. Where it is
appropriate, we also wish you
eoiifioleuces.
As you know onlv too well.
these are trying- times (no matter
iiow you look at it), so why not
brighten up a few of yojir spare
moments'* (JET STONED!! This
method has proven a great misery-softener, and often ean give
great insight to all problems at
hand (while never really solving   them).
Anothei- tested method of redwing this gloom, and sometimes
even bringing on a state of mild
euphoria, is to drown youi- sorrows , deep in the middle of a
delicious, steaming hot pizza, o-
sandwich from the PIZZARAMA
kitchen.
You don't have to leave your
chair to get these culinary masterpieces,, because a phone call
will     bring     any    of our     300"
different types of PIZZA or anv
of our sci-wmptious sandwiches,
steaming, hot to vour door. You
see—WE DELIVER after 6 p.m.
and delivery is FREE on orders
$2.50   or   over.
We are -also: open for lunch
every   day   for   your   convenience.
At night, on Tuesday, Thursday Friday & Saturday, we feature live entertainment—ALSO
FREE!!
Don't forget us during- the coming month just because you don't
see our ads. We'll still be rig-ht
here at 2676 WEST BROADWAY
RE   3-9016.
Our best wishes for the Festive
Season (Like, Have A Cool, Yule,
and   A   Frantic   First,   Man!)
FXSZABAMA....
2676  W. Broadway RE  3-9916
CHEZ VOUS A PARIS
Supported   by   World   University   Services   oi   Canada
and by France-Canada
Provides transportation Montreal-Paris, twenty-eight days'
accommodation and all meals with a family in Paris, language tuition, guided visits in small, discussion groups .to
places of interest in and around Paris, group entry to selected museums, personal interest of experienced directors,
for     : . ■____ _ . _ _„. $750.00
DATES: July 2 -July 31
Enquire: J. Warwick, Department _of- Romance Languages,
University  of  Western   Ontario,   London,   Ontario
were:
• Claus will not visit Malcolm
Snott.
• He refuses to rent a U-drive
sleigh.
c The conference budget has
been allotted.
• He refuses, to prepare a
brief on the tour,
• Finance committee doubts
the value of the tour..
Snott told The Ubyssey Wednesday: "The decision is that of
the committee,  I do  not  even
(Continued on page 15)
See FAMOUS RED
Large, bright.- heated room,
kitchen--and bath; ideal for
student. West 11th. $37.50
monthly. MU 3-4723 doys. RE
1-4891 evenings.
Double  Breasted   Suits
Converted  to ■
Single   Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED  TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLENS
549 Granville St.
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(Show Student Card)
4435 W.lOthAve. CA 8-8718
•vr
*rr
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING c.oarbttb
'»* iVitf Page 4   .
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily  those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of  B.C.
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
,      Managing Editor Denis Stanley
Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
I       Photography Editor Don Hume
I      Senior Editor     .      Sharon  Rodney
j      Sports Editor Mike Hunter
I      Photography Manager              Byron Hender
'      Critics Editor     .........   David Bromige
f STAFF THIS ISSUE
f Layout by Mary Christmas
i REPORTERS: Mike Grenby, Ken Warren. Pat Horrobin,
' Sharon   McKinnon,   George   Railton,   Eric   Wilson,
\ Chris  Fahrni,   Krishna Sahay,  Joy  Holding,  Mike
i Horsey, Richard Simeon, Bob Cannon, Ian Cameron.
i;        SPORTS: Deskman Bill Willson, Bert MacKinnon, Glenn
Schultz. Ron Kydd, Dieter Urban.
Peter Wood, Pauline Fisher.
TECHNICAL: Bob Cannon, Fred Jones, Beatrice Wong,
T H E
UBYSSEY
Friday, December 1, 1961
♦:*
"* .\ -*■ ■*-
N2.     x ..(.-< .     f
Consider
The fengineering undergraduate society is to be commended for its presentation of a report on university parking facilities and control.
It poses a question that has long been in the mind of students and has not yet been answered satisfactorily.
The question is: Why must the students of this university
subsidize Buster's or any other towing company to the tune
of $10,000~per year?
Why should every car incorrectly parked be towed to a
compound and held there until the owner arrives, money in
hand, to claim his vehicle?
It doesn't happen at the majority of other universities.
Certainly the city of Vancouver would not even consider such
a scheme.
Yet, the system remains at UBC with the students paying
for it.
i      And they do pay for it.
Quick figuring indicates that the average student who is
;ffried at UBC, pays something slightly over five dollars. If he
|was at an average campus anywhere else in North America, he
'would be paying about two dollars.
There is of course one difference.
Other campuses have found methods of fining students
without going through the costly and troublesome business
of first making sure his car has been towed and held under
lock and key.
Other campuses use tickets. A car is towed only when it
is parked; in a manner which is dangerous to other vehicles
;pr is blocking access or service routes. These, universities do
■not tow a car merely because it is parked in the wrong lot.
Such a system can bring only chaos, such as we have here.
This is the third year the present system has been in force
at UBC. It was antiquated before it began.
If those responsible for such things are unable to come up
with a better system than that in use at present, it is their
responsibility to carefully consider the proposal now advanced
by the students.
—K.B.
Spunk
There's still some hope for Canadian women! At least
there seems to be. Following the editorial in Wednesday's
Ubyssey, we received many letters (most of them unsigned)
wondering what sort of "idiot, fool, fink, etc.," would write
such a piece. These girls have spunk! Pity they did not have
the courage to sign their efforts. They should be proud of striking a blow for the underprivileged, downtrodden Canadian
Female.
And underprivileged and downtrodden they are, too! Why,
some of them even have to open doors for themselves and carry
their own books or umbrellas. Some even have to stand in
a filled bus while males lounge comfortably in the seats. Yes
sir, they sure lead a rough life.
Surprising how many females took the editorial personally.
Letters to the Editor
Hoax! hoax!
Dear Santa:
Please bring a two-button
suit and a wide tie. I won't
be needing my ivy league stuff
anymore.
JOHN MACDONALD
Boston
Dear Santa:
Please send me a gavel.
MALCOLM SCOTT
Dear Santa:
Please send me a gavel,
PAT GLENN
too.
Dear Santa:
Please send Scott and Glenn
to Hell.
ERIC RICKER
Dear Santa:
Please, if you wear your red
coat, don't let me mistake you
for a hunter. I'm a dear.
BUBBLES RODNEY
Dear Santa:
Please send me a bromo-
seltzer.
BURPY
Dear Santa:
Please send me Burpy.
A LONELY YOUNG GIRL
Dear Santa:
Please send me a lonely
young girl.
BROADBELLY
Dear Santa:
Please answer the last three
letters, its unhealthy down
here.
STAFF
Dear Santa:
Please send me a razor.
TERRY GUEST
Dear Santa:
Please send me a beard.
AL SAWBY
Dear Santa:
Please send me a megaphone.
DEITRICH LUTH
Dear Santa:
Please send me a muzzle.
NUCLEAR
DISARMAMENT CLUB
Dear Santa:
Please send us a man.
PHYLLIS ROSS HALL
Dear Santa; 5
Please send us Phyllis Ross
Hall.
KOOTENAY HOUSE
Dear Santa:
' Please send  the   women   to
Acadia next year.
FORT AND RESIDENCE
PORTERS
Dear Santa:
Please send me some long
black cats. We need them for
censored signs.
PAT GLENN
Dear Santa:
Please take B.C. away and
bring me a new province.
JOHN DEIFENBAKER
Dear Santa:
Please bring us Malcolm
Scott for Christmas — we'd
like to use him in our celebration.
UCC
Dear Santa:
Please bring me the exam
time-tabl£ arranger for Christmas.
13,000 STUDENTS
Dear Santa:
AH I want for Christmas is
a few weekend passes.
A RESIDENT
Dear Santa:
We need some money. Ath-,
letes  have  to have  Christmas
trips as incentive — spring and
fall trips aren't enough.
MAC
Santa:
Please bring us some free
thought and controversy for
Christmas.  We don't have any.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Mr. Claus:
Enclosed   please    find    Mr.
Khrushchev.   He's all yours.
JFK
Pansies and pot holes
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Certain roads in the campus
area, like "Agronomy" for instance, are full of large potholes
which shatter both automobiles
and nerves.
Perhaps between the Endowment Lands, and Buildings and
Grounds Departments there is
argument as to which holes are
whose; nevertheless they go unrepaired.
Meanwhile people go on raking leaves despite gale force
winds and continue planting
pansies on the eve of hoarfrosts — ignoring the potholes
entirely. Although all students
surely hate leaves and love
pansies; still, we are bound to
the principle of "first things
first."
Certainly we all petition for
the abolition of potholes.
Yours truly,
GEORGE BLOURT
Arts II
Divine duty?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.   •
Dear Sir:
It appears there is a small
element of hoodlumism thriving on this campus at the expense of those who place trust
in their fellow students.
On Thursday afternoon, Nov.
23, I returned to my car to find
that the owner of a size 10
shoe had cleverly > and artistically left the imprint of his heel
in the centre of a large dent in
the hood of my green Morris
Minor.
Such a person obviously feels
it his divine duty to leave his
imprint on society — but why
in such a degrading manner.
This person Craves recognition — if he can't gain it in an
academic manner! then he uses
baser methods.
I don't believe this person
could perpetrate an art of this
nature by himself. He hasn't
the intestinal fortitude. He
needs the security of the gang.
This is the same type of person
■who roams the streets at night
in the company of fellow punks
looking for little children to
beat up—not the type of person should expect to find in
attendance at a university.
I imagine we can gain a little
comfort in the fact that this
particular individual relieves
his pent-up frustrations only on
inanimate objects.,
; I should be more grateful if
any witnesses to this crime
would contact the writer at AM
1-7696. It would indeed be
more interesting to reduce the
owner of this childish mentality to his proper status.
The  act was committed between 8 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. in
the third row of Lot "C".
Yours truly,
J. D. GIBB
Arts I
Stuck-up-ness
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Editor:
Re: Jack Ornstein's ". . . (?)"
Well, Jack, I always thought
you were stuck on yourself,
but as for sticking your neck
out to admit how "sticky" your
"stuck-up-ness" is, well, stick
one on me!
I was most pleased to note
. your profound explanation of
the relatedness of things, especially Jews as "baby eaters",
or "Babe Beaters", — which
was it now? Must have been
the latter, as you erudites say.
Amen, I say.
To be stuck on stickiness or
what have you, I am pleased
to know of late (that is, not
latter, this time), that you have
great knowledge in philosophy
and things in that is why you
write in great explicity (or
explicitness), or Ex-od-us^-or,
yes, lets us get out too!
Thank you.
Yours truly,
MISS J. COULAS
(Erasmus Ex)
"Captive class"
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I would like to congratulate
our engineers on their extreme
ingenuity and cleverness. Consider the problem of constructing a bridge  to carry perhaps
millions of people safely above
a swirling river or the problem
of  computing the  stress on  a
solid  wall   of  concrete  which   '
must   support   a   twenty-four
story  building—the  engineers'
fund of knowledge is amazing!
I am  reminded   of  another
example    of   the  keen  minds
found   in   our   own   school   of
engineering; an absolutely profound   idea   that  upwards  of
two  hundred  students can be
made captives by simply -wiring the handles of the students'
lecture   room   doors together.
Tremendous! And, just contemplate   a  moment,    when  they
have  to   break out   forcefully
they   can   be accused of willfully damaging university property. All one has to do is make
one student give his name and
then   he   can   be   accused of
causing any destruction.
Great! Of course not all engineers are quite that clever,
some are even stupid enough
to try and prevent the girls
from being pushed around in
any scuffle which might result. Others might even think
the idea of locking a class up
a little childish and absurd, but
then one must always make
allowances for such fools because in any group there are
a few who tend to give the
group a bad name.
Again, in closing, I take my
hat off to the select individuals in and out of our
schools of engineering who are
concerned for the safety of
their fellow men.
Yours truly,
GARY WICKETT
An admiring member of the
captive class who is glad there
was not a fire in the engineering building Friday at 2:30
p.m. Fiidoy, December 1 ,1961
T HE       U BYSSEY
Page. 5
What price "Freedom"
Jack Ornstein
■
'In Florida, an argument has broken out as to whether
or not bomb shelters should admit both whites and negroes.'
—Financial Post.
I do not think that, we should admit both whites and
negroes. We should definitely keep out the whites. I refer
to the whites who made this argument necessary and to those
who would for a moment dream of closing the shelter door
on someone because his skin pigmentation is different. When
all are going to end up being burned to a coal-black crisp (or
whit or yellow or whatever human crisps look like), what's
the difference if one is black before entering the shelter?
This is the point. Anyone who seriously thinks that at shelter is protection against sustained nuclear fallout or blast
ought to read the last four copies of the Saturday Review.
Norman. Cousins has written a series of telling articles called
Shelters, Survival and Common Sense. In essence he argues
that our only realistic hope for protection from a nuclear war
is to prevent it from occurring. The state of anarchy among
nations must be changed to one of association under a common
world law. That is, if we are not "one-worlders," (a dirty
word among John Birchers, Moral Re-Armamenters and the
Ku Klux Klan), we'll likely be "none-worlders."
I take it that Cousins would have us strenghthen the
U.N. and through a centralized, authorized and representative
world government, introduce some peace and sanity into international relations;-r- much as the central, authority in the
USA does its damndest to make sanity and order prevail in
some recalcitrant southern states.
Which brings us to the.above question. Some argue that
we'll go to war to defend freedom and the American (Canadian) way of life. Does this mean freedom to enterprise and
to segregate or does it mean equality of opportunity, equality
before the law and the freedoms of speech, (ir) religion and the
private pursuit of happiness? Most of the time I think that
it means the former. Just as the "dead" in "red or dead" usually
<, means annihilation of us all rather than suicide for those wEo
would prefer death to communism. Now it is one thing to
prefer suicide to communism and it's another thing to build
shelters, rattle rockers, vilify the sworn enemy of "freedoifi"
and prepare to kill everyone off! I7
My point today (mah. friends) is that some of us have a
world of soul-searching to do before we scramble madly for
"shelters" or acquire nuclear weapons to "defend freedom."
I detest the sort of thing that's been going on in the soviet
camp for the past few decades but it grieves me even more
to see all the cherished ideals, which we at last paid lip service
to, being flushed down the drain of doom. I urge you all to
read the Saturday Review.
Letters to the Editor
Get lost boys
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
What's wrong with UBC
boys?
Nothing that a few shoulder
pads and common sense won't
cure. They lack all the qualities that make a man, mainly
common dency towards the fair
sex. If they don't like what
they see then who is asking
them to look? Let them hold
their own., hands on Saturday
night.
'there are four males to
every female on this campus
and I am sure that the men
wouldn't mind if the boys got
lost.
Yours truly,
RON MARTIN
Arts II
On debates
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Having read about Student
Council's action of dropping
plans for a debate on homosexuality, may I point out some
facts on debating.
There are two types of formal debates usually carried on
at universities^ The first involves competitive debating
between two opposing sides. A
debator in such competitions
must use the art of persuasion
in his attempt to win, and may
have to argue PQ|nts in which
he does not reajy'ljelieye
Examples of this type are
the McGoun Cup between four
of the Western Canadian universities, and the Inter-FacUlty
debates.
The second type involves
"educational" debates which
are used .to- acquaint the university community with the
issues on the leading public
questions. Examples of this
type are the Student Forums
where such issues are raised by
debators, and then the student
' *.. \J?        '     .{V
audience is asked to comment
from the floor.
I regret that the student
body has not shown more interest in this aspect of campus
life as I feel it is very important on the campus, and it is
another way in which students
can learn to think and speak
for themselvep.
There is an obviously more
popular type of "debate" which
discusses, subjects, often those
to do with sex, in such a way
that the audience ean^ have a
good laugh. Perhaps the famous
"Chastity Debate" was of such
a nature, but the annoying
thing is that the majority of
the critics of that "debate" apparently did not know what
was actually discussed or the
manner in which it was handled. They were shocked, chas-'
tity without considering
whether or not it was a formal,
competitive or educational debate.
I do not believe the public
was told what type of the one
on Homosexuality was to have
been. Perhaps it was to have
been an educational debate?
One gathers, however, that if
any topic with the word "homo-
'sexuality" in it were debated,
there would be a great public
outcry because it would involve such a "touchy" ■ subject.
The topic for this year's McGoun Cup debate was almost
chosen to be "Resolved that the
sexjial morals of a nation
should be legislated.;' -I Submit
that if thishad been the serious
competitive debate topid ..this
year, there would prabSMy
have been many critics because
the word "sexual" was ' included. The outcry from these
critics could lead to the prohi
bition of serious debating 6n
subjects having even fhe slightest hint at sex.
Is UBC going to continue to
be a university where there
can be intelligent discussions
and debate, or will it become
1962 and 1963 ENGINEERING or
HONOR CHEMISTRY GLASSES
THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
HAMILTON, ONTARIO. POINTE CLAIRE, QUEBEC
has openings for permanent employment for graduating men
and
openings for summer employ ment for those in Class of'63
'  in ■ ,
PRODUCT RESEARCH
PROCESS DEVELOPMENT
PRODUCTION SUPERVISION
QUALITY CONTROL
Company representatives  will be present for campus
PROJECT ENGINEERING
MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING
PACKAGING DEVELOPMENT
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
INTERVIEWS: January 9,10,11,12
Personal interviews may be arranged through your Placement Office
a woman's club where the most
daring   topic   discussed would
be the current hemline height?
PETER HEBB,
Law I,
President, Western
Canadian Universities
Debating League
Dear Santa
Editor, '
The Ubyssey,
Dear Santa:
We have observed your
traditionally red costume, we
have seen you spying in the
skies every December over innocent Canadian homes. We
know for a fact that your beard
and belly are false. We have
our spies too, you know!
We warn you. You cannot
continue this nonsense much
longer. We don't openly accuse
you of being a filthy red communist frying to destroy freedom in the freest free world
ever. But we do think that you
are acting like a communist
might act. Cease or we'll bo-
mark you out of the sky, you
enemy of all we hold dear you.
Yours truly,
THE CMPR and FIEF
The Ubyssey will run unsigned letters only if the
editor knows the identity oi
the writer. We had three good
letters for today's edition
which were unsigned when
they came into ihe office.
Hence they were not prints^.
now..
two added
ingredients
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OF  TONY'S
TASTE
IN   FIXE
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VNT)    shirts
MEET
TOST   HALL,
C'L'R   X'r""~
BARTENDER
TO   MAKE.
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BUYING
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TRYj UvR 'iVKW
SERVICE
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• Dress shirts in all sizes
• Slim ties, wide ties,
bow ties
• Cuff links, tie racks, bars
• Socks in all subdued hues
TWO  EXTRAS
• Man tailored shirts for
ladies
• Free gift wrapping
shirt rn tie bar
658 SEYMOUR  ST.
"Come in and tie one on" Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, December  1,  1961
Pres, says camps too shabby
Acadia charges Prices too High'
By KRISHNA SAHAY
The new residences are too
lavish, in sharp contrast to the
camps which are barely utilitarian, says Milton Schellen-
berger, president of men in
Aeadia Camp.
For fifteen years the administration " has been promising
that the camps would be replaced but nothing has happened, he said.
The only effort to do anything  is   the  building   of  the
new residences, but the cost
of these makes it impossible
to build enough comfortable
residences.
The new residences are
open chiefly to upper year
students.
The fees charged for the
camps are entirely disproportionate to the facilities provided, Schellenberger charged:
This is because housing is not
subsidized by the university
and has to operate oh profits.
Schellenberger did not deny
that some improvements had
been made, but commented
they have been sO few and
far between that they hardly
count.
Schellenberger said the present council in Acadia has not
tried to change things this
year. The main cause for this
is that the Housing Administration "has undergone
changes, with John Haar taking the plkce of Dr. Gordon
Shrum.
CLASSIFIED
WANTED: One or two fellows
to share house 'near ■ Kits
beach with two other senior
students. Please call Morley
at HE 8-^7602 after- 10 p.m.
WANTED: Spanish 90 text book
(Rogers) in good condition.
WA 2-4088.
WANTED:- 1 -or 2 large gas
ovens. See M. Ole, parliamentary council^ Brock 303. J
WANTED: Old 78 rpm records*.
pre-1950. Phone CA 4-543.^
eves.
WANTED: Ride to Banff on or
about Dec. 18. Will share ex-
'■"Ijenses1 and driving.' Phone'
Derek, CA- 4-4*12.
felDE    WANTED:    From    30th;
and Hosebury, West Van., for
: 8:30 lectures, Dec. 4-18. Call
<5eorge,    WA    2-2325    after
6  pm.	
mEM, WANTEP:   For   9   to   a-:.
"'-vArbu*os•.■■»■ ah* Cornwall.   Se<.
vVicki,  AMS   officel ."....,.
r-
JlTEqSRS" WANTED:   For   Rossland - Trail - Castlegar area.'
Leaving    Vancouver    prefer
ably  Dec: .17,  16.   19.  Phone
. ^ut-at ge.a-^tasg. - . ■ ■ :
APABfTMENT WANTED: Prefer 2-lSedi-oom on campus apt.
under $90 per month. J$sk
*0r*J1£E' _,oc. 15, CA 4-3242
or   'Ed,'  TR   4-0410.
FOR RE&T: Two warm rooms,
kitchen, frig., 'etc. Suit 24
girls. CA 4-1581. Available
end of Dec.	
LOST OR STOLEN: Black plastic purse with gold chaia—
pair of contact lenses inside.
Please phOfie AM  6-0755^	
LOST: Will the person who
found my brown wallet in
Chem. 150-at 11:30 the 27th
please phone me at CA 4-
0'326">or >eturn ti to the
chem. office.
LOST: A turquois corduroy bag
with miscellaneous junk. If
you find (?) it please leave
at lost and found or phone
Marlene at FA 5-8755.
LOST: Would the person who
took a grey Harris tweed coat
from room 250 in the chem.
building" last Tues. please return it to the lost and found
or phone Doug at AM 1-3947.
No questions asked!
LOST:    Would   4he    girl    who
"found my wallet please phone
. M. -McHale at CA 8-8892  or
.    leave it at lost and found.
LOST:   Eyeglasses   "nth   black
, fewe^ led frames. Please con*
tact Sandra Frisby at RE 3-
4054  or  leave message.
FOUND: Three keys in a black
cage in the vicinity of the
Physics building on the East
Mall. Owner call Don, LA 1-
7048.
ATTENTION: Submit names of
suspected subversives to Pari.
Council,  Brock  363. Reward.
WATCH for the homebakin^
sale! Friday 12:30, Buchanan
Plaza.
WA\NE! Slide rule? Urgently
needed for Xmas exams —
Phone Tutti.
SANTA CLAUS is coming to
UBC Dec. 5th and 6th. YES,
VIRGINIA, there'll be two
Santas at UBC Dec. 5 and 6
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3: ADVENT STfflDAY
Stflft a.m.—Holy   Communion   (followed   by   light   bi-eakfa't)
11 :(H) 'a.m.—Holy   OoJTjiminion.    Sei-mon:    The    Rev.    H.    B.    Barrett,
General   Board   of   Religious   Kctueation.
*::!0  p.m.—W'*ensong\   Ser/non:   Rev.   13.   J.   Hulford,   Rector   of
St.  .Tarries:   "Christ and  the'Criminal."
(Jollowed   l>y   coffee  and   discJjssion)
EXAMS!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
I
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
UNIVERSITY     P HARM ACY      LTD.
5754 University  Boulevard CA. 4-3202
FOR THAT..
Holiday
Hair Style
LIONEL
NOW AT
TOWNHOUSE
BEAUTY SALON
627  Hornby MU 5-9351
Just what you've been asking for .
THE
HIGHLAND
HOUSE
114 OAKRIDGE SHOPPING CENTRE
AM 1-2646
NEW!    BERNHARD   ALTMANN   SWEATERS!
fl^.9S, $15.95   Cardigans $1895
MATCHING SKIRTI    --:•-Slim $17.95
'■".':""' • Pleated $19.95
"But, I tell you, there is no powder room.
What do you think this is, TCA?"
Next time she will choose TCA and enjoy the comfort of the DC-8 jet,
Vanguard or Viscount. Fast, luxurious and economical, too.
VANCOUVER TO CALGARY $54.00
Economy Return Fare
(Even Less on Excursion Days)
TRANS CANADA AIR LINES
AIR CANADA   ' Friday, December 1  ,1961
THE
UBY vS 5 E Y
Page  7
Few critics4
present at
food forum
By ERIC WILSON
Students appear con;ent vv>1'
food service at the University
Only four students turned os
at a public meeting Wedne^da1
to register formal complaints <>'
suggestions about campus ea1
ing.
A handful of other studdi
spectators sat in on the meeting
chaired by Peter Leask of tnt
Student Food Services Commit
tee.
A medical student, who pre
fer red to remain anonymous
.presented Exhibit "A" — a bjfc
' lunch prepared at the Me'i '
Residences cafeteria and do
scribed by the student as "a disgrace". The medical man dissected a sandwich, revealing a
limp slice of cheese and two
pieces of bread which he likened
to chewing gum.
FOOD IMPROVED
Turning to dieticians, the student noted that last' year there
were four dieticians and the
food was "rotten, to say the
least."
This year there are two dieticians and the quality of food has
improved somewhat" He said he
did not think . it necessary to
complete his formula for the
perfection of UBC food.-
(Chairman Leask later stated
that he felt this vociferous
complaint from the Men's Residences to be most significant, for
Residence officials had informed
the Food Service Committee that
all was running smoothly and
there were no complaints.)
Garry Watkins, Arts 3, suggested that coffee and milk dispensing machines be installed
in the'Brock cafeteria to relieve
some of the crowding on lunch
lines.
COMMITTEE  SURPRISED
The final word came from J.
D. Gibb, a commuter from the
city, who suggested that a system of non-resident meal passes
be est&blished at Fort Camp,
with a resulting reduction in cosv
from the present sixty-five cents-
per meal.   '     ■ !" '
Committee members were surprised that there were no suggestions made for the improvement of Saturday afternoon eating facilities. They had hoped
for strong student backing as a
means to convince one of the.
campus establishments to remain
open.
Cornette  Beauty
Salon
Special Prices for UBC
"Individual  Attention"   by
Male and Female Stylists
UP to the minute
hair styling
OPEN FRI. TILL 9
4532 W. 10th    CA 4-7440
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St. MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and  Hoods
Uniforms
We   specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes   -
Special Student Rate*
ST TIMOTHY LUTHERAN CHURCH
OH CAMPUS WORSHIP
HUT L4 - EAST MALL
11:00 a.m. every Sunday
"Everyone Welcome* ~
tf+V
THiS SURE AS HELL beats Santa and his reindeer. Guess
where me and Malcolm Snott are going on conference money  for  the  holiday.
'li
Pifdfs To
For private, commercial, night and instrument flight training at a Government. Approved Flying School, contact Abbotsford Arr Services, Box 345, Abbotsford, B.C., or phone
Ulysses 4-7231.
New Democratic Party
lenc.er Torr.my Douglas will
speak, on "Private Freedom
and Social Responsibility" at
The Vancouver Institute lee
ture at 8:i5 p.m. Saturday ii
the Armory.
Xmas Employment - Posi Office
Registration for WOMEN-Tuesday, Dec. 5
Registration for MEN - Thursday, Dec. 7
Sign up from 8:30 a.m. at the Personnel Office, Hut M 7,
West Mall
Your  WOMAN
ALDERMAN
Who can give
FULL TIME
ATTENTION
to Civic
Administration
V CONCENTRATED
GWfC EXPERIENCE
V SECRETARY   OF
"SAVE  OUR PARKLAND  COMMITTEE".
EXPERIENCE!!
DESIRE!!
WATSON, Rebecca X
Perfectly-matching sweaters and
slim slacks. Girls with the right fashion
answers choose this beautiful jumbo-knit
Shetlantex cardigan with its colourful
Jacquard front panel. New Wevenit slim
slacks dyed-to-match. Stunning Fall colours.
Cardigan, 36-42 . . . $14.98, slim slacks, 8-20
. . , $14.98. At good shops everywhere.
is not a genuine Kitten.
1
Would You Like  to  Cut   Your
Homework  Time in Half?
It's possible . . . and quite simple! Just enlist the aid
of a typewriter . . . the greatest development in writing since the quill.
You'll not only do your hoiTiework faster . . . but it
will look neat and tidy. And because you ccin learn
more by studying from typed notes, your marks sbould
also show a big improvement.
Visit our Stationery Departments and see the model
in which you're interested. We carry all recognized
makes — and feature EATON'S own famous brand
names.
EATON'S Stationery — Main Floor — MU 5-7112,
Brentwood  CY  9-5511, New Westminster,  LA  2-2741 Page 8
Friday, December 1 ,1961
THE
Ik
- pish -
by george boring
HASTILY    TO    SAY    ALL
you cats that take a lot of Tish
and wear it with a hip grin
better about-face on this Carlos
Williams bit. Me and us other
young-guy editors just realised
we got this Carlos by anagram-
izing the name Oscar!
SO HOW ABOUT THAT.
but never mind, here goes on
another Boring first, ole golden
Yeats there said he made his
song a coat or sumpthin, -well
-we can cut our coal according
to the latest cloth, man! and
here gees on Oscar as the
recentest party-line poet, the
Knight of the Black Mountain.
OBJECTIONS THAT OLE
Oscar never anthologized Olson
an' them are met by this defence, viz., he knew he'd do
'em more harm than good by
bringing 'em before the public
before the public was ready.
SURE. HIS EARLY POEMS
have an over-pertinence, too
strong a dose of appropriateness meshed up in the WHY?
of his questing syllables. But
in his later stuff, WHEN?
WHO? and HOW MUCH A
LINE? take over, an' sound
echoes sense until sense seems
te echo sound:
(Quote cut because of
space  problems)
OSCAR BRINGS US FACE
to face with that terrifying
question: what are you, young
poet, doing about it all? Are
you still interpreting? Still
claiming responsibility for your
work? Still pacing that ole
iambic cage? (Who said like
Blake's Tiger? Throw him out!)
It .gives one to think, nicht
wahr?
Remember, when you've
read this, swallow it whole. We
can't leave Tish lying around
for everyone to use.
V.L.T.A.
presents
"The   Flowering   Peach"
by Clifford Odets
DtiEector  i—©tto  Lowy
York T!iSN_rre
Bee. 6-9.-^-r- tfep. 12-16
',,    (Sold'qm\M<ec:.: 6th)"
"■-", 8i2tf pj*».
Advance Tickets    feoor Sales
Modern Music $1.50
• SIN E
A COLD WIND IN AUGUST By PETERS
DALE STAUFFER IS APPALLED at RAE BROWN'S condition in
the scene from THE WOMEN, Clare Booth Luce's comedy
which runs this week at the Cambie.
y e s /  v i r g i n i a
YES, VIRGINIA, THERE IS A PnlSM. It is a magazine
and it is putting on a play called SANTA CLAUS! A nasty
old man called Norman Young meets a nasty young man
called George Bowering on the stage of the Aud-it-or-ium on
December 5th'and 6th at noon.
Free  tickets in  front of the library 4th,  5th and 6th.
SANTA CLAUS is written by a very nasty old man
called e. e. cummings.
(Directed by Alexander Singer, U.S.A. 1961)
I never dreamed that ii would be possible
for any film to equal the sheer deliberate exploitation of sex evidenced in a film called
PRIVATE PROPERTY that was shown two
years ago at the Vancouver Film Festival. That
was until I saw A COLD WIND IN AUGUST.
At least, PRIVATE PROPERTY was very well
made; but A COLD WIND IN AUGUST doesn't
even have this redeeming feature. It is a deliberate exploitation of the success which PRIVATE PROPERTY had in art theatres in the
States, and an intentional perfidious attempt
to cash-in on the success of recent 'realistic'
films like ROOM AT THE TOP, SATURDAY
NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING and
SHADOWS
So obvious ere its tricks and treatment that
one can imagine the scenario writer explaining
the film to the director. (The director, for
publicity release purposes, will be described as
wearing blue jeans, a purple shirt and a soggy
sweater because "I'm an artist, man, I gotta
portray life as I find it." Natch.) The story
would be explained in the following way:
"It's like August, see, and hot. So we gotta
show how passions run high with the temperature. Cos it's like August. We'll get the audience in the right mood by opening the film
with a middle-aged square leering lustily at a
busty teenager in an apartment house elevator.
Then we'll bring in this sexy piece who's an
exstripper. (We'll get Lola Albright for that
part.) And we'll have some talk about how hot
if is, so's everyone gets the message. We gotta
have a message, but let's not be too subtle!
Then we'll introduce this young good-looking
guy. And we'll have him go up to this woman's
apartment to fix her air conditioner. Cos it's
like hot, see? And they gotta meet somehow
don't they? Natch. Then we'll have some crazy
camera angles and leering close-ups to show
how this woman Iris is affected by this guy,
Fido. Cos it's like August, man, and this is
liie. Then when he leaves we'll have Iris say
to her friend,
"Thjen we'll
and a big Sexy b
AT THE; TOP c
artists too. Then
scenes ^nd sex;
idea. And thert
won't sleep wit
And when she ^
you break my h
"Naturally
we'll have Iris !
a week just t©
don't tell Fido.
gotta send him
she is at. And,
natch, so do thi
man, we'll have
theatre, like wt
burlesque housi
drunkenly outre
a stairwell, and
have them come
And we gotta sh
source for his se
real, we don't v
Iris doing a lov
thing. So we'll
into a chesterfie
that like Augus
ing. Like cool, i
"And to m
sound sorta hoi
location. And '
off-beat like, an'
jazz for the cli
camera anglesr-a
bosoms. It'll be
Moral of stc
Women in Augu
The film d
feature. I wouJ
banned, but I'n
THE LONG, T:
should be banr
suppose it's con
Cancer' while
magazine stands
a chemist on the critic''s
Apparatus and Materials: one
orchestra, one conductor and
one pianist. Object: to test their
quality. Procedure: have them
play a program of familiar
compositions.
Before lhe news spreads that
a chemist has taken over the
Critics' Page let me reassure
anybody who might be reading
these words that what will follow is a review, not a chemical
analysis of Sunday's Vancouver
.Symphony Concert at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre. Yet
who knows, in this so-called
Age of Science a chemistry
degree might not constitute a
poor background for a music
critic! Oh well, back to business.
Scored for full symphony,
Sunday's opening selection,
Brahms' Variations on a Theme
of Haydn begins with a statement of the theme, the St.
Anthony Chorale, by a chorus
of oboes, bassoons, contrabas-
soon, horns, and pizzicato
double basses. There follow a
series of eight variations and a
conclusion, elaborating and
commenting ugon various parts
of the theme. Irwi'n Hoffman's
approach to these; ^variations
coupled comparative restraint"
and straightforwardness. The
gracious Sicilienne, the; seventh
variation, was taken at perhaps too slow a pace but the
playing of the orchestra
throughout  seemed .easily bet
ter than its usual standard.
As featured soloist, Leon
Fleisher presented his reading
of Beethoven's Third Piano
Concerto, in C Minor, a work
of much richer tonal texture
and emotional range than
either of Beethoven's previous
essays in this form. Fleisher, a
highly dependable pianist,
could hardly be criticized for
giving an uninteresting performance, even if less satisfying than that of his previous
appearance with the Symphony. Particularly effective
was the stately, solemn largo
movement wherein the soloist
showed both considerable capacity for -tonal gradation, and
a general evenness and clarity
YES VIRGINIA, THERE
ARE TWO SANTAS
SANTA No. 1 outside the library has a
ticket that will let you in FREE (really) to
see
"SANTA CLAUS" inside the Auditorium
a play by E. E. CUMMINGS
DIRECTOR^Caroline Friedson
STARRING—Norman Young as Santa
George Bowering as Death
Presented by 12:30, Auditorium
PRISM and m ■ „
UBC SPECIAL Tues' December 5th
,      EVENTS COMMITTEE Wed., December 6th
^ j       Tonight Through
Dec. 10!
DON'T MISS!
Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee
America's  Best  Blue  Singers
726 SEYMOUR
MU 2-9135
j S     Q£Nf  DISCOUNT EXCEPT FRI. AND 5A1.       |
INQUIRE ABOUT OUR NEW YEAR'S THING
of touch in the rolling and
cadenza passages. I say general
because trills and runs occasionally lacked evenness. These
were minor flaws, however.
The opening and final movements while somewhat less successful, rather over driven at
times and less penetrating,
were yet clear and vibrant in
execution. Except'for a few differences in tempo in these
movements, the orchestra and
conductor seemed to agree with'
Mr. Fleisher's interpretation. A
bit more emphasis here and
there would have been advan-
tagious but the level of playing
was again above average ancL-
full bodied.
For his usual rousinq finale.
Conductor Hoffman led the
orchestra in the Hary Janos
suite by the Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly. This
imaginative and witty work
comprises selections from the
composer's opera of the same
name telling the story of the
legendary rhapsodical dreamer
and story teller Hary Janos. In
depicting Hary's exploits Kodaly   has  utilized  a   variety   of
TWO GREAT LIMELITER'S A
MONO -
^ ,   ft ££ C 4
Alexander a
Appliam
4508 W. 10th Avenue SvE Y
Fridoyi December  1,  1961
Page 9
>)*3**^3*****^3(5*3**»>3»t3t
this big seduction scene.
p to precede st; If RO$H$E
it: why; can't we? WeSre-
have .some .more bedroom.
smso's everyone gets the
this other- guy that Iws ,
just wants as a friend,
sve'll have him say: 'Iris,
itta have a break-up.   So
k to being a stripper for
an old friend. And she
ate (this is like life) just
3 very burlesque theatre
, he sees the strip. And,
ence. Since this is real,
f sweaty old guys in the
it on location in a real
d then after Fido reels
theatre ;and vomits down
and Iris break-up, we'll
her for the final parting,
w Fido has found another
he leaves. And cos this is
othing melodramatic like
ap from a Window or no-
iSweJri* sobbing bittferly :
ve|s^>6ut, ;And to show
er, ^e'll-have Iris shiver-
more real we'll hare the
Just as -if it was shot on
nake the dialogue kinda
[ have some crazy modern
scenes. And lots of arty
rring close-ups of heaving
:razy, man."
igust is, like hot, man. Or:
on heat.
have a single redeeming
uggest that it should be
zed that a film such -as
IORT AND THE TALL
id this one not. . But I
•'le:to banning 'Tropic of
ng. trash to pervert the
;h.
9
" ^st ^"* ■ ®
estral effects, effects which
unday's: performance were
always in balance — such
l the Musical Clock section
-e the percussion battery
:times obscured (believe it
ot) the brasses. The open-
section of the Intermezzo
ded hurried over and could
benefitted by stronger ac-
>. Smoother string playing,
fewer mistakes in the drf-
t   horn   passages   would
been assets as weilf'Such
t of flavrsVprobably- sounds
i. serious than it really is
gh.: Generally -'the' tempo
brisk and the conception
y,/ and   large  scaled.
iturning to  the  scheme  of
opening   paragraph,   now
observations:    have   been
; T should reach a cbnclu-
Thus With .all its faults',
lay's was in ray opinion a.
;ssful concert both pro-
i-wise " and artistically.
r the ifriptirities have been
ipitated we. arc left" with a.
ion that is not only beau-
ly colored) but highly pala-
—-william littler
S AVAltABLE NOW!
O
TOR
Axelson
-td.
Vancouver 8,,B.C.
c
Y
N
I
PAGE
1      (alias the Critics' Page)
|    EDITOR: JAVE BROMIGE
Laid out: Jones
*g^^S®!S!fi^«^SS^SS-K-^€SS«SS*S!6«
NATURE   POETS   APPEAL
to the reader because the
reader cannot ever deny that
he is a part bf nature, and because he cannot drive out all
his natural responses to nature, try as he might. The dif-
frence between Coleridge and
Gary Snyder is this: when Coleridge spoke of- making the external internal etc., he was calling for a connection between
nature forces and the imaginative soul; while Snyder writes
about the actual existence of a
physical bond between the objects of nature and the whole
human body and mind.
HERO OF A NOVEL (THE
Dbarma Bums), logger, bush-
wacker and climber of great
snowy up above the whole
state of Washington mountains,
Snyder evokes with amazing
acuteness the actual feel/
smell/sight of the forest in the
Pacific northwest. Anyone who
has worked (not just weekend
walked) in the bush, and who
has any sensual perceptions at
all, cannot help but feel it, the
re-enactment running through
Snyder's lines. No essences
here—just the thing itself.
and:
"In the frozen grass
smoking boulders
ground by steel 'tracks."
SSDUeSR HARRY BAiLLY is removing that ring from YVONNE
WSGHTMANN'S finger! What happens then? See FABLE FOR
FRAUDS at the Freddy Wood! This week or next.
THE BACH CHOIR Of VANCOUVER
presents
HANDEL'S "MESSIAH
n
with
JOHN AVISON
conducting the CBC-Vancouver Orchestra
and
• SARAH FLEMING, soprano • ROBERT McGRATH, tenor
« DOROTHY COLE, contralto      • J. ROY FIRTH, baritone
QUEEN  ELIZABETH  THEATRE
FRIDAY, DEC: 15 AND SATURDAY DEC. 16
8:30 p.m.
Tickets on sale theatre box office Dec. 4th
,S3.0<h $2.50,  %%M.  Sl.75j $1.50
ace bo -
Jby george bowering
It is there, the real "riprap" of
the scene.-
SNYDEB*S OTHER SCENE.
as I suppose most people know,
is Japan. For the last fcouple of
years, until just recently, he
has been studying in a Bhud-
dist monastery in Kyoto. The
Japanese art form shows its
influence in his form, and in
his basic stance as a poem-
projector. The quotation above
indicates the Oriental rendering of object-scenes into short
lines of verse. It is like the
English-language concept of a
haiku, in fact. Also we see
Snyder's position as poet in his
world, and we understand, in
the most direct of terms, from
where it is the poem is coming
MYTHS AND TEXTS; poems
by Gary Snyder; Totem
Press,.48 ppv paper: $1.25.
at us. It is Coming -from the
objects and actions in a natural scene, through Snyder
and all his faculties (not just
some of them subjected to the
tyrannical mind or imagination), and out to us, the third
important part of nature as j
represented in the act of mak- \
ing a poem. Each of the three
parts (object-"poet"-reader) is
absolutely essential to the
poetic experience. The poet
does not make it for us. It is
that we need the poet to make
the entire experience possible.
Similarly for the other : two
parts. All three must be there.
SO THAT THE STUFF OUT
of which poems are made is no
imaginative trick on the part
of the learned and overbred
esthete. It is the unadulterated,
uninterpreted THING out there
in front of you. lhe poet's job
is to make it REAL for his
reader:
A  LARGE   DIESEL    BULL-
through the young pine trees,
dozer    grinds    and    cracks
"Actaeon saw Dhyaaa in the
Spring.
It  was  nothing .special,
misty rain on Mt. Baker,
Neah Bay at low tide."
IN FACT. I WISH THAT
Snyder would write the novel
about the Washington timber-
land. Kerouac tried, and did
well, evoking a certain feeling
for the bush. But it was a
transcendental kind of feeling,
so that you were there, all
right, but you were sailing
above the scene too. Snyder
could put you right there, and
you would respond as a part
of Nature, as yourself,
THIS PRESENT VOLUME
of poetry was written while
Snyder lived at Crater Mountain^ fire lookout, and together
-with his subsequent book,
Riprap, makes for the best,
poetic writing ever to come
out of the rural West.
THOREAU
A YANKEE IN
CANADA
Cn   The   Walls   of   Quebec
The 9'iVatet, or rather the most
prominent, part of this city was
constructed with the design to
offer the deadest resistance to
leaden and iron missiles that
migrr.t be cast against it. But i'
is a remarka o 1 e in e t eo ro i o g i e a I
and psychological fact, that it
-■■- rarely k'own to rain lean with
much violence, except on places
so constructed.
^aper  $1.65 Cloth   $£.50.
HARVEST HOUSE
MONTREAL
P.O. Box 340 Westmount P.Q.
REYDE LA TORRE
CELEBRATED CLASSICAL GUITARIST
AUDITORIUM,  THURSDAY,  DECEMBER 7
12:30 - FREE
*» Page  10
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, December  \,   196T
FIVE THUNDERBIRD  FACES  IN  THE TOTEM
ington.   They   are,    left   to   right,   Dune
Court  Brousson,  Dave  Black,   Dave  Way,
Lusk. Thunderbirds, defending champions,^
CLOSING IN.QN TOTEM TOURNAMENT are Thunderbird basketball coach Jack Pomfret's probable starting  five  for  tonight's  game against  Central  Wash-
Vikings, Athletics but
to steal Birds' thunder
McCallum,      dogs in   this   year's  tourney,   which  goes   with   two
and   Jack      games  both  tonight and   Saturday,  starting  at  7:30
are under-     at Memorial Gym.
UBC's basketball Thunderbirds open their 1961-62 season in a precarious position.
They open the season atop
the Totem Invitational Tournament pole — with three eager
opponents whittling away at
their roost.
In addition, UBC coacn Jack
Pomfret is fielding a comparatively inexperienced team
that's lost the scoring punch
that won them fast year's
championship.
Only centre Dave Way played first string last year. In
comparison, Western Washington Vikings have lost only
one member of last year's
team, which finished second
in the tough Evergreen Conference.
Central Washington State
and Alberni Athletics, the two
other teams in the tournament,
both lack depth, but have two
or three standouts who carry
the team.
Championship meet
up cross-country
UBC's cross country team will be putting on their spikes
for the last time this year in the annual Canadian Cross Count/try Championships at Brockton Oval Saturday.
The meet is the biggest cross
country event of the year for
the vastly improved runners.
Starting time is 11 a.m.
Coach Peter Mullins says the
team is in good shape and he is
expecting a good showing.
The highlight of the meet will
be the 10,000 metre event (nine
and a quarter miles) in which
the top Canadian runner will go
to Brazil for the annual New
Year's Eve Around-the-Houses
Road Race at Sao Paulo.
Calgary's Doug Kyle is favoured to win the trip to Brazil.
Coach Mullins feels that Geoff
Eales has a good chance to win
the race and predicts Eales will
definitely be in the top five.
But if Eales won the event he
would probably not go south
because he is on a scholarship
from Britain.and oannot officially compete for Canada, Mullins
said. .    - ■■
Xmas List
This year the Ubyssey in all
its munificence decided to give
certain hthletic factions of the
University the things that they
need most.
Jack Pomfret — the N.W.
Bakers.
Frank Gnup — a 6-4, 240 lb.,
fast, vicious lineman; with twin.
Mike Sone — a one-way ticket
to cover football in Manitoba.
Pete Mullins—UBC boulevard
to practice on.
Albert Laithewaite — the football team.
Bus Phillips — a perpetual
sponsor.
Jack Schriber — yard stripe
narrow enough for him to get
over without tripping.
B & G — What's left of the
playing fields.
MAC — $100 for travelling
expenses from the Gym to the
Stadium.
The two-day L tournament
starts tonight, with UBC playing. Central at 7:30 and co-
favorites Western and Alberni
matched in the 9 p.m. feature.
The two winners meet for
the championship Saturday at
9, while the losers battle for
third and fourth spots at 7:30.
All games are at Memorial
Gym.
Birds, with more than a
month's practise under their
belts are slight favorites over
the Wildcats, who haven't had
the benefit of many workouts.
Birds, despite the fact that
eight members of last year's
team have either graduated or
not returned, have an impressive array of promising newcomers. To Dave Black, a former all-star and mosl valuable
piayer at the B.C. High School
tournament, falls the large
task of filling Ken Winslade's
guard position.
At guard with Black will be
Jack Lusk, who is expected to
play despite a foot ailment
diagnosed as jungle rot by
club pseudo-physician Dr. M.
Sone.
Centre Dave Way is expected to lead UBC's offense. Big
Wayne Osborne, just back
from football will also probably see action.
Central's Ray Kihnamon, a
6-foot-5 forward, and centre
Jeff Kellman are the nucleus
of a young team which includes no less than six newcomers.
Ihe Vikings have last year's
stars, Jim Adams and Mike
Kirk back. Alberni, however,
places its hopes on three tall
forwards, one of them 6-foot-
9 Billy Joe Price from New
Mexico State, one of the top
U.S. college teams last year.
Imperial tup hopes at stake Saturday
UBC's Thunderbird soccer team meets Daytons Saturday
in the quarter-finals of the Mainland League's Imperial Cup
competition.
Although crippled by injuries, Birds lost only 2-1 last
Saturday to Pilseners in the final league game of the first half
schedule. Only playing coach Joe Johnson won't play Saturday.  He has a leg injury.
what a REFRESHING
NEW
FEELING
.. .what a special zing.. .you get from Coke!
Refreshingest thing on ice, the cold crisp
taste and lively lift of ice-cold Coca-Cola!
No wonder Coke refreshes you best!
Ask for "Coke" or "Coca-Cola"—both trade-marks mean the product ol
jtata-Cola Ltd.-HnworK'j btat-loved sparkHng drink. Friday, December 1 ,1961
TH E
U-B-Y SSEY
Page  IT
Sports shorts
PETER BIACK
.   .   joins  Braves
'Lomas invade
UBC Saturday
UBC Braves venture into the
battle of the Miller Cup against
powerful Meralomas Saturday
at 2:30 at UBC Stadium in first
division rugby play.
Braves will have speedy Peter
Black, a standout with the football team this year, in the lineup for the first time.
T h u n d e r birds, undefeated
since thsir third game of the
year,l piay North : Shore All-
Blacks at 2:30 at Confederation
Park, North Vancouver.
The resurging Birds still have
a chance to catch the league-
leaders,, but must win all their
remaining games to do so.  '
In other games, once-beaten
Phys. Eds. meet Rowing Club at i
Douglas Park east while Tomahawks play CYO at Montgomery. Both games start al
1:30. '
Frosh A, rneets Meralomas III
at Carnarvon, and Frosh B "plays
Wanderers   on   the   UBC  gym i
field.' 71
Students!
For a new, dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
Football coach fired
up
Football coach Frank Gnup
was fired up about his team's
performance this season. '
"We were really great," he
prowled in a specia] interview
held some time ago.
•    •    •
IN BASKETBALL — UBC
Jayvees meet their toughest
competition of the young basketball season Saturday when
they meet the Everett Junior
College Trojans in Everett;
So far this year, Jayvees
have won three games and
have dropped only one. Their
latest victory "came Saturday
when they defeated St. Regis,
the team which handed them
their only set-back in the season opener.
Jayvees' scoring has been
spread fairly evenly. Laurie
Predinchuk' a 6-foot guard
from. Manitbbk, scored. 15
points against- St.; Regis,, and
High school students get a kick
out of bowling ba/i championship
BATTLE GROUND, Wash. — Six high school students
set out in a cold rain lest Friday to kick a bowling ball to
a record.
They intended to travel 62 miles by nightfall, kicking
the ball all the way. The rules prohibit: anyone from carrying the ball, said the Battle Ground high school student
body president, Bob Carter.
Carter said the present cross-country bowling ball record is 32 miles, set by George Fox College students at
Newberg, Ore., last spring.' The collegians, however, did not
kick the ball, but bowled it.
6 more in the season opener,
but was held to only 5 points
in the other two games.
Another fine suard prospect, Gord McKay from Courtenay, is leading, the club with
40 points in four games.
Former Gladstone High star,
6-foot-6 Ron Erickson has been
showing well under the backboards, as has Ron Brooks, a
6-foot-5 forward up. from the
•freshman, squad.   ' •■•'■,"
* * *
, ^UBC Thunderettes.added .to -
their victories defeating Sunset 55-25 in league action
Tuesday night. Barbara Ben-
gough led the Thunderettes
with 20 points. UBC led the
scoring the whole way; 13-6,
3.4-11, and 48-16.
In a juvenile   girls'   game,
STUDENTS'CASUAL AND
DRESS FOOTWEAR
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OPEN 9 to 6 (FRI. TILL 9)
Campus Shoe Store
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CA 4-3833
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LA 6-8665
Susan Hamilton's 12 points
paced UBC to a 42-31 victory
over Sunset.
• •    •
IN WRESTLING — UBC
captured the team trophy with
21 points, while Totem finished second with eight points
and Seattle Y third with
seven.
UBC's Ed Apt was the divi-„
sion winner in the 160-poiind
class. ■„
• •    •      '
IN PREDICTIONS—        *
Winnipeg over Hamilton.
Faloney over rated.
Rodney over anxious.
Frosh over confident.
Sports types  over  worked.
Bradbury over weight.
McAfee over my dead body.
Sun over scooped.
JOHNNY      THOMPSON'S
THUNDERBIRD    SERVIC El^l
University District Chevron  Service Station     FSs^^-H
10th & Tolmie — CA 4-5313 %%^
XMAS  GREETINGS and  a  HAPPY  NEW  YEAR
The Slf ^/tender
, He's4 on the . town and
ready, to pick up the tab.
The tab collars at Jack Elson,- that is. "■
- £ft;Gur shop- "for young
men, we've assembled a
collection of these collars
They make their appearance not only in white
button subtle colors and
discreet stripes.
If you're a big spender
drop in to the shop and
pick up the tab.
6.00   to   7.95
Jack CImh Xtd>
545 GRANVILLE
MU  1-9831
Shop Downtown til 9 on Friday
£eaJcnJ (jpeetihtfA
To those of you who have patronized our shop for young
men, a very sincere thank you. It is your valued friendship
that makes us the leader in the young men's field in Vancouver.
The best of luck on your term papers and for the festivs
season ahead.
jack €Uen Page 12
TH E
U B Y SS E Y
Friday^ December li  1961
Edmonton Bound?
Canadian National Railways
has announced a special low
student fare to Edmonton during the Christmas holidays.
Return fare to Edmonton for
students is $28.80. including
meals. Students wishing further information should call
Walter Busswood at MU
4-0171.
Three grad
teachers needed
JnAchimota
The UBC section of Canadian
University Service Overseas
wants three teachers to leave
ior Achimota, Ghana, early in
January.
•Graduates with at least a second-class standing or an honors
degree in geography, chemistry
and math are needed to teach
at the secondary school in Achimota.
For further information contact Dr. Cyril Belshaw at the
UN training centre in the old
arts building.
Honorary societies
Elect new members
Delta Sigma Pi president Val
Cospick has announced the election of ten "active" campus
females to the honorary sorority.
They include: Bev Clarke,
Comm. IV, president of Alpha
Delta Pi; Lynn MacDonald, Social Work, AMS secretary; Zen-
na Jones, Science III, Pan Hellenic secretary; Vera Clemens,
Education IV, president of
Women's Big Block; Kathy
SpearingT Arts III, Women's
residence executive; Mimi Roberts, Arts III. AWS president;
Ann Pickard, Arts IV, Ubyssey
associate editor; Sandy Seed,
Nursing IV, president of Gamma
Phi Beta; Wendy Moir, Arts IV,
WUSC vice-president; and Barb
Whidden, Education IV, president of Women's Athletic Association.
The election of men to the
honorary fraternity, Sigma Tau
Chi, was also announced.
Included are Lance Finch,
George Bowering, Pete Shepherd, Mike Mathews, Fred
Fletcher, Chris Davis, Stu Robson, Tom Nisbett, Gordon Olafson and Pete Haskins.
TOO FULL of human kindness
to be really efficient, Mary
is all broken up over not being able to keep abreast of
her work.
1962 GRADUATES
Job  opportunities exist for  graduates from coast to coast
Contact
Mr.  W.  L.   Roberts,  Room   14,   University  Personnel   Office,
or phone CA 4-6034
NATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT
SERVICE
JONDON
m- RECORDS
London s tint Phase 4 Stereo Recording Program
The Repertoire
. % With'this new technical capacity and with this new concept of arranging to
make musical use of this technical capacity,: London, early in 1961, drafted a
repertoire program to create a library of PHASE 4 stereo music for the record
buying public. Many London recording artists and a whole corps of arrangers
were interviewed, schooled and tested; repertoire was suggested and tested for
its application to this type of recording. From this new recording effort, London
is  proud  to  announce  those  items which  are   included  in  its  first  PHASE   4.
stereo release:
SP44001   Pass in Review ,  5.98
SP 44002 Big Band Percussion 5.98
SP 44003 Bongos from the
South  5.98
SP44004 Exotic Percussion .... 5.98
SP44005 Percussive Moods   5.98
SP 44006 The Percussive
Twenties     5.98
SP 44007 Melody and Percussion
for Two Pianos      5.98
SP 44008 Percussion in the Sky   5.98
SP 44009 Percussive Oompah .. 5.98
SP 44010 Percussion Around
the World  --•-.- 5.98
SP 44011  Twelve Star
Percussion- --.. 5.98
SP44012 Percussive Latin
Trio  5.98
The Ideal Xmas Gift for the Lover of Shakespeare
MARLOWE  SOCIETY
RECORDING OF HIS GREATEST WORKS.
A 4334
A 4335
A 4336
A 4341
A 4343
A 4344
A 4346
A 4413
JULIUS CAESAR—Marlowe Society
KING RICHARD II—Marlowe Society
AS YOU LIKE IT—Marlowe Society
THE SONNETS—Marlowe Society
MACBETH—Marlowe Society
TWO GENTLEMEN OF
VERONA—Marlowe Society
THE TEMPEST—Marlowe Society
TROILUS AND
CRESSIDA—Marlowe Society
A 4414    OTHELLO—Marlowe Society
A 4415   CORIOLANUS—Marlowe Society
A 4416   THE MERCHANT OF
VENICE—Marlowe Society
A 4417   MEASURE FOR
MEASURE—Marlowe Society
A 4418   KING JOHN—Marlowe Society
A 4419   ROMEO & JULIET—Marlowe  Society
A 4420   A WINTER'S TALE—Marlowe Society
A 4421    HENRY IV, Part I—Marlowe Society
A 4422   HENRY IV, Part II—Marlowe Society
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NOBODY TELLS
!
What does anyone else know
iibout my problems? I'm myself,
I'm an individual, I make my*
own decisions!
Yes, and I made my own
decision to change to Tampax., I
didn't ask for advice, support pr
reassurance. Tampax promised
me in an ad that I'd feel "this
cool, this clean, this fresh'' with
the product—and they showed
a girl swimming. Well, what
more could you want?
Now that..I'm a user, I find
that Tampax has many other
advantages too. I'm not
even aware I'm wearing
it. It's invisible in place.
Easy to dispose. Prevents odor
from fotiiiing: In evety "way it's,
a better way—as they said in the.
ad, "the modern way."
The package of 10 Tampax
(Regul*r, Super ©r Junior) is so
tiny, ir slips readily into my
• purse. But recently I've been
saving money with the
economy-size package of 40's.
As I said—nobody tells me!
But I'm telling yoii — try
Tampax. You'U like it. Canadian
Tampax Corporation Limited,
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note ustdky miUiom ofmrnm Friday, December V ,1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 13
Prof s wife peels -
St. Nicholas exposed
A UBC English professor has made the biggest literary find
of the half-century, The Ubyssey learned yesterday.
The find was an early Middle-
"I AjEMOST lost my mihd
when t council barred that debates" M»ry said. "&ut I man-
.cis^-;toVsav^,.ha(ffy;ir;;:V?':., ,
Age English lyric poem, possibly
the oldest English lyric in existence.
The discoverer of this Middle
Age masterpiece was English
professor Walter J. Walters.
"Actually it was my neighbor's dog," said Walters. "My
wife had been peeling onions,
and needed something to wrap
them up in to throw out."
"Since we had cancelled our
subscriptions to those lousy
downtown rags and we have all
our Ubysseys bound, she went
into my study and tore some
fly-leafs out of my old manuscripts," he said.
"She wrapped up the onion
peels and placed the package in
the garbage can, which our
neighbor's dog upset, of course,"
he said.
woman in bed
An oinauthorized male gained |
entry^iotfie Women's Residence
last night.
He is described as short, fat
and rosy/
Here is the story of Ima Rese-
dente:
"It was really exciting :— I'd
just gone to bed and all of a
sMden I just khejvthere was
someone in my room.
> • "I was a little, well, surprised,
well, what I mean is gosh, he
didn't look at me, or say hello
or anything.
"He rummaged around for
about ten minutes, arid theri he
just picked up my stockings and
left.
"He didn't even say goodbye
or anything—golly I just didn't
know what to think. At first I
wasn't going to tell anybody.
"But every time I thought of
how he ignored me, I just got
so mad—I mean really, after all
it was my room.
"So when some of the girls
phoned the police and just
everybody knew all about it, I
thought I'd better tell my story.
"I mean about how he just
came in, and, well sort of
ignored me."
Ima seemed shattered by her
experience.
FABULOUS YOUNG FASHIONS
on
Jet and Flat Heels
SANTO
Black Suede
Rust Suede
10.95
RELAX
Black Patent
Black Calf
Pine Green Calf
See! What's New in Winter Patents
AT-2858 WEST BROADWAY (Near MacDonald  St.)
"When I came home at 2:30
p.m. after a long day, and went
to pick up the mess, I noticed
these faint scribblings on the
paper," he continued.
"Apparently the onion's odor
works like lemon juice or a
secret ink," he explained. "I ran
inside and we peeled the rest
of our onions, and soon these
fresh, and powerful lines became legible."
RYME   OF  SAINT NICHOLAF
Cristmas is icumin on,
Lhude sing helles belles.
Falleth snow and reindeer
slow
Ande ice on runners gells
Sing helles belles.;
Bloweth wind and low on gyn
Winter's cold breath expells
Up rooftops hyke whyle
helpers stryke
That's why I synge helles
belles.
Helles belles, helles belles
Wynter's colde breath expells
Syne helles, singe belles,
My wife me offeth telles.
Synge helles belies, Synge
helles belles
Well synges thu helles belles.
Ne swik thu naver knells,
Helles belles.
.pant      A
farmer   ^        ?th&    n&w
•""'■'■'" -i^_|_y^.iW;i'ii'^l''fir'^,'iiVli''Vr».i.'r*'.'*
EASY
parking!    >*
BEHf*a>
STOHJS
RHLIM APMUUKES m. Fhilidim Ekdric Shawn i Tape Reorders. Dichtfrtf Equipment. Intercommunication Systems ■ Sound Systems > Car Radios • Ughtlnf
New.. .Philips Battery Tape Recorder
Small Wonder -with a Big Voice
Here's a really new recorder that goes
where the fun is and brings it-back
alive. It records and plays back anywhere, anytime because its all-transistor
circuit is powered by
Push a button and you're in record or
playback position ... in the car, at the
ski lodge, in the concert hall or the jazz
loft. See and hear the Continental '100
now at your Philips
flashlight batteries.    ai_d it's Only $144.95     tape recorder dealer. Page  14
T HE
UBYSSEY
Friday, December  1,   1961
Students arraigned
on conduct charges
Two students will face student court next Friday to hear
conduct unbecoming charges
laid against them.
Student vice-president Eric
Ricker said Victor Beaumont
(Phys. Ed. I) is being charged
with causing damage by forcing
the door of the Mildred Brock
room and Maurice Anderson
(Ed. I) for drinking beer in the
Common room.
The alleged offences took
place at 8:30 p.m., Nov. 22.
Ricker said Beaumont was
with a girl at the time of the
offence.
He said the girl is not a university student and can't be
touched by the campus discipline
committee.
Anderson is accused of drinking beer in the Common room.
Student court
notice of hearing t
Take notice that the student court will sit -on Frfd*?»
the eighth day of December,
1961, at 12:30 p.m.' in ih*
Stage room to hear charges of
conduct unbecoming ra student against Maurice Anderson and Neil Beaumont.
Students invited
to carol program
There will be a Christmas
carol sing for all students in
Brock lounge Thursday noon.
The program will consist of
conventional carols arranged in
the sequence of the Christmas
story. There will also be some
special numbers.
Varsity Christian Fellowship
invites all students to come and
forget their studies by an informal hour of singing.
•British Columbia has a
unique'situation in tuberculosis;
Tb& number of deaths due to TB
in Canada is twice as high for
men as women. However when
you look at British Columbia
alone you find that there are
five, men die from TB for every
woman.
^^^§egpg?^KKS?858?®8?K^e5»K^i?g?sKa?^^
E.
g&
THE   FOURTH   PIECE   of   The
Ubyssey's do-it-y ourself
Chris1mas> present. Help Mary
to pull herself together in
time    for   Christmas   exams.
THE AUTHENTIC
i   ircmim
I     SHOULDER
I SUIT
|6 Just one of many
gg from  our   natural
IS shoulder   Suit
|| Collection
I jAom  59-50
S3
m     , .,,TO_:^,.„: 	
164 W. HASTINGS
760 COLUMBIA
%
NEW WESTMINSTER «a
I
aS_!_!_._i_3_.-E_§^^dS_S_-_?_B^S-aS^-^^^^^
On behalf of lhe following Ubyssey Advertisers, who regularly support this newspaper
and help make its publicaton possible, Th€ Ubyssey Advertising Department extends
Season's Greetings to all students over Ihe coming Holiday Season.
ALEXANDER & AXELSON APPLIANCES LTD. ■
BENSON & HEDGES LTD. (ALPINE CIGARETTES)
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA LTD.'
BROADWAY THEATRE GUILD
BANK OF MONTREAL ,
BANK Of? NOVA SCOTIA
BELL TELEPHONE CO. OF CANADA LTDJ>
IMPERIAL TOBACCO CO;L-TBi
(BRAHADI'S PIPE TOBACCO)
THE CLOTHES HORSE
CYANAMH) OF CANADA LTD.
CAFE DAN CABARET
CAMPBELL STUDIOS LTD.
CAMPUS SHOES
CANADA PACKERS LTD:
CANADIAN GENERAL ___ECTR_C CO, LTD.
CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE
CANADIAN CHEMICAL CO: LT®;
CANADIANrTAMEAX CORPORATION
CARRS LADIES READY TO WEAR
THE >CAVE SEPPER CLUB
THE CAVALIER SHOPPE
CHARLTON & MORGAN LTD.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA .
COCA COLA LIMITED
THE COLLEGE SHOP
CONSOLIDATED MINING & SMELTING CO; LTD*
CORNETTE BEAUTY SALON
CREATIVE SHOES LTD.
CUNNINGHAM DRUGS LTD.
NORTHAM WARREN LTD..(CUTEX KAIL ENAMELS)
DEANS BESTAURANT
DEPART»_ENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
THE DEFENCE RESEARCH BOARD
DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY OF CANADA LTD;
B. G- HOUDE & GROTHE LTD. (DU MAURIER
CIGARETTES)
DUPONT OF CANADA LTD.
T. EATON CO. LTD; ,
JACK EliSON^ LTD,
ELVIRA'S GIFT SHOP
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD:
GEORGE HAYES MEN'S WEAR LTD.
GLENAYR KNIT LTD.
GUYS & GALS LTD.
THE HIGHLAND HOUSE
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY LIMITED
HYDE PARK CLOTHES LTD.
THE INQUISITION COFFEE HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES LTD.
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA LTD.
KAUFMAN RUBBER CO. LTD.
THE LEADER BEAUTY SALON
E; A. LEE FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
THEiLIONSDEN ^
MACDONALD TOBACCO CO. LTD. (EXPORT CIGARETTES)
MAC3LEAN HUNTER PUBLISHING  CO.   LTD.
MARTY'S LIMITED
MATZ & WOZNY LTD.
MURRAY GOLDMAN LTD.
NA'EIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
NEW YORK COSTUMES
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS LTD.
PHILIPS APPLIANCES LTD.
PITMAN OPTICAL CO. LTD.
B. C. PIZZA PRODUCTS LTD. (PIZZARAMA)
IMPERIAL TOBACCO CO. LTD. (PLAYERS CIGARETTES)
POINT GREY JEWELLERS
PRESCRIPTION  OPTICAL  CO. LTD.
PROCTOR AND GAMBLE CO. LTD;
THE QUESTION MARK CLUB
THE REEF CABARET
RICHARDS & FARISH MENS WEAR LTD.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
ROYAL TYPEWRITERS CO. LTD.
CURTIS PUBLISHING CO. LTD. (SATURDAY EVE. POST)
THE SHIRT 'N TIE'BAR LTD.
SOUTH SEAS GIFT SHOP
THE SNACKERY
SPOTLESS STORES LIMITED
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. LTD.
TOTEM SHOES LTD.
THUNDERBIRD SERVICE LTD.
TRANS CANADA AIR LINES LTD.
TROYKA BOOK STORE (TORONTO)
UNITED TAILORS
THE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LTD.
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS
UPPER TENTH BARBERS
THE TOWN HOUSE BEAUTY SALON
THE VANCOUVER BACH CHOIR
VANCOUVER OPERAL ASSOCIATION
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
PETER VAN DYKE BARBER SHOP
VARSITY FABRIC LTD.
VARSITY JEWELLERS LTD.
THE VARSITY THEATRE
THE VILLAGE BEAUTY SHOP
THE VILLAGE BARBER SHOP
WINRAM INSURANCE CO. LTD.
R. L. FRISBY
Advertising Manager
R. B. MocKAY
Vancouver Sales , Manager
J. P. KENNELLY
Salesman -friday, December 1  ,1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page  15
Council
bans Clous
on Campus
By  I.  C. ITALL
Santa  Claus  will  not  be   ai- j
lowed on the UBC campus this
■year, if the students council has
its way.
Tuesday night, in a special
meeting, council president <\1
Broomball announced the couii-
cil decision to refuse permission for the von^rated Christinas-figure ta appear on campus
this year.
"The council- feels that a figure
such as this is liable to cause a
gathering of students which will
be detrimental to public opinion
of tile university," he said. "Be
sides, there is no chimney on J
Campus large enough for him." |
,--•' it ' *    *
Council said they had received
requests from B and G to prevent Clans from coming nere,
because they could not find parking space for the fat man and
his reindeer.
"We are trying to save the!
grass in C lot. We can't have a I
hunch of cattle grazing there."   I
Engineering   president,   Ferry j
Host, said his faculty could not j
guarantee -safety- to Claus if he
did: arrive.
,   "We   are   the   only   redshirt;
on campus," he said. "My faculty,
will not tolerate jolly fat men!
Anyway   who  heard of   a   red-
shirif singing 'Jingle Bells'?"       ''
Initiating a motion, "That the
figure, known as Santa Claus, be
not permitted to come to the
University Campus this year," |
fcouneil treasurer, Malcolm Snott
commented:
"With due respect to the student intelligence, I am sure they
'': v$|l not toleratje ,any -fai figures
t^Jbe prominent on campus. We
certainly cannot nllow any man !
to endanger the rights of student 1
^government here." ;
.'-"   *   -*' '■'•'.. I
: When asksd by The Ubyssey
if ixe would play Santa Claus in
■ the event of the non-appearance
of the real McCoy, Snott said:!
"Certainly not, I feel my position as AMS treasurer prevents
me from taking any such ludi-;
crous position^ unless of course,
there is money involved." :
,';W.hen: asked about the Santa :
Claus  question,   Council  Public:
Relations officer,   Patter Valley
safd;
;   'As.'far. as   I  am   concerned,
that man is off the- record. How-'
ever,-just, between  the two   of'
'tis, I don't know what the hell)
is going on." • !
From Page 3
FAMOUS RED
way
V.&™V !
OWING TO STUDENT COUNCIL pressure we were unable to
print the uncut version. Mary told our photographer, "Ha,
ha ... I didn't know there was such a fraternity as Feela
Limpa Thi." "Ha, ha, you didn't, eh?" our photographer
answered.
have  a vote.   I  can in no
influence their decision."
"I did point out, however,
that this person does not exist.
He has never visited me," he
added.
Second vice-president Patter
Valley, speaking on behalf of
Mr. Claus said: "We have to look
at this from a public relations
viewpoint. Our public image will
suffer if this gentleman cannot
make his tour."
"Our finances will suffer if he
does," replied Commerce president Bob Gayton, "If he refuses
to visit members of this committee, our university will not benefit."
Claus told the committee that
he "could not even consider visiting Mr. Snott or his associates.
"Mr. Snott is just not the type
of person my visits are intended
for," Claus said, "I cannot sacrifice my principles just to get a
few dollars from UBC.
"They don't give — they don't
get," he added.
Claus also refused to consider
renting a U-drive sleigh.
"I've been using my own
sleigh for centuries," he said.
"Nobody has ever complained
before. I like my sleigh and
reindeer and I'm going to use
them."
Claus' request was turned
down by a 2-to-l vote with
seven abstentions.
Just Arrived at
Elvira's
FOR CHRISTMAS
A  wide  selection   of  original
and   unusual   presents
, You   will   be  served   by
2   Spanish   Senoritas
ELVIRA AND MARIA
Please  feel   free   to  come  in  and
look  around
Vancouver's Most Unique Gift Shop
4479 West 10th Avenue CA 4-0848
St. James' Church
-C.cr. Gere Ave & Cordova St.
^GLICAN — EPISCOPAL
Sunday   Services
7:30 a.m. Low Mass
8:00 a.m. Matins
8:30 a.m. Low  Mass
9:30 a.m. Family Mass
11:15 a.m. Hgih Mass
7:^0 p.m.  Solemn  Evensong
Mass daily at 7:15 a.m   Confessions   Saturday   7   &   8:30
p.m.
Take o Short Cut
Through Your
Exams
Keep a cool  head.
See  PETER VAN  DYKE
The Campus Barber wishes
you  a Merry Xmas  and  a
Happy New Year.
Close-up
fi§*f
in
Contemporary
r Finish
Worsted
This fine worsted plaid
enjoys ^perpetual    acceptance   among   devotees   of
the natural look.
At the Lions Den.
It's fun to shop for Xmas
at "The Den."
Let us help you select a
gift for that special
someone on your list.
The
Lions
Den
SEE THE STYLES FOR
TOMORROW—TODAY AT
771 Granville Street MU 1-2934
mfmmi Page  16
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, December 1, 196J
TWEEN CLASSES
Foulks to speak on
Russian experiences
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Dr. James Foulks to show
slides and talk on experiences
in Russia, Sunday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m.
*   -&   -!k
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
Hugo's life film, not shown
last week, to be shown Friday,
12:30, Bu. 202.
Astronomy society
meets December 5
The Roydl Astronomical Society Christmas meeting will be
devoted to the American need-
les-in space  program.
Professor F. K. ^Bowers will
take^a searching lo£k at Project
Westford at 8 p.m. Dec 5, Phys.
200. Society members planning
to attend the preliminary banquet in Brock at 6 p.m. should
get in touch with J. A. Jacobs as
soon as possible.
EAST ASIA SOC
Last general meeting before
Christmas.
&    -fr    ->
LAST MINUTE CLUB
Tickets available for "Orpheus
in the Underworld."
*    *    •*
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Ta'.ent night tonight 8 p.m.,
St. Mark's lounge.
■m     >r    -&
PLAYERS" CLUB
Special general meeting to discuss  entry in Dominion Drama
festival.    Monday   noon,   Green
roomie'  -A-   &
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Banff trip cancelled. Meeting
board room today.
tr    it  '-&      '
VCF
Dr. Henry Brant speaks on
Psychology and the Christian
faith in Bu. 106 today noon.
Aussie scholarship deadline set;
Cominco fellowships announced
The deadline for application for Australian Commonwealth Scholarships is January 15th, 1962. The Scholarships
provide for two years study in Australia at the level of second
degree or beyond.
TRAIL, B.C. — A $150,000 fellowship program to assist
graduates who are working toward advanced degrees at Canadian universities has been announced by The Consolidated
Mining and Smelting" Company.
The money will be provided in form of 50 fellowships
worth $3,000 each.
■*—•
FOR UBC
5*
WELL, THIS IS THE END (of the   I
series),  fellahs.
STUDENTS!
•I ft!
"WITTS'
LOW PRICED GIFTS
FOR
Men, Ladies, Students and Children
5732 University Blvd.
CA 8-8110
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
« 1000 Garments to
Choose from
■ Full   Dress
« Morning: Coats
« Director's   Coats
0 White and Bine
Coats
m, SOiirts   &
Accessories
m 10% UBC Discount
E. A. Lee Ltd.
One   Store Only!
623 Howe St.      MU 3-24o7
ALL IMPORTED CAR PARTS,
TOOLS AND ACCESSORIES.
f 5*> DISCOUNT
(Show AMS Card)
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
12th & Alma
RE 1-7686
"THE SNACKERY
rr
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075  Kingsway  - HE  1-8818
FREE  HOT  &  FAST  PIZZA
DELIVERY
"r~fr
Dow Chemical Of Canada, Limited
Offers  Career  Opportunities
ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY GRADUATES
Company Representatives will be on campus
January  9,   10,   11
Please make an appointment for interview with your
Placement Service.
ftofatttftT^aji dompflnn.
Georgia  at Granville
INCORPORATED   2?9    MAY   1670.
Shop  daily 9-5:30, Fridays 9-9
PHONE Ml' 1-6211
Give each other HIS N HER SHIRTS
for Christmas... Perfect Team-mates !
his  only   $6 .... .' hers  only  6.95
Your're match-mates . . . can be spotted together in any crowd ... in these
striking cotton shirts. Photographed oa the hapj*y pair abwe.^a dark-toned plaid,
man-tailored right down to the button^down collar and button cuffs. Match up
others in plains, brighter shades and pastels . . . tailored and pepever styles.
For .HER, sizes 10, 12, 14, 16. For HIM, sizes S, M, L.
Shop early to get the PAIR you want . .?. at the Bay Career and Campus Shop,
second floor.
REMEMBER, YOU CAN SHOP UNTIL 9 FRIDAY, and USE YOUR PBA CARD

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