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The Ubyssey Nov 1, 1938

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 CAIRN CEREMONY
FXIDAY
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, J3.C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 19.18
No. 12
Governors Present Decision Today
HEADLINE
From Canadian
University Press
FEATURES
Hy ROSS MUNRO
CUP Correspondent
OTTAWA, Oct. 24—With Canada's
wheat worries accumulating, a major
debate on the government's agricultural policy and Its attitude towards
a subsidy program ls predicted for
the next session of parliament.
DILEMMA AND WHEAT
Faced with the farmers' dilemma
of a good crop and falling prices, the
cabinet ls understood to be considerably concerned over the loss which
the federal treasury will have to
meet when the Canadian Wheat
Board has disposed of this year's
crop.
After six lean years the west has
produced a crop estimated at 334,-
000,000 bushels. The federal government has guaranteed 80 cents a
bushel for No. 1 northern at Fort
William if farmers sell to the wheat
board.
With practically the whole crop
likely to be sold to the board, the
weat wlU benefit materially but the
board Is selling the wheat at 80 to
80 cents a bushel leas than It paid
for It.
It has been estimated that the loss
to   the   federal   government   will   be
about   $-0,000,000— and   this   Is   $16,-
000,000 more than the annual Canadian  National  Railways  deficit,  considered   one   of  the   country's   major
burdens.
PATERNALISM
Many old Liberals oppose the guaranteed price principle on the grounds
it is a concession to government paternalism.   Others   high   in   the   party
ranks,   contend   80   cent   ■wheat   was
the only thing to save the west and
that within a few years government
subsidies   to   agriculture   and   other
branches   of   our   economy   will   be
accepted    as    a    sound    practice.
With both sides lining up. It appears that the problem of Canada's
agricultural price economy will be
given a thorough going over when
parliament meets, probably  before
the  end of November.
With   Canada    selling   more   than
225,000,000     bushels     of     its     wheat
abroad,   this   problem   naturally   assumed international proportions and
closely   Involves   the   United   States
and  Its plans for controlling surplus
farm  crops.
Acutely aware of the difficulties
faolng  the  Dominion  and  particularly     the     west,     Premier     John
Bracken haa called an international  conference  on  marketing  agricultural products to meet In Winnipeg  next  December.
Many   authorities   here    feel   it   la
rather peculiar that the international
conference   has   been   called   by   Mr.
Bracken   instead   of   by   the   federal
government. However, dominion officials    likely    will    attend    and    give
every assistance to the parley.
SURPLUS WHEAT MARKET
There is a belief In some quarters
here that the conference ls a development from recent conversations
between U. S. and Canadian officials
concerning marketing this year's
surplus  wheat  crop.
No  disclosures   have   been   made
as   to   whether   the   two   countries
are   working   In   unison   but   lt   Is
accepted that this Is a, fact.
Further extension of this principle
of    co-operation     between     the     two
nations    on    marketing    agricultural
products might be worked  out at the
Winnipeg   conference.
President Roosevelt told Senator
Lee of Oklahoma last week that he
believes any plan for coping with
surplus farm crops must be supplemented by an agreement among the
nations of tlie world for an equitable
division of the world market.
CROP   QUOTAS   AND   DEBATES.
Many government farm experts believe In such crop quotas and by tlie
time the subject comes up for debate
in   the   house   there   probably   will   be
(Continued on Page 3)
See   HEADLINE
FREDA UTLEY
TO LECTURE
ON JAPANESE
NOTED
HERE
JOURNALIST
THURSDAY
Thursday, November 3, In the
auditorium of the University of British Columbia, Freda Utley, the greatest critic ot Japan and things Jepa-
nese, will speak at 12.30.
OUARDIAN CORRESPONDENT
Miss Utley, the Japanese correspondent of the Manchester Guardian, ia extremely well known as a
writer, and has had several works
of particular note published. Her
best known effort ls "Japan's Feet
of Clay" which appeared in the latter part of 1937. In this she analyses
Japan's social, economic, and political condition so outspokenly and
frankly that her writings have been
barred ln Japan.
She is also a frequent contributor   to   Pacific   Affairs,   the   I.P.R.
publication, and to other Journals
dealing with  the  Far  East.     Her
latest book la "The Brink of Disaster."
Freda Utley can be ranked among
the  foremost writers of the  present
day.    W. H. Hamberlln of the Christian     Science     Monitor,     Oreenther
Stein,    the   Oerman    correspondent,
and   Hessell   Tlltman,   authority   on
Far  Eastern   questions  are  prominent journalists -with ■whom ahe may
be  ranked, and among whom she  is
by  no  means  the  least.
ADMISSION BY  PASS
Admission to this Interesting lecture ls on the pass system. Attendance should be at capacity, especially with conditions as they are In the
East.
"TUUM EST"
NEW NOTICE SYSTEM
INAUGURATED BY
UBYSSEY
A new system of notices Is to be
Inaugurated by the "Ubyssey" next
week.
It has been brought to the attention of the Ubyssey that the Indiscriminate posting- of notices on the
various notice boards around the
campus has resulted in confusion
and that a coordinated list of coming
events is badly needed.
Consequently, the Ubyssey has taken upon Itself to run a list of the
coming week's events on the front
page of each Tuesday's paper. All
activities of Interest to the student
body will be listed whether or not
they are directly connected with the
University. This list will also be
posted on the notice boards ln the
quad and at the foot of the Caf
stairs.
CO-OPERATION NEEDED
This feature will  require the cooperation of  the various clubs and
organizations concerned, which will
■te required to bring In a notice of
any lecture, dance, etc. to be held
in the following week, hy Monday
noon.
This   list   will   not   preclude   write-
ups   of   the   larger   functions   but   is
Intended   to   serve   as  a   reference   to
the   students   interested.
No notices of earning events wlU
be accepted for publication after
noon Monday, except in speolal circumstances.
THB CAIRN
Homecoming is
Super-Success
—Bob Smith
STUDENTS GATHER AT
CAIRN MONUMENT TO
REMEMBER PIONEERS
While the legislature ln Victoria is considering the problem of University fees and accommodation, Students' Council is planning the annual
Cairn Ceremony.
The ceremony, which Is to be held Friday, Nov. 4th, at 12.45, ls ln
commemoration of another campaign, the campaign of 1933, which
culminated in a parade of students carrying stones to the present site
of the University from the former quarters at the "Fairview Shacks."
i Those stones are today evident ln
the form of the Calm situated opposite the bus-stand on the Mall.
They form an ageless tomb for "the
roll-call of parade," the list of names
of those who marched the six miles
from Fairview to Point Orey.
SEALED SCROLL.
' Sealed Inside the tomb Is a long
scroll of paper with the names of the
U.B.C. pioneers Indelibly inscribed
upon lt, those students who massed
together to campaign throughout
Vancouver and the province ■ by
means of the public platform, door-
lo-door visits, pamphlets, parades,
and films, to secure what we, the
students  of  1038,  now  possess.
To those who know of that campaign the Cairn, though plain and
covered with Ivy, represents a really
monumental effort. It stands opposite the Science Building, that building which was but a bare skeleton of
steel girders ln 1923.
HISTORIC   MARCH.
In the spring of 1923, when the
historic march took place, 800 students lined those girders three full
stories  high,    and    along    the   entire
"Homecoming this year was a great
success," stated Bob Smith, the treasurer of the A. M. S.
Although the complete financial
returns were not available as yet,
there was assurance that the total
gate receipts for the complete function were twice those obtained last
year. These receipts were beyond all
expectations and tended to show that
the Homecoming was being established   as  a   major  campus   function.
Student interest ln Homecoming
was very keen this fall, which was
responsible for the success which accompanied it. The outside Interest ln
this event as shown by ex-students
and Vancouver ln general contributed
largely to the social success of the
Homecoming party
the game.
at   the   close   of
PEARCE RE-ELECTED
ARTS '41 PRESIDENT
Joe Pearce was elected president
of the class of Arts '41; honorary
president will be Dr. Sedgewick; vice-
president, Dorothy Hircl; secretary.
Kny Evans; treasurer, Betty Bolduc;
L.S.E. representative, Stan Durkin;
men's athletic representative, Dave
Ritchie; woman's athletic representative,  Betty   Muir.
(Continued on Page 2)
See   CAIRN
Pawlett, Floor show, at
Commodore for Arts*Aggie
Elaborate preparations are being1
made for the Arts Aggie Ball on November 17. It promises to be the
biggest and most Important social
event of the year, and to eclipse
every former affair. The price ls
$3.00 per couple. This Includes dancing to the syncopated rhythm of
Charlie Pawlett's orchestra, at the
Commodore Cabaret, and a delicious
supper.
FLOOR   SHOW
The interesting program will include June Roper's dancing display
and the singing of Donna Lee, formerly with Sterling Young's orchestra.
The central motif has not yet been
chosen, but the committee in charge
promise that the final results will be
absolutely  colossal!
A.M.U.S. IN CHAROE
Arranging the affair is the Art's
Men's Undergraduate Society including Darrell Braldwood, Frank Turner, Jim Ferris, and Byron Straight.
The ball will be held in the Commodore for the flrst time since 1935.
It is announced that the tables will
be moved back to give greater space
for dancing.
Remember the Arts-Aggie: Date,
November 17; place, Commodore
Cabaret.
UNION BUILDING VERDICT
WILL BE GIVEN TO A.M.S.
STUDENTS AWAIT DEVELOPMENTS  IN  BROCK
MEMORIAL SITUATION
The Board of Oovernora, after their meeting last night, would
not make publio their decision regarding the Brook Memorial
grant of $2,500 per annum, whloh was requested by the Students'
Oounoil. They stated, however, that they would make a report to
the Students' Oounoil sometime today.
It is expeoted that a oommittee will be formed to investigate
the situation regarding Union Building funds. Upon the deoislon
reaohed In this matter there hangs the fate of the entire student
Building Campaign.
Durkin Preps
Orchestra for
Island Trip
At a special meeting last Thursday
noon,  members  of  the  Varsity  band
elected  their  executive for  the coming year.
NEW  APPOINTMENTS.
Osborne Durkin, organizer and
president of the Band, announced
the following appointments; Oeorge
Olass, vice-president; Aileen McKln-
non, secretary; Bob Murray, treasurer; Frank Hills, business manager,
and  Don   Caldwell  librarian.
The new executive ls busy making
plans for the coming Victoria Invasion, at which the instrumentalists
will do their part ln the fostering of
Intercollegiate spirit.
As the    Invasion   is   one   of the
most    Important    activities  of   the
Band this year, It was decided yesterday    that   only   those   members
who report to practise and appearances    regularly  will    be  fortunate
enough to make the trip.
Students who have so far failed to
join  the Band  are invited  to get in
touch  with  a member  of  the  executive  as   soon    as    possible  regarding
try-outs.
SCIENCE TO HOLD
CLASS PARTY AT
ALMA ON THURSDAY
The Red Menace will make its annual Invasion of the student body on
Thursday evening, when the Science
Class Party swings Into action at
the Alma  Academy,
SJM..U.S. PRESIDENT IN CHAROE
Sclencemen ln charge of the student end of the arrangements are
S.M.U.S. president, Alfle Allen, and
Fifth Year residenPt, Lawrence
Oarvle.
Patrons are President and Mrs. L. S.
Kllnk, Dean and Mrs. M. Finlayson,
and the Honorary Presidents of each
Science   class.
An extra-special Science Pep
Meet, also guaranteed to be scarlet, will be held on Thursday noon,
to arouse Intereat ln the evening's
doings.
The request for $2600 a year during the next ten years, to be granted
by the Oovernors for the purpose of
erecting a unit of the long desired
Brock Memorial Union Building was
made by the students at the semiannual meeting of the Alma Mater
Society.
NO BENEFIT
The feeling of the students of the
campus, and that expressed by the
Students'   Council,  was   that  since
the    $26    Increase    In    fees—from
which the student body was derlv-
no apparent benefit—It was Impossible to raise any more money from
them.
the   proposal   was   put   before   the
Board last night by President Kllnck,
following  an  interview  with  Carson
McOulre and Evan 'apRoberts.
COST  $76,000
The unit of the Union Building will
cost $78,000 of which the Student
body has raised $50,000. Of this sum,
the women alone have raised $25,000
and the student body, the remaining
half.
The students have been receiving
numerous set-backs but Council are
determined to make a start on the
building this year.
CENSORS BAN "SEXY"
FILMS FROM CAMPUS
"Madame Bovary," the Film So-
Soclety's latest epic, almost didn't
reach the campus last night. In fact,
The Board of Censors let it be shown
only because all the arrangements
had been made for its appearance
and it was impossible to obtain a
substitute, announced Dick Jarvis,
Film Society prexy.
UNIVERSITY   MORALS
However, the local keepers of the
public morals made it quite clear
that they would henceforth allow no
"sexy pictures" to defile the minds
of  the   University   boys  and   gii Is.
MEN WANTED FOR
SATURDAY
JOBS
Do you want work on Saturdays?
. . . Dean Clement has had a requeat
for a few boys between the ages of
18 and 22 for work on Saturdays.
Those interested can get in touch
with him at Room T in the Agriculture  Building.
RESERVATIONS PLACED
ON A.M.S. MINUTES
BY FACULTY
The Faculty Committee on Student
Affairs has placed a reservation upon two of the most important of the
minutes passed by the Students
Council  last Monday.
These minutes read as follows:
"That the Literary and Scientific
Awards system be adopted," and?
"That the Students Council go on
record as advocating the use of commercial means to further the Union
Building fund, all such means to be>
approved, ln writing, by the Student.
Council."
L.S.E.   AWARDS   SYSTEM
The first of these minutes concerning the L.S.E. Awards system, is
the culmination of the efforts of
Struan Robertson to have this system Installed at U.B.C. Particulars
of this system were given in a previous edition of the "Ubyssey."
UNION BUILDING FUND
The second motion, concerning
the use of commercial methods to
raise money for the Union Building fund, Is of great Importance.
The Students Council decided,
some time ago, that such methods
would be used only as a last resort in  the campaign  for  funds.
The reservation imposed by the
F.C.S.A. indicates that the Faculty
is opposed to any fom of commercialism which might be used in the
campaign. If this situation can not
be relieved a serious Impasse may
develop, and it may become altogether impossible to build the Union
Building.
TOTEM
WILL ALL FRESHMEN
KINDLY  RETURN
THEIR   PROOFS   TO
ARTONA  AT   ONOE! Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 1,  1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ...
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy   Cummings
Tuesday
Jack Mair
SENIOR  EDITORS
SPORTS  EDITOR
Orme  Dier
Phone Point Orey 206
Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
Friday
Robert  King
Editorials
THE NOON-HOUR
Another problem of short noon hour periods hits raised a incline in-* head in tlie Musical Society activities. With a one hour
noon period, the maximum time available for rehearsals is only
three quarters of an hour. With an even more difficult opera than
they hove ever attempted, under production, the Musical Society
finds this alone n very serious handicap.
Unfortunately the short noon hour is not the only complicating factor in the matter. The rehearsals are retarded not only by
lack of time, but up to half of the cast cannot be present because
of noon-hour lectures. According to Frank Patch, club president,
the lectures which most handicap the rehearsals occur in the Herman department. Student authorities have realized this unfortunate situation and a committee has been appointed to deal with
tho problem.
This is a very grave example of the hardship placed on the
campus organizations by the one hour noon period. If the move
made by Brynelson's council in 1935 ever needed justification, it
was provided this year.
The longer noon was first instigated with the view to increasing the activities of clubs and fostering n university spirit by a
longer period of association of the students when on the campus.
Slowly the spirit did grow and it was not recognized' until this
year when tho noon period was restricted and many activities begin to feel tho effects of a setback in inter-student co-operation.
The second problem which the societies are facing arises out
of an unwillingness on the part of the professors to take lectures
in the afternoons. It is true that the excuse for noon lectures is
that it is tho only time the whole class is free. When the timetables were rearranged this year the faculty promised that there
would be no noon lectures and no classes or labs after :,1.:10 on
Wednesday. Provision for these lectures could have been made
then. The noon-hour lectures are taking place in only a few
departments and it seems unfortunate that these few professors
cannot arrange their time tables to conform with the university
regulations.
CENSORS
For the second time in their short life the Film Society has
run up against the problem of censors. According to the Censorship Act, the Board of Censors must pass on all films to be shown
to the public. In spite of many explanations of the clubs private
and educational nature, the Board persists in considering its meetings as public.
The first objection the Board made was last year, to the morbid nature of a film which dealt with the theme of murder from
a surrealistic point of view. The film was never shown in Vancouver but from reports one would gather that it was much more
artistic than the productions called " Krankensetin" and "Drac-
ula" being shown to a public audience at present.
This year the censor's have raised their objections to the sexy
nature of the two films shown by the club up to the present time.
Dick Jarvis, club president, explained that the film was an exact
representation of a French classic and ordered under the supervision of the Department of Modern Languages.
When this explanation had no effect, Dick told the Board that
the films were considered from an intellectuul point of view and
explained that the educated young people who form the Film
Society have sufficiently highly developed minds not to need protection from the so-called sex aspects of a French Novel.
However the Board of Censors still refuse to exempt the
group from censorship under the law that they are a private organization. The result of the conference was that orders for
films must be approved by the Board and that no films, which, in
their opinion emphasize sex, can be shown on this campus.
MEETING LISTS
It has long been evident that, the conglomeration of badly
printed signs which cover our notice boards and supposedly tell
the campus of coming events, have been failing badly in their purpose. A plan has been evolved in the mind of one of the faculty
that it would be more efficient for all notices to be tabulated and
posted I'or the coming week in a neat compilation.
The publications secretary has taken on the duty of receiving
and tabulating lists of all activities which might interest U.B.C.
students. The list will be published in the Ubyssey every Tuesday.
It is an ambitious undertaking but we believe that the result will
justify the  work which  it  entails.
However, the listing will be successful only if every campus
organization co-operates in the plan. In order to ensure the success of the undertaking all organizations must bring notices of
their meetings to the publications office by noon on the Monday of
the week when the meeting will be held.
If every  campus  club   will   assist   the  publications   Board  this
listill '" " ' ' "" "     "' ..'....l....* 1 :-.l-
tl
est  them.
If every campus club will assist the publications Board this
isting will be of great assistance to the students who wish to plan
heir time for the week to include those meetings which most inter-
ED-FED DANCE TO BE
HELD ON NOVEMBER 7
The Ed-Fed Dance, a combination
of the Education Class Party and the
B.C. Teachers' Federation Dance, will
take place on Monday. November 7,
at the Alma Academy. This Is a new
social feature and the committee In
charge are making lavish plans for
its success. There will be Stan Pat-
tons orchestra ln a new bookish setting. Dances will follow the new curriculum.
passes aoon.
Passes   may   be   used   by   anyone   in
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NEWMAN   CLUB
A meeting of the Newman Club
will be held on Wednesday, November 2, at 8.00 p.m., at the home of
Mr. J. Coady,  2550 Vourtenay Street.
Mr. Coady, a prominent lawyer,
will   discuss   the   "Padlock   Law."
NOTICE
Thursday, October 27, Public Library copy of Pamela. Vol. 1. lost on
the campus. Please return at Publications Office.
Education Class, and by those teachers who do not intend using their
passes for a class party. Otherwise,
admission   will   be  a   dollar.
A draw will be held on a transportation convenience basis, although preferences will be regarded. Those wishing to go In the draw
are to notify, through the Arts Letter Rack, either Stan Bailey, Bill
Grand or  Doris Turnbull.
ALONG
By  PROXY
FAR
ABOVE
RUBIES
by Elizabeth
NUTS
That's the toughest part of a columnist's existence. Every once In a
wlille lie runs out of things to say.
And when that happens, he has to
do one of two things. He either writes
drivel, or—which is more usual—he
tears something or somebody to
pieces. And he does that because he's
so mad at himself for not getting
hold of some material before the
deadline.
So I'm going to be different—or unusual. I'm not going to tear anything
lo pieces. Which is unusual for a columnist without material, and ls unusual for me, the worst beefer on the
campus. Or at least so I've heard tell.
I'm not going to write drivel today.
And   I'm   not   going   to   beef.   For   a
change,    I'm   going    to    be    kind    to
people.
DORIS
Let's be kind to Carson McOulre
flrst.
Carson was pushed around miserably by Doris on Varsity Time Friday
night. (CJOR. 8:15). (Plug). It's hard
to say what will become of Council
dignity on the campus If this kind
of thing goes on. First apRoberts, and
now Carson, have been torn to shreds
by Doris' impertinent questions and
scathing observations. Doris has an
uncomfortable way of bringing a
man's most secret ambitions and personality traits Into the cruel light of
public  apprehension.
And it's being said that every
member Qf Council will be subjected
to a similar "interview," a la Doris,
on Varsity Time programs ln the
near future. Starting next Friday
night. (CJOR, 8:15). If you have inhibitions, steer clear of Doris. And
Incidentally, John Garrett, ^ace Interviewer" for Varsity Time, (ditto) has
been unaccountably absent for the
last two programs. Is lt a gag? Or
has Doris taken over his Job for
good? The next victim ls to be Oertrude Pitman, the grapevine tells me.
Watch out. Sec.
And  so—-from   being   kind   to  Carson, this thing has moved around to
being   unkind   to   Doris.   Cap't   I   get
away from criticism at all?
COLLITCH   SPIRRUT
Perhaps it's no use trying to be
kind to people. Let's drop that policy
and get back to one of the old pet
peeves.
The peeve: College Spirit. The history of this column's attacks: Plugging the bonfire, smashing the Cairn
lorgetters, discussing the Pep Club.
And a few other things. Now, however, a bit about the general problem might be worthwhile.
Down the Pacific Coast, set ln a
background of browngrass hills, and
across The Bay from good ol' Frisco,
ls the famous University of California. And at the University of California (from here on to be known as
Call, is a thing called College Spirit.
CAL
At least I'd call it that. For Cal
literally runs the small town of
Berkeley. The City Council, tt seems,
doesn't dare hold a meeting without
nrst finding out what University
function is slated for that night. If
you get a ticket for speeding, you
Just say you're a Cal student. The
judge will then hold a post mortem
on the last Stanford game, and ask
your opinion on the one to come. And
tlie summons goes into the waste
basket.
It's like that all through. Why??
Because the students of Cal make lt
possible for Berkeley merchants to
live. The stores exist for students.
The movie houses are run for studes.
The transportation system is run for
studes. Of course, there are around
lft,000  students  in  attendance.
Student activities in Berkeley are
backed up by the population of the
whole district. 85.000 people attend
football games—and only 25,000 of
'hese are students. It's really a terrific racket.
The point ls this. Students at Cal,
over    tlie    past    twenty    years,    have
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At Popular  Prices
The ladles progress. Twenty years
ago our mammas combed their hair
into as attractive buns as they could,
and left lt at that. But today, with
so many different coiffures at our
disposal, and the fact that we pride
ourselves on knowing something about
what a particular hair-do will do to
a particular face, wu have no excuse
not  to have  an  attractive  head.
Of course we refer to the Queen
Anne hair dress now so prevalent on
the campus. It's lovely ... on some
women. If you have a well-shaped
head, straight nose, firm chin and
good contours, by all means try lt,
and show off these good points. On
the other hand, don't forget that this
particular coiffure emphasizes the
topography of the face. For Instance,
it brings the nose very much more
Into relief, and seems to emphasize
the   general   nasal   characteristics.
Then there's the coiffure - care.
Looking about the campus, we sometimes wonder whether many of the
wearers of elaborate hair-dresses have
ever used a mirror to take a rear
view  of   their  heads.
«      *      *
No criticism intended, but have you
ever noticed the difference between
the "get-up-and-go-about-lt"ness of
Canadian and U.S. universities? We
have our Big Sister system for the
freshettes and consider ourselves very
modern as, for the first two weeks
of the term, we sagely conduct our
little sisters about the campus and
explain Its Intricacies.
At the University of Washington,
however, the Freshman Standards
Council, which exists for the purpose
of Instructing freshettes on college
regulations and Ideals, at their meetings discuss problems under such
headings as "Blind Dates", "Oolng
Steady", "Necking", "Small Talk",
and  "Smoking and Drinking".
Perhaps  that's too radical an Idea
for us ... or what do you think?
»      *      »
Overheard at the Huskle-Thunder-
blrd game was a question put by an
Interested little brunette. "Why do
they start all over again so many
times? Don't they know how to do
lt  yet?"
CAIRN
(Continued from Page 1)
length. A motion picture of the period shows them clustered like files
along the entire length and breadth
of the steel framework, cheering, and,
at  last, victorious.
Today, In 1038-39, U.B.C. is once
again overcrowded and in dire need
of assistance. The Cairn Is an example of success which students of
this day might well emulate by getting together and co-operating in
personal and unrelenting campaigns
wherever the opportunity lends Itself to conversational propaganda.
This year, of all years, the ceremony Is significant, and an Important function to attend.
—J.D.M.
worked to get public sympathy and
support. And once they have that
support, they can put on bigger and
better functions. And having bigger
functions, they have bigger gate-receipts, more people, more excitement,
the studes get to think they're pretty
Important, they become more and
more proud of their school, and the
inevitable result ls College Spirit in
the  large  way.
It's not impossible to do something
of the sort here in Vancouver. The
first thing to do, probably, ls to gain
public favor ln every way possible.
Oet the folks out to the games. Be
polite to your elders. Help old ladles
across the street.
And go where the students go. Oet
together wherever students congregate. If it's the Georgia, don't be
caught under the tables. If It's the
Palomar on Satiddy night, learn to
do the Lambeth Walk—all the campus cream is at it. But whether It's
the Georgia or the Palomar, sing your
songs, and yell your yells.
Three ruddy cheers for the School.
Whee-e-e-e-e-e   .   .   .
NOTE—Proxy's  address  for  the  next
week  or  so  will  be  the  psychopathic
ward  of  the  General  Hospital.
Special University Tuition
Pure   and   Applied   Sciences —
flrst  yonr.
Advanced  Mathematics,   Mathematical   Physics, History, Philosophy,   Languages,  etc.
1479 West   0th Ave. (Cor. Gran.)
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Pioke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McOILL ROAD PT. OREY CJ
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UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: » i. m. lo B p.m.; Saturdays 0 u.m. to noon
LOOSE  LEAF  NOTE BOOKS,  EXERCISE   BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper, ALL VOUR
Loose   Leaf   Refills,   Fountain   Pens  and   Ink      BOOK SUPPLIES
and  Drawing  Instruments. SOLD   HERE
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ASK  MRS.  NELLIE  MeCLUNG;
SHE CAN ANSWER THEM ALL
TORONTO      PUBLICATION      INTERVIEWS      NOTED
LECTURER,  A  DELEGATE  FROM THE
LEAGUE     OF     NATIONS
By OLADYS KIPPEN
TORONTO, (CUP), Oct. 30—It is
one thing to know what is wrong
with other people and ourselves: lt
Is another thing to know the answer. Mrs. Nellie McLung knows
both. In Toronto on a brief visit
during her lecture tour across Canada as returned delegate from the
League ot Nations, Mrs. McClung
graciously received The Varsity during   a   busy   Saturday   morning.
"Of course physical activity appeals to Oerman young people," she
said briskly, when asked what the
Germans had that we haven't. "Imagine yourself over there after Versailles, wtth starving children all
about you, and bits of your country
dropped like plums into the laps of
the victory.
"Hitler came along to those people with a god they could understand
—a national god that made them
hold up their heads again. They admired the smart boy of the town
getting back at his fellows who had
snubbed him. This Is all real to
them . . . and until English youth
and Canadian youth will see that
their god appeals to every bit of
physical energy they possess . . . "
The telephone rang (lt was about
9.10 a.m.) and Mrs. McClung's voice
carried her positive, radiant personality  over the  wires  to a  friend.
"When we kill enmity instead of
the enemy, we'll get results," she
continued, with hardly a pause, as
she returned to her desk. "That's
why   Chamberlain's    wire    to   Hitler
$4-
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it! Designee* specially for Vancouver's   Young  Follows!
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AT
St.
marked a new era in diplomacy. Do
you know that within twenty-four
hours after the Munich conference
he had released Lutheran churchmen
from Jail, not as part of the pact, but
out of courtesy? And ln Franca
they are talking of a permanent
home for England's prime minister;
even a Rue de Chamberlain."
To the query, "What about Canada's responsibility, and our own?"
she replied, "National responsibility
doesn't mean much unless we are responsible to ourselves." She pointed
out that resentment at home, among
friends, on the campus, against other races cramps our style as a national  influence.
"Take our government relief system . . ." She continued, "YoU can
put new clothes on a man and money
in his pocket, but until you change
his adjustment to society, you will
never get at the cause of the slum
problem."
To the question, "But where do we
come In?", she replied enthusiastically, "I can see that the more knowledge students acquire, the more they
are disgusted with what Is. Mobilization of trained thinking is the
greatest weapon we've got towards
moral rearmament. Words and
(houghts are powerful things." Mrs.
McClung believes youth would substitute constructive for destructive
thinking, if they would try to give a
boost to every conversation they
hold, they could change the way of
Canadian  thinking In one  year.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
75c and
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$1.0()<*
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RITCHIE'S   .   .  .   840 GRANVILLE
HOTEL
GEORGIA
We again "bid you" for your Social Functions,
Luncheons,   Teas,   Dinners  and  Dances!     Our
Maitre  d 'Hotel will offer you the  fullest co
operation.
E. W. Hudson, Mgr. Tuesday, NovoihIht 1, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
PLAYERS' CLUB ANNOUNCES
CASTS   FOR   XMAS   PLAYS
PROGRAMME  OF  FOUR  PLAYS CHOSEN   BY  STUDENT
PLAYERS;  TO  INCLUDE COMEDY,  TRAGEDY,
DRAMA,   AND   A   FARCE
This your tho University of British Columbia Player's Club
is expo'-tiiiK one of their most successful seasons. The Christmas
plays, in whose selection the students have had a voice this time,
■ire'exceptionally well enst, and, in contrast to other years when
the emphasis has been laid on the tragic or the comic, are remarkable, for their versatility.
COMEDY r
The first performance, "One Evening at Nero's" by A. J. Talbot, is a
comedy of the highest order. The
plot centres around the efforts of
Nero to liquidate his mother (not his
mother-in-law, as usual in such stories), who in spite of all such efforts
on hia part foils him at every turn
and emerges the victor. Mrs. Kenneth Caple of Summerland who has
been prominent in dramatic work
there for some time and is experienced ln the field, "will direct the
play. The part of Nero ls taken by
John Carson, a freshman, while
Aileen Dougan, a member of last
year, but In a Christmas play for
the first time will play Octavla, his
wife. Art Ballard in the role of Seneca, Nero's author friend, will complete the major part of the cast. The
general tone ls similar to that of
"Lucrezta Borgia's Little Party" by
the same author produced two years
ago,
DRAMA
This will probably be followed by
Stephen Burnett's drama entitled
"The 300th Performance." James
Frazee, a third year student who has
Just Joined the club, will display his
talents In the major part as Sir
Julian Rosslter, a distinguished actor, who has starred In a long-run
play. This performance will be ably
directed by Sidney Risk, a former
member of the Players' Club who
produced a spring play here some
years ago.
JUDOE   LYNCH   TRAGEDY
To follow this psychological drama
the really tragic piece of the evening
has been chosen. It Is "Judge Lynch"
by Lawrence Houseman. The scene
ls laid ln 1493 and deals with the
story of a Judge who 19 forced to
sentence hla own son to death. He
finds no-one who will execute the
sentence and ls forced to do it himself. The heavy part, the character-
■ ization of Judge Lynch, ls taken by
John Glenn, a newcomer to the Player's Club, but who took part in "Trojan Women," the Summer Theatre's
production. Barbara Griffin, whom
you will remember as the mother In
•Curse You Dack Dalton," the melodrama whclh went over so well last
Christmas, will be Bridget, the old
nurse. Produced by Ellen Valken-
berg and directed by Audrey Phillips, an alumni member who haa
played ln several spring productions
including "Hedda Gabler," "She
Stoops to Conquer," and "The Brontes," thla play promises some fine
performances.
"Good-night   Please"   Is   a   farce
originally   produced   by   the   Yale
Drama School In 1037 and la based
on the universal theme of a man
who has always wanted to  go to
bed for a week.
The part of the tired business man,
Meredith  Whitehouat,,  Is  ably  taken
by  Bill   Nickerson,   vice-president   of
the   Club;   that  of  Burton,   his  valet
by  Tommy   Bailey   of   Anglican   College,   who   has   been   outstanding   In
dramatics  there for some  time. Mra.
Whltehouse   (Lucy)   ls peraonlfled by
Margaret Morris,   a freshette  of this
year's    crop;     Mr.    McWlnkle,    vice-
president of the bank, by Bruce Emerson,    Arts    '41,    and    Basil,    Lucy's
brother,   by  Jack   Dorchester   of   the
same  year.  Josephine   Kennedy,   who
appeared    some    years    ago    in    the
Christmas play "Villa for Sale" takes
the part of Vivian Whltehouse, while
Ursula Rhodes, Arta  '42,  Is the cook.
If Mr.  Oage,  the  director scores  the
same    success    as    he    did    with    his
melodrama   last   year   this   should   be
good.
Farts In the Christmas plays
must be played liy those who have
never appeared In a spring production. They are to a certain ex-
ten n means of testing out new
talent and would-be talent, and because of their diversity provide
suitable vehicles in which each may
display his special forte.
CREDITABLE PERFORMANCES
There    should   be   a    good    turn-out
HEADLINE
(Continued from Page 1)
a strong group who will support international quota agreements and
even direct subsidies to western
farmers.
There is u possibility of a storm
being raised by Ontario members
because Ontario farmers are not
being given the opportunity to sell
their wheat to the wheat board at
the  fixed   price.
Both Premier Hepburn and Leopold Macaulay, conservative leader
ln the Ontario legislature, have
voiced their protest and lt likely will
be echoed in parliament.
CORRIDOR   GOSSIP.
Finance Minister Dunning ls hopeful of returning to active political
life but Intimates Indicate he won't
take much part ln the next session.
The King and Queen will not prorogue Parliament according to Justice Minister Lapolnte, who feels
that the legislators will all want to
be free from their parliamentary
duties when Their Majesties arrive
ln Canada. '
A new unemployment insurance
bill will be introduced next session,
despite the opposition of several
provinces.
SECESSION TO INAUGURATION.
The secession talk from the west,
promoted by the United Farmers of
Canada, Saskatchewan section, ls not
taken seriously here and will prob
ably end where lt began—with the
convention  resolution.
Inauguration of the express service from Montreal to Vancouver by
Trans-Canada Air Lines Is considered a feather ln the cap of Transport
Minister Howe, whose persistence
and capacity have led to T. C. A.
accomplishment.
Communism Is
Good Example Of
Wishful   Thinking
—PROF. J. A. IRVING
Speaker Scores Marxism at
Institute
A "most beautiful example of wishful thinking" was the definition of
Marxian philosophy given by Professor J. A. Irving, formerly of Princeton, and now on the faculty of the
University of British Columbia, ln an
address before the Vancouver Institute Saturday night.
HISTORY PRIMARY FACTOR.
"Hunger," he said, "as a concept
In  the  explanation  of  human  development  is   the   crudest  form   of
anthropology  known."   Communists
lay   too   much   Importance   on   the
theory that all history is dependent
on   economic   developments,    while
the   history   of   man   Is   the   really
primary  factor.
Professor   Irving   traced  the  course
of   the   Marxian   philosophy   through
the    revolutionary    theory    and    the
revolutionary   strategy.   He   laid  special  emphasis  on  Marx's  application
of the Hegelian theory of conflicting
forces  to  the  making  of a  thesis  to
the course of man's development.
RELIGION.
Communism, he said, was a religion, and required from Its followers a fanatical devotion comparable to the fervour of any religion of today. Communism must
come flrst and always.
To carry out the Ideals of Communism a world revolution would be
necessary—all assertions to the contrary by Stalin. This ls the only way
ln   which   Communism   can   succeed.
APPLICATIONS FOR
'PEP'' MEMBERSHIP
ACCEPTABLE  NOW
Applications    for    membership    In
the Pep Club will be accepted a,t the
Club table in the Caf. up to Monday,
November 7.
PROBATION PERIOD
From the above date until the beginning of the spring term will be
a period of probation during which
applicants will _e Judged by their
proficiency in performing duties peculiar to the Pep Club. No special
qualifications are necessary beyond
enthusiasm and Varsity spirit.
This organisation also has room
for poster experts, cheer-leaders,
and a reasonable number of dlllet-
tantes, Uterateurs, lovers of the
fine arts, and similar parasites. In
other words, if you are at all Interesting, there's a place for you in
the sacred 13-MAYBE.
STUDENTS INVITED
TO VETERANS BALL
ARMISTICE NIGHT
The Canadian Veterans Association
extends to U.B.C. students a special
invitation to the Armistice Ball,
which ls to be held ln the Hotel Vancouver on the evening of Friday, November the 11th.
A FORMAL AFFAIR.
The   Ball,   which   will  be   a   formal
affair,  will take place In the Crystal
Ballroom,  and  in  the Oak  Room.
Mart   Kenney   and   his   Western
Gentlemen   will   be   in   attendance
from 0 p.m. until 3 p.m.
The tickets, at $5.00 a couple, may
be obtained on the campus from
Alan Morley, or through the C. O.
C T. They may also be purchased
at the Vancouver Hotel desk, or from
any   military   or   naval   organization.
to these productions. They are primarily for the students, are included
on their pass functions, and should
be supported. The Players' Club deserves great credit for its efforts
both   this   year   and   ln   the   past.
U.B.C.  ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
"Where The Gang Meets"
LUNCH 25c
DINNER 35c
MUSICAL SOCIETY
WILL HOLD MORE
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
CHANG SUEY
in
THE TEMPLE
of the
GOON GODS
For the purpose of creating a more
vigorous spirit ln the organization,
the Musical Society has increased
the number of social functions lt will
sponsor this year.
SERIES OF INFORMALS.
The first ln a series of Informal
parties for Society members took
place on Saturday night at the home
of Mr. Owen Sheffield. A similar* affair will take place in about two
weeks time.
Frank Patch, president, announces
another supper in the cafeteria will
be  held  a  week  today.
Scores and orchestrations for the
Society's new production, "Serenade", have arrived from New York,
and Mr. Williams, musical director,
requests all those intending to try
out for principal parts to obtain
Information from him Immediately.
CARNEGIE RECORDS
PRESENT VARIED
PROGRAM TODAY
The weekly Carnegie Record Interlude takes place today ln Arts 100.
Devotees are asked to be there by
12.40 sharp. Featured today will be
the third movement of Tchalkowsky's
4th  symphony.
The programme will start with
Wagner's "Die Melsterslnger" and
will also include:
Erlkoenlg   (Schubert).
Two Waltzes  (Chopin).
The    shipwreck    scene    and    the
palace  of Bagdad from Scheheraa-
ade   (Rlmskl-Korsa,Hov).
THEOLOGS SPONSOR
ORATORICAL CONTEST
The ninth annual oratorical contest presented by the Literary and
Athletic Association of the Anglican
Theological College will be held on
Thursday evening at 8.30 ln the College.
Program for the occasion will include "The Quest of Happiness" by
Ernie  Ollbert,  "A  University  Problem"   by   Hookings,   "The   Romance
of  Running."  E.   W.  Seltt,  "Capital
Punishment"  by   C.  W.  Bryce,  and
"Tradition"  by   David   Somervllle.
Following   the   presentation   of   the
a. O. McOeer cup, refreshments will
be served.
Headed by the Ven. Sir Francis
Heathcote. the Judging group will
comprise of Professor W. N. Sage,
and Mr. John A. Hall.
NOTICE
Book Exchange pays off November
7. Closed for sales beginning November  1.
.,111II, l Milt, It,It, IMI It" Iltlttllltllllltll
I VARSITY SERVICE
1 STATION
I        "AT THE GATES"
f    "OUR SERVICE MEANS
1      HAPPY MOTORING"
|-M„„„«»llll,MIMI»,MIIMIIIIIMIII»IIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMM
CHAPTER  SIX
IHE   FRESHMAN  AND  THE  LADY
PART ONE
Horace Q. Fizzle sidled around the
corner of the Auditorium, and squinted   through    the    darkness    and   fog.
The  quad  seemed   empty   but   for   a
motorcycle and about  a  dozen horizontal Alumni left over from Homecoming. But suddenly his eyes bulged.
quivered, and hastily squirmed back
Into  the   security    of   their sockets.
What they saw was a lone Freshman
leaning   back   against   a   Temporary
Building,   a   dangerous  act   ln   Itself.
Horace's  grey   cells  shuddered  under
the  Impact  of  a   thought.  Could  this
be   the   arch-flend,   Chang   Suey,   ln
some   new   disguise?   He   boldly   stepped up, and gazed earnestly into the
addled  face  of  the  creature.  It  did
not  twitch  a muscle,  but stared Into
the night with unseeing eyes. A lecture   look.   Not   a   trickle   of   intelligence.   A  sort  of   morgue   Cinderella
that  had   stayed   oat   past  the   midnight hour. Horace went through the
pockets,   but  there  was  nothing   unusual.  Three  yo-yos,   an   apple  core,
12 assorted photos of Shirley Temple,
several   unused    pipes,    and    a  corkscrew.  Horace  was  Just  sending  the
grey  cells   Into  a  6,   2,  2,   1   defence,
when,  suddenly,   a   frenzied  band  ot
wild goons  swept   through  the quad,
and carried him for a neat gain of
three hundred yards, before he could
burn his way  out  with  a blowtorch.
In his absence, however, the left ear
of the Freshman wiggled, a periscope
shot out of the mouth, and the front
slowly swung open with a creaking of
hinges. The Dirty Nine, led by Chang
Suey, sauntered out, carrying a collapsible     windjammer     which     they
quickly   set   up,  and,   singing   an  old
Chinese    hymn   entitled    "My   Little
Yellow Basket," they sailed away Into
the  golden   rays   of   the   setting  sun.
PART TWO
In   the  centre  of   the  floor  of   the
Palomar Ballroom, a gorgeous blonde
and  a  sleek,  young  man  were  rlco-
chetting off one another  In  an  athletic workout called the yam. As they
cavorted  off    the    floor,    the   various
layers   of   spectators   cheered   wildly.
They quickly  went outside and stopped   in    a    dark    alley.    The   lissom,
young gigolo mopped the hair oil oft
his brow, and  beamed at  the blonde
beauty.   She  leaned  toward  him,   and
(lapped   her   variable-pitch  eye-lashes
ln his face.
"Oh Mr. Hedgequlck!" she warbled,
"You dance divinely!"
"Make mine Burgundy," said Mr.
Hedgequlck.
"I think you're just too cute!"
babbled  the blonde.
"Make mine Burgundy," said Mr.
Hedgequlck.
"You can call me Bubbles!" bubbled Bubbles.
"Make mine Burgundy," said Mr.
Hedgequlck, bordering on the trite.
The blonde suddenly threw her
arms around him. Ills beam slid Into
a fixed smirk, his eyes filmed over,
his throat rattled, and he fell over
backwards with a dull crunch. In his
bnck were four wlng-jlngs and a
Schick electric razor. Was he dead?
Were all future Sophomores doomed
tc fall back on momma and poppa?
It looked bad. A dark puddle was
spreading under his hand. But, suddenly, that hand trembled, Ita arm
vibrated, the neck twitched, and Mr.
Hedgequlck sat up to stare at the
puddle.
"My Life's Blood!" he cried. "And
at  $4.75  a  quart!"
Then he fell back once more, and
there was a gurgling sound. Rigor
mortis was coming through the rye.
The blonde quickly whipped off her
wig, to reveal the pig-tall of Chang
Suey. He put his foot on the still-
warm vest, beat his chest, and went
into the Kitsilano yell. Just as he
was playing around with the squaw,
a cab drew up ln a nearby street,
and Horace Q. Fizzle tumbled out.
took a scienceman out of Us case,
ran lt up and down, and started for
the alley. But even as he blundered
In, a heavy object bounced off his
head, and shadowy figures carried
him off into the darkness.
Will Fizzle escape the moils of
Chang  Suey?
Lion's Gate Bridge
Subject of Lecture
By Mr. S. R. Banks
The new series of vocational talks
commenced Thursday when Mr. S.
R. Banks, engineer ln charge of the
superstructure of the Lions' Gate
Bridge, addressed a capacity audience of enthusastlc men and three
females ln Sc.  100.
The speaker was introduced by
Major Flndlay and chose as his subject: "The Lions' Gate Bridge." He
spoke of the main features of the
construction of the bridge which Is
the longest In tho world outside of
the United  States.
He stated that additions to the
towers will take the form of an aerial
beacon required by the department
of aerial transport, and a marine
signal station to replace the present
station on the south shore.
A suspension type of bridge waa
dealgned because of ita appearance
and also because of the low cost of
construction.
The apeaker followed hia interesting lecture with a reel of moving
pleturea showing men in action at
different  stages   of  construction.
The second lecture ln the vocational series will be  given  November 10.
VOLPE AND BRAIDWOOD
DEFEAT K. OF C.
DEBATERS
Paul Volpe and Darrell Braldwood
of the Parliamentary Forum won a
decision over the Knights of Columbus team of James Muirhead and
Alfred Holmes In a debate held last
Friday night. In successfully defending the resolution that "Canada
should adopt a policy of strict neutrality in the case of European conflict," they brought the University Its
first victory of the year.
Volpe opened the case for the
University. Iu his argument he
stressed three facts: First, the
Canadian foreign policy had always been and still was one of
non-intervention; second, Canada
herself was Immune trom attaok
being one ot the most secure countries in the world, and third, the
absolute necessity of maintaining
Canadian unity.
LOYAL TO  BRITAIN.
In reply, Muirhead claimed that
Canada could not remain neutral because she could not defend her neutrality. In ills opinion Canada was
not so secure as claimed by Volpe; on
the other hand she was open to Invasion by foreign powers. He maintained that Canada should remain
loyal to the British Empire and
Great Britain. She would have to
fight ln order to preserve democracy
for herself and the rest of the world.
SWING CLUB'S EXAM
AT MEETING TODAY
The newly formed Swing Club
swung Into action last Tuesday with
the  election  of  officers.
Frank Clark was choaen president
of    the     new    society    with     Byron
Straight,   vice-president    and   Frank
Turner   secretary.
EXAM.
It was decided to have an examination on various aspects of swing
music which all prospective members
will have to pass.
The second meeting will be held
today noon to discuss policy, adopt
the constitution and—have the
exam. There Is still time, announces Frank Clark, to join the
Infant organization—just come to
today's meeting and try your hand
at the quiz.
S.C.M. INAUGURATES
TUESDAY VESPERS
At the request of many students,
the S. C. M. U planning to hold vesper services every Tuesday afternoon
from 4.30 to 5.15 p.m.. alternating ln
the chapels of the Union and Anglican Colleges.
FIRST   SERVICE   TODAY.
The intial service will take place
this afternoon at Union College.
Everyone  is  welcome.
THESIS TYPIST
Reasonable  Rates   for  Students
Phone   Bay.   G308-L
It's a College
Man's World
. ..in the
Esquire  Men's
Apparel Shop
You may be a boilermaker flrst
string man, a U.B.C. Phi Delt,
or Journalising through Butler
but wherever and however you
go you need lots of things besides books. Our faculty has
made a thorough study of the
University Wardrobe and will
be delighted to tutor you, gratis, purely for the love of the
subject, so come, gentleman,
and take honors in Sartorial
Excellence.
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P. D. C. TO DEBATE
TWO MEASURES THURS.
The Conservative Government under Don McGiil will introduce two
measures in the next meeting of the
Political Discussions Club which will
be  held  Thursday  noon  in  Arts  100.
These bills: 1. "Resolution favoring complete control and administration of relief by the Federal Government;" 2. "BUI setting up a scheme
of Imperial defense," will be opposed
by the official opposition, the Liberals
under Bernard Reed.
FERRIS AND JONES
IN FORUM DEBATE
The next Informal Forum debate
will be held ln Arts 100 on Friday
noon. Jim Ferris and Elmer Jones
will argue on the resolution "That
democracy is on the wane."
EXPERIENCED  DEBATER.
Ferris is a past president of the
Forum, with a great deal of experience In debating and speaking.
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
_157.
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SOOIAL
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VANCOUVER, B.C.
_e RESULTS:
Varsity 60; Barbarians 0
U.B.O. 32; Grads 14
Seconds 8; Shawnlgan 16
Frosh 12; Arts Olub 6
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
SATURDAY—2:30—STADIUM
VARSITY vs. NORTH SHORE
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 1,  1938
Careymen In Record
Win; U.B.C. Downs Grads
Varsity   Tramples   On
Barbarians   69-0
Powered by a scrum thnt wns
really hitting- on nil eight, nnd
backed by n deceptive, hnrd
running, nnd smooth thrce-qunr-
ter line, Vnrsity's 1938 model
Wonder Tenm set n record in
locnl rugby circles by overwhelming West Vancouver 69-0.
As the well-conched university machine clicked for try nfter
try the most skepticnl of fans
admitted thnt this yenr's club is
probably tho best ever turned
out by the Point Grey seat of
learning.
All attempts to keep individual
scorings were abandoned by halt-
time which read Varsity 36, Barbarians   0.
WHO  SCORED?
However,   after   the   melee  waa
over the general opinion seems to
have been that Ranjl Mattu, Tom
Robaon, Wilson CoUedge, and Tod
Tremblay scored at leaat two tries,
while Ted MaePhee, Lyman Day-
Smith,    Basil    Robinson,    and   Al
Gardiner added one each. Converting  duties  were  ably  handled  by
Ernie Teagle, Tremblay, and Roblnaon.
Wilson Colledge was Injured shortly after  half-time  and  retired  from
the game after turning In a magnificent  performance. Harry Lumsden
stepped   up   from   fullback   to   take
Will's three-line apot.
With the return of Captain Strat
Leggat and Howie MaePhee to the
line-up, there doesn't appear to be a
team ln sight that will threaten Varsity's supremacy this season.
SCRUMSTER
It's Alan Gardiner, outstanding
Thunderbird scrum man, who came
straight from Shawnlgan Lake School
and made the flrst team In his greenest freshman days. Alan, who ia an
absolute powerhouse In the llne-outs,
was among those present on Saturday when the brilliant Careymen
trampled West Van. Barbarians Into
the Brockton Point mud to the tune
of 69-0.
SHAWNIGAN RUGGERS
IN 15-8 WIN
Captain Dobbie, the miracle coach
of local rugger, returned to the scene
of his former triumphs Saturday and
after a few passes with his magic
wand, his Shawnlgan Lake ruggers
downed the strong Varsity Seconds
by a  15-8 score.
The Island team showed remarkable condition and literally ran the
Blue and Oold team Into the earth,
with a snappy Meld goal in the first
minutes of play, giving the Dobbiemen a never-threatened lead.
The fourth Varsity team to battle
on the rugger pitch over the weekend came away with a 12-6 win over
the Arts Club. The Frosh showed
lots of power and but for a muddy
field   would   have   doubled   the   score.
Grass Hockey
Manager Archie Macauley's hard
luck grass hockey squad absorbed
another close defeat at the hands of
the North Shore Men's Hockey Club
by the score of 2-0 on the over-the-
lnlet pitch Saturday.
With mud In their eyes and a sloping field the Varsity squad missed
some nice chances but just failed to
click at the right moments, while the
North Shore team took some long
chances  to score  the winning tallies.
FOOTBALL SATURDAY
The crucial game In the grid-iron
parade for this year unfolds on the
green sward of the Varsity Stadium
Saturday afternoon when the undefeated Blue and Oold of Varsity
clashes with the untrampled black
and white of the North Shore
Llona In the contest that ahould decide the Big Four League title for
another  season.
Both teams are working up to a
fever heat for the big fray, and
when the time comes for the kick-
off It is expected the reverberations
of the battle will echo through the
corridors of time as the greateat
football game In the history of
the game.
NOTICE
Come all ye weightllfters. . . . An
Organization Meeting on Thursday
next in Room Arts 108 at 12.40
noon.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing- and Engraving1
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,     AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS   CARDS
GEHRKE'S
506   Seymour   St.
HITCHENSMEN
GO DOWN 1-0
TO ALLSTARS
A hard-playing bunch of Seattle
All-Stars dropped Into town Saturday afternoon for a soccer enage-
ment with Varsity at Cambie Street
and when the battle was over, carted
two more points home by virtue of
their 1-0 shut-out of Charlie Hltchens hopefuls.
A heavy-checking, rugged style of
play caught the collegians by surprise In the first half, but no score
was registered until Just before the
half-way mark when Oezueke headed in • a nice cross from the right
wing.
Settling down soon after the
breather, the campusmen started to
bombard the Sound City net and
were only repelled by the brilliant
display of the visiting custodian. Led
by the constructive attacking methods of Jack Rush and Fred Sasaki
who starred all through in the Blue
and Gold half line, the collegians
showed great form in mid-field but
indifferent finish In front of goal.
Doug Todd stood out in the Varsity filing line, which was somewhat
light in comparison with the bruising
defence of  the  All-Stars.
Hall   Outstanding   As
"Seconds" Win
It may hnve been homecoming
week Inst semaine but on Sntur-
dny it wns anything else but to
the Ornds' rugby fifteen who
got a savage welcome from the
IJ.n.O. to the tune of a 32-14
first division rugby defeat.
The U.B.C. speedsters greeted the
lowly Orads with a high-powered attack that rolled up 18 points In the
first canto and 14 more in the final
stanza. They scored practically at
will ln the later stages of the flrat
half and then tgok It easy after the
breather.
The Orads started with a bang,
though, and for a time In the early
part of the game threatened to soore
an upset. Bill Lee of the Orads gave
the Varsity team quite a scare ten
minutes from the opening whistle
when he smashed over for a try with
half the U.B.C. team on his back.
Oordle Orant made It complete with
the convert.
U.B.C.   CLICKS
From then on it waa all  U.B.C.
with the blue and gold outflt running over for 18 pointa on tries by
Bob Smith   (»),  Alec Urquart and
Fraser   Shepherd   and   a   penalty
goal  and   two  converts  by   Ormle
Hall.
After the interval the Varsity boys
kept up their faat pace and lt wasn't
long   before  Hall,   Evan   Davies  and
Fraser   Shephard    had   crossed   the
Orad  line  again.  Bobby  Blggan  and
Chick  Hudson  both raced away  for
long tries  late in  the game for the
Orads but the damage had been done
and the U.B.C.'s moved up a notch in
the  league standings.
Outstanding for the U.B.C. team
was captain Bob Smith who played
a clever game at wing three. Bob
turned two opportunities In the first
half for tries and ln the last half
repeatedly worried the Orads with
brilliant dashes down the wing. Fraser Shephard in the scrum played his
usual hard game while Don Pyle
again was the hardest-working man
on the  field.
BASKETBALL
OPENER ON
CAMPUS WED.
VARSITY VS. WEST'NS
GALS. PLAY PRELIM.
INTRAMURALS
VOLLEYBALL  SCHEDULE
Wednesday:
Arts '41 vs. Arts '30.
Sc. '41 vs. Sc. '39.
Friday:
Sc. '40 vs. Arts '42.
Anglican   College   va.   winners   of
Arta '41 va. Arta '80.
WOMEN HOCKEYISTS IN
DECISIVE DEFEAT
Eleven dejected young ladles are
wandering sadly about the campus
these days. Last Saturday, full of
mistaken optimism and feeling equal
to anything, the high-flying U.B.C.
hockeyists took on the league champs
— General America — and returned
home with a 5-0 defeat chalked up
against them.
The America's powerful forward
line was too much for the collegian's
defense while their own lnsldes and
centre failed dismally to make use
of   their  scoring  chances.
The Varsity team missed the boat
too when Ex-Kltsllano routed them
4-2.
Pat Carey and Viola Davies scored
for  the  students.
If   winter   comes   can   basketball
be far behind?
The rallblrds say lt Isn't, and at
any rate the first league game for
the Blue and Oold Hoopsters ln the
local Inter-City league is set for tomorrow night ln the Varsity gym
when the students tangle with last
year's  championship Western  team.
So far this year the Varsity colors
have not been very prominent on the
basketball battle front, going down
before the Dominoes in Victoria and
to the Homecoming grads on the
campus.
EX-CHAMPS.
But the former champs drank deep
of the bitter draught of defeat last
Saturday ln the season's opener at
V. A. C. gym when the powerful
Tooke outfit took the measure of the
Western line-up by 16 points.
And since Varsity won the Dominion title two years ago, the
game tomorrow night Is lining up
to be a battle of the has-beens
with the gods of hooping on
neither side.
LINE-UP.
The old reliables, Hunk Henderson
and Rann Matthison will be holding
down the guard spots ln the starting
team with Livingstone, Lucas and
Brud Matheson up front for the
Varsity team.
HYA BUOSt
Pallas, Straight, Miller, Turner and
Alexander will also be out to do or
die for the love of Coach Maury Van
Vllet, who Incidentally has been so
abjorbed ln his thunderers of the
gridiron that he has been out to two
practices of the melon tossers this
year.
In the minor basketball corners,
the big news ls the coaching of Jimmy "Bugs" Bardsley of the Senior
"B" outfit. The newly organized
Frosh team ls coming right along,
too, and the way things are shaping
up, they will enter the Intermediate
"A" league.
FEMME HOOPERS
Varsity's Senior "A" cagettes usher
ln the local hoop season on Wednesday when they play ln the preliminary to the Varsity Senior men's game
taking on last year's champions,
Spencer's, now under the name Cunninghams.
Chosen for the fray are: Faye
Burnham, Ruth Wilson, guards; Lois
McEwan and Alice KJos, forwards;
Jean Thompson, centre. Reserves will
be Adle Collins. Lois Harris, Mona
Asselstlne, Betty Cole, and Nancy
Martin. Oame begins at 8 o'clock.
THE BEBT  CHOCOLATE
Sport Sputtering*
BARDSLEY TO COACH
TRACK MEN!
Remember the Cross Country Race
next Tuesday ln which points will be
awarded in the annual intra-mural
contest  for  the  Governor's  Trophy.
Best men in the campus run will
likely be sent to Portland for the
Pacific   Coast   championships.
Jimmy "Bugs" Bardsley, one of the
best melon tossers ever to wear the
Varsity Blue and Oold, and a member now of Vancouver Westerns,
champions of Canada, will return to
the campus ln a new role ln the near
future.
Yes, sir, Mr. Bardsley has been engaged to coach the campus Senior
"B" hoopers for the coming season,
and woe betide any unfortunate hoop
machine which gets ln the way of
tlie rumbling Thunderbirds when Mr.
James has been coaching them for a
few weeks.
JUNIOR GRIDMEN IN
TOUCH 18-13 LOSS
Thunderbird Junior Canadian footballers dropped another close one
Saturday when they lost 18-13 to
Vancouver  College.
Varsity led for a while in the second quarter on a touchdown by Jack
Tucker but lt was a short-lived supremacy as the Collegians tied it up
just before  half-time.
Don McLeod and Austin Frith
combined to give the Varsity machine its only other major score in
the third quarter when the former
passed to the nippy Frith who ran
the rest of the way for a touchdown.
Junior Lamb booted the convert to
bat a thousand ln the convert league
for the day. He also looped a long
punt that forced the Vancouver team
to concede a rouge.
By   ORME  DIER
HULLO!
Well, to begin with, lt might be a good idea to explain why this column
Is here. -We don't wish to make any apologies becauae if Joe and Josephine
College don't want to read the weird rhetoric of a sports editor, they can
always read Mary Ann. But people have been telling us that they are tired
hearing about the exploits of gridders, ruggers, hockeyists and basketballers told from the impartial viewpoint. They long tor something to
throw things at; so what happens? We ■write a column.
OFFSIDE
Starting off on the wrong foot as uaual, we come right out in the
open and pick the North Shore Lions to trounce the highly-rated Thunderbirds in the premier grid battle of the season Saturday, Shut up Alphonse,
this Isn't treason; we merely believe that the 'Birds have been building
up to an awful letdo'wn and that the Lions are going to be the elevator
boys on the down trip.
No one can deny that the blue and gold squad Is a sweet aggregation
of pigskin maulers with the proverbial pillars of granite up front and
a powerhouse backfleld that simply mows 'em down. And everyone says
they have the right mental attitude, their timing ls perfect, their eoaoh
is one of the best in Canada and they are the best conditioned team in
thef Big Four. But putting two and two together, we still get the Lions.
(Come  on   boys,   make  us  eat  dem   wolds.)
EQUALITY, FRATERNITY
And getting around to the milder forms of athletic mayhem, that 69-0
fiasco of the rugger pitch out at Brockton on Saturday left us very oold.
Maybe your would-be columnist was brought up ln the wrong sohool, but
ln our books It still takes two teams to make a game. No offence Is
Intended to the valiant -West Van Barbarians, but something should be
done about  the  rugger situation  here  at  Varsity.
WONDER?
With the greatest mine of talent in the city and two teams ln the
first division, there is no point ln putting most of the stars on one team
and letting the lesser lights shine as best they may on the second team.
If the real object ln deah old ruggah ls to "play the game" and not make
a reputation for coaches and players, there ls no good reason why the
Varsity squad and the U.B.C. aggregation should not be evenly matched.
Of course blue and gold reputation for "wonder teams" might be lost but
that expression ls getting a bit hackneyed now anyway, and wtth two
evenly matched teams from Varsity In the league, It would be more fun
for the players and also for our mutual friend Joe Fan.
Oh to be a football hero now that fall la here? Doo Howden of the
Huskies told ua the day he left that he missed 37 lectures and 88 hours
of labs, on the coast Jaunt with the Saskatoon gridders. Not only that,
but the green and white laddies get mid-terms three days after they return.
How much is a triple reverse worth on an eo. exam? Tell it to the Prof. son.
NOTICE
LOST—Sharon Brown "Essays of
Modern Times." Finder please turn
ln  to A. M. S. office, K. Large.
Speed...
Seymour 4484
Quality...
Service...
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NOTICE
The  Varsity  Christian  Union
Rev. H. N. Konkle, of Toronto,
Secretary for Canada of "The Mission to Lepers", will address an open
meeting under the Joint sponsorship
ol the V. C. U. and S. C. M. in Arts
100 on Wednesday, November 2, at
12.30 p.m. This address will be illustrated  with  Lantern  Slides.
All students are Invited to this
address.
i
HOW'S YOUR
GOLF GAME?
To be accurate you
must learn the Fundamental*) of the Oolf
Swing. The winter season ls the time to iron
out your difficulties nnd
learn how to enjoy
Oolf.
Hal Rhodes Golf School
USB W. Pender Street        Seymour 5333
IIIIIIHHHH
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