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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1938

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 Published Twice Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Vol. XX
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1938
No. 28
OPEN HOUSE
ASSUMES NEW
IMPORTANCE
Overcrowding
To Be Shown
This year's Open House, according to Committee Chairman Charlie
Campbell, will be of vast importance In winning public favor to the
university.
"There Is no reason," he stated
at yesterday's A.M.S. meeting,
"why there ahould not be twenty
or twenty-five thousand visitors
te thla oampus on February 12.
Suoh  a  large  public  representation,   he   continued,   would   be
easily persuaded that university
wants ars real.
In this connection, plans are under way to take advantage ot Open
House   to   Indicate,   wherever   possible,  tbe  lack  ot  accommodation
which  ia  endured  by  students  in
various   academic  and  social  pursuits.
STARTED IN 1932
When Open House was inaugurated ln 1B32, there was no thought ot
its being used to reveal deflcencles
at the university. At that time, the
Engineering faculty invited the
public to attend a demonstration of
the work being done by sclencemen
on the campus.
Open   House   was   repeated   in
1934 and 1936, but very little Interest waa shown by either students or ths visiting public.    The
present   Opsn   Mouse   committee
lays the failure of these previous
ahowe  to the fact that  etudents
failed to give full oc-opsration.
To avoid a repetition of this situation, the current Open House will
include   displays  by  all  clubs  and
organizations on the campus.
Arts and Agriculture, too, are
competing with tbe science faculty
in an attempt to oarry oft display
honors.
BROADCAST
An added attraction will be the
Open House broadcast, which is to
originate on the campus. Through
the courtesy of CJOR, equipment
ls being Installed by Wilbert Smith,
staff technician, which will make
the broadcast possible.
An interesting description of all
displays will be given by Dorwln
Baird and a staff of announcers.
RADIO TALKS
STRESS NEED
OF STUDENTS
"The premier was admant in his
refusal to meet any of our demands," stated A.M.S. president
Dave Carey during a radio address
laBt. Friday evening, In reviewing
hlB conversation with Dr. Pattullo
on the previous day.
Carey deolared that the premier's reply to a question concerning   why   appropriations  for  ths
mental     hospital    at     Essondale
have   been   very   materially   Increased,    whlls    the     university
grant   has   remained   unchanged,
waa   that    "public    opinion    demanded It."
The     speaker     emphasized     the
point   that   although   students   are
firm ln their resolve to protest, the
idea ot a "strike" ls very far from
the   minds   of   the   students   as   a
whole.
EDMONDS   SPEAKS
"Most Important, however, ls the
necessity of keeping the university
accessible to all people ln the Province," declared Carey. "The last
thing we want ls the masses paying
tor the classes."
Kemp Eklmonds, editor ot the
Ubyssey, gave the second address
of the series on the following evening, which was mainly concerned
with reviewing the history and development of the present overcrowded situation at the university,
and comparing fee scales and accommodation facilities between U.
B.C. and other leading Canadian
universities.
"It Is not the students alone
who are cognizant of the serious
conditions at the university," aaid
Edmonda.
"All three of the Vancouver daily
newspapers have written frequent
editorials stressing the necessity of
greater government aid. The university's Board of Governors has
told the government time after
time, by note and by delegation, ot
the institution's plight — to no
avail."
Glee Club Will
Gather Wednesday
The first rehearsal ot the University Olee Club is scheduled to take
place on Wednesday at 4.30 ln the
radio studio, room G, Aggie Building.
As this is the first practise of the
spring term, a good turn-out is desired. Students who have not yet
put in application should get in
touch with Ozzy Durkin or attend
the practise Wednesday afternoon.
Cleric Issues
Support
"Speak your minds so that the
leaders of our government will
know that we want education 1"
was the challenge given by Rev.
Elbert Paul from the pulpit ot the
First Baptist Church, Sunday evening, when he spoke on the serious
social issue that lies behind the
present crisis at U.B.C.
"The Premier oan fllnd $3,000,-
OOO for road work on the eve of
an    election    and    $4,000,000    to
throw  a  bridge  across the   Fraser," the  apeaker  stated,  ''but  he
oan't find  any for eduoatlon."
"The  question  as  to  the  uses  to
which our resources should be put,
whether    for    destructive    or   constructive  ends,   is  one  of  the  most
crucial    issues   of   modern   times,"
Rev.   Paul   continued,   "and   unless
democratic    countries    choose    the
former way they are doomed."
ARMS   AND   LIQUOR
The speaker drew attention to
the  135,000.000 grant for Canadian
Call For
of University
armaments and the annual expenditure of $14,000,000 to $18,000,000 by
Canadian people  for liquor.
"Strikes    or    petitions    at    the
university may or may not_ be of
use at thia time," Mr. Paul stated,
"but the  baslo problem envolved
oan only  be solved when human
beings, especially  thoae  In   Influential positions, put higher values
first."
Mr. Pavtl pointed out that the university  is  one  of  the  greatest factors for promoting good citizenship
and developing culture in the province, and that hundreds of students
were now facing the fact that they
would  have  to  discontinue  attendance due  to the increase in fees.
"There's plenty of money In B.
C," the speaker exclaimed, "but
if the people of the province continue their mad raoe for the destructive thlnga of life, education
will aoon become the privilege of
the  rich."
ALMA MATER
SHOULD GO
INTO BUSINESS
—Depoe
Enterprise To
Raise Money
That the University go into business was the suggestion of Norman
Depoe, leader of campus fascists,
at the A.M.S. meeting Monday
noon.
Speaking strongly, Depoe suggested that students take advantage of several possible sources of
revenue whereby the University
would be more independent of the
government.
He stated that students ahould
get  behind  the  development  of
the University area—that If thla
area were developed as rapidly aa
other sections of the city work
would be provided for needy studenta ln stores, theatres, etc.   In
addition  such  a  display  of  aggressiveness and business enterprise would  be  better  publicity
for studenta than would talk of
atrlkea and petitions.
He advised students to take over
the cafeteria and book store, thereby providing employment for students and at the same time increasing the revenue of the A.M.S.
CO-OPS NEGLECTED
At the same time he charged that
the   idea  of  co-operative   boarding
houses had been grossly neglected—
that   the   erection   of   several  with
students   doing    the   work   would
considerably    decrease     their    expenses, thus making U. B. C. more
attractive to out-of-town students.
In closing Depoe charged "the
governing bodies of this Institution  have  either deliberately  or
unintentionally made themselves
blind   to   these    possibilities.    In
either case it is time that someone    more    alert    opened    their
eyes."
FILM  SOCIETY
REVIEW
The longest and most harrowing
of the Film Society's programmes
held a good-sized audience stiff and
spellbound from noon to 2.BO Friday. Propaganda and adolescent
psychology were the types of picture shown, and both carried an
impact that will leave its impression for some time.
"Heart of Spain," a documentary  discussion  of  the   plight  of
Loyalist   Spain,   utilized   actual
scenes of destruction and bloodshed    to    build    up    resentment
against    Fascist    "non-intervention."
Editing,   commentary,    and    pictorial emphasis all carried out the
idea of an oppressed people slaughtered     by    Fascist-supported    elements.    Strongest   single   sequence
was   the   spoken   statement,   "Germany   wants   Spanish   iron,   zinc,
mercury, copper, lead," accompanied  by rapidly-succeeding shots of
bombed    buildings,    smoke    clouds,
bodies, forges, and ruin.
ADOLESCENCE
"Poll de Carrotte," a lengthy
French feature picturing the misery of misunderstood childhood,
was distinguished by a brilliant
characterization from Harry Baur.
The stolid, heavy-set, pipe-smoking,
bourgeolse French father dominating a squalling and unpleasant
household, he gave a real life and
vitality to his part.
Resembling a cartoon by Max
Beerbohm, his taciturnity and impassivity were- so real that the
pathos of his sudden realization
and subsequent tenderness towards
son were doubly effective.
|      BUSINESSMAN      |
Norman Depoe, co-operative
housing enthusiast, who advised
the Alma Mater Society to "go
into business," at the meeting
Monday. He advocated that the
students should operate the
cafeteria and the bookstore.
CAMPAIGN SONG
(To the Tune of "Sympathy")
We've got sympathy, sympathy,
Just sympathy.
We need new buildings for all.
We   need   accommodation   next
fall.
So let's fight, men, canvass the
town
Don't let Pattullo get us down.
Fight Men, tight for the right of
our U.B.C.
—Pat Fowler.
Snow   Is   Here
Again - Goodie I
Bei uns 1st es schoenl
What is? The weather.
Snow comes again and the -oeds
gambol and ye stalwards perform
manfully with snowballs almost as
they did way back when at Christmas,
The spry birds and quick squirrels of last week's fickle spring disappear as completely as the caution
money at the Alma Mater meeting.
And In the same manner—for they
will both return greatly multiplied.
The "caf" swells its sides to receive a further quota of "caf pilgrims" from the ranks of those who
used to walk in the spring sunshine
in the woods. The pillars of the
shrine are adorned with dripping
umbrellas and the somewhat limited foyers with beautiful drapings
ranging from blanket checks to
conventional tweeds.
The park-like beauty of the
campus hides under a white wetness. The "steeds" in the parking
lot quickly become as bumps on the
landscape. Any atmosphere of frivolity is dispelled. It is a time to
get to work.
PETITION IDEA DROPPED
AS BEING  PREMATURE
Council Petitions
GovernorsTo Defer
Increase In Fees
Students' Council last night
forwarded a motion to the
Board of Governors asking
that the increase in fees and
the limitation of registration
be set aside until such time as
it will be known what result
will come from the present
student campaign for public
support.
The motion was immediately sent to the Board of Governors also in session last
night.
Council felt that it would be
wise to wait until October
when the Legislature will
meet again to see if the University could possibly continue without further penalties being imposed upon the
students.
Council will await an answer from the Board of Governors before taking any
further action.
W.C.Shelley, Magician,
Performs For Students
Wednesday at Noon
Mr. W. C. Shelley, former minister of finance in the British
Columbia Government, will give
an exhibition of sleight of hand
and magic in the Auditorium at
noon Wednesday.
Mr. Shelley has perfected many
of the great Thurston's famous
feats, according to advance notices from the Player'a Club,
under whoae aponaorshlp the programme haa been arranged.
There will be no charge for the
performance.
Canadian Politicians
Topic of Thursday
Debate at Forum
"Raaolved that R. B. Bennett
Is a better statesman than Mackenzie King," la the subject of
discussion fer the Forum this
coming Thursday noon.
Victor Freeman will lead the
government, In favor of the resolution. Lsadsr of the opposition
will be Graham Darling. Both
apeakers are appearing for the
first time aa Isadora of a Forum
debate.
Any persons Interested In the
subjeot ar* Invited to attend. Opportunity will be given fer anyone to voice hla or her opinion.
The Forum will take plaoe In
Arts   100   at   12.15.
"Yeomen" Garb Seen
In Coronation Newsreel
Much excitement and rushing
about is manifest in the Auditorium Building these days, as the
dramatic rehearsals for the "Yeomen of the Guard" proceed.
Under the direction of Mr. E.
V. Young, prominent local dramatist, and Professor Walter
Gage, the dramatic end of the
operetta production swiftly gains
a polish and perfection not excelled in shows of previous yeara.
Well known throughout the province for his direction of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and radio
network plays and for his part in
the Vancouver Theatre movement,
Mr. Young is proving an invaluable asset to the "Yeomen" cast.
Popular, patient and jovial, Mr.
Young seems particularly adept at
Long Campaign
Under Way
"A petition at this time would be
crazy."
With this Indictment of the proposed city-wide campaign for support of university students in their
drive for additional government aid,
Dave Carey greeted a special A.M.
S.   meeting   Monday  noon.
A week-end of thought on the
part of a special committee named
last Wednesday ended In the decision to scrap the petition, and substitute a six-months' drive for public support by means of an educational campaign.
By September It Is hoped that
public opinion will be such that
It will be to the advantage of the
government to extend a helping
hand to the unlveralty.
Plans  adopted  Monday noon  by
the A.M.S. meeting were essentially
those put forward last Wednesday
by Morris Belkin, subsequently appointed head of the central executive ot the apecial oommittee.
92 CAUTION   MONEY
Financing for the publicity drive
will be obtained from a 92 assessment on caution money—of those
students willing to sign that sum
away. Waivers were handed around
at the meeting, and several hundred
were signed.
"A  petition  should corns after
the publio haa been properly prepared for it," aald Carey Monday.
With this ln mind, "proper preparation" will go ahead under a pro-
paganada  will   be   utilized   by   the
committee   to   be   set   up,   and   attempts made to create a public demand for government support.
CO-OP.
Norman DePoe took advantage of
the meeting to damn Premier Pattullo and put ln a word for bis own
"co-operative scheme." He also
noted that the premier had spent
two million wasted money on the
Pattullo Bridge.
LAW SCHOOL
DEBATE TIE
In an unusual decision last Friday noon the audience that listened
to.the U.B.C-Vancouver Law School
debate gave gave a 86 to 35 tie
verdict.
Murray Hunter and Harold
Halkala supported the resolution
that the press should be censored. Representatives of U.B.C.
were Bob Hayman and Norm
DePoe.
"The abuses of the freedom of
the press must be met with censorship," said Hunter in opening the
debate for the affirmative. He stated that common abuses of the American and Canadian press were
sensationalism, partiality, and petty quarreling.
CONTRARY TO IDEALS
Hayman maintained that censorship is contrary to the ideals and
precepts of democracy. He claimed
that the right of free expression
without restriction was necessary
in a country ruled by a democratic
government.
demonstrating    the    intricacies    of
making love,
GAGE HELPFUL
An old friend of the Society and
its Assistant Director, Mr. Gage
displays an amused delight at all the
proceedings, and frequently substitutes for members of the cast who
are unable to attend. With his good
cheer and humour, Mr. Gage does
much to restore the spirits of the
tired  players.
Continuing its policy of exactness about details, the Executive
viewed recently movietone news-
reel shots of the Coronation, in
which Yeomen of the Guard
appeared. The pictures assisted
in costuming and scenery plans.
Rehearsals continue on the stage
and  in  Science  100.
Music   Lecture
Today   Noon
String music, recorded in the
Carnegie Music Library, returns today noon ln Arts 100 after being
postponed from yesterday due to
the A.M.S. meeting. Mr. Dilworth
will offer his second lecture with
selected recordings, continuing
from  last Monday.
"Creation du Monde," a celebrated string suite, will highlight the
program. Full of startling rhythms
and dissonances, this work illustrates the new values which are derived from musical composition. A
Debussy quartette will also be included.
Subsequent music lectures will
take place on Monday as previously
scheduled. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 1, 1938
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbi
Phone  Point Gray  206
Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
Office: 206 Auditorium   Building
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Kamp Edmonds
NEWS MANAGER
Dorwln Baird
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Frank Perry FRIDAY: Dorothy Cummings
FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR
James Beveridge Frank Turner
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Monty Fotheringham Bill Sibley Robert  King
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITORS EXCHANGE EDITOR
Jack Mair Hugh Shirreff James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Victor Freeman Rosemary*Collins Irene Eedy Beverley McCorkell
Jack Mercer John Garrett
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Van Perry Orme Dier Myrne Nevison
CIRCULATION MANAOIR
Norman Depoe
RIPORTIRS
Joyce Copper,  Joan  Haslam,  Ann Jeremy,  Ozzy  Durkin,   Barbara  McDougal,  J.  C.
Penney,   Keith  Allen,   Victor   Freeman,   Verna   McKenzie,   Ed.   McGougan,   Virginia
Galloway,   Katherine   McKay,   R.   Ker,   Elko   Henmi,   Lester   Pronger,   Doug   Bastin,
Helen Hann, Molly Davis.
SPORTS REPORTERS
Norm Ronwick, Basil Robinson, Frank Thornloe, Archie Byers, Bob Melville
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 303-A Pender Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephones: Trinity 1945
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited
$ anil g>ktttl?0
I    By The Beggar Student
BEER AND SKITTLES
are    some    people
The're
EXPLANATION,
MR. FREUD?
whose
minds can contain only one
idea at a time;
and this Genus
Monomentia envelopes an alarmingly large section of the population, from the Red Menace to the
Evangelistic hell-fire churchgoer.
A particular species of this type
combines another symptom, which
is a burning desire to be helpful;
the result is the chap we all know,
who insists on Helping Out; whoso
blunders embarrass everyone
around him, although he remains
oblivious to the fact, and proceeds
blithely on his cheerful way, confident that he is really helping his
friends.
ENTER THE
HELPFUL BLOKE
STUDENTS ON THE BOARD
An editorial in a recent issue of the "McGiil Daily," that
very worthy organ ruled over by John H. MacDonald, head of
both the Canadian University Press and the National Federation of Canadian University Students, comes out advocating
student representation on their Board of Governors.
It appears that at Melbourne, Australia, the Governors
are chosen by a method similar to our own: in part by the
State and in part by the University. Of this latter part, two
representatives are elected by the students. The students do
not have to elect fellow students, but they may not elect a
member of the faculty. At the present time in Melbourne,
one of their representatives is a student.
The "Daily" says:
"It is interesting to note that the students there are
evidently not regarded as a mere adjunct to the University.
It is too often hastily assumed that the University confers a
favor upon the students by permitting them to come and sit
at the feet of masters of learning. That the real function of
the university is the promotion of intellectual progress, and
that this progress is brought about by the original advanced
work done by professors, is perfectly true, but that the training of young men and women as successors to those savants
is equally important, seem to be forgotten. Students are
treated as if they were still children, and therefore they often
act as if they were still in the nursery."
". . . . we would do well not to dismiss this idea of student representation on the governing board too lightly—we
may find ourselves behind the times."
The idea of students on the governing board is particularly acceptable here. And particularly in the present crisis,
when students have, without any notice or consultation, been
told arbitrarily that their fees are to be boosted and their
numbers reduced. Clearly, in a matter of such direct concern
to the students, the advice-of their repVesentatives should
have been sought.
Students* representatives on the Board of Governors
would have made sure that such action was thoroughly justified before they would have given it their consent.
And, too, students would be able to know how the money
they pay in the way of fees is spent. . Not that we have
reason to believe anything amiss, but because the principle
of "no taxation without representation" is not too far removed to be applied.
Students are being asked at the present time: "Why is
the Government's $400,000, coupled with fees of over 2400
students, not sufficient to run your University?"
And because they have no access to the accounts, they
cannot answer.
THE STUDENTS' PART
The decision of our new "Action Committee" to embark
on a long-term campaign for better terms should not be taken
by the individual student as a signal to forget that any such
project is under way.
Much of the success of the campaign depends on the cooperation of every member of the Alma Mater Society. Talk
about the situation. Become familiar with the history of
the overcrowding, with the relation of our fees and facilities
to those of other institutions, with the number of out-of-town
students who will be inclined to leave the province, and, even
more important, with the facts of our University's contribution to the province. Be able to show your parents, your
friends, your parents' friends, and your friends' parents why
our demands are justified.
TRANSLATIONS
Wa   can   supply   nny   English   Translation
published—FOR   ALL   LANGUAGES
Order   or   write   for   prices   on   your   needs
The Book Exchange Reg'd
Specinllita   I*   New   and   Used   Textbook.
3BO Bloor w.    Toronto, Ont.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
There will be an open meeting
of the Chemistry Society on Wednesday, February 2, at 12.20. in Sc.
300. Mr. Harold Beard fo the Canadian Fishing Co., will speak on
the "Production of Fish OU antl
Meal."
One of the most ubiquitous of
this group is
the Helpful
Bloke who
suffers from
the fixed idea that one drink makes
a drunk. Recognition of the type
is impossible, since they are not
characterized by any distinctive
coloring; but their habitat is any
social function. The only way to
lure the Helpful Bloke out of his
shell is to set out a decoy. This
will cost you ten cents, and is
known as a glass of beer. Then, if
one of the species is about, you
will immediately notice that you
are being humored. Any normal
blunder in speech, such as the
normal individual makes a hundred
times a day without comment will
be rapidly met with: "That's all
right, old fellow. I understand perfectly."
Then will come the fatuous smile
peculiar to the Helpful Bloke; a
smile which Implies a wink, and a
nudge in the ribs with an ebow;
a smile that wags Its finger, and
tells you that you are 'a gay devil,
but I don't think any the worse of
you for it. From this point the
Helpful Bloke will be at great pains
to make it clear that he sees nothing out of the ordinary In your
actions, that you are perfectly All
Right; and that he prefers your
society to that of kings.
Eventually, he will display a tendency to help you up and down
stairs, to open doors for you, and
to hover about generally to See
That the Old Chap Doesn't Make
An Ass of Himself.
*     *     *
The next step in the procedure
is to imbibe another
SYMPTOMS decoy. This will pre-
DEVELOP sent some difficulty
unless you can shake
the Helpful Bloke for a few minutes, because he will try to dissuade
you from this suicidal action. However, perseverance will result in a
return of the thought that you are
Not Responsible and Must Be Humored, and you will get your drink.
The Helpfulness increases rapidly as the evening goes on. The dear
fellow goes about apologising to his
friends, and, what is worse, to your
friends, for your condition; he volunteers to Take Care of Him, and
to See That He Gets Home All
Right. The crisis comes when the
Helpful Bloke approaches you with
that indulgent smile which is a
combination of motherly love and a
man-to-man attitude and delivers a
speech along these lines:
"How about a walk, old boy? Bit
sticky in here. Of course, you're all
right, but I could do with a bit of
air."
It is right here that your future
reputation is irrevocably damned.
If you state, with perfect truth,
that you are absolutely normal, and
would much rather dance, you
merely confirm his idea that you
are Absolutely Blotto, and he will
go about for the rest of the evening
chuckling at your perfectly normal
actions and pointing to your condition.
If, on 'the other hand, you give
in, the Helpful Bloke immediately
thinks that you realize your condition, and will relate this fact to
all and sundry when you return
from  the walk.
*     *     *
There is nothing you can do
about this sort of
A BAS LES thing; once the de-
HELPFULS coy has been swallowed, the only remedy is to lure the Helpful Bloke
into a quiet corner and stab him.
An alternative is to spill a drink
on his waistcoat, and go about
telling his friends you didn't think
he drank. But this rarely works,
as he usually manages to convince
them that you framed him, and this
only proves that you are not responsible.
And the next morning, when you
meet him, he will turn on that indulgent one - man-of-the-world-to-
another   smile;    inquiries    will    be
STATEMENT
By the Film Sooiety, regarding the eensorshlp of films
shown at U.B.C. laat Friday.
POII.
Poll      de
DE   CAROTTE
Carotte ("Carrot-
head"), based on a play of 1894
by Jules Itenard, is the story of
the unhappy life of a child deprived of parental love. M. Lan-
son, in his sober "History of
French Literature" (p. 1159) has
described lt as a "unique masterpiece  of  Classical   purity."
The film Itself ls a landmark
in the history of the motion picture. Unique In Its restraint of
treatment, Poll de Csrotte gives
an Intensely moving portrayal of
childish character. It has been
a favorite foreign-language picture in many schools ln Oreat
Britain. Equally attractive to
grown-ups and to children under
16, its morality and decency
have never yet been impugned,
and nowhere has it met with
anything but commendation from
public  authorities.
It was left to the Censor of
Motion Pictures for the Province
of B. C. to detect indecencies ln
It and to stigmatize It as an objectionable film by his action In
suppressing two sequences —
one In which the little boy, driven to desperation by a sense of
loneliness, is on the point of
hanging himself when he ls
saved by the arrival of his father, and another ln which objection was taken to the words:
"Your father and I were too old
when you were born.' '
All Canada Watches
Present Situation
On U.B.C. Campus
Since last Wednesday the eyes
of all Canada have been on the University  of  British   Columbia.
Telegraph editors of all student
newspapers from Vancouver to Halifax have received full details of
our protests against conditions at
U.B.C. and the following morning
students ln all major universities
"A Mare Ad Mare" have read avidly
of our actions by courtesy of Canadian  University  Press.
Yesterday at noon, as President
Carey said "passed" to the motions
empowering the Campaign Committee to embark on a long term publicity drive and authorizing the
raising of money for the drive, runners were departing to telephones
to wire the news to harassed editors waiting In Edmonton, Saskatoon. Winnipeg, Toronto, Queens,
Montreal, Frederickton anil Halifax,
to say nothing of smaller way
points.
Aggies Feature On
Varsity Time Over
CJOR Wednesday
Short four-minute talks by senior students In eaeh department
will feature the Agrioulture Discussion Club Varsity Time broad-
oast over CJOR at 10 o'clock
Wednssday evening.
The seientlfic sspeots of the
work being done In Animal and
Poultry Husbandry, Dairying,
Agronomy, Horticulture and Soils
will be outlined, and a short skit
of agricultural flavor is to be presented.
Ssvsral musleally talented Aggies will contribute entertainment to the program, the aim of
whioh la to Indicate that Aggies
oan do more than milk oows and
hoe turnip*, aeeordlng to A.U.S.
president  Paul Trusssl.
made about your head; offers of
Bromo-Seltzer will be made with
depressing regularity, to the accompaniment of sly chuckles; and
eventually the whole world will
know that you are a good egg, but
dissolute.
On   second   thought,   stabbing   is
too  easy a death.
There is nona Batter than th* "Basstt"
"ffiess'tt
-Beauty
■•y.
_______
lenth
»    and
*%*\wppt g,:::....*
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Dentist
Telephone Elliot 17M
Hours: 9 to 5
Saturday: 9 to 1
Cor.   10th snd  Sasamat St.
For Sophisticated Swing
MART KENNEY
and his
Western Gentlemen
"LET ME SERVE YOUR CAR, AND YOUR CAR WILL SERVE YOU"
"FRANK" FICKB
U.B.O. 8ERVI0E STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facilities
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 53
OUR STORE is well stocked with goods you will not see in
any other stationery store. Come in and have a look
around.
PRINTING of the best. Let us print your Dance Programs,
Fraternity an4 Sorority Stationery.
THI
CLARKE & STUART
Company Limited
STATIONERS AND PRINTERS
550 Seymour Street Phone Trinity 1941 Vancouvar, B. C.
Cast    Of    Play
Complete
After a month of strenuous competition the final selection of the
cast for "The Playboy of the Western World" was made at noon,
Monday.
Beth Qillanders, who portrayed
the part of Emily ln "The Brontes"
has been given the difficult role of
Widow   Quln.
Pat Fowler, a freshman who
gained recognition for his work as
the Chancellor ln the Christmas
play, "The Fascinating Foundling,"
has been chosen for the part of
Michael James, the jovial father of
Pegeen.
Arthur Sager, who had the leading male part In "The Brontes," is
to understudy Archie Bain for the
character  of  "Christie."
Full time work on the play will
commence Immediately bo that the
production from March 16 to March
19 will equal the high standard of
previous years.
TOTEM
Fraternity snd Sorority pictures are so near complete thst
Artona will be in the Book Exchange on Thursday specially to
finish them up.
Class Executives and players
in Major Sports should take thia
opportunity to get their pictures taken.
PENS  LOST
Two Waterman's fountain pens
In the Library. Kindly return to
Mr. Home's office or to O. K. Nlc-
olsky care of the Arts Letter Rack.
Exchange Plan
About one hundred students have
received Exchange Scholarships
during the past nine years. , This
year a total of eleven are enjoying
the privileges of the Exchange
Plan. In most cases the saving In
tuition fees mare than balances the
transportation costs Involved. Applications must be handed in to the
N.F.C.U.S. representative before
March   1st,   1938.
VALUABLE PEN  LOST
Lost, very valuable Shaeffer pen,
black and white striped, with name
M. A. Twiss on barrel. Please return to Mr. Horn's office or Mildred
Twiss.
BOOK LOST
Lost—Small size black notebook
from Pub. Monday. Notes illegible,
but valuable;; name clearly printed
on first pages. Return to J. A.
Beveridge, Pub Office.
Vancouver Sun Adds
British United Press To
World News Network
JT is announced thst, effective February 1, BRITISH UNITED
PRESS joins the network of news-gathering agencies that
bring the events of the world daily to Vancouver Sun readers.
With headquarters in London, British United Press news
bureaus and special correspondents cover the earth; by cable,
telegraph and wireless Britiah United Press dispatches pour
into the Sun office, in ADDITION to the full Canadian Press
and Associated Press services which have always brought news
of the world to Sun readers. Now the Vancouver Sun offers s
world news service not excelled by that of sny newspaper in
Canada, and bettered by few anywhere. For all the NEWS
Phone Trinity 4111 and have the Sun delivered to your home
daily; the cost is 60 cents a month.
DINE & DANCE EVERY NIGHT!!
TO A FULL PIECE ORCHESTRA ... NO COVER CHARGE!
At One of Vancouver's
3    BEST    RESTAURANTS
Where   the   Food  Tastes   Better
and  Costs   No More
EMPIRE CAFE
160 W. Hastings — Downtown
NEW GOOD EATS
Centre
No. 1
619 W. Pender
NEW GOOD EATS
No. 2
938 Granville Uptown Tuesday, February 1, 1938
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
THOUGHTS ON
STRIKES FROM
HOSPITAL BED
By JOHN GARRETT
It was a dim grey dismal dawn
as I tossed on a bed of pain awaiting the awful mask that would forever snuff out my life, and ease my
agony with soft asphyxia . . . then
it was a wet cold evening. I gazed
around and about ... it was a
hospital ... I remembered, or did
I?  ...*** my leg ... 1
TO STRIKE
Some days after, as I lay idly
musing on a sickly breakfast, a
surfeit of Jap oranges, beautiful
nurses, and a generously amusing
doctor, I cast an empty watery eye
on a newspaper. My limp dank hair
rose in terror . . . my leg throbbed
afresh in ecstasy ... I screamed
for Miss Ha . . . "The University
was to go ON  STRIKE."
e
All   day    and    every    day    I
scanned the dally press (even the
gutter press), and gradually my
drugged brain came   to   realise
that at laat the atudent body of
the Unlveralty of British Columbia   had   awoken   from   a   deep
slumber to realise that a rascally
Government   was   about   to   do
them a colossal amount of dirt.
"That ought to rate a few mass
meetings," thought I to myself as
I  sipped  a  glass  full  of  straight
codeine.    With   feverish   anxiety   I
tossed about until at last the  papera  again  became  harbingers  of
glad  news  .   .  .  "A  Delegation to
Wait on Premier Pattullo ..." I
couldn't for the life  of me think
what the Premier could do with a
crowd of students to wait on him
. . . must be the last "hypo."
PETITION NO GOOD
"Premier Extends Sympathy,"
was the next greeting. . . . Alas,
what a world! . . . this needs Miss
Ha . . . again. What! no strike!
. . . perhaps no petition! But then,
that is a good idea. Who ever heard
of a strike getting any one any
further than a hospital bed. What
good has a petition ever been other
than giving us a chance to celebrate or to go mountainwards, or
maybe to stay at home to sleep in
with a clear conscience.
My temperature chart looked
like a graph of the Japanese
earthquake at the end of a week
of this; but it rose so high at the
climax that the nurses Imported
a stepladder to keep up with It
Caution Money Waivered ... think
of that!!! That $2.00 would have
bought me another twenty shots
of morphine . . . but then, as my
feeble mind weakly argued, you
can have a campaign without
nurses ... no that's wrong, I
mean sacrifice.
Totem Excellent
Propaganda For
Student Campaign
CABINET  MINISTER IN TRIBUTE
TO U.B.C. MINING GRADUATES
UMBRELLA LOST
A red oilskin silk umbrella somewhere on the campus. Will the
finder please communicate with
Esme Caydzien via the Arts Letter
Rack or Student Council's Offlce.
TRANSPORTATION WANTKD
For 9 oclocks. From 325 W. 16th
Avenue. Please apply John Hampton, Applied Science letter rack.
FOUNTAIN   PEN   LOST
Marine  green  fountain pen   lost.
Please return to Mr.  Home's office
or David  Morrow.    Reward.
Book Will Be
Out In About
Six Weeks
One of the best contributions to
the Student Campaign to enlist fav-
orabe public opinion will be this
year's Totem, which will be out ln
about a month and a half.
The Totem, earrled  baok eaeh
year     by     students    to     towns
throughout the Interior of B. C,
form    the    moat    comprehensive
and forolble propaganda to Interior B. ,C. that the Unlveralty oan
produee.
With  this  purpose  ln mind,  the
Totem staff is trying to concentrate
on the overcrowding situation and
lack of facilities, as well as showing the University's Importance to
the   province.     It  la   therefore   important    that   all    photographs   be
taken   in   order   to   carry   out   the
overcrowding    theme.      Freshman
photographs  must  be  taken  downtown after Wednesday.
Any freshmen who haven't already been photographed are urged
to make their appointments immediately.
COEDS LEARN
TO SPEAK
Public speaking ls evidently one
activity ln which university women
are Interested.
Over 60 eo-sds ware present at
the first  Isoture given  last  Prlday on the oampua by Mra. J. W.
Morgan, experleneed teaeher and
adjudicator,   under   the   auaplees
of the Womens Literary Porum.
Berclses  In  breath  control were
demonstrated    and    the    necessary
requirements   for   correct   enunciation explained by the speaker.
The four remaining lectures will
be given on succeeding Fridays at
noon ln  room  205.
Freshmen to Make
Debut Next Week
At Arts '41 Party
Arts   '41   will  make   its  debut  Into   the   Varsity   social   circle   at
their   first   class    party   on    the
evening   of   February   10   at   the
Palomar.
The executive, under the presidency of Joe Pearse and honorary
president Professor Walter Oage,
hint that a draw and a pep meet
will probably take place Monday.
According to Charles Nash, L.
S.E. representative, visitors from
other classes will be allowed to
participate at fl.00 per ticket.
Refreshments are Included.
POLITICAL DISCUSSION fcLUB
The executive of the Political
Discussion Club will meet at 1.00
p.m. on Tuesday, February 1st, in
Arts   103.
ROOM  ANO  BOARD
ents.     Reasonable
McOlll  Road.
— Men Stud-
Rates.     1815
EXTENSION DEPT. ARRANGES
SERIES OF ART LECTURES
A special course in Art Appreciation has been arranged by the
Department of University Extension, to be given by Mr. Charles H.
Scott, Director of the Vancouver
School of Art, accordln gto Dr. G.
M. Shrum, director of the department.
Eight lectures covering in miniature the historical growth of European painting from the 13th to the
20th century will comprise the
course which will commence on
February 2nd and will continue on
every Wednesday from 4.30 to 5.30
p.m. in Arts 100. A registration
fee of $2.00 will be charged the
public, but general students may
attend the course at a cost of $1,00,
and members of the Art Club at a
cost of $0.60.
Subjects  to  be  dealt with  in the
various lectures are as follows:
Lecture 1—The approach to
appreciation. Principles by which
painting may be judged. What a
painting is not. The elements of
painting. Form and subject matter.
Lecture 2—Modern painting,
tradition in painting. The Italian
Primitives.
Lecture 3—The higher Ren-
naissance. The Florentlans and
Venetians.
Lecture 4—German and Flemish painters.
Lecture 5—Spanish and Dutch
painters.
Lecture 6 — French painting
with special attention to Impressionism  and Post-Impressionism.
Lecture 7—English painting.
Lecture 8—Canadian  painting.
MINERAL DEPOSITS IN B. C.
MAY COVER 75°/q OF AREA
By Deputy Minleter of Mine*—Provincial Oovernment.
British Columbia has an area of 366,255 square miles,
the greater part of which is mountainous; the average elevation being over 3,500 feet above sea level.
The population of British Columbia is approximately
700,000 people, of which about 400,000 are centred in and
within a few miles of Vancouver. The population is dependent on the acreage of agricultural land, and on industry. In
the case of industry, the capacity of population is largely
governed by the iron and steel industry.
It is estimated that about 5 per cent, of the area of
British Columbia, or 18,000 square miles, is arable land, of
which half is good land and half poor to fair.
There are only a few places in the world where the land
directly supports over 500 people per square mile, and not
many places where it will support 250 to 500 people per
square mile. If the good land in British Columbia will support four people to every 20 acres, and the fair to poor land
four people to every 50 acres, our total rural population
would be 1,685,000 people. At present 300,000 people occupy
6,500 square miles of land.
Since 1891 the rural populations of Nova Scotia and
Prince Edward Island have decreased, while the rural populations of New Brunswick and Ontario have remained fairly
constant. Alberta and Saskatchewan show a rapid growth in
the early years of this century, more so than Manitoba and
British Columbia, which are older Provinces. The rural
growth in British Columbia has been slowing down for some
years, and becoming fairly stable. There are, however, still
possibilities for agricultural development in the Province.
Considering forestry, it was estimated twenty years ago
that only 28,000 square miles of British Columbia constituted
statutory timber land. Today, it is estimated that 53,500
square miles, or approximately 15 per cent, of the area of the
Province, constitutes commercial timber land, with an addition of 94,170 square miles of young growth. Twenty years
ago it was estimated that timber on 100,000 square miles of
potential forest land had been completely destroyed, and the
timber on half the remaining area seriously damaged by fire.
However, it is now estimated that with proper control and
protection, British Columbia can maintain or exceed the
present cut without depletion of its forests. Forestry has
for many years been either the flrst or second basic industry
of importance in the Province, and will undoubtedly remain
so.
Mining, after fur-trading, was the flrst basic industry in
the Province, and is now the second basic industry in importance. It is known that 76 per cent, of the area of the Province is not unfavourable to the occurrence of mineral deposits, and that coal and possibly oil and natural gas may exist
in the remaining 25 per cent, of the area. It is not reasonable to expect that all of this area of three-quarters of the
Province will produce minerals, but if a relatively large part
of this area is not productive from the mineral standpoint, it
is worthless as agricultural land or for growing timber. It
is true that some of the rugged sections of the Province are
of great value for their scenic beauty and tourist attraction.
Agriculture can be considered a permanent asset, and
also forestry, provided that our forests are protected against
Are, and that logging operations are properly carried out.
Mining, however, is a wasting asset, and when mineral is
once taken out of the ground, it can never be replaced. However, as time goes on, mineral deposits which today are of no
value either because of the complexity of the ores, or the
distance from transportation, or competition in world markets, may become of value. Again, scientific development
will And uses for raw materials which today are considered
worthless. The future, therefore, of the mining industry,
though mining is a wasting asset, is reasonably bright, and
as it is the only industry i!hat may be developed in large
areas of the Province, our future prosperity must depend to
a great extent on it.
r
]
CM. OLIVER & CO. LTD.
734 West Hastings
Sey. 8024
SECURITIES FOUNDATION LTD.
829 West Pender Street
Trinity 1334
Write or telephone us for latest information on the
new Leballos Mining Area.
MERIDIAN MINING
Company Limited
555 Howe St. Trinity 3513
Low Capitalization:   1,730,00 shares,  50c.
Par Value.     In Treasury:   854,411 Shares
HOW PIONEERS
WON WAY TO
KEY POSITIONS
IN PROFESSION
By Minleter of Mine*—Provincial
Oovernment.
It is with rssl plsasurs that
I havs aocepted ths opportunity to writs a fsw words
on mining for ths columns of
ths "Ubyssey." Muoh hss
bssn said about ths soonomlo
relations bstwssn ths mining
industry and ths Province—-
I would like to make a fsw
random oommsnts on ths human relationship bstwssn ths
mining industry and ths University.
Sixteen years ago I arrived from
the East for my first post in the
mining profession in B. C. I say
this, not as a personal reminiscence, but to illustrate a point—I
arrived from the East to take a
mining post, Just as many others
came from the East and South to
nil positions ln the mining Industry
ln B. C. The University of British
Columbia was in Us Infancy then,
and mining men were recruited
from the hardrock men ot the Ontario fields and from the Eastern
universities.
FIR8T CONTACT
That summer at the Premier
Oold Mine I had my flrst contact
with the University, when a few
undergraduates came north to work
as laborers ln the mine and mill.
Their object was twofold—to secure practioal experience, and sufficient money to tide them over the
next term. At flrst lt was difficult
for these young men to secure Jobs,
for they were young, soft and untrained, and the mining operators
could easily secure hardened laborers, trained In mining, for the same
wages. Through their own persistence and the co-operation of a few
of the larger mining companies, an
increasing number secured placement each spring. On graduation,
some obtained minor engineering
positions, but many, to get a foothold, started their professional careers mucking and mining underground.
Sixteen yeara later, a brief survey shows how well these U.B.C.
pioneers sold themselves and thalr
University to the mining Industry.
There Is not a mine of any alas In
Number Two In a Serlet ef
Indutlrlal Article.. Compiled
by   Pacific   Publisher.   Limited.
this Province but has U.B.C. men
in key positions. At Britannia,
Trail, Bridge River, the Kootenays,
2eballos, the Portland Canal, there
are U.B.C. men as managers, super-
Intsndanta, geologists, engineers,
metallurgists and assayers. I feel
I ean eorrsetly aay that there Is no
other major Industry In B. C. whioh
now draws so heavily on the University.
The reasons for this pleasing
condition are obvious. An excellent
University staff developed well
rounded courses ln geology, mining
and metallurgy, particularly adapted to actual mining conditions ln
the Province. The opportunity for
practical training through summer
work underground has enabled the
University theory to be adequately
complemented by actual mining
practice, and in addition the financial return has enabled many a
deserving student to carry on.
Above all, my own personal experience has shown me that the mining course at the University seems
to attract the finest type ot young
men.
THE MINING CAMP
The University has done more
than this for the mining industry.
The average mining camp, perched
alone on a barren hillside with the
clattering ore trains, the roaring
mill and the rows of Identical
houses would be a bleak and forlorn place were it not for the cheerful community spirit which generally prevails. In the creation of
this community Interest ln social
and athletic activities, the young
engineer and his wife—for the flrst
raise in pay invariably brings a
bride northward — always play a
leading part.
I eannot help but think that the
ability of the Impaounlous oollege
student to Snd sntertalnmant at
little eost develops later Into the
ability of the young engineer to
create community aotlvities In a
mining eamp with fsw eonven-
iencaa. I alnesrely hope that thla
oonatruetive Interest In oommunlty
affaire will soon lead some of thsse
young men to play a leading part
In the political affairs of our Province.
Sixteen years ago, professional
mining men flocked Into this Province. This morning I have on my
desk letters from two U.B.C. engineers In responsible positions, one
ln Broken Hill, Rhodesia, the other
In Kirkland Lake, Ontario, an indication of how the tide has turned.
The engineering department of the
University has certainly Justified
Its existence to the mining industry and to the Province in general.
CONGRATULATIONS . . .
To the "Ubyssey" on its efforts to present to its resders
a picture of B. C.'s steadily growing mining industry.
HALL, HOLLAND & CO., LIMITED
STOCKS — BONOS — GRAIN
Hall Bldg.
Trin. 6231
Vancouver, B.C.
RIDDELL, KEENLEYSIDE
& Company Limited
Investment Dealers and Underwriters
Insurance Agents
Underwriters of the Alma Mater Society
Bond Issue 1937.
808 Hastings West
Sey. 4491
WHO BENEFITS
from the facts . . . that British Columbia mines during
1937 produced minerals* to the extent of $73,000,000 against
$54,000,000 in 1936 . . . and returned to shareholders as dividends $14,000,000 against $10,000,000 in 1936 . . . that wages
and salaries paid by mining companies in the Province during
1937 totalled $21,000,000 against $18,000,000 in 1936?
You and every resident in the Province benefits directly
or indirectly from the mining industry.
A. E. JUKES & CO. LIMITED
Members Vancouver Stock Exchange
810 West Hastings Street
Trinity 2545 Ruggers, Soccermen Lose Close Week-End Tussles
BASKETBALL
TOMORROW AT U.B.C.
VARSITY vs. RYERSON
TIME: 9 P.M.
BASKETBALL
TOMORROW AT U.B.C.
VARSITY vs. RYERSON
TIME: 9 P.M.
Four
THE      U BY S S E Y
Tuesday, February 1, 1938
HOOPERS FACE CHURCHMEN IN CRUCIAL BATTLE
Just Lookin'
by
'Van" Perry
There's a road race or so in the
offing, boys. Saw Brian Martin out
tuning up the old dogs around Marine Drive the other day, with the
prettiest red and blue sweater you
ever Imagined.
When the track gang starts, it's
a sure sign ot something or other.
We used to think it was spring, but
you can't believe in signs any more.
Go  over  to  the  stadium  and  ask
Johnny Owens.
• *      •
ODDS 'N ENDS
Oeorge Pringle has the nicest grin
we ever saw outside a movie.
"Hunk" Henderaen comes second,
with Johnny Bird third. (Nice
rhyming ... we did lt tor effect.)
And Maury hlsselt haa the most
pleasing voice. Wonder what sob-
story he gives the boys in his office at half-time during the hoop
battles? The effect ls electrifying,
or did you stop to notice?
• •      •
We hear from our art critic that
Lanoe Hudson ot Westerns has
such beeeyoootlful laigs he should
pose In the Art School. What kind
ot art, please?
And teammate Joe Roas Just
can't keep his waist down. Funny,
he does enough running around.
• *      •
That reminds us. How does Hal
Straight ever get close enough to
a typewriter to pound out his dally
stint?
• •      •
And did you know that apRoberts' first name is outlandish as the
old Harry? It's "Qwllym." And we
can prove it.
Funny, It'a namea that provide
the news. What would we do
without our Rann Matthlaon,
Dave Carey, Howie McPhee and
all the rest? What would Council do without Thorneloe? What
would Beer do without Skittles?
Now ya got muh.
CAGETTES BROKE
Seems the Cagette league are
writing their accounts in red ink
this year, and trying to break into
the blue columns by bringing out
the Broadway Clowns for the odd
exhibition tilt with somebody here.
This might be worth seeing. V.A.C.
Monday, February 7th. These boys
are like the Harlemltea, and take
the cakes in hoop satire. Ducats
for the festivities are cheap, and
you can get 'em from any girl on
the  Senior  "A"  squad.
NOYAH,  NQVAHI
We hear a columnist of the alcoholic variety proclaiming his virtues. We don't like him, because
he says he doesn't read us. (Question: Can we like anybody, then?)
We remember when said beer-artist
got squashed rather neatly for being presumptuous. And not so long
ago.    They never learn, do they?
And that's how it's done when
we can't tlnd any copy. Goodnight
all.  .  .  .
UmB. C. Ruggers
Give Clubbers
Bad Scare Sat.
THUNDERBIRDS CAN MAKE
PL A YOFFS WITH THREE WINS
Ryerson May Prove Stubborn Obstacle
Students Need Support in Fray
By HUGH SHIRREFF
With Westerns and Munro's coining through with
upset wins on last Saturday's basketball schedule Varsity's chances of snaffling a playoff berth are particularly bright.
The students have three games left on their schedule and
if they take all of them they will be in one of the flrst three
positions no matter what the other teama do.	
Tomorrow night at U.B.C. In the
first of these three tough tussles,
Varsity's hopefuls will tackle the
hard-fighting Ryerson crew. The
students are really gunning for a
victory In thla fray, and the more
howlers who're on hand to cheer
the better they'll like It.
RYERSON  ARK   HOT
The second of these contests promises to be a torrid affair against the
Munro's who showed surprising
power in downing the second place
Ryerson quintet on Saturday night.
With that well known spirit and
do or die drive that characterises
all Varsity teams the melon tossers
are positive that they can come
through once again with the required wins.
SPIRIT IS THSRS
Thla same spirit has not been
much In evidence so far this year
with Varaity losing In most of the
eloss    ones.    Two    weeks    ago,
however,  they   took   the    highly
touted   Westerns   Into   oamp   by
virtue of showing  some  of their
old fight and what they did once
they    think    that    they    oan    do
again.
One big reason for the studes'
confidence is that captain Rann
Matthison, who went Into a temporary scoring slump for a few
games, snapped out of lt with 17
points against Westerns last Wednesday and seems to be well on
his way to regain the lead in the
scoring.
The game Is to be played at the
Varsity gym tomorrow night and
a  large crowd la expected to  be
on hand to give the studenta any
moral support that they might require.
CO-ED
SPORTS
HOW THEY STAND
W. L.
Western's     7 B—14
Staey'a     7 B—14
Ryeraon     S ft—12
VARSITY     S •—12
Munroa  _  S tt—12
Adanaea   3 9— S
OUTDOOR   CLUB
The Spring Party is on Friday,
February 1st. A draw has been
made. Details, name ot partner,
etc.,  from   David   Smith,   P.  G.  430.
Seconds  Smear
'Loma Team
In a game that was more remarkable for the fact that Senior Manager Ron Andrews turned out and
ran about under the shelter of a
raincoat than tor any remarkable
playing feats, Varsity seconds defeated a shorthanded Meraloma
outfit by the decisive count of 12-0.
The failure of one or two of his
team to turn out had Associate
Manager Bill Calder scampering
about looking for players before
the game. His sear jh was complet-
ly successful by the time he had
roped in Ron Andrews, who almost
succeeded in detracting some people's attention from the Stadium
game by his antics on the upper
field.
The halves were shortened by
mutual agreement before the game
but the erstwhile Third Dlvlsloners
left little doubt as to which was the
superior squad as thoy pressed
practically throughout the tussle
and gave Fullback Andrews little
chance to do anything towards continuing his gettlng-in shape campaign.'
—ROBINSON.
By VAN PBRRY
A slightly diluted first team ot
Varsity Ruggers gave the Rowers
a bad scare at the Stadium on Saturday when they went down fighting to the tune ot 14-10.
VARSITV  AHSAD  At   HALF
The Blue and Gold, composed
mainly of second team players,
turned in a very snappy performance which garnered 10 big points
to the Coal Harbour crew's three
before the half-time whistle.
Mattu made the first try of the
game when he broke through to
tag the turf right between the
posts. "Bas" Robinson had a bit
of hard luck In hla kicking, and
mlsssd the eonvert.
SMITH  SCORES THRILLER
The next score, also for Varsity,
was a real thriller. There was a
mlxup near the Rowers' line, and
the ball bounced over loose. Freddy
Smith won the race by a nose, and
burled self and ball ln the ley turf.
The convert was from an impossible angle, and missed.
Varaity'a final counter, the third
of   the   game,   gave   Roblnaon   a
ohanee  to  make  up  his  convert,
as he took a pass from the serum
close In, and smaeksd over a field
goal, making tho acere 10-0.
Tailing   opened   up   for   Rowing
Club   before  the  half,   with  an  unconverted try.
In the second stanza, Wilson,
RqbertBon, and Clark went over.
Clark's try, ln the dying moments
of the game, was made good, to
write thirty to the scoring at 14-
10 for the Red and White.
Injuries were frequent throughout the encounter, and both teams
played short for the major part of
the game. Robinson got a wallop
tn the head that put him out, and
Griffin played stoically with a nose
dripping  gore.
By MYRNE NEVISON
After letting the Britannia
Grads pile up a 2-0 lead by
half time, the U.B.C. grass
hockeyists rallied to hold the
Crimson Tide 3-2 in the remainder of the battle of the
year Saturday.
COLLEGIANS FORGET TO PASS
In general the play was very
good though the collegians seemed
to have forgotten that passes are
atlll permtssable.
Ellen Bovln, seorlng Just after
the breather, started tho oo-eda
In the right direction. Hortense
Warne starred on the defenae.
Playing the best basketball any
girls' team has attempted this year
the Senior B hoopettes lost out 33-
26 after a valiant effort to the
speedy Monophone quintet.
Margaret Porter and Lois Harris
were high scorers for the evening
with eight points apiece.
Mural  March
Continues
Science '38 vs. Education
on Wednesday
In spite of the Friction of
the Fees and a minor blizzard
or two, the March of 'Mural-
continues apace.
Volleyball continues to hold
the spotlight and the biweekly games are still of the
same high calibre of previous
contests.
SC. '40, SC. '39 WIN TILTS
Friday noon aaw two hot games
decided In the last few minutes
and whsn ths smoke of battle
had cleared Soience '40 had taken the points from the rival Engineers of '38, and Science '39
took the count ef the Freshmen.
The schedule for Wednesday
shows Science '38 drawn against
the men from the schoolroom ln the
first battle and Arts '38 against the
Agglea. Both games should be of
the hot variety and points are
meaning a lot these days ln the
race for the Governor's Trophy. See
you at noon ln the Oym Wednesday. —O. D.
Reporter Collects Game Shrapnel
SHRAPNEL . . . Coaoh Hltohins was said to have almost wept
against the goalpost as the victorious Excelsiors whooped it up in their
dressing room. . . . You can't keep a good man down as Dan Quayle
proved for the umpteenth time by turning out again for the students.
... It may be stale but Allan Croll played another steady game on
defence. . . . Rookie McMillan and centre-half Jim Roblnaon both turned
in heady games, —B. R.
PUCKSTERS BREAK EVEN ON
SEATTLE-SPOKANE JOURNEY
By ORME DIER
Varaity'a perambulating puoksters climbed off a rattler Sunday
night after a week-end trip to Gonaaga and Washington and when
the average had been worked out the Blue and Gold aquad olloked
for a .000 rating.
THUNDERBIRDS   BEAT   HUSKIES,  LOSE  TO  GONZAGA
Friday night at Seattle the Thunderbirds flew all over the Huskies
to take a smart 6-0 win. The night at Spokane the Bulldogs proved to
be just too good for the B. C. aggregation and took a 10-1 decision from
the travellers.
The first game saw some smart hockey dished up to a fair crowd
and the 'Birds really clicked to come away with their first'decisive
victory of the season. Captain Hughie Shirreff was in rare form to
keep the Huskies off the score sheet, while the forwards burned up the
Ice in their scoring bee.
Taylor, Trussell and Dier clicked for five of the markers between
them and defenceman. BUI Lowe notched the other. Coach Maury Van
Vliet, who accompanied his charges on the journey, kept the gang in
fighting mood all the way and the game at Spokane gave the team all
the fight they could handle in one game.
The Bulldogs, most of whom are athletlo aoholarahlp atudenta,
play a rough tough brand of hookey and when the smoke had oleared
from the aoene of battle, there had been one fight that nearly became a riot, numerous penalties, lots of cheering from the Gonzaga
aeotlon complete with a band and plenty of goala.
GONZAGANS  HOLD  AN   EARLY   LEAD
The Gonzaga team built up an early lead and then relied on breakaways to run up their ten tallies on Shirreff, who played the best game
of his career, by stopping more rubber than a tire factory. Taylor made
the play for the lone Columbia counter by pulling the defence out of
position before slipping the disc to Dier.
Q^^d-4!
«P
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ROUNDBALLERS LOSETOUGH
ONE TO EXCELSIOR STARS
Coach Hitchins Sad as Charges Lose Early Lead,
Game 3-2; Quayle Back to Stay With Collegians
Varaity senior soeesrmen have had a tough season up to now,
fer the most part playing aecond fiddle to the other teama In the
V. e\ D. League, but they never came closer to enacting the role of
giant-killers than on Saturday when they lost out by sheer bad
breaks to the desperate Excelelora by a score of 3-2.
DANNY QUAYLE   RETURNS TO  SOCCER  FOLDS
The return of Dan Quayle to the centre-forward apot signalized
a reveraal of form by the etudente which was little short of sensational. Dominating the play throughout the flrat half and giving
the highly-touted Lumbermen little ohanoe to ssttle down, the
oampusmen were nevertheless behind by the lone goal soored at the
Interval.
Early  in   the   second  half,  however,   the   Blue   and   Gold   stock  was
boosted considerably, when flrst Dan Quayle tallied from a scramble to
tie  the  score, and  then  the  same  player  repeated  after  some  Trojan
hustling by Dick Foster.
HARVEY  STARTS   EXCELSIOR   RALLY
With the score 2-1 ln favor of Varsity, Allan Croll and his fellow
defencemen were called on to repel constant Excelsior attacks. Four
minutes before the final whistle the break came when Trevor Harvey
was awarded a free kick from near centrefleld and the big halfback's
floater watted gaily into the goal over the head ot the surprised Mr.
Harrower who had counted on a goal kick. Encouraged by this success,
the Lumbermen's titanic efforts were rewarded with 30 seconds remaining when Harrower was once more beaten.
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