UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1919

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125082.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125082.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125082-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125082-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125082-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125082-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125082-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125082-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125082-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125082.ris

Full Text

 Issued Weekly by  the  Publications  Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 6, 1919
Number 5
Historians Disagree
on Irish Question
INITIAL   MEETING  OF  THE   HISTORICAL SOCIETY WAS  A
DECIDED SUCCESS
Not even the prevailing conditions of
the Vancouver climate could dampen
the ardor of the "would-be historians"
of the University on Thursday, when
the first evening meeting of the society
was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
E. W. Keenleyside. Very little business
arose to disturb the harmony of the
meeting, or else the members were so
deeply immersed in the study of the
Irish question that such trivial matters
ceased to interest them. According to
precedent, the meeting was opened by
short speeches by the honorary members; but, contrary to many precedents,
their words of advice were eagerly received and remembered. The offer of a
new scholarship in History, to be presented through the society, was received
from Mr. Robie L. Reid by the honorary
president and read to the members. The
club then turned to the pressing question
of Ireland, and her facts, fame and fancies were expounded by Miss Katherine
Pillsbury and Miss Patricia Smith. An
innovation has been introduced in the
programme by the inviting of interruptions, questions and criticisms during
papers; not that such occurrences have
been hitherto unknown in the annals of
U.B.C. societies, but never before have
they received official sanction.
The matter of Irish history was dealt
with by Miss Pillsbury, who was fortunate enough to set forth her facts in
such a logical manner that little exception could be taken to them.
Miss Smith, who dealt with the present difficulties of the situation from an
Ulster point of view, was "heckled" unceasingly, until the honorary president
took pity on the reader and suggested
that all further criticism be left until the
conclusion of the paper. When the reading was concluded a decidedly heated argument was indulged in by the audience.
Everyone present voiced their appreciation of the papers of the two young
ladies, each of which showed a really
earnest endeavor to get at the fundamental basis of the problem. Especial
commendation was expressed in regard
to the quotation with which Miss Pillsbury opened her work. Miss Smith purposely took a very definite stand with
the object of promoting discussion, and
this aim was most certainly attained.
Help 'Varsity
In Loan Drive
STUDENT CANVASSERS HARD AT
WORK—SUPPORT STILL
NEEDED
The Victory Loan committee of the
University is justifying its existence by
the excellent work done in canvassing
during the past week. The majority of
the homes of students have been canvassed, and the total is announced as
approximately $10,000. This result is
good, but not as good as is expected
from the 'Varsity. For the sake of the
University, support the student committee as far as possible.
NORMAN   HACKETT   SENDS
GREETING TO PLAYERS' CLUB
On Friday evening last a group of
about sixty, including Players' Club
members and other students, was in
attendance at the Avenue to see the
brilliant little comedy, "Tea for Three."
The leading man, Mr. Norman Hackett,
received a warm welcome from the college party, as many remembered his
entertaining address on "Shakespeare's
Birthplace," given under the club's auspices, on the occasion of his last visit
to  Vancouver.
In conversation with Prof. Wood, Mr.
Hackett expressed pleasure in the work
the Players' Club has been able to do in
the presentation of worth-while plays
in the name of the University. He was
disappointed in finding that we were no
nearer Point Grey than upon the occasion of his former visit, but hoped that,
when he next came West, he would be-
permitted to address the student body
in a more worthy auditorium on the
permanent site  of the U.B.C.
Mr. Hackett was delighted with the
interest the college is beginning to show
in the better type of plays that visit
Vancouver. He was emphatic in denouncing the listless attitude of this city
in past years in failing to patronize attractions of the first class when they
happen to play here. He mentioned two
plays of last season that were successful throughout the U.S., and that played
to poor houses here. The result was
that, in both cases, Vancouver was reported throughout New York theatrical
circles as a very "poor show town," and
the warning was sounded to avoid it in
future.
Let us hope that, when this graceful
actor is again a stranger within our
gates, we shall have both a college
home at Point Grey and a modern new
city theatre in which to receive him.
Science Men Make
Merry at Smoker
NOT   A   DULL   MOMENT   IN   THE
ENTERTAINMENT HELD ON
SATURDAY NIGHT
Oh, boy! It was a smoking success1
The writer wended his way to the Science Smoker, held in the Rowing Club
on Saturday evening, prepared to smoke
a pipe and a few cigarettes, drink some
punch, and return home. So interesting
was the programme, and so quickly did
the events follow one another, that
there was very little time for smoking
or drinking. There was not a dull moment from start to finish. Many of the
professors, and a few Arts students,
were the guests of the Science Men's
Undergraduate Society, who were at
full strength.
Before the first number on the
lengthy programme, Mr. J. R. Kingham,
president of the S. M. U. S., introduced
Dean Brock to the ga^iering The Dean
gave a short address to the Science students, whom he was meeting in a body
for the first time.
The most popular numbers were the
exhibitions of fencing and jiu-jitsu, put
on by two local Japanese, and the boxing bouts staged by the University Boxing Club. Messrs. Fuzita and Kamino
indulged in a fast fencing bout, during
which each received many hard wallops,
and followed this with about ten minutes of wrestling. They were loudly
applauded.
The boxing consisted of two three-
round no-decision fights, in which "Kid"
Hunter met "Slugging" Clegg and
"Battling" Berto opposed "Young" de
Pencier, "The Fighting Bishop." Both
bouts were fast and even: Prof. Elliot
refereed.
In addition to these sporting events,
there were a large number of vocal and
musical selections. Among those who
contributed to the success of the evening were: Mr. Benny Crann; Mr. Betts;
Mr. Schofield, of the Orpheum Cabaret;
Miss Barth, of the Lodge Cabaret; the
Clay Hawaiian Trio; and Miss Dorothy
Randall and Messrs. Horner, Smith and
Ridley, of the Regent Cabaret.
Great praise is due the members of
the committee in charge of the arrangements for the smoker, who put on one
of the best entertainments ever held in
connection with the University.
The members of this committee were
Messrs. J. R. Kingham (master of ceremonies), R. Anderson, N. McAllum, L.
McLennan, D. Wallace and C. O. Swan-
son. THE   UBYSSEY
November 6, 1919
Arrow Shirts and Collars
Stanfield's Underwear
Hobberlin Clothing
THIS   IS   THE   STORE
that can always show you
something new, and where
you are always sure of a
smile.
"Our Prices Are Right"
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE  STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
JffaHljtmt - (Eraft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHIONCRAFT
®\xob. JfioBter $c (En.
Etmttru
S14 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
THROUGH THE EYES OF A
RETURNED SOLDIER
Though October 1st was not a bright
day, climatically, it was, however, a day
of great promise for the seventy-eight
returned soldiers who commenced their
Agricultural course of three months under the S.C.R. at the University of British Columbia site in Point Grey.
In an incredibly short time three
classes were formed, the first studying
Agronomy and Poultry Husbandry; the
second, Dairying and Animal Husbandry, and the third, Horticulture, black-
smithing and carpentering.
Before the actual work commenced,
Dean Clement, in a short opening address, pointed out to the men that all
would receive a month's tuition in each
of these departments, under instructors
appointed by the Faculty of Agriculture
of the University of British Columbia.
The first period has passed, and the
students unanimously agree that the
careful selection made by the University
in their appointments in every branch of
tuition has been of the highest order.
So enthusiastic have the students
shown themselves, that the house committee made successful application to
the S.C.R. for optional evening classes
in blacksmithing and carpentering, which
have been crowded every night. Two
evening addresses have been delivered
by Prof. P. A. Boving and Prof. Lunn,
each speaking on important phases of
their respective  specialties.
One of the most important items is
the excellent board and accommodation
arranged for the men's comfort.
Practical work in conjunction with
theory has been aimed at throughout the
training, but, owing to the amount of
ground to be covered, the theory has
been given the foremost place. The returned soldier has ample opportunity to
put his theory into practice during the
three months on the farm to which he
is sent for further instruction.
At the end of each lecture ample time
is given for questions and discussions.
To date the Horticultural Department
has been the most successful in placing
more light on a subject heretofore unsolved. One of the students has discovered that, by the careful application
of "dry moisture" to the root of a
decorative shrub bearing red berries,
known as the "whiffletree," excellent results will be obtained.
Under these ideal conditions, there
can be no doubt but that these returned
soldiers have the opportunity to fit
themselves for their place in the foremost ranks of the agricultural life of
British Columbia.
GEO.  D.  PETER.
CHAS. G. MAJOR.
•VARSITY GIRLS WIN
The U. B. C. girls played their first
game of basketball with an outside
team last Friday afternoon, when they
vanquished the K. E. H. S. players by a
10-1 score in a practice match. The
score at half time was 4-0. M. Gordon
(4), E. Eveleigh (4) and G. Weld (2)
were the scorers for 'Varsity. University lined up as follows: Guards, M.
Kilpatrick and M. Gordon; centre, G.
Weld; forwards, L. Coates and E. Eveleigh.
.. Cbe ...
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R.  Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital  $13,500,000    Reserve $15,000,000
THRIFT AND SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District, including the following, which
are in the vicinity of the University:
Falrview—Corner    Sixth    Avenue   and
Granville.
Kitsilano—Corner Fourth Avenue and
Yew Street.
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street.
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
it
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578 Seymour Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. November 6, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
L. PATTERSON
L.  PATTERSON
GROTTO
CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
L. PATTERSON L. PATTERSON
%.3ioii<LQo.
©Teciust've furriers
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
E. C KILBY
''Good Goods''
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10% off to Returned Men
DO  YOU  MENTION  YOU  SAW  IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
W. D. McLEAN    L. S. POWELL
McLean & Powell
Iron Works
358-398 Dufferin Street, W.
Phone, Fairmont 1546
GENERAL   FOUNDRY
AND   PATTERN-MAKING
We specialize in Mill and Marine
Boiler Grates
Satisfaction    Guaranteed
DEFEATS K. OF C. BY 33-6 SCORE
ON SATURDAY
The "Kitsilano Capilano" tribe made
it three straight when they massacred
the Knights of Columbus at Brockton
Point on Saturday, 'Varsity scoring 33
points, with only a few minor casualties, and holding their opponents to two
tries.
Heyland, the speed boy from Victoria, started the raid, when he charged
the whole K.. of C. team, finally passing
to Ternan, who neatly dropped over the
line. After the first blood the batlte
was all 'Varsity's till half-time. Lord
and Ternan each went over for two
touches, amid cheers from the sidelines. Gwyther did some wonderful
kicking when he converted three out of
four tries, and also increased the spoils
by six when he successfully made two
very difficult free kicks. Just before
half-time Don Morrison's head hit the
earth an awful wallop and knocked it
a little out of plumb. But you couldn't
kill Don, who insisted on playing till
half-time.
The Knights opened the second half
with a rush, gaining six points on our
lead of twenty-four. Then Heyland
again went on the war-path, and U. B.
C. Benefited accordingly. Ternan made
his third try when he went over after
a pretty run and pass from Ross. Wallis
ended the scoring when, accepting his
only chance of the day, he dived over
two of the opposition and neatly slid
across  the  line.
'Varsity I. lineup: Fullback, Broadfoot; three-quarters, Wallis, Morrison,
Ross and Heyland; five-eighths, Ternan:
halfbacks, H. Gwyther and Hunter; forwards, Gross, V. Gwyther, Carlisle, Gunning, James and Lord.
SONGS FOR THE ROOTERS
The  following  songs  have  been  submitted
for use at the Rugby game on  Saturday:
Tune:
"I'M FOREVER BLOWING BUBBLES"
We're forever  scoring  touch-downs,
Touch-downs well   across the   line;
They come so fast
From the first to last
That all  our foes are quite downcast;
Points  are  quickly  mounting,
Mounting all the time;
We're  forever  scoring   touch-downs,
Touch-downs well   across the  line.
Tune:
"HOW YA GONNA KEEP 'EM DOWN ON
THE FARM?"
How   ya   gonna   keep   us   from   winning   this
game?
That's what we'd  like to  know.
How ya  gonna  keep  us from   going  over,
Over the line, most of the time?
How ya gonna keep us from scoring points?
That's the mystery.
You   thought  that  you   could   beat   us   from
the start,
But now you  know that you're  not quite so
smart.
How   ya   gonna   keep   us   from   winning   the
game?
That's what we'd  like to know.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTT-SHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
Sprott Shaw Stamp==QuaIity
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
At a meeting of the Arts Men's Undergraduate Society on Tuesday, noon,
Mr. H. W. Colgan, of Arts '20, was
elected to the secretaryship vacated by
the election of Mr. Allon Peebles to the
presidency.
Stylish Caps
for
Young  Men
Ours is easily the largest showing of Men's Caps in the City.
Plain Tweed Caps in staple
shapes,
75c to $1.25
Dress Caps in new shapes,
colorings and materials,
Prices, $1.50 to $2.50
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED THE   UBYSSEY
November 6, 1919
CLUBB  &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
Our slock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS  for
New Models
309    to    3 J 5
Hastings Street W,
®
HE FINEST FOOD in the
world. Serve it to your
family and watch them grow; eat
it yourself and notice the difference from any other bread.
AT YOUR GROCER'S
 OR	
PHONE FAIRMONT 44
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University  of British  Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
( Lillian Cowdell
Associate Editors -j H. L. Keenleyside
.(c D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   H.   Imlah
Exchange  Editor ." T.  P.   Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business  Manager J.   N.  Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
,    . fD. A. Wallace      D. Mclntyre
Assistants -   .„   „ v T   „    ,
( W.  McKee J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   CrawforJ
Editor for the Week Miss  L.   Cowdell
DISCIPLINE IN THE HALLS
It is a sad fact, but true, alas! that
further comment on the lack of discipline in the halls at various hours during the day is required. Students of the
University of B. C. are expected to display sufficient appreciation of the rights
of self-government enjoyed, and enough
consideration for the peace of mind of
others, to refrain from creating undue
disturbance. Our large and stately halls
are, unfortunately, far from soundproof,
as the sad experience of classes in such
rooms as 31 has proved many times
since the beginning of the session. The
sound of merry voices in the near neighborhood is tantalizing in the extreme to
those students whose minds are inclined
to wandering during lecture hour, while
the distraction is highly provoking to
the  more   serious-minded.
Yet another matter: During the address of Mr. Robertson on Monday, at
noon, a great deal of entirely unnecessary noise was created in the corridors
leading to the Auditorium. Granted that
it is impossible for all desirous of attending to reach the meeting place before it is begun, it seems only fair that
late comers should strive to make as little disturbance as possible, and that
those who do not intend entering the
hall should refrain from tramping back
and forth in the echoing corridors outside of Room Z. If the students only
realized the impossibility of hearing
distinctly the words of a speaker in the
Auditorium while any sounds are heard
from outside, they would surely moderate their tones and pass sufficiently
quietly on any essential errands along
the corridors, to enable meetings to
proceed   entirely  undisturbed.
This matter of rather too much noise
in the halls and corridors touches us all
closely, and, for the sake of the University as well as for our own comfort,
should be regarded seriously.
EX CATHEDRA
By the Editor for the Week
The staff of the "Ubyssey" was greatly encouraged by the enthusiasm shown
over last week's issue. They had not
thought that the "Ubyssey" was of
sufficient interest to the students to
cause them actually to forget their
lunches and to indulge in a wild scramble in the lower hall for their copy.
The members of the Publications
Board wish to announce that they will
not receive at all during the coming
week.
We would like to ask the Students'
Council why their minutes are always
oosted in the top left-hand corner of the
notice board, where it is impossible for
Freshmen and others of small stature
to  read  them.
While we are on the subject of the
notice board, might we draw attention
to the fact that the electric bulb which
should illuminate the notice board is on
the far side from it, thus leaving the
notice  board  in  shadow.
For the second time in two weeks the
Council has amended the by-law relating to the use of the University name
by subsidiary societies. Apparently they
realize that they exceeded their prerogative in the decision of last week.
The palatial furnishings of the "Better 'Ole" are arriving every day. Yesterday the rug, lonnge, curtains, and tea
service came. To-day we expect the tables and easy chairs.
(£ort?Bnonbmn
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
October 24th, 1919.
Editor of Publications Department,
University of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:—I have always had a great interest in the matter of initiations at U.B.C,
since being on the original committee which
set the precedent for our Alma Mater in this
matter,  and I think that some of the points
in   the   enclosed   letter   might   be   of  interest
enough  to  bear  publication  in  your  correspondence  column.
I am,   sincerely yours,
A. L. MARSHALL.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—From current numbers of the
"Ubyssey," and from personal information,
I would be led to conclude that our Alma
Mater has again been forced before the public eye in a very unfavorable manner, due to
the Freshmen initiation. Remembering that
the University is a provincial institution,
depending entirely on public support for its
expansion and transition to Point Grey,
an occurrence of this sort seems very
inauspicious.
In the fall of '16 initiations were first introduced at U.B.C, and Dr. J. G. Davidson,
then member of the Faculty Committee on
Student Affairs, advised us strongly against
setting up this precedent in our new institution, and it was only with the greatest
difficulty that we were able to secure tile
use of the Physics Building. I remember
that the committee in charge of the initiation felt some misgivings at carrying on in
the face of Dr. Davidson's advice; but we
were  too far committed to draw back with November 6, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
dignity, or, at least, thought so at the time.
This affair was what you now would call
"tame," and received no comment from any
source. Each year, however, you are coming nearer to fulfilling his predictions by
going "one better" on the previous performance, and now comes all this unpleasant
publicity.
It would seem to me that, if these affairs
are to be carried on in future, and I am informed that such is the desire of the student body, it would be better to have them
under the direct control of a committee
appointed by the Students' Council. They
could go carefully over the programme
drawn up by the Initiation Committee, and
could deal fittingly with anyone who desired
to carry things too far. If one or two men
were expelled for "hoodlumism" in this connection, such things would not happen very
often; and surely some of the Seniors would
be willing to forego some of the pleasures of
the evening in the interest of the good name
of our Alma Mater.
In the East such matters are under the
direct control of the Students' Administrative Council, and plans for all such events
as initiations and class fights have to be
submitted and approved, and there are very
severe penalties for any breach of these
regulations; thus effective measures are
taken to prevent things from going too far,
and unpleasant publicity that might cause
harm to the institution is avoided. It might
be interesting to note that, after the initiation, it is a custom for the Sophs, to give a
banquet for the Frosh. '18.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I have read, with feeling varying from disgust to sorrow, the four issues
of our weekly which have made their appearance this term. Has the Editorial
Board any policy?
Sometimes I have been tempted to believe
that our paper was but a medium for the
expression of the opinions of the editor for
the week—as witness the last issue. At another I was almost convinced that it was
merely a glorified publicity sheet of an
exclusive society, known, I believe, as the
Sigma Delta Kappa.
Surely there is need of a definite policy.
Let that policy be—first, news; second,
NEWS; third, NEWS. News from our
own  college;   news  from  other  colleges;   big
news, small news; all news that would
affect college students. Have we an exchange  editor?
Our last issue contained no report of the
election of Allon Peebles to the presidency
of the A.M.U.S. Why? Had you not time?
The editor of the week made mention of il
in  "Ex Cathedra."
The issue of October 23rd contained a
report, headed "Arts '23 Elections," which
appeared in the Daily Province of October
11th. Why this unseemly haste to present
the news?
The reports of the Rugby games read like
a "penny horrible." Your correspondent
should watch  a game  of marbles.
These are but a few instances. But they
point to the need of a definite policy. We
pardoned the poor copies of the first year
on the ground that it was a new venture.
But   now—"Tuum  Est."
Yours, etc.,
R.   A.  F.
Editor   "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Since you have invited criticism, I would like to be permitted to say
something  apropos   of   the   editorial   column.
Some of us, expecting little, are rarely
disappointed when we waste time enough to
read the editorial columns of the local press,
subsidized and controlled as it is by moneyed interests; but we expect the writer of
the editorial column to maintain the proper
dignity of a college  paper.
When last week's editor states that he
"does not have to run the gauntlet of a
mob" and is not assailed as a traitor to
humanity, does he mean that such was
ever the case? When he states that "it is
not considered a sign of moral degeneration
for one to be interested in History, Literature or Art," does he mean to suggest that
any student in this University was ever
fool enough to think so? When he says, so
naively, economics is a study of importance, does he think it may never have occurred  to  any  of us  before?
Could he tell us what statements were
thrown at his head? What the latest
theories are that he says so much about;
and, finally, what idiot thinks economics
can be studied without history or history
without economics, or that human knowledge can be divided off into watertight
compartments having no direct inter-relation?
To conclude, I may say that otherwise I
am well satisfied with the "Ubyssey," and
wish it every success, while suggesting that
its success will depend to some extent on
a high standard for the editorial column.
Yours respectfully,
"KHATMAR."
ALUMNI NEWS
The University Memorial Service,
under the auspices of the Alumni Association, will take place at Christ Church
on Sunday evening, November 9th, at
7.30 o'clock. Bishop de Pencier will deliver the address. Special music has been
provided, and during the service the
Honor Roll will be read.
The date of the second Alumni
luncheon has been set for Saturday,
November 8th, at the Hotel Vancouver.
The members of the Faculty, Seniors
and Juniors, are cordially invited to
attend. The committee in charge has
not yet announced the speaker, but notice   will  be  given  as   soon  as   possible
HOCKEY CLUB
The University Men's Hockey Club
hope to have a good year during the
present session. It is the desire of the
club to put hockey in the U. in good
standing. The coming winter promises
to be one of the best ever known. The
club is in communication with the Alberta University Hockey Club, with a
view to arranging an inter-collegiate
hockey league between Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia. The University of Washington also
proposes to have a hockey team this year,
and the clubs are arranging for an intercity league. Two teams, Intermediate
and Junior, are being entered in the city
leagues. The officers appointed at a
meeting held at the close of last year
were: President, N. T. Grimmett; secretary, A. M. Russell; treasurer, H. L.
Hunter.
The club has yet to elect an honorary
president and a vice-president.
Smart Footwear for every occasion
©
U R SHOES are worn by young people who appreciate the
limit of shoe swellness. Fall and Winter Styles are now ready
and the new creations are indeed smart.
t* INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
November 6, 1919
Art  and   Style   Clothes   Shop  for
Snappy Styles
REMEMBER THIS !
When you buy your Clothes from
us you are getting the very best
of   material,   tailoring   and   style.
Prices:
$40.00 t0 $75.00
GLOVES
Our Glove Department offers an
assortment hard to beat — constantly being added to. We invite
you   to   come   in   and   see   them.
Prices:
$2.00 to $5.50
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
THE   YAMATO
Direct Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone, Seymour 2288
ft*0> e« Tlowm.    Tracffl Wort a Specialty
Brown Bros. & 60. Ltd.
?lori$t$, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728. GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
DISCUSSION    CLUB    STAGES    AN
INTERESTING PROGRAMME
"Resolved that all aliens should be
deported from Canada" proved a most
interesting topic for the second debate
of the Agricultural Discussion Club.
Miss M. S. McKenzie, the vice-president,
was in the chair. The debaters were
Messrs. C. A. Lamb, R. Fisher and Bert
Sweeting, who upheld the argument for
the affirmative, while Messrs. H. Greenwood, R. L. Fraser and Davis ably
represented the negative. Strong arguments were put forth by both sides, and
the vigorous rebuttal was a feature of
the  debate.
Dr. Sedgewick, Prof. McLean and Mr.
G. Boving kindly acted as judges. In
his criticism, Dr. Sedgewick pointed out
the necessity of making definite, clear-
cut points. "Do not attempt to make
too many points," he advised. Continuing, he stated that it is better to spend
more time on one or two points, and
make them impressive, than to attempt
a number of points, thus leaving the
audience in a confused state of mind.
The decision was rendered in favor of
the negative.
Mr. C. P. Leckie gave a brief resume
of his experiences in the Okanagan, and
Mr. C. Rive a short talk on "Animal
Husbandry," while the judges were out.
Prof. McLean then gave the speakers
a few valuable suggestions. He emphasized the value of correctness of diction
in public speaking, and deplored the use
of slang. "Slang," he said, "lowers the
dignity of the thought presented and
does not convey the idea in as clear a
form."
ARTS '20
A short meeting of the women of
Arts '20 was held on Friday to elect a
representative to the executive of the
Women's Lit. in place of Miss Aber-
nethy, who has resigned. Miss Helen
Matheson was appointed.
ECONOMICS   DISCUSSION   CLUB
On Thursday night, October 30th, the
Economics Discussion Club listened to
a very thorough and instructive address
from Alderman Kirk on "Civic Taxation." After showing how the single
tax system, all right in boom times, may
prove unsuccessful, Alderman Kirk outlined the present system, which taxes
the full assessed value of the land and
half the value of the buildings. Vancouver's sources of revenue, he explained, are: first, from taxes; second,
from license fees from certain businesses and from banking houses; third,
the Government grant. In describing
the workings of municipal government,
Alderman Kirk cleared up several fallacies. He showed that the assessed
value of a piece of property does not
necessarily represent its true value, but
must represent its relative value, and
pointed out also that the council, contrary to the idea of many people, has
little control over the expenditure of
either the school board or the police
force.
The discussion which followed involved the question of a more equitable
means of taxation, the method of
financing the public schools, and the
single tax system as opposed to the
present plan.
BRIDGMAN'S STUDIO
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  E
. C.
Phone, Fairmont
2075
The Art of Speaking
Debates,   Speeches,   Play-parts,
Recitations   Coached
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
U. B. C.   Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite  23,  709   Dunsmuir  Street
Phone,   Sey.   6535Y
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouver Stationers Ctl
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone, Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.       Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville   St. Phone, Sey. 8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government  St. Phone 4742
After the exhaustion produced by the
discussion, the members were forced to
imbibe a modicum of nurishment provided for their alleviation by the hosts of
the evening. This completed a very
successful first meeting, and the society
is looking forward eagerly to the next
gathering. November 6, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
THE COLLEGE CAT
There are constitutions numerous as
flies on summer days, there are efforts
rather humorous to mend the Freshies'
ways. I've often tried to memorize the
Alma Mater laws; I always found, with
mild surprise, I never knew a clause.
These laws beset us everywhere, they've
got us hand and hoof; there are rules
for falling down the stairs and walking
on the roof. The Bolshevist may frown
and shout and cut his many capers; the
soviet is down and out (according to the
papers). Whene'er a rule is brought to
light, by students stern and grave, the
President sits up all night to hear the
Council rave. When peaceful is the narrow way within this institution, they call
a meeting every day to 'mend the constitution. These laws are very sacred
things; obey them, I beseech, that you
may sprout two little wings and fly far
out of reach. So swear by radiators
cold, and by Prof. Boving's Ford, and
by the annuals still unsold by the Publications Board, and by the Senior's
flowing gowns that have not yet appeared, by Mr. Henry's awful frowns,
and by your father's beard, that you'll
obey these righteous laws, created for
your good; you may not know a single
clause, although, of course, you should.
A constitution's frail and weak, and very
easily broken; remember that before you
speak, and after you have spoken. The
Senior shalt thou humbly greet, and
love him'as thyself, and, children, never
place your feet upon a stack-room shelf.
Thou shalt not one-step in the hall,
thou shalt not run upstairs; for fear
you have a dreadful fall, thou shan't
stand on the chairs.
These laws are very numerous, as I
have said before. I hope that they will
humor us,  and  not  make  many  more.
PUSSY.
Y. M. C. A.
Dr. Sedgewick delivered the address
to the University Y.M.C.A. last Friday,
choosing as his subject, "Imagination as
Applied to the Study of the Bible." He
declared that it was no longer possible
to consider the Bible different from any
other book, and that it must be studied
as a literary work of a past age. When
studied thus, the temporary element
which exists in all writing can be discounted, and a clearer conception of the
underlying truths attained.
This new attitude toward the Bible,
said the speaker, would necessitate the
abandonment of some things which
have always been closely allied with religion. It is no longer possible to regard
the baptismal rites as an actual cleansing. The superstitions of the age in
which these rites were founded are no
longer part of our national belief. "We
would not be worthy of the faith of our
fathers if we hesitate to adapt the beliefs of our religion to the needs of today," said Dr. Sedgewick.
The speaker also declared that there
was a need for the Bible, and that it
should be studied reverently. He showed
that the ideals of life which the Bible
present are by far the most satisfactory
that have ever been given.
The address was listened to by a well-
attended meeting, and was much appreciated.
PLAYERS*  CLUB
An interesting address was recently
delivered to the students by Mrs. R. L.
Sharpe, late of Mont-Clair Players'
Club. Mrs. Sharpe was enabled, by her
personal connection with the development of this club, to give many useful
suggestions concerning the "little theatre" movement.
THE    'VARSITY    HOCKEY    TEAM
DEFEATS KING EDWARD 1-0
Last Monday the ladies' grass hockey
team met King Edward High School in
a practise match.
In spite of the lack of a right halfback, the U.B.C. defense kept the ball
well up in their opponents' field; but the
forwards, lacking combination and practise, found it hard to score. The only
goal scored was knocked into the King
Edward net about five minutes before
half-time.
The second half started with the
King Edward girls determined to at
least equal the score. But, although
their forwards pressed hard, and looked
as if they might score on two or three
occasions, the 'Varsity defense held
them back. The game ended without
further  score  on  either  side.
The lineup for 'Varsity was: Goal,
V. Herman; fullbacks, M. Copping and
J. McKenzie; halfbacks, B. Garlick and
Z. Smith; forwards, C. Fitch, S. Thorn-
steinson, J. Buckerfield, P. MacKay and
H.  Draper.
Other games are being arranged with
the Normal, Vancouver ladies, North
Vancouver ladies and South Vancouver
teachers. The Girls' Athletic Club hope
to send a strong hockey team to represent U.B.C. when it takes its annual trip
to Victoria.
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R.e.Purdy,Cta.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET
Exclusive Designs in
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS
(Business and Personal)
CHRISTMAS PAPETERIES
GIFT   BOXES   OF   STATIONERY
LEATHER GOODS
IVORY MANICURE SETS
VOLLAND'S   CHILDREN'S   GIFT
BOOKS
FRAMED MOTTOES
HALLOWE'EN   SPECIALTIES
BIRTHDAY
AND  FRIENDSHIP  CARDS
WEDDINGS
AND   CONGRATULATIONS
BIRTH   ANNOUNCEMENTS
MEMORIAL CARDS
Western Specialty Limited
Society Stationers
and Printers
572 Granville St., Vancouver,
British Columbia
MADE IN   CANADA
DOMINION
MATCHES
(THEY   LIGHT   EVERY   TIME)
Get them from Your Grocer
B. N.—The secret of eternal youth is
to keep a boyish heart.
Feminine Member of the Class (in
sorrowful tone)—I wish I could get one!
HEY FELLOWS!
Have    You   Seen
Our New Overcoats ?
SNAPPY  STYLES
$30, $35, $40
G.   B.   KERFOOT
155 Hastings St. East. THE   UBYSSEY
November 6, 1919
.. The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers  in its  Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See the Manager, or one of their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
626 Pender Street, West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,  Manager
J.W.FOSTER
LIMITED
l
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
MR. ROBERTSON'S ADDRESS
The student body of the University on
Monday, November 3rd, had the privilege of hearing a short address by Mr.
J. W. Robertson, the Dominion representative of the Department of Agriculture at the Peace Conference. Taking
as his subject the work of Canada in the
war, both in the actual fighting and at
the Peace Conference, he emphasized
the power of a great Idea—the necessity
of earnestness and cheerfulness, and besought the students to remember the
pressing need for leaders from among
the youth of the present. After a brief
account of the valor displayed by the
Canadians in action, he touched on the
work of the Allied delegates at Paris.
An unusually large number of students
were present at the meeting, showing
the appreciation of Mr. Robertson's
lecture.
•VARSITY II. WINS ALSO
The 'Varsity second team showed
what it is made of when it defeated the
King Edward boys at the Point on Saturday, in a ragged game, by a score of
9-0.
Although K.E.H.S. did not have their
full Senior team, nevertheless 'Varsity
did well to win in their first game of the
season.
The play was ragged, and it was evident that both teams suffered from lack
of teamwork practise, the tendency being towards individual playing; but our
second team certainly has material
enough to warrant an entry into an intermediate league.
Scott, McPherson and Hearst did the
scoring for 'Varsity, Art Lord handling
the whistle.
The lineup: Greg, Hatch, Wallace,
Scott, Rear, McPherson, Sollay, Russell,
Arkley, Underhill, McLean, Harvey,
Grimmett,  MacDonald.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Thursday—Sigma Delta meeting at
Ye Little Brown Inn, 8.15 p.m. Junior
Economics Club at Ye Little Brown
Inn.
Friday—Senior class party at home of
Mr. and Mrs. Damer. Junior class party
in Auditorium. Jack Storey will address
the  Y.M.C.A.,  noon.
Saturday—Senior Rugby game,
Brockton Point, 3.15 p.m. U.B.C. Intermediates vs. Adanacs, at "Y," New
Westminster.
Sunday—Memorial service for members of U.B.C. killed in the  Great War.
STOP!   LOOK!   LISTEN!
A certain amount of discussion as to
the favorite book and author of college
students has given rise to a plan which
the Publications Bbard has decided to
entrust to the tender mercies of U.B.C.
students during the next few weeks. The
request is therefore made that each and
every student write the name of his or
her favorite book and that of his or her
favorite author on a slip of paper, and
drop this into the "Ubyssey" box in the
Main Hall. A careful tally of the votes
will be kept, and some interesting results may be announced in next week's
"Ubyssey."
The Young Men's
Clothing
Store
Here you will find a very -
large and complete stock of
New Suits and Overcoats
—brim full of real class—
Smart and with lots of pep
to them. The quality is
the best, at values that will
surprise you—
$35, $40, $45, $50, $55
J. N. Harvey, Ltd.
123, 125, 127 Hastings Street, West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria
Look for the big Red Arrow Sign
J&TBell.
MM IT CO
Dame   Fashion's   latest   dictates   in
Fine Footwear
in   endless  variety at
CLUFF'S
(555
You will always And just the shoe
you are looking for at the right
price here.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where  quality counts, we win.
ClufF Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank   of   Commerce

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125082/manifest

Comment

Related Items