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The Ubyssey Feb 15, 1951

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 The Ubyssey
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1951
No. 49
ILLEGAL BALLOTS obtained in yesterday's elections are displayed by Ubyssey reporter Doug
Upex. With borrowed AMS cards and a borrowed picture, Upex found he could have voted
six different times.
How To Fix Elections
Outlined By Reporter
False Credentials Accepted
Six Times at Polling Booths
BY  DOUG  UPEX
I have proved-it possible to vote six times in an AMS
election.
JOBS OPEN
IN THE COLONIES
FOR UBC GRADS
"Tween dosses
Canada Defense
Debate Subject
At Forum Today
Government defense program will be the subject of the
Parliamentary Forum debate
today at 12:30 p.m. in Arts 100.
Foster Isherwood. former Liberal candidate for the federal parliament and Ian-Seymour, president
of the student Progressive-Conservative Cluil) will debate the
resolution.
Subject Is "Resolved that the
government's defense program Ih
adequate to meet all the needs or
emergencies which may *arise."
f 9ft 9ft 9ft
GLEE CLUB members are reminded that their regular rehearsal will be held today in IIM 1 at
12:30 p.m. Music for study will he
the opera Bohemian Girl.
9ft 9ft 9f.
REV.     FATHER      AUGUSTINE
KALBARES will  speak, under  the
auspices   of  the   Newman   Club   In
Arts   100  at   12:"0   p.m.   Friday.   A '
|01*aduiate   .of    the    I'uiversity    of i
Toronto and the theological college!
at   Mount   Angel,   Oregon,   Futhcr|
Kalhares   is   at   present   professor j
and   head   of   the   department   of!
philosophy    at    the    Seminary    of i
Christ the King, New Westminster.
9f.9f.9f.
DR. M. CLARKE, of the CMC
economics depart ment will address
the Civil Liberties Union Friday
at   12:.'10  p.m.   in   Engineering  200.
His topic will be "The True
Friends  of  Liberty."
9f.9f.9f.
BEETHOVEN'S Symphony No. 1
In C Minor will be the Kriday
present at ion of lhe Musical Appreciation Club at I2:'!0 p.m. in the
Men's Club  Room ol'  Hrock   li.ill.
Six blank bulbils are In the
hands of the Ubyssey because polling clerks in Wednesday's elections were none too observant. A
seventh might have been obtained
but for a sharp-eyed beauty watch
ing the auditorium poll.
BORROWED CARDS
I'sing borrowed AMS cards and
a borrowed picture I travelled
around to every campus poll Wednesday and managed to pass inspection at all but one of them. I
could have voted at any of the
polls I visited had I wanted to —
proving that It Is simple, as The
Ubyssey warned Monday, for unscrupulous groups to stuff the ballot boxes under the present system.
At each poll I used a different
card, completely filled in and signed by Its legitimate owner, and
topped by a picture «of someone
else altogether.
One poll gave me a ballot even
after I had removed the picture,
presenting the card with no picture at all.
TWICE AT ONE POLL
Another poll I visited twice,
getting a ballot each time with
no   questions   asked.
At the last, poll I wa.s betrayed
by the well-known features of the
man for whom I was standing In.
Ills picture was identified by the
only observant poll-watcher I encountered, who refused lo give me
her name,
The leaks In tlie system of checking, and tiie apparent carelessness
at tlie polling booths is seemingly
not confined only to eases of deliberate hand like mine, I'or another
student brought to the I'byssey a
second ballot she bail received
gratuitously (and probably by mistake) from the poll-clerk where
she easl  her vote.
Students interested in Colonial Services appointments
are advised to see Mr. H.
Irving, who is making a tour
' of all Canadian universities.
He will be on UBC campus
today.
Appointments can be made
through  the   personnel  office.
Liberal  Majority
In  Mock  House
Liberals will hold a majority in
the new Mock Parliament as a result of elections held in conjunction with AMS polling Wednesday.
Total seats In the new Parliament will be 48 with Liberals, 21.
Progressive-Conservatives 13, CCF
10, Social Credit 4.
Total voting for the election was
1853. Liberals won 812; Progressive-Conservatives .r>15; CCF :i8(),
Social Credit  140.
For the first time in recent
years, there was no LPP slate.
During counting, every party except the Liberals sent a scrutineer.
Council To Probe
Charges
Banham Won't Disclose Sources
Because of Newspaper Ethics
Student. Council Wednesday ordered an investigation of
Ubyssey charges that campus political groups are attempting
to elect a bloc of candidates to office.
 . ,»    charges were made by Ubyssey
Four
Seats
Filled
Anderson,  Lee,
Jay,  Lintott
By HUGH CAMERON
Next year's council was increased by four members Wednesday when Ted Lee, Anita
Jay, Phil Anderson and Jack
Lintott were, elected as junior
member, secretary, treasurer,
and co-ordinator of activities.
New financial bead of the Alma
Mater Society, Phil Anderson, led
In six of the eight polls with a
lotal of 1272 compared to Franck's
961. and 92 spoils.
Anderson said after the election,
"I will endeavor to treat all clubs
und AMS organizations with equal
Impartiality. I am very happy to
be elected and thank the students
for the confidence they have placed in me."
LARGE MAJORITY
Leading the co-ordlnator race
with the largest majority at every
poll was Engineer Jack l.lntotl.
Final vote was Dent. 270; Lintott,
Mi'll; Mawhliiney, .",87. and !»4 spoiled ballots.
flerause Lintott len with more
Minn ">0 percent after the first
round of counting, elections com
mlttee chairman Jo-Anne Strutt
declared him elected without further counting.
Anita Jay won over secretarial
opponent Mary Rittich by two to
one. Miss Juy led at every poll
except  one.   .
Flnul tally was Anita Jay, 1487,
Mary Rittich 731. with 100 spoiled.
FOUR COUNT8
In the fourth round of the junior
member race, Ted Lee beat out.
Engineer Gleig by 210 votes.
On the first round, votes were
Lee, 91.'; Gleig, 675; Foerster, 353:
Cheffins, 269; and spoiled, 112.
Cheffins' second choices went
largely to Foerster. In the final
round, Foerster's second choices
went to Gleig three to two against
Lee.
Final tally: Gleig, 1001, Lee. 1211.
and spoiled 112.
Spoiled ballots were the heaviest
since the preferential system was
started In 1914. Chief returning
officer Murry Martindale said in
explaining the large number. "The
ballot had to be completly filled
out to be counted."
columnist Jim Banham, who said,
ln his column entitled "Brickbats,"
that political factions stand a good
chance of taking over student
governmont,
Monday night Student Council
ordered Banham to appear before
them Wednesday to prove his
charges or make a public apology
to the three candidates mentioned.
POLITICAL BLOC
Banham charged in his column
thut candidates Vaughan Lyon
(now president-elect), Norm Dent
and Ron Cheffins were part of a
political bloc planning to control
council.
I'nder the AMS constitution, no
person with the support of a campus political faction is eligible to
hold a student office.
A committee of student councillors has heen appointed by A'MS
president Nonie Donaldson to Investigate the churges. Committee
members have not been disclosed.
At Wednesday's special council
meeting, Banham reiterated his
charges and maintained his original sources had substantiated
them.
APOLOGY REFUStD
•"As a newspaperman, I refuse
to divulge my sources,** Banham
told Council. "I also refuse to
apologize for an action which 1
feel waa In the best Interests of
tho student body.
Ilanbam offered to ask his
sources to appear, In* secret, be*
fore an unnamed group df councillors and repeat the charges
made to him.
"Since I felt I was acting In the
best Interest of the* student body,
I will urge my sources to verify
the statement which they made,"
Flanham said.
FULL  SUPPORT
Editor-in-Chief Kay Frost 'of the
Publications Board told the special
meeting the editorial board of the
student newspaper wholeheartedly
supported the stand taken hy Ban-,
ham and udvised council that no
apology would be forthcoming
from Banham, the editor-in-chief
or the editorial hoard as a whole.
"The Publications Board has
every faith In the statements made
by Mr. Banham," Frost said, "and
we refuse to reveal the sources
of the statements or make an
apology for an article written and
printed in the best interests of
Hie students."
BALLOT BOX
LEFT UNTENDED
SHORT WHILE
Ballot box In the Engineering
Building w«« left untended for
approximately four mlnutee
election day.
However .when th* ballets
were cheeked agalnat the signature Met of the scrutineer It
was found there were . five
fewer ballots than signatures.
The« Phyelee Building ballot
box was found to have 20 more
ballots than signatures on the
list. Ths box was admitted.
______________________
Glee Club Wants
Hundred  Singers
One hundred girls are wanted
to participate In the Glee Club
choir to sing at Delta Sigma Pi's
titlont show  March  9.
Meeting of girls interested will
be held in HM1 at 1:30 p.m. today,
after the Glee Club meeting. Membership in the Glee Club is not
necessary.
TICKETS ON SALE
Mussoc Show February 21
Mussoc have announced that the
two student performances of "The
Gondoliers" will take place on the i
afternoon   and   evening   oi"   February 21. at :i::'.o and 8:'I0 p.m.
Tickets   for  tills   famous  Gilbert
and  Sullivan opus  will  be on  sale
at  the Quad  box-office at noon
day and Friday.
to-
This promises to be one of the
best Mussoc shows In years as
rehearsals have been going on
since last  lull.
Musical direction wil! li" by old-
Miner ('. Iladyn Williams, who has
been associated with lhe group for
iwcnly-six   years,  and   stage  direc
tion   will   be   by   10.   V.   Young
Theatre i'nder the Stars.
of
Legality
Queried,
vIGdiwM
Sptciol Committtt
Soys 'All Okay'
Despite charges of unfair
campaigning yesterday, a spec*
ial Student Council committee
ruled all candidates eligible
before ballot counting started
last night.
Jack Volkovich, third year Law
student who lodged the protest,
said: "From certain sources of
information it appeared that members of the Engineer Undergraduate Society executive were grtitlty
of .Indiscretion on election day by
speaking to their classes and asking them to vote for candidates
Gleig and Lintott. who are both
Engineers.
ASCERTAIN FACTS
"Purpose of the complaint was
merely to ascertain the true facta
und if the Investigation points to
the truth of information then council should take proper disciplinary
steps In regard to the two Engineer candidates.
"This Is as far'as the matter
went   with   me,"   Volkovich   said.
John MacKinnon, Brock Ostrom
and Jim Midwinter were named by
a special council meeting to rule
on eligibility of the two candidates
before counting started.
NO  INTENT
After the meeting, which was
attended by Don Duguid, BUS
president, and Jack Volkovich.
MacKinnon said: "There has been
no Intentional violation of election
rules, although Don Duguid and
another Engineer executive member told classes Wednesday morning that two Engineers wero running for council."
"This announcement was made
In classes after both Engineers had
urged Redshirts to donate their
blood and to attend an BUS general
meeting to be held at 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday," the treasurer said.
Both Lintott and Gleig and their
campaign managers denied they
had anything to do with the Engineers'   announcements.
RITA LOISELLE
The colorful story of "The Gondoliers" Is set in Venice and concerns the trials and tribulations
of two boat men and their lady
loves. The four leads will be played
by Milla Andrew, Illta Loiselle,
Kelvin Service, all Mussoc veterans and a newcomer to stardom
this  year,  John   Yeomans.
Others featured in lhe cast include Dorothy Mc.Phllllps in the
taxing role of the Duchess, Leo
Kulekis as the Duke, Fred Walker
as    Ruiz   liis    servant,    and    Jack
| Downs.   Victoria   David,   and   liar-
! barn   Gw.vther.
United Nations
Sponsor Diplomat
Visiting UHC from Ottawa today
will be M. lOmile-Paul Naggair, ex-
French Ambassador to Moscow and
Nanking,
The distinguished diplomat will
speak to students on thu "United
States of Europe."' in the Auditorium at 12:.'!() p.m. today, sponsored
by the United Nations Club.
Mr. Naggair was previously the
chief of the For lOastern and Pacific Affairs Division of the French
Ambassador to China In the troubled years of the Slno-Japanesn
War, before he was transferred
lo the ambassador's post In Moscow. He was the French delegate
to the United Assembly MeetlnR
in San Francisco and at the session
in   New   York. Pago 2
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 15, 1951
The Ubyttey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorised as Second Class Hall Post Offics Dept. Ottawa. tStudsnt Subscriptions fl par
year (Included lu AMS Fees). Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 per year. Published throufhout
the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society ot the
University ot British Columbia;
Editorial opinions expressed herein arc those of the editorial staff of The Uhysiey tod set
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Sooiety nor of the University. '
Offices iii Brook Hail, Phone ALma 1021 For display advertising phone ALtna WW
1&IT0R4N-CHIH'     KAY FROlT
GENERAL. STAFF: Senior Editors, Ann Langbein, Marl Stainsby, John Napier-Jlemy;
Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill; Women's Kditor, Joan Fraser,
Sports Editor, Alex MacGlllivray; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington; Editorial Writers,
Les Armour, Hal Tennant;, Photography, Tommy Hatcher.
Senior Editor TMe Issue—MARl; STAINSBY
Associate Editor—JIM ROM
Writers This Issue: f
DOUG  UPEX JOHN NAFIER-HBMY*
ELSIE 0,0RSAT JOAN CHURCHILL
JIM BANHAM JOHN BROCKINGTON
Mug Those Loopholes
the fact that a Ubyssey reporter was
able to collect six ballots In yesterday's elections should be substantial enough proof for
all students that our polling system smells to
high heaven.
i
-—We have no substantial indication that
other-students have also been duping our
polling officers, but there is no reason why
they couldn't have.
We were prompted to commission r*«
porter Doug Upex to carry out the multiple-
voting assignment after we heard boasting
from students who claimed to have cast more
than one ballot each in the presidential rjico.
We don't know for whom such dishonest persons may have voted.
Nor   are   we   implying   that   Vaughan
Lyon won the election by such means.
What is important is that the present
system does not safeguard students against a
clique forcing the election of their candidate
by foul methods.
Students should demand an immediate
overhaul of their whole polling system, and
they should demand that such steps be taken
immediately.
In the case of elections this year, it may
seem like locking the stable door after thu
horse is out, but unless we prepare now to
guard against further foul play, another 1<
moriths will have rolled around and our
presidential elections might go to a man who
can get the most students to vote for him
the greatest number of times.
Lets Move, Gentlemen
*UBC's Board of Governors has decided       quick action the situation demands.
toaend a delegation to Victoria to petition for
higher professors' salaries.
i   Strangely enough, however, they haw.
not yet set a date for the trip and they have
refused to name the delegation.
i Surely, the governors are awar* of tho
need for speed. The term is nearly half
through. The time of year when professors
usually decide whether or not they will move
to! other schools is not far off.
Unless they get some assurance that
salaries are going to go up, many of our hesr
will undoubtedly accept other offers.
The governors are to be commended for
agreeing to support their staff. But they cue
apparently unwilling to cut through the nor-
mal maze of red tape in order to take thc
Even the politicians and would-be poli-
ticions among them—who are probably rea*
ponsible for the muddling—ought to know
that the government will be finalizing i'i*
budget within a few days. If the brief ingoing to have any effect, it ought to be presented now.
What's more, we are faced with the possibility that the government may flatly turn
down the brief. In that eyent, some more
positive action will be called for.
Here, too, time is all-important. A pro
longed agitation cannot be carried on if
the term is too far advanced. Students and
professors alike will be forced to take note
of the nearness of exams and the entire move
may be frustrated.
In This Corner
A number of bright people have taken
ancient Greek plays, dressed them up in modern costume, given them modern settings
and modernized the language so that their
presentation has been quite acceptable.
This sort of effort is interesting to see and
hear, if the translator and settings are uniform throughout,
Unfortunately, John Reeves, who tried
todo this last week with Euripides' "Alces-
tis," failed miserably because he didn't quite
manage to make the play completely modern.
HetcUlgs, ipt instance, Cquld have lounged nonchalantly on the stage picking his tosth
and refering to himself as "Herky" if he
hadn't' been dressed in a traditional Greek
costume. His lines contained a good deal of
mbdern American slang and this only helped
to' completely break down the illusion.
Besides, Mr. Ed Ramage, who tried to
appear inebriated, appeared to be under the
influence of a sound blow from a crow bar
on the nape of the neck.
Miss Eva Mammone had absolutley no
conception of how a voice may be used, to project  drama  and  emotion   and  consequently
ly Jim Banham
most of her lines sounded as though they belonged to a soap opera script.
Mr. Reeves, who took the part of a courtier and also served as the traditiona1 Greek
chorus, managed to translate the soliloquies
he spoke quite well. The language was measured and imbued with a good deal of dignity
In the period in which he held the stage
alone, the play took on some semblance of
art—but certainly not in a modern vein. The
modern touch was attempted on the other
characters and failed because their language
was in juxtaposition with Mr. Reeve's
speeches.
It is hard to maintain any sort of illusion when a minor character comes on stage
and says, "You've got to accentuate the positive and eliminate the negative," immediately
after a stately, measured speech by Mr.
Reeves.
There were a good many other cliches
in the play as well and I'm afraid I found it
a trifle boring to sit and listen to them.
The setting was completely brre and
there were two overhead lights, one of whicli
bothered my eyes. The light cast was rather
harsh and didn't do anything for the play.
Letters To The Editor
Pear Sir:
May I ask that the author of
Brickbats take a little time out
to familiarize himself with the editorial comments to which he has
lent his name:
"Bven lif they are all wrong, and
this ie a perfectly clean campaign In other respects, it is being
badly besmirched by the rumours
themselves."
Ittrterring to political candidates,
Mr. Banham has a suspicion that
something is amiss, then he states
that this Is confirmed by what he
refers to. «s reliable sources, ff
this Is not rumour mongering similar to that svhlch he condemns
later in his same article, then my
reasoning in the matter is slightly askew. K Air. Bartham has proof
of his assertions then in all fairness to the candidates whose
names he has besmirched, the
least he might do is make such
proofs known. Otherwise Mr. Ban-
ham's charges' can be considered
as nothing more thai! villifying
rumours themselves.
I should else like to know ir
there Is anything wrong with a
candidate simply because he belongs to a political party? It ill
behooves any man on this campus
to state emphatically that he has
no political interests. If people do
not take an interest in politics at
this stage of their career it certainly does not speak well tor the
future administration of this country.
At the present stage of the campaign there are a total of exactly
THRBE (3) members running from
political clubs. Considering the
fact that there are at least 5 or
6 political clubs on the campus
this hardly appears, to be a determined drive to sponsor political
nominees. Furthermore, lt just so
happens that the men in the political clubs—like those in the other
clubs, fraternities, undergraduate
societies, etc.—are the type of men
that take an interest In extra cur-
rlcular affairs on the campus. For
that reason they are amongst those
from which nominations might
well be expected to be forthcoming.
The above remarks are directed
strictly at the method of attack
on the candidates concerned. I
have little mere than a passing acquaintance with any of the candidates concerned and this letter is
not meant as an endorsement or
otherwise of such candidates. However, the article was so condemning and so unjustified in its presented state that I felt obligated
to present the above.
Cy MoGuire.
Dear Sir:
Regarding the AMS presidential
campaign, 1 feel that there Is some
comment dne on tho statement
made by Mary Soitthln, printed in
the Ubyssey, Feb. 2. In her statement. Miss Soiithln. seconder for
Vaughan Lyon, mentioned that Mr.
Lyon is president of the Student
Liberal Club.
I shall net comment upon Mr.
Lyon's political opinions, which, I
feel, are his personal affairs, and
which he is fully entitled to in
this free country.
However, in my opinion, this
statement certainly does not show
good taste. I might go so far as to
say that it has had a discriminating
effect on the chances of the other
two candidates  for election.
Is the Liberal Party not the
strongest political party in Canada? Certainly the last Federal
ejection results have shown that.
Therefore, would tt not be a good
idea to mention that a candidate
were a Liberal?
I think that the statement was
unfair to any faithful Liberal, be-
suptpoit a candidate whom lie knew
cause he would feel obligated  to
to be a Liberal, and on the other
hand, a OCFer or a Conservative
might feel obligated to vote against him.
If the AMS is going to remain
non-partisan, let's keep lt thai
way; otherwise, I would propose
a change in the constitution, making the elections a political brawl,
in which the bewildered voters
vote for the party and not for the
candidate, as is the actual case
in all political government.
Malcolm MacDonald,
Dear Sir:
Mr. Banham s "Brickbats" was
more bats than bricks.
He has injured his own theses
ih > regard to "partisanship" and
"political control" in student elections by pointing out that clear
distinction between the candidacies of Mr. Dent, and Mr. CheUfins
on the one hand and that of the
Creeks on the other hand.
Both Mr. Dent and Mr. Cheffins
whom he attacks (can Mr. B. have
a political axe to grind?) are free
from any endorsation by a tight,
organised   machine,   and   In   fact
100 Milts For $1.00
It's tuy In the new
Morris Minor
• Economy
• Comfort
• Readability
FLEMING MOTORS
7th 4 Cambie PA 4169
NEW   4     USED CARS
have completely non-partisan support by people of many political
beliefs,
The Greeks, whose motives Mr.
B. extols, according to Mr. Midwinter are dreaming of the spoils
of office—the Housser Cup! By its
very nature this brings out the
quintessence of "machine politics"
—group loyalty, concentrated and
organized support .by a special
faction.
Gordon Dowding.
SHIRT) tri CLIANINO
1-DAY SERVICE
HELD OYER!
II I (M-WlT'S WM
WWMtt THAN THI STAGS
Ml THAT PANKKCD
tSNSON AMS NIW Y0KKI
Thurs. Fri. Sol.
Fob. 15-16-17
MMIO WITH (1IVII (OMIT
SMIKUN0 DlilOtUI, m
tow or rw nmmiT
SITUATIONS  (VI!
ON TW ICttUH
Varsity Jheaire
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
t
Hrs,: 0 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAP REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by thc University of B.C.
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
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JOHN TF.NER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
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ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PAClfic S321
SUN UFE ©FCANADA Thursday, February 15, If51
THE U3YS81Y
Pkf* »
REDSHIRTS  SKIP  CLASS
TO DONATE THEIR BLOOD
Engineers Wednesday showed the campus how to get
out of lectures—and help a worthy j|ause doing it.
Members of two classes sat quiet in their seats until the
professors appeared, then swooped down on the unlucky
mentors, tossed them onto their shoulders and marched
gaily off to the Red Cross Blood Clinic to donate their
pints.
Instructors shanghaied were Heslop and Moyls, by first
and second year classes. . <
Raises For Faculty
Faculty Briefs Accepted Monday;
Othpr Grants To Be Requested
Salary increases and other grants will be demanded by a
delegation of the Board of Governors when they present a
petition to the provincial government in Victoria in the near
**• future.
Arts Faculty Leads
In Blood Donations
Artsmen, who challenged nobody this time, have taken an
early lead in the Red Cross blood donors drive at UBC. Contributing 137 pints of blood by Wednesday morning, the Arts-
men tied their closest contenders, the Engineers, by 37 donations.
^    Tabulation   of  donations,   made
Wednesday morning, showed break-
Ottawa University
Student Newspaper
To Stop Publishing
OTTAWA—«3UP) — The Fulcrum, the, University of Ottawa's
English language student newspaper, is bankrupt.
Usually published every ten days,
the paper has appeared once in
1951. A hews story in that issue,
dated January 26, stated that It
m'ay be its own obituary,
The Fulcrum, financed chiefly by the Students' Federation,
has now used up this year's funds
ln appropriations to campus activities.
The advertising staff has stated
that it would be Impossible, to find
more advertisers at this time of
the year, and the Bdltor-ln-Chlef,
Robert Dubreull has stated that
the student body would not tolerate an Increase tn advertising
space to the exclusion of student
news.
The Fulcrum ls one of two undergraduate newspapers at the University of Ottawa. The other. Lb
Rotonde, is published by ahd for
French • speaking students at the
bilingual university.
Berkely Professor
Goes To Carnegie
BERKELEY, Cal. — (Exchange)
jian Carlo Wick, a former U of
California physics professor, has
accepted a position at the Carnegie
Institute of Technology. He was
recently discharged from the U of
C faculty for failure to sign the
UnlversHy Board of Regents' loyalty oath.
He has been described by Enrico
Fermi, Nobel Prize-Winning physicist, as "one of the world's most
talented theoretical physicists."
Wick, 'who had been professor of
physics on the Berkeley campus
since 1948. Is one of the 18 professors who have a suit against
the Board of Regents in the Third
District Court of Appeals requesting reinstatement.
All were discharged for failure
to sign, and they maintain that
the Regents violated their right
to tenure.
down of faculties as follows:
Agriculture — 39; Applied Science
— 100; Arts — 137; Commerce —
13; Forestry — 36; Graduate Studies — 9; Home Economics — 2;
Law — 13; Medicine — 3; Nursing
— 5; Pharmacy — 3 and Physical
Ed. — 2.
Brilbh Columbians
TO*RONTO--(CUP)—Reviewing
the British Columbia Society of
Artists show in Hart House Art
Gallery, U of Toronto, William
Newcombe said last week that
these artists-are on the way to becoming established as a group 'of
painters who are sincerely and
honestly painting Canada.
This was a contrast, Newcombe
thought, to eastern artists, who are
becoming sophisticated and are
not depending on the Canadian
scene. "Here we are relegating
landscape to the background," he
said.
Newcombe himself is a second-
generation British Columbian, and
knows personally many ot the artists exhibited in the show. His own
work, shown in Toronto last year,
was mainly Mexican scenes.
Vancouver Rain Aids
Scientific Research
Vancouver's rain may implement the discovery of a new
isotope, according to findings made by the UBC Physics department under Dr. G. M. Shrum.
A brief outlining the needs of
professors In view of the currently rising cost of living was drawn
up by the Faculty Association last
week, and accepted by the Board
ot Governors Monday night.
EXACT DATE
Neither the exact date foi* the
presentation of the petition nor the
members of the delegation have
been decided yet, acting president
Dean Gage said Wednesday. It Is
believed, however that the delegation will probably be headed by
Chancellor Hamber.
An organisation of students who
planned to back faculty demands
for increased university grants is
wltholdlng action until results of
the petition are known.
Tne Faculty Association's brief
pointed out the need of a minimum grant of $250.00 to meet additional costs before wage increases can be considered.
EVEN  TIOHTIR
The brief also showed that
through the losses of DVA grants,
and 'the expected drop In enrollment the university will be in an
even tighter financial position than
In previous years.
Cost of Ivlng index, the brief
states, has risen 70 per rent during the past twelve years while
teaching' salaries have risen only
25  per cent.
Tests which have been carried
out by the department during the
past week show definite traces of
radioactivity In rain collected on
the top of the physics building.
Because it dies away to half Its
strength in one half hour, the activity docs not appear due to any
tests in Nevada, says E.K. Darby,
Ph.D. stuitent carrying ont the
tests with Dr. Shrum. It Is more
likely that it is being formed In
the atmosphere all the time by
cosmic radiation.
Tests, which have aroused much
Interest among physicists, are now
being conducted to determine what
tiie radioactivity is due to, It may
he due. claims Darby, to some new
isotope  not  yet discovered.
Experiments with radioactive
rain were started after reports
were received that similar activity
in snow had been discovered ln
parts of th« U.S. as the result of
atomic blasts.in Nevada.
LOST
PARKER '51 PENCIL, black with
gold cap lost on 7 th or 8th of Feb.
Please return to Lost ft Found.
BUSINESS FINANCE, Guthman
and Dougal. I am in DIRE NEED
of this book. Lett in Library, Mon.
13th Feb. Mease phone Q. Robertson, CH 2M8.
WHITE NURSES' FOUNTAIN
PENCIL with inscription. Valuable
keepsake, please phone CH 1866.
PARKER '51 PEN ft PENCIL SET
maroon ft gold, lost Monday morning on Campus or at Bus stop. In
black leather initialled case, BFG.
Please phone Barbara Gwyther at
AL 0729M or return to Lost ft
Found or Musical Society in Aud.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET
lost in Biol. Huts, HM 32. Please
return to Lost ft Found. Sentimental value.
FOR THE LOVE OF HANNA will
the person who found black wallet,
15th Jan. please phone again to
West 9«6R or return contents to
the Lost ft Found.
HANDMADE REJD WALLET with
Intlals EAG. Please return to Lost
ft Found or phone W. 882L.
TIFFIN. Gold nugget. Lost in
Brock on Sat. night, Please phone
KE 1A77R. Or return to Lost ft
Found. ,
FOUND
NECKLACE may be Identified at
Lost ft Found.
RONSON LIGHTER awaits identification at Lost & Found.
SHAEFFER BALL POINT. Apply
to Lost ft Found.
GI ASSES in case, may be identified at Lost ft Found.
TRANSPORTATION
STUDENT   WWO   BROKtf   LEG
skiing would like to arrange transportation betwen vicinity of 37th
ft Yew to the University. Please
phone KE 24B3R, after 6 p.m.
RIDE WANTED from vicinity of
12th and Cambie. Phone Sally at
FA 30B4R.
PASSENGER WANTED from Main
and 41st Ave., Mon. tp Sat. Phone
Ed at FR 606* afttv 10 pin.
TUTORING
TUTORING in  1st  year  EafUsit
and Math, by McGill graduate. KE
77S60U 2SJf W. 3-ftfc.
COACHING in German ft French
for reasonable fees. AL 1004&.
FCI* SALE
VIOLIN, 1st class Stalker. Guaranteed. Only hall price, $40, bow
and case Included. Phone AL between 6 and 8- p.». AL <*m>
THE NEW WEAR-BVBR HEALTH
method of cooking is now being
represented at University area.
Morris Dauncay, B.Bd. (UBC) CE
4644.
FORD TUDOR 1940. engine rebuilt
in 19*48. Good rubber, heater. $600
Quick sale. AL 3298Y. W.J. Rose.
FOR A DISPLAY OF BCKOS new
"Eternal" stainless steel ware In
tihe varsity area, please contact Ed
Bissell, Fort Camp, UBC.
ROOM   A  •OARD,  ETC.
COMFORTABLE ROOM available • •
fior 1 or 2 girls. Board if deslr-id*.;
5 mln. walk from UBC. AU 088&L*
SUITE. Wanted a suitable person
to share suite with. Contact H.A.
Buckmaster, AL 1415-, erttings.
ROOM ft BOARD, single room with
breakfast,   board  optional.   Male;
student, 4570 W. 14th, AL 0343L  ' '"
ROOM ft 2 MEALS. Single room,
laundry  done,   cooking  facilities. .
For quiet; bay. $88 per month. 4422
W. 13th, AL 10O4U
WANTED
NOODLE HEAD, grejr. Phone Jim
at FA 2012L, after 9 p.m.
TYPING. English ft Foreign langu-
ages. Theses ft Essays, Manuscripts, card Work, Letters of Application; •Campus rates. Miss
Elolse Street; Dalhoasle Apt*. AL
0855 R.
TYPING OF ALL KINDS  lira, S.
Cairns, 2983 W. 29th. CE 77*8,
PUBLIC   STENOGRAPHER:   Ex
perlenced in University work, reasonable rates. Lomin* Ctoaptoll, .'
3820 E. Boulevard. KE 4784 ft.
NOTICES ft WESTINGS ETC
JUDO CLUB meeting In Hut M-8.
Thurs. 15th Feb. for all those definitely wishing to join. After tills
date, new members must comi
through the executive. Training is
about to begin & classes are bel'uy
formed,
CAMERA CLUB, meeting Mon.
Feb. l!)th In Photography Studio
A.{. My. Hill-Tout will speak on
taking  portraits,
STl'DKNT PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB, general meet-
1ti!> in Arts 102, 12:30.'Newcomers
are welcome.
Todays %\& B«rjpU
COSTS  SO  LITTLE ... DOES  SO  MUCH
m
Checked
C h a rm...
'*■>
*
s
SPRING SUITS FROM
WOODWARD'S
Our 1951 smooth worsted check suits.
So much fashion, dash and vol we in
one of our check suits .. .
suits featuring new collars,
tiny waistlines, new details,
new trtms in the many jacket
designs . . . while skirts adhere
to the straight and narrow.
Sizes lOto 20
n
&
49.50 fo 69.50
*
VANCOUVER'S FASHION CENTRE
——-m
m___mi Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 15, 1951
•U*.
***■*' % ***t    ^^
4 fry> Wsrk
WENE SMITH, the fellow
\JT to whom soccer is the
staff of life, hurried into our
office the other doy as excited
as the girl who received her
first kiss from "Blister Shot"
Mclntyre. You don't know
who "Blister Shot" Mclntyre
is? Well that's a different
story, so we'll leave you wondering.
But to get back to Gene,
who by this time had prostrated himself at my feet clutching a paper containing, I imagined, some information on
soccer.
; I didn't think it right to
have the man in such a position,
considering my* shoes had just
been polished so I beckoned him
to a chair.
*;*:■;'* *
' "^ hRve," he began looking
"been reading that
column by one
Austin Delany.''
"A n 4" ho
he erupted,
ed.' you liked
It?"
"Uked it?,"
he err u pted.
Why man how
can we promote soccer on
with guys like him
horrible  untruths
0. Smith
this campus
wilting  such
about us?
"Do you know what he called
I nodded ln assent but he merely Ignored my motion and repeated the "puny things" written concerning Varsity's first division
entry.
AjLULdl
j7JJ****rTou know we're not as bad
■ \ »h he painted us," he
stated, "but what will people out
hlere think If they believe bin
column. Some of it ls true, grant
ed but we still have one of the
ityst teams In the first divisions.
II) tact we are right Into tho lm-
periel Cup final."
While lie continued to explain
his grievances aimed mostly a»
our guest columnist, I asked
about  this  Imperial  Cup  deal.
"It's like tills, he explained,"
We won our way into thp final
and now await either Collin?
wood or South Burnaby as opposition,
"Probably will be Collingwood
as they have beaten Burnaby
once before in league play.
"Our   game   goes   two   weeks
hence at Callister.  And  I have
""\      visions ot bands and students ln
\    the stands screaming us on."
He's b, Out
SO I left our friends with his
visions when Dick Penn
walked ln with his latest intramural doings.
"Hig boxing show coming up."
be bellowed, giving a meaningful
glance, "and we could do with
some publicity. Finals will be In
Ihe new gym, l hope, but the
eliminations start on the 19."
Then he too walked out loavlns
nic slightly mystified.
if>        #        *
I see where Jelly Andersen hn.s
railed baseball work-outs next
week.
Not only that hut the coach is
also running spring "raining In
the football department. Energetic   lype,   whuf.'
PASSING THOUGHT DEPT.—
wonder how Jack Pomfret and
Ills cagers must (eel after winning .1 basketball game . . . same
fur  Penn's i 'liiefs.
EXPECTED TO ANSWER the call issued by Jelly Andersen, that of baseball spring
training which goes next week, is Bert Harbottle. Harbottle is a first baseman. Although
it's early yet Andersen wants to make sure his 'Birds^ will be top contender by time
league play rolls around.
HE SAYS IT'S SPRING
Baseball Training Starts
Jelly Andersen, disregarding
. the   groundhog's   annual   prophecy, felt the first warm rays
Of the sun Tuesday  and  decided  that spring Is here.
The UDC football and baseball coach announced baseball
spring training would start
next week, providing the
weatherman co-operates.
His announcement came as
a surprise to even  the  most
hardy of the university's base- *
ball clan.
Andersen explained that with
a 17-game schedule squeezed
Into three weeks he felt that
he needed to whip up some enthusiasm for his team which
didn't fare too well last yeur.
Last season's nine finished
as Andersen puts It "above St.
Martin's" but when one considers that St. Martin's took .
residence In the Evergreen
Conference cellar, his statement doesn't  moan  too much.
I'BC will play from May 1 to
May 20' unless of course thoy
get into the playoffs, but with
several of last year's team having left school, Jelly Isn't sure
Just where his team will place.
Jimmy Russell, who held
second base last year, has
dropped from school and other
boys have signed contracts to
play with professional teams
In  the   I'nited  States.
Armand Paris, another second sacker, Bobby lllndmarch
and Glen Matheson, are a few
returning   veterans.
Morrie Mtilhearn, who holds
down a guard spot for the
Thunderbird basketball team,
Is expected to turn out. He's
a catcher who played with
Portland ^'university last year.
The league this year will be
divided Into two divisions with
lTDC in the western section.
SPORTS
EVENTS
THERE WILL be a meeting of
the Men's Hig Block Cl'ub Friday
at 12:*"0 p.m. in the Brock Double
Committee (looms. New sweaters
will be given out. Also ou tap is
a discussion on the "California invasion."
9ft 9ft 9ft
WOMEN'S Intramural Managers
meeting to be held Thursday, Feb.
I.I In Hut t.ti at 12:110. All managers
please turn out.
*& 9ft 9ft
INTRAMURAL soccer I'or women
will start  Wed.,   Feb.  21.  All  girls
interested    in    refereeing    soccer
games please sign up In the gym.
*        *        *
ENTRIES or cancellations of any
teams in the Women's Intramural
Ski Meel scheduled I'm- Mils weekend on Mt. Seymour should be
handed in to Tad Harper or Belly
Hall  eil   lhe  Inlrainurnl office.
In previous years, UBC played home games at Capilano
Stadium but as that park is
slowly taking its place In history, Jelly doesn't know where
they'll play.
The baseball spring training
program is coupled with a football   training  program   which
Andersen has ben running for
the last two weeks. His football schedule calls tor eight
weeks of lectures, on basic
funadmentalH. It Is planned to
have a spring football game
six  weeks  from  now.
So It seems our boy will be
busy.
SPORT
Sports Editor—ALEX MaeGIIXIVRAY
PLAY ALLSTARS
Hockey Series
Starts Feb. 26
By HERM FRYDENLUND
• (Ubyssey Hockey Writer)
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team starts local playoff*
Feb, 26, when they tackle the Vancouver Commercial league
representatives in a two of three series for the right to pity ths)
winner of the Victoria-Nanaimo series. The Island c'tlea art
p.nymg for the Free Press Trophy, emblematic of Senior "Bt
hockey supremacy on the Coast.
Winner   of   the   coast   playoffs*
will   be  eligible   to  play  for   the
B.C. Championship Coy Cup.
PLAY  BENEFIT
Thund|>rJ)ird» have agreed to
donate their services in the Art
Schuman Memorial Benefit at the
Forum on Feb, 27. The 'Birds will
tackle the PNE. All-stars who will
he composed of the best amateur
talent available.
The top team of the Commercial
League will represent that league
ln the local playdowns. They will
however bolster the squad from
within the league so ln effect they
will be an All-star aggregation.
First game of the series Is tentatively scheduled for Kerrisdale
Arena on Feb. 26. It is possible
that an earlier date will be set
at the Forum. In any event one
of t\tf games will be played at
Kerrisdale Arena on the above
date.
THUNDERBIRDS' YEAR
The local squad will be going
all out to win this trophy to partially replace the loss of the Hamber Cup.
The    Free   Press-  Trophy   was
donated in 1940 by the Nanaimo
paper of that name. Since that
time the Nanaimo club has won ft
seven times. This could be Than*
derbirds' year. *
mm
BIRDS LEAVE
MILLER SERIfS
Varsity Thun'*irt»lrda wUl
withdraw from Miller Cup rug.
by after they oomploto their
first round.
'Birds novo boon playing In
both Mekeohnlo and Miller
Cup competitions and art also
attempting to work In their
California gomes.
'Birds still have threo tames;
remaining; in tho B.0. series
• and will travel south for their
games with tho .Amorlean university.
Aa o result there will bo
Juot throe rugger oontosts on
tap thla weekend.
& "*     - ' f      '           '
i  ■.•:••," *     *               J_\
sAmmWfmmB
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These qre the shoes men come back for again and again
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oxfords feature dependable Goodyear welt construction.
Artfully crafted of fine, supple leathers in black, brown,
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