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The Daily Ubyssey Oct 26, 1948

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 VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1948
No. 20
Tour Cancelled As Livingstone
Returns To Answer Fund Probe
Former AMS President Expected
At Vancouver Thursday Morning,
DOUBTING COLUMNIST
'BEER-EDS' UBC ENGINEERS
Can Engineers really demolish 40 beers as they
boast in the faculty's immortal song?
Daily Ubyssey columnist Les Bewley sticks his neck out
a mile today and, offers to buy the 40 beers to disprove the
claim.
His challenge is on Page Two.
Photo By Danny  Wallace
Princess For A Week
ENGINEERS' CHOICE is Patsy Jordan, chosen Homecoming
Princess at Saturday's UBC-Whitman football game. Patsy
registers surprise and happiness as she is declared winner al
the football dance Saturday night.
Crowning At Homecoming
For Redshirts' Queen
Queen of UBC's Homecoming Week ceremonies will be
Patsy Jorday, pretty nursing student,
Lectures Cancelled
For Fall Assembly
All lectures and labs from" 2 p.m.
on will be cancelled Wednesday,
October 27, in order that Faculty
and students may participate in
the Fall Congregation and Library
Ney Wing opening ceremonies.
This docs not iurhihe thc enn-
ccllation of Night Labs, stated
Prof. Andrew, assistant to the
President.
Honorary Sorority
Seeks Nominations
For New Mem!
Nominations for membcVrship
are being sought by Delt* Sigma Pi, women's honortyry sorority of tbe University/of British Columbia,
President   Nancy   Davidson   annmi
eras  that  letters have  hoc a  sent  lo all
club   and   faculty   e.\oci/tivcs   as!?ir
for  their  nominees.       I
Prospective mober.s inusi' he I hird
or fourth year women T'lio have le.i'.'eii
outstanding service in their varinu-.
fields. The must, havr at least second
class standing anil ibavo been aetiee
in executive and ecjmmittee work on
the campus, ('
Nominations  mus'}   he   in   Ihe   hands
of    Delia    Sigma    Tfi'.s    president    not
later than Saturday, October .'M. Thee
must    be    accompanied    by    a    short
brief   outlining    the   candidate's   record   and   qualifications.
■<$> She was announced winner of tho
Homecoming Princess contest' at Saturday's football dance, following
balloting during the UBC-Whitman
fitimc in the stadium. Candidates
from all faculties vied for the honor.
CORONATION
Official crowning of the Princess
will highlight, tho Homecoming dance
which winds' up the week's festivities
tn SatU'-dav n'.sh". Pa's.v will reel :\'te her i. rov.si from Indian Chief
Billy Scow who will come from
Alert Bay by Queen Charlotte Airlines plane especially for the ocas-
si on.
Another attraction at the dance
in the armories will he the floor
show, shirring Patricia Doyle Dancing oii'ls directed by Don Cunliffe
ir;  an Indian  Passion  Dance.
The dance will be built around an
Indian l'hcme, with Totem poles
flanking the orchestra platform to
acid to tlie atmosphere. Tables, mixer
stands and decorations will tran.s-
fci m the drab interior of the armories.
Raffle tickets will bo sold for blazer
and sweater prizes,
'Twsen Classes
Director Speaks
The Aluminum Company oi
Canada is planning a large project in C3.C. In connection with
this industrial venture, the Engineers' Undergraduate Society
is presenting Mr. Decaric, a
director of the venture a.s guest
speaker in the Auditorium at
12..10 Tuesday,
BC Electric
Cancels Fare
Privileges
Five Cent Fares
On Interurban Out
UBC students will no longer
enjoy special fare privileges
on B, C. Electric Interurban
lines.
A special amendment to the company's rate structures made Saturday
morning after company directors
learned that UBC students could and
were riding from 10th and Sasamat
to New Westminster for 5'/2 cents,
so cancelled all university student'
rates on interurban lines,
NLW FATES
New rates went into effect on thc
Central Park line October 10 and
were expected to raise fares generally.
Owing to re-zoning, however, student rates from Vancouver to Lee-
side (Westminster City Limits) were
reduced from 10 cents to 51/2 cents.'
The 10 cent«rate had been in effect
since 1918 when a clause was written
in the B.C. Electric Railway Company's franchise providing for special
rates for students travelling from New
Westminster and Burnaby to UBC.
New rate will be 15 cents from any
\r. vi    of   Vancouver    to   any    part    of
Burnaby   and   Z\  cents  to   downtown
New   Westminster.
FORMAL PROTEST
New Westminster and Burnaby
si'udents expressed hope that AMS
would make formal protest against
thc action of the BCER on thc ground
that increased fares would work
"real hardship" on commuting students.
Burnaby Municipal Council and
New Wesminster City Council may
protest the action since no cancellation of student rates was provided
for in the published rate schedules
effective October 10.
Students boarding interurbans Satin day were informed ,by conductors
that sl'udent tickets were no longer
valid. No advance announcement was
made of the move.
ABUSE OF PRIVILEGES
BCER officials said that, abusing of
privileges by some sludents who reside in Vancouver but used cheaper
inlcnirbaii tickets when travelling
to points inside Vancouver had some
bearing on the move.
Interurban rickets were supposed
lo be punched by conductors on city
lines indicating that transfer privileges had been used but on crowded
(sirs conductors often neglected to
punch the tickets with the result
that Vancouver students were able to
ride city cars free of charge.
Enforce Code
Student Council
Keeps Check On
Campus Speakers
.Dire punishment awaits clubs'
bringing unauthorized speakers to the campus, Students'
Council officials warn.
Council stated yesterday that infringements of Article 16 of the AMS
code will be dealt with by action
ranging from cancellation of the offending club's budget to suspension
or invalidation of its constitution.
Article 16 requires all organizations to obtain council's permission
before bringing outsiders to address
meetings on the campus.
The required permission may be
obtained by applying to the AMS office for a "confirmation slip". This
slip must be presented to the clerk
in tho booking office before a room
booking is made.
Speiial t'o the Daily Ubyssey
HALIFAX, Oct. 26 — Former U£C student President
Grant Livingstone has cancelled his tour of Canadian univers*
ities and is rushing back to Vancouver today to answer charges
that war memorial funds were "diverted'' to general student
funds last year.
Livingstone, who headed a Canadi-^-
an   delegation   to   a   meeting   of   the
First Beaver
Club Grants
Next Year
TORONTO, Oct. 26. (CUP)
Beaver Club scholarships will
be awarded for the first time
in 1949.
The scholarships have an annual
value of not more than 500 pounds,
and are tenable at any "jhversity or
college in Great Britain. They arc
open to all veterans of the second
World War who served at least one
y(*hr in thc Canadian armed services,
or to the sons of such veterans.
The scholarship fund was created
as a result of the operations of the
Beaver club which catered to thc
needs of Canadian service men in
London  during  the  war,1
Trustees of the fund aro thc Rt.
Hon. Vincent Massey, former Canadian High Commissioner in London,
and General II. P. G. Crerar, commander of Canada's overseas army
during  the  war.
Not more than len scholarships will
bc awarded in 11)49 for the whole of
Canada. Emphasis' will be placed on
the humanities and social sciences,
since Ihe purpose of the scholarships
in  educational  and  not  for research.
Candidates are required to submit
an application lo the secretary of the
Beaver Club Trust not later than
December 1, 1918. Interested UBC
students may obtain application forms
fnan the Registrar's office.
International   Union   of   Si'udents   in
Europe,    arrived    in    Sidney,    Nova
Scotia, Thursday.
CANCELS TOUR
He left Halifax for Vancouver Friday night, cancelling the speaking
tour he had planned in order to report to Canadian universities on the
IUS meeting,
Livingstone, last year's AMS president, and Bob Harwood, treasurer,
have been under fire from si'udents
for the past few weeks. They have
been accused by students of mis-managing $17,000 in conducting student
activities of last year.
"I am completely dumbfounded by
thc charges that I am guilty of any
misappropriation of funds," Livingstone stated when interviewed by a
reporter in Halifax yesterday.
NO .STATEMENT
"Frankly, I cannot make any official statement regarding these
charges until I reach Vancouver"
Livingstone said, "I did not hear of
them until I was able to read eopies
of the Daily Ubyssey. I do realize,
however, after a telephone conversation with an official of the university
made last night, that the charges are
more serious than I had at first imagined."
"I will grant you that as president
of the student governing body, I
signed cfteques, but I didn't keep a
wad of papers beside me on which to
total up the expenditures. I had to
depend on my treasurer for that."
A BLOW TO FUTURE
Livingstone expressed complete ignorance of the matter, stating that he
had absolutely no idea what had
happened, and also mentioned that
wether the charges were found to
be correct or incorrect it would constitute a blow to his future and ambitions.
''This is no small matter involving
petty jealousies," he declared. "Apparently there is a strong move afoot
to saddle someone with what appears
to   be  extravagant   expenditures  last
Damage Suit For
Prairie Paper
SASKATOON, Sask., (CUP)
About 100 students at University of Saskatchewan are threatening to sue the Edmonton
Bulletin on charges of slander.
The complaint arises from a frontpage story in the Bulletin accusing
Saskatchewan students of smearing
Clarke Stadium (Edmonton) with
green paint.
Tlie damage, amounting to almost
$1000 oecured shortly before a Huskie
Go'dcn Bear grid encounter.
While it is not known who did decorate the stadium, it can be proven
(hat the job was done before thc U of
S train arrived in Edmonton.
Students are reported to be asking
Stfl.'O.OOO damages.
Legal authorities at UBC say they
"haven't got  a chance."
[US Moscow
Directed;
Livingstone
Ex AMS President
Blasts Conference
HALIFAX (CUP) Oct. 25—
International Union of Students
was denounced as a tool for
Communist propaganda by
Grant Livingstone, NFCUS
delegate to the recent IUS conference and former AMS President of UBC.
Livingstone described the policy of
IUS as "blind, Moscow directed."
He said Canadian delegates were
never allowed voting privileges at
the  conference  and   were permitted
to sit only as observers.
Because of this discrimination,
Livingstone joined the Belgian National Student's organization in calling a special "Democratic Frontf'
conference of the Western delegates.
The   special   conference   fell   flat,
however,    because    delegates    from
Britain, France and Denmark failed
to attend.
REFUSED DISCUSSION
Western delegates attempted to protest Czechoslovakian putsch which resulted in Czech students being jailed
but the executive committee refused
to discuss the issue, Livingstone
stated.
'The executive is overwhelmingly
Communist and the Council which
should be i'he deciding body serves
only as a rubber stamp," he added.
Livingstone will advise the National
Federation of Canadian University
Students to abandon all hope of
achieving world peace through an international union of students sponsored by the United Nations because
"there is no hope of our ever overcoming the Communist majority in
such organizations."
Grad Students
Get Added Week
For Totem Pix
ONCE AGAIN, Totem photo-
graphers have extended their
deadline for graduating student
pictures.
Dick Blockberger, Editor of the
Totem, announced today that photographers will continue to accept appointments for graduating pictures
until next Friday. He emphasizes,
however, that as this has necessitated
the extending 0f the printing deadline, any si'udent not appearing before the camera this week will automatically be dropped fr otenrThe ot
matically be dropped from the Totem.
I
LOTS   OF   'KEY  WOMEN'   FOR   NEW   ORCHESTRA
Ml     ■
jrTai
<y
ex-aphone' Band Bogged By! 19 Piano Players
By   HAL   TF.NNANT \.\.,|.    (';,,,.,.,,,,    Flails    set    oul    to Tho  take   was  nineteen   applica
nt   IH  pianr»f  you're   not   u.mo.i:.' ,,,,,,;,[    ||,e    h,airt    al'l'.iir.s   of    UBC        lions   the    first,   night     thirteen   of
Ur.C's Howard   Flu, hes of  ideas,       Mu.'cul.s   by   opening   a   dale   bur-        them    piano    players.    Six    others
ox-baby    e il!"re   ai.d    dale    baia ■ n , .1M
manager,  Ividhl  W'edeock,   is  planum.'!   a   bigger ' and   boiler   enlor-
prisi-   foe   tin s  yinr    .a.)   ,d! ■ Jrl   i ii-
chostrn   for   Ike'oampos.
Ahoady     tho    V..  a , ■ ,,,;!     saa .,.,[
Vs ;ir   a. l.-'mall   i   i(l     o(     On-   in.  .■'|M,.r
halite;   hla. im!  ''tit   Ihe   iia.no of
I., . I.   year   it   was   a   baby   sitl'in,
\aw    lbe\     |'i ano   Ihoy'll    be   sil-
eamc   along   later.
TALENT SCOUTS
''Producer"  Wedeck's  two   laleiu'
scouts,    Ken    Travel's    and    Harry
| 11      | ai 11 ier    I h:iii    i \ or
I:...     oka     ■(■    os
.f   halves.
before   it        Golden,  have located throe women       Y==
aioos;    iiMend veith     plenty    of    brass.    Trumpet
playois,   thai    is.   Tlie   problem   i.s,
Ci,a,,al     h.aao;.;    ajven    them    a how   .soon   call   Eddie   get   Ihem   lo
>aihe pucker   up?
Wodock   and   I'dagc,;;'   Enlorpri.-.es
, nn   i an   lie fai   into (lie grey        Inc., also  hoard   from a  young coed who plays trombone and doubles
i\    III,,, i Ira
fled      ad      thai       kep
on saxaphonc, clarinet and trump-
Such versatility, Eddie admits
would probably require her to
double up all over tho place. She
.should  be fjundruplet.s,  he says.
Eddie has temporarily abandoned auditions until ho sorts out
the bevy of feminine talent that!
currently lies dormant on Ihe
campus.
ltF»-HOT MANDOLIN
He's having a little trouble too,
finding appropriate jipoLs behind
the    podium    for    the    cello,    the
French   Horn,   t'he xylophone  and
the   red-hot  mandolin.
A man, Eddie explains, will lead
the outfit as soon as they have
overcome those minor preliminary difficulties. Who'll lead? Oh,
it's just a matter of finding the
right  man.
One obliging young lady who
is the last t'o deny that she is no
slouch on the Hammond organ,
offered her services. Eddie wanted
to know  if .she would audition.
"Certainly," she said, "Shall I
bring the organ with me?" Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    October    26,    1948
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—52.&0 per year
Published throughout the university year by the Student PuBUcatlons Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
•Y. *        *
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the edit irial staff of Tlie Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Saeiety nor of the University.
>(, !f, if,
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALrjia 1C24 For display advertising phone ALma 8153
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF   -   -   -   -   RON  HAGGART
MANAGING  EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Novia Hebert; Features, Ray Baines; CUP Editor,
Jack Waaserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall; Sports Editor, Chuck Marshall;
Editor Tills Issue - CHRIS CROMBIE
Mnke-iip Editor - MICKEY FYNN Associate Editor - PETE HEPHER
people are saying
Must Education Go Begging
A New Westminster lumberman with profound faith in his province has added to the
substantial roll of bursaries and loans available for UBC students, His $100,000 bequest
to the university is the largest single donation
ever received by UBC for assistance to students, a notable step in the integration of the
university with the community.       ,
The bequest is evidence that men who
have made their fortunes from British Columbia are coming to recognize the value of
a strong university in continuing the development of the province's resources.
Leadership by competent university graduates can be one of British Columbia's greatest assets in the future, as her virgin natural
resources are depleted and its citizens are
forced to find new avenues of commerce.
Competent university students, however,
cannot always be the sons of wealthy men.
take It Off
Have you ever had your portrait taken with
your shirt-tail hanging out?
.   UBCs library did.
|n fact, in every photograph for over half
a decade the "shirt-tail" in this case an unsightly ladder—has figured prominently in
the picture. '
The dam thing was put up on the library
roof during the war in case the Japanese, in
a fit of exuberance, flew 3000 miles across
the Pacific to drop a fire bomb on it. Then
hor*des of ARP'ers could rush up and sprinkle
sand all over.
Someone must provide the means of ensuring
education to satisfy the abilities of British
Columbia's talented young people.
At other universities much of this money
has come from successful graduates anxious
to assist their old school. But in British Columbia the graduates of UBC are still young
men, and few of them are ready for the past-
time of philanthropy.
For its size, UBC is not heavily endowed.
Something like eight percent of its students
are here because of generous citizens who
haye provided bursaries and scholarships. In
England, by contrast, 30 percent of its university students benefit from financial aid.
Unless provincial or federal governments
provide public university scholarships, similar to the benefits enjoyed by veterans under
DVA, our colleges must continue to go begging for assistance.
Now the Japs have gone back to selling
vegetables, the sand is back on the beach
and the ARP'ers have joined the Kiwanis
club—but the ladder remains.
We would be the first to admit that now
and again blemishes add to beauty, as in the
case of cheeks or bosoms, but it doesn't hold
in this instance.
The engineers might mourn its passing because there would be no place to hang their
effigies but they may be persuaded that it was
for the general good.
Gypsy Rose is no relation to our Mr. Lee,
but the old cry applies: Take it off.
SIGNBOARD
For Sale
REFERENCE BOOKS FOR GOV-
ement 400—3 volumes of "The Report of I'he Royal Commission on
Dominion and Provincial Relations."
Excellent condition $14, Phone TA
2297. L. Tsung.
FURNISHED TRAILER, 4 WHEELS,
air brakes, $450. Phone CE 3923.
HIKERS, SKIERS, ONE PERMAN-
ent ownership share available in well
equipped and located cabin, privately
owned, Hollyburn Ridge, $100 cash.
Prefer veteran or man between ages
of 23 and 35. Phone Ken Urquahart
at GL 0652-M.
WOULD LIKE TO BUY A PORT-
oble typewriter in good condition.
Please contact Flo Fraser, AL 0942,
WILL SADIE STOFFET PLEASE
contact Will Jones in reference t'o
Hammond Organ at Radsoc immediately.
1930 CHEV. COUPE. BODY SHOT,
but will provide good dependable
transportation. Phone BA 5060-Y after
C:60 p.m.
K &E POLYPHASE DUPLEX SLIDE
rule. Phone AL 1886-L evenings.
ENCYCLOPAEDIA        BRITANNICA
as new. $125. CE 7224 after 6:00 p.m,
Lost
RED LEATHER WALLET COM TAIN
papers. Please return to I.o:t and
Found or Putty Clarke AL 2AT ■?,.
MATHEMATICS OF INVESTMENT
in HM-9 Monday morning at 9:30.
Finder please turn in t'o Lost and
Found.
LARGE ZIPPER TYPE NOTEBOOK
containing geology notes. Finder
please phone Jack CE 4296.
WHITE PLASTIC UMBRELLA
Thursday, October 21. Phone PA 8995
or turn in to Lost and Found.
BLUE-GREY AQUASCUTUM RAIN-
coat in Arts 100. Tear in right shoulder. Return to Lost and Found.
BLUE RAINCOAT IN B-2 THURS.
noon at First Aid Meeting. Please call
Dorothy at KE 6047-R.
ONE FRATERNITY PIN, PSI UP-
silon. Would appreciate very much
having it returned to Lost and Found.
BLACK LOOSE LEAF CONTAIN-
ing valuable notes vicinity of Caf.
Finder please notify Don AL 0056.
Reward.
AIRFORCE BLUE RAINCOAT ON
campus. Name inside, R. Thornton.
Phone BA 9530-M.
PARKER "51" PEN. GRAY AND
silver. Please return to P. R. Mclntyre, Acadia Camp.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my glasses from v'he washroom in thc
Chem building please return them to
Lest and Found or phone AL 3191-L.
RONSON     LIGHTER     ON     ARTS
lawn. Initials A.F.G. Reward, Phone
BA 8382-Y.
Meetings
VARSITY BARBELL INVITES YOU
to listen to Johnny Tutte, Canadian
Olympic wrestling coach and National
chairman of the A.A.U. of C. speak
on his Olympic experiences in Art's
102 at 12:30.
GLEE CLUB REHEARSAL TUES.
Oct. 26 at 12:30 in HM-1.
A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE UBC
Jazz Society will be held today at
12:30 in the club room behind the
Brock, Today's guest will be the
eminent disc jockey and "Owl-about-
town," Jack Cullen. Everyone interested is invited to attend.
NO REASON
Dear Sir:
I was talking to myrclf the other
day and I pointed cut that there
was really no reason why I should
give blood to the country because
there is nothing heroic when it
doesn't hurt anymore and it's
quite beneath me to behave like
some people who go just for the
free coke and anyway I hate coke
and thank God I'm not so puffed
up with pride that I think my
little pint will save a life and anyway my type is "o" which is the
universal type and lots of people
have "o" blood which makes it
very easy for the blood clinic to
get and also when I passed
through the armories thc other
day there were at least three
people sitting on chairs and doctors and nurses are always so
overworked saving suffering humanity that it's a shame to make
them any busier and also I was
told yesterday that the blood is
usually used up in about three
weeks or so on seme silly person
whom I don't even know and so
when you come to think of it if it
goes at that rate you might just
as well not give it and I don't
want to.be one of the few who
made such a splendid turnout last'
time showing what a wonderful
record UBC has for this sort of
thing and it would be different
if I was asked to contribute a
nickel to the mangy cat protection
society because no cue has ever
given me blood and after all blood
is sort of personal and Canada is a
free country etc. and therefore
there's absolutely no compulsion
to waste half an hour or so of my
valuable university time when I
might be studying or thinking or
anyway having coffee with a friend
and I'm sure you'll see my point
Sensibly
Yvonne Agazarian, 2nd Year Arts
LAWYER'S COMMENT
Dear Sir: '  <- 7 '•*,'
I would like t'o comment on the
editorial which appears in the issue of the Daily Ubyssey of Tuesday, October 19, 1948, and headed,
"Let The Lawyers Blush." The
writer cf that editorial was misinformed as to the facts on which
he commented.
9AKTi-mST
™ NO REGRETS/
Specializing in
Printing
FOR
FRATERNITIES
AND
SORORITIES
GEHRKE
Stationery   and   Printing   Co.
566 Seymour St.
Tlie editorial opens with the
cc mment, "Student Lawyers on the
campus have been scurrying around for the past couple of weeks
rallying their ranks behind a resolution . . ,': No move was made
at any time nor was it necessary
to obtain support in advance for
the resolution, The matter was
raised in the course of a general
meeting of the Law Undergraduate Society called to elect officers
to govern the Society, The agenda
did not call for discussion either
of the action of the Benchers of
the B.C. Law Society in refusing
to admit Gordcn Martin to that
Society, ncr of the editorial comments which appeared in the September 28 issue of the Daily Ubyssey. At the conclusion of the elections and after some discussion of
the general business of the Society
I, as chairman, asked if ftiere was
any further business, It was then
that thc resolution referred to was
proposed. At no time prior to this
meeting was any attempt made to
obtain support for thc resolution
and in fact the proposer, W. D.
Roach, did not have his resolution
prepared.
The resolution was discussed as
fully as time permitted and it was
only after support for the general
tencr of the resolution had been
expressed by a majority that it was
decided that the resolution should
be drafted by thc proposer and resubmitted to the Society. In the
interval between the general
meeting and the re-submission of
the resolution no attempt was made
to obtain support for the resolution. I submitted t'he resolution as
drafted to each of the three law
classes and it was overwhelmingly
approved, I would like to empha«
size the fact that a majority of
those present at the general meeting voted support of the tenor of
the resolution before it was turned
over to Mr. Roach to be put down
in final form. Moreover the final
meaning of the resolution varied
not' at all from the meaning of the
resolution proposed at the general
meeting. In addition, each member
of the Society was at liberty to
comment on the resolution, not
only at the general meeting but
also when it was re-submitted for
the approval of the three classes,
The dearth of adverse comment
indicates the acceptance of the
resolution by the majority of the
members of the Society,
It is objected that the editorial
of the 28th of September was not
read to the members of the Society
It was my impression that at tho
general meeting the persons present had knowledge of the editorial.
When I re-submitted the resolution for approval, 1 gained a similar impression. I was asked by one
member of one of the classes to
read t'he editorial but this request
was not that of the majority of
thc class. In any event there had
been ample time for any interested
persons to read the editorial. It is
not true that a "mob of confused
students who mumbled a chorus
of ayes and nays were told they
had just passed the resolution."
Tlie writer of the editorial in
question states that "the resolution does not represent the opinion
of the law students on this campus." This conclusion cannot bc
justified in view of the passing of
the resolution by a majority of the
law students. The resolution does
represent the opinions of the majority of the law students on the
editorial language used by thc
editorial writer in the September
28th issue of the Daily Ubyssey.
Yours truly
J.  D.  Taggart
UniVERSITV BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS
AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC   ENGINEERING   PAPER,   BIOLOGY   PAPER
LOOSE  LEAF  REFILLS,  FOUNTAIN   PENS  AND  INK
AND DRAWING   INSTRUMENTS
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
What Has The
C. O. T. C.
To Offer You?
. Full Summer Employment!
. A  Commission!
. Good Pay!
. Healthy Outdoor   Life!
. Travel!
. Campus  Mess!*
Enquire at the Orderly Room in the University
Armouries any day from 9 to 4.
CANADIAN  OFFICERS'  TRAINING  CORP
The Children's H
our
We ace, tec ore,
We  arc  thc  Engineers,
Wc can, we can
Demolish forty bcern;
Drink rum, drink nun.
Drink rum  and follow  us
Etcetera.
Fool columnist, fighting long way back to
daylight, awoke this morning to find boots
on counterpane and reek of brimstone in air.
Boots on counterpane were no problem, as
anyone with slightest acquaintance with boots
knows boots have habit of climbing onto bed
at night, for company.
But smell,of saltpetre and brimstone hanging above fool columnist's head presented
problem, until fool columnist remembered
Hallowe'en parly previous night. Fool columnist,, life of parly, had stolen show and
won great rounds of applause by running
wildly around room, bent over double, with
firecrackers in each nostril and arms outstretched, in clever representation of jet-
propelled Vampire,
I. IRE CRACKERS
Fool columnist, remembering shrieks of
delight that followed his leap over davenport
as fire crackers exploded, was almost reconciled to nasal pain, but not so reconciled as
not to make mental note to earn applause by
swinging from window to window on hostess' drapes, next time.
And fool columnist, remembering hilarious
events of night before, was even put too far
off to sing favorite morning madrigal: "What
Care I of Cost of Living, When I'm Not Living
With You."
For most hilarious event, he recalled, be-
sides Berlin airlift show-stopper, was vile
rendition of vile bit of doggeral reprinted at
top of today's column, by vile group of vile
engineers.
PAGEBOY-CUT BLONDE
Vile engineers, he recalls, hopelessly outclassed by high-flying columnist, had made
c iimterbid for pageboy-cut blonde's attention
hy throwing empty pop bottles in high-flying
o'!i!inni-;ts air corridor, under shabby pretext of routine anti-aircraft practice. Failing
to slop noble columnist's airlift to bring bottles to Berlin babies and delight to pageboy-
cut blonde, vile engineers, sulking in corner,
made desparate bid for attention by jumping
up and down in circle, bellowing vile chant
reprinted 'at top of column.
Following crash - landing of columnist behind davenport, fickle pageboy-cut blonde,
broad Slavic cheekbones gleaming under
light, joined vile engineers in corner, and was
last seen bawling bawdy "We Are. . ."
ALL FORGIVEN
But fool columnist, never one to hold a
grudge, forgives pageboy-cut blonde and envious engineers. He even forgives hostess
who, bawling out vile song with vile, envious
engineers, ignored pleas of crash-landed columnist for hostess' witch hazel for gun powdered-covered air intake.
Full of Christian charity, he merely wonders how drunken engineers, wobbly as newborn sparrows in ihe nest after three watered
ryes, can have infernal gall to sing "we eao,
wo can, demolish fortv  beers."
by les bewley
Christian columnist merely opines that engineers will reach the can long before any of
them reach the forty,
GUM STUCK SLIDE RULE
And Christian columnist, without wishing
to cast reflection on engineer's social abilities,
merely suggests that any engineer who boasts
he can drink forty beer must have had old
piece of gum stuck on polyphase slide-rule,
when he counted empties.
hi fact, Christian columnist is so sure that
weedy, ten-beer-then-taps engineers cannot
demolish forty beers, that he ho/cwith offers
to set up round of free forty to tiny plumbing
marvel that engineering faculty will nominate
a.: representative; allowing boaster two full
hours to live up to claims in engineers' silly
song, *
And all Christian columnist suggests is that
ii engineers cannot find such , Horatius and
make good, then engineers had 'boiler be pre
pared lo face combined scorn ef other facul
ties, and los s ot alTections on' pageboy-cut
blonde-.
/ Tuesday,    October    26,    1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
Writer, 'Mock' Assembly
Spark UN Week Activity
Matthews, Leggatt
Elected To Aero
Club Executive
Jack Matthews was named
president of UBC Co-operative
Aero Club at a meeting Saturday. He succeeds James Harty,
club organizer and first president, who is working in a Seattle aircraft factory.
Other officers namoel were: Jack
Leggatt, vice-president; Enid Sinclair,
treasurer; Dennytc Pierce, fecielr.ry:
Fred Nesbit, "A" flight leader; John
Wadleigh, "B" flight leader; Pete
Oldershaw and Wally Evans, assistant flight  leaders,
Tlie Club is operating a Link trainer in the university's armories and
two aircraft at Sea Island.
British Art
Outlined By
:or
^Columnist Elmore Philpott and
a "mock" general assembly
will spark United Nations week
activities, Tuesday and Wednesday at UBC.
Speaking on the United Nations,
Mr. Philpott will adrress students
Tuesday noon in Arts 100.
The "little assembly" based on tlie
UN general ascmbly will take place
Wednesday at 8:00 p.m. in i'he Brock
Hall. Undergraduates will take over
as representatives of various countries to discuss international problems
out at othe Canadian universities to
promote   a   better   understanding   of
Similar program are being carried
UN and its concept cf world federation.
West Point Grey Merchants Welcome
VARSITY RECREATIONS
To The Community That Serves
The University
Courtesy of
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A' plaster cast of a tortoise
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exactly but it is not a work ol
art.
Such is the opinion of Sir Eric
Maclagen, eminent British sculptor
who addressed more than three hundred si'udents on tho subject, "Modern British Sculpture" in Phys 200
Wednesday.
"In the work cf Art," s?.id Sir Eric,
"the sculptor stresses tho features cf
the tcrtoisc  that strike  him most."
S\v Eric's talk was accompanied by
n selection cf slides illustrating the1
work of such famous modern sculptors as Epstein, Moore and Gill.
Tlie former director of the Victoria
and Albert Museum in London emphasized the relationship between
subject and material which British
sculptors are very Conscious of. They
fee!, he said, that a work of art in
one material cannot be copied in another material without sonic depreciation in tlie value of the work.
Plea Answered
Reactionaries
Bait Leftists
At Rally
When politicos cry for help,
their prayers are  answered.
Following the pica expressed last
week-end hy CCF Club members for
"the other s'do of the story" campus
Frogressive-Censervativcs are holding a public rally today in Aggie 100
at 12:30.
"Case for Conservatism'' is the topic chosen by two speakers, W. H.
"Cappy"  Kick! and  Les Bewley.
CCFcrs and Liberals will be given
reserved seats at the Aggie meeting
P.  C.  officials  declare.
"Reactionaries  or not,  we are still
c::pablc   of   bringing   out   speakers"
said Jack Cowan, speaker's committee
chairman, "If the CCF'ers are sincere
thi.   is their big opportunity."
SASAMAT CABS
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Alberta To Reward
Student Activity
Alhcrta, (CUP) A Sl.V) scholarship
has been established at thc University
of Alberta based solely on extracurricular  activities.
The award is ol'fcred by way of
recognizing (thc important part thai
student government plays in tlie life
of   the   university.
It will be given first in the sprint!
of 1M9.
Orchids to Varsity Recreations
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THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,    October    2G,    194S
The
Armchair
Athlete
By CHUCK MARSHALL
When football experts put their
heads together to decide the score
of last Saturday's Thunderbird-
Missionaire game, they gave the
home team about a 50-50 chance
to win.
With   this   in
*/ the   wind,    the
'Birds who had
upset      predictions   so   badly
the   week   before,      decided
, to be more co-
I operative     this
I time  and  keep
as much as possible to the laid-
down schedule.
Neverthless, although the final
score was as predicted, a number
of events unfolded on the gridiron
which surprised a lot of spectators.
For the first time this season
the front line supplied the driving
force for the Blue and Gold offensive plays.
The heavier UBC gridsters made
a total of 209 yards on the ground
aa opposed to the Missionaires 134
and in the process looked as if
they really knew what they were
doing.
Once again it was the stellar
broken field running of Dougie
Reid which made most of the
ground but also Bob Murphy's deceptive quarterback sneaks accounted for a lot of distance and
at one point a touchdown.
THE OGGIES HAVE IT
On the other hand in the passing
department, which usually sees
the 'Birds best efforts, the home-
towners looked like the bunch of
proverbial farmers both on the
offensive and defensive.
The much talked of tightening
of UBC's pass defense failed to
materialize with the result that
Cial Boyes' pin-point tosses almost
spelled victory for the Whitman
cTew.
Boyes made 10 of his 17 throws
good for a total of 127 yards while
Murphy, having a hey-day on the
ground, made only 4 of 9 tosses
click for a mere 25 yards.
Despite their rather weird reversal of form, however, the 'Birds
never looked better. Almost 4000
fans turned out in the pouring
rain to cheer the locals on and enjoyed every minute of the tilt.
With the breaking of a losing
streak which extends into last seas-
son, the Thunderbirds seem well
on the road to an honest to goodness win,
NOW IS THE HOUK
And what could be a more appropriate time than next Saturday
when they tangle with the College
of Idaho.
Little is known of the crew from
the potato state except that on
this very same homecoming day
last year the 'Birds racked up
their first recorded victory against
the team from Moscow, Id.
If the UBC gridmen have a
touch of the dramatic in their
souls they could beat the same
team on the same day this year
and make a permanent notch for
themselves in the hall of fame.
In conclusion let's have a quick
look at one of the more obscure
sides of the grid picture.
There are still on the campus a
number of students, particularly
among the minor sports enthusiasts who wonder why the 'Birds
wit|h their rather quesitionaible
success to date, keep getting so
much attention from promoters,
athletes and the press.
Here is the answer.
In the first two games which the
grid team played at home, enough
profit was made to pay for all
football expenses for the remain-
er of the season.
This means that all of the profit
made from the rest of the games
this season is clear and will be
stacked away in the MAD coffers,
LOVE THAT MONEY
With austerity rampant on the
campus and hitting the smaller
sports where it hurts most, this
tremendous boost to the parent
bank roll will mean more and
better athletes for the whole university,
And so you people, who wonder
why the winning but non-paying
soccer, rugger teams etc. are not,
receiving as much attention as
might be expected, there is your
answer.
Win, lose or draw, football, is
supporting most of the rest ot the
sports on the campus by the
crowds it attracts and as go thc
grid wars so goes the rest of UBC's
athletes.
VA
y«r
SPORTS EDITOR CHUCK MARSHALL
Editcr This Issue - DAVE CROSS
Cagers Split Debut
With Port Alberni
Win Opener 47-36, But Islanders
Bounce Back With 51-44 Upset
UBC's basketballing Thunderbirds made their debut over
the weekend by taking half of a two-game series with the Port
Alberni Athletics.
A STUDY IN EARNESTNEST'is recorded in the above scene from the intermission of Saturday's UBC-Whitman grid tussle. With a 13-13 tie on his hands at half time Don Wilson
strives to find a winning combination for the remainder of the tilt. Among the attentive gridsters in the backgroudn are Bobby Brewer (20), Jim Breen (45), and Bob Murphy (44).
Photo  By  Danny  Wallace
'Birds
After
Prep
1 ying
for Idaho
Whitman
By JACK WASSERMAN <$>—
Like the orses of yesteryear
the first part of the Thunderbird schedule has passed intc
the football limbo.
When the 'Birds meet College of
Idaho in the annual Homecoming renewal next Saturday they will have
behind them a record of three losses
and one tie to wave in the face of the
vaunted enemy. And the worst
should be over.
FOOTBALL TEAM
The "Birds finally hit their stride
Saturday when they played like a
football team to hold the Whitman
College Missionaries to a 13-13 saw-
off.
Some people might have called it
luck but when UBC held out two
Mission thrusts from inside the five
yard line it was a case of smart ball.
There was once a time when UBC
fans were resigned to a score when
their team was backed to tho wall
but .iter Don Wilson';; men held
Whitman twice in a row il was easy
to see that there have been .some
chances made.
BEAT IDAHO
According to Wilson the first four
games "are all behind us now." The
'Birds are practicing with an eye towards beating tho Coyotes who last
year took UBC into camp by a 3n-0
tally.
One of Wilson's main jobs will be
to sharpen up the Bue and Gold pass
attack which was conspicuous by its
absence in the Whitman contest. But
despite complaints from the grandstand quarterbacks, the UBC back-
field will probably still be made up
Soccer XI Regains Form
To Blank North  Burnaby
Varsity's powerful soccer machine was clicking on nil
eleven cylinders Saturday, as the Blue and Gold aggregation
jhalked up a 3-0 triumph over North Burnaby in a Vancouver
uid District soccer league fixture on the campus.
Jack   Cowan,   Stu   Todd   and   Ken*- —
Campbell   scored   for   Varsity,   while
The Bird aggregation, which is thc
one tentatively to represent UBC
in thc newly formed Evergreen Conference thi.s season, easily took the
first game of the series 47-36.
Coming from an 18-15 count at thc
half, the Birds, sparked by firebal-
ling Ried Mitchell who garnered 15
points for the winners, roared on to
victory. Exichief Bobby Boyes and
holdover from last year, big Johnny
Forsythe aided the Bird cause.
However, it was a vastly different
Port team that took the floor against
the Pomfretmen on Saturday night
in the island city.
The Athletics got off to a fast start
and held a 10-point lead at the quar-
termark and then held on to leave thc
floor leading 26-18 at the half.
After a big pep talk from coach
Jack Pomfret in the half time breather, the UBC team came on the floor
in the second half bent on leaving
Port Alberni with two victories under their knee guards.
Smooth styled Jimmy McLean
came alive in this period and pulled
in 12 points for the Birds as they
made their bid for the lead. But the
team effort was not quite enough,
and even though McLean was helped
by some 11 points from the arm of
Mitchell, the Birds were still the
underdogs by a 51-47 count as the
final whistle blew.
In an interview after the series,
coach Pomfret said, "I am quite satisfied with the showing of the Birds
in Port Alberni. However, we are
going to have to do a lot of work before we will be able to meet Conference opposition in January."
GRID SCORES
EASTERN   COLLEGIATE
University of Toronto 41        McGill 0
Western Ontario 19 Queen's 12
PACIFIC NORTHWEST
Whitworth 12     Western Washington 6
C.P.S.  7 Willamette 6
Eastern Wash, 14    Pacific Luthern 12
North Idaho 0 St. Martin's 19
Lewis  and  Clarke 20        Linfield  19
uorj   '/Ca.toig   3Ang   '/\i[cl.ini\[   qog  jo
Nesbit  and  Dougie  Reid.
People close to the team point out
that one game doesn't make a season.
They back up their contention with
references to the Willamette game
where the 'Birds passed rings around
the opposition only to stall on thc
ground.
Against  Whitman  the   reverse   was
true.
BREWER  FINISHED
A blow to UBC hopes came yesterday with tho announcement that Bob
Brewer, starting half back Saturday,
is probably out for the season, a.s a
result of injuries received when he
was clipped.
Another clipping casualty who
won't see action this week is Pete
Trim.
Gil Blair picked up his first shutout
in first division company.
The win moved Varsity into second place ahead of Collingwood, who
lost 2-1 to the rampaging No'quay
club. The hapless South Hill eleven
lost their fourth straight, 2-1 to Raniers,
Coach Davies shuffled his line-up
in an attempt to find a winning o in-
Linal.ion, moving Stu Todd to left
wing with Ken Campbell Uil.'mg over
Todd's left inside .spot. The rn>\e paid
off, a.s each of these boys celebrated
his new position by getting a goal in
thc second half.
Jack Cowan broke up the game late
in the first half, booming in a blistering penalty shot, bis fourth of live
season. Todd's goal came a.s the re-
suit of a perfect center by Bobby
Moulds, and Kenny Campbell scored
after   a   goalmouth  scramble.
Varsity Ruggermen Lead
e For Millar Cup
Varsity Ruggermen have taken over the undisputed lead
ii Ihe Mi I lief Cup Series by virtue of their 2C-0 win over North
Shore All Blacks at Confederation Park last Saturday,
V.i'esiiy
hi?;    all     l
,-.,led      e
'.'.!.i:'!lc.   ■■
Corey :d.
firs I pc-
scorc 9-0.
(1   to   make   the   li
rv  dur-
le.tham
• ■pi ning
i  1   Geoff
'.•■  iii  the
alf   time
Varsity lost centre Don Gleig for at
least one game, thc big freshman receiving a blow on his already bruised
ribs. Halfback Murdo McLeod took
over at center, and played well in
the unaccustomed position, although
Howie Oborne finished thc last few
minutes at center.
In an intermediate game on Sunday
Alf Blashili's undermanned UBC
club dropped a 5-0 decision to Bur-
rard Lions. There will be a full practice for both teams on Tuesday at
4:00 and on Wednesday at 2:30. Thc
coaches have uttered dire threats to
anyone who doesn't  turn out.
ICE HOCKEY
A hockey meeting will bc held on
Thursday at 12:30 in HL-2. All out.
FISH  AND  GAME CLUB   	
Chicken    shoot    Tuesday    on
range behind the Arts building.
the
INTRAMURAL SCHEDULE
VOLLEYBALL
Tuesday, October 26, Field House
Physical Ed. "A"
Zetcs "A"
1st Engineers
vs
Gymnasium
Phi Delt"A"
Psi U"A"
Foresty "B"
Mu Phi
Sigma Foo
Fiji "A"
Mad Hatters
North Shore was held to a likewise
scoreless second half. Varsity tallied.
11 more points via two tries and a
penally kick lo make the final score
read 20-0.
After Saturday's game, Varsity is
in top spot in t'he league standing,
with Rowing Club second, followed
by North Shore, South Burnaby,
Meralomas, with the UBC squad in
the bottom slot.
UBC went down again before the
onslaught of the Rowing Club. Injuries plagued them at the beginning
of tho game when both Geoff D'Ease-
urn and Art Lilly were forced to
lcetvc the game.
The UBC team fought hard in the
first half, holding the second place
Rowers to a small three point advantage. But in the final period the
favored boatmen pushed their way
through the campus team to make the
final score 11-0.
What's A
Tune-Up?
At Duck's It includes a compression test; overhaul of distributor, coil, condenser;
valve Inspection; resetting of
ignition timing; carburetor
adjustment an dmany other
services. It's thorough, scientific, inexpensive. It steps uf,
performance measurably. It's
one of the best investments
you can make.
DUECK
CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE
CltfeKAL   M070HS
WffpLlSAli PAKtS PWRIBUTORS
Smart, Practical
NAVY BLUE BLAZERS
ICE HOCKEY
A hockey practice will be held on
Wednesday at 6:45 in tho Forum.
There will bc no Thursday practice
this week.
SOCCER
There will bc two important, soccer
praclices this week, Tuesday al 4:00
and Wednesday at 2:30, Both teams
out.
ENGLISH GREY WORSTED SLACKS
All sizes in stock or carefully tailored to
your individual style and measurements.
Richards & Smith
Limited
577 HOWE ST.
PA. 6724
'The shop for men that are going places"
PLEASE !
....  That Blood
Donor Appointment !
CflnflDlflnfRCDICROSS
Wednesday, October 27, Gymnasium
A.
Aggies
Beta "A"
TOUCH FOOTBALL
Tuesday, October 26—Lamba Chi vs
Wednesday, October 27—Phi Delia
Thursday, October 28—Sigma Foo
Friilav, Octobei'29—Kals
T. O. "A"
Termites
Stringer's LT
Mu Phi
Teacher Training
Forest r\
AH   Games   Played   On  The  South  I  Field
Peter S. Mathewson
SERVICE SUPERVISOR
GOO Royal Bank Building
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Telephone
PAc. 5321
West 1619-L-l
SUN LIFE OF CANADA

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