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The Ubyssey Mar 15, 1940

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 ENGLISH RUGBY
STADIUM WEDNESD Y
STUDENTS 25o & PASS
(Sty? .HhysBtfg
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH RUGBY
STADIUM WEDNESD Y
STUDENTS 25o & PASS
VOL. XXII.
VANCOUVER, B.O., FRIDAY, MAROH 15, 1940
ww»*
ItTo. 37
Pride and Rreiudice
Anniversary Production
Wins Triumph Tuesday
John Glen, Nancy Bruce Star; Men Outshine
Ladies as Players' Club Completes Twenty-
flve Years of Production
The Tuesday performance of the Players' Club was indeed a
First Night Triumph. With spot-lights aglow outside the theatre,
and a fifteen-minute broadcast over the Western stations of C.B.C.
in progress behind scenes, the nineteen members of the cast of
"Pride and Prejudice" awaited with more than usual trepidation
the moment when the curtain was to rise. Out front were assembled not only the usual distinguished patrons and patronesses, including the Honourable Minister of Education and Mrs. Weir, the
-■President and the Chancellor, prominent members of faculty and family
PRIDELIGHTS
FROM THE
GREEN ROOM
By FAT KEATLEY
Lush red pomegranates were responsible for the energy whloh students saw In last night's performance. Oolng baok to the Oreeks for
their Inspiration, the greenroomers
sucked the same fruit that was the
standby of Athenian crowds at a Sophocles smash hit two thousand
years ago. The liquid pippins were
reported to be marvellous for the
throat,
• •      •
Eight men are going straight to
the barber on Monday. As key characters they have been forbidden to
mow their lush foliage by director
Sidney Risk, and have even submitted to the Indignity of finger waves.
• •      •
The show was over, the audienoe
poured out of the auditorium, and
backstage Papa Bennet dipped his
Angers into a pot ot cold cream and
started to remove make-up. But instead of removing the grease paint,
the cream gave his eighteenth century faoe a twentieth century chromium glisten. Reason: thespians
with a mal-developed sense of humor
had deftly substituted a jar of silver
polish  for  the cream,
• •      •
Other sidelights of the twenty-
fifth anniversary production: Players are now the oldest amateur dramatlo group in Canada . . . this year's
program was twenty Ipages thick,
best ever . . . graduates came from
a quarter century back to the reception In the Brock after Tuesday's
premiere . . . publicity chief very
happy about his speolal events
broadcast over CBR believed to be
first of its kind on the oampus, and
excellent publicity for the tour . . .
alumni hailed Prof. F. O. C. Wood
with three cheers and a tiger as' the
guiding genius of the Club slnoe its
inception.
friends, but also several hundred
former members fervently Ihoplng
that the 20th Annual Spring Production would suitably mark the occasion.
The expectations of all were fully
realised. The players gave a smooth,
delightful performance that pleased
the large audienoe, and those associated with previous achievements
felt happy in the knowledge that the
club's reputation was to be further
enhanced by their talented successors of 1940.
HELEN JEROME'S VERSION
The success was not cheaply gained. Instead of selecting a play of
easy type and assured reaction, the
olub courageously tackled Helen
Jerome's well-known adaptation of
the popular Austen novel. In doing
so they -were confronted with two
difficulties. A drama based on a novel almost invariably loses some of
the tension of a story shaped for the
stage alone. Also, because every
reader has a pre-conceived idea of
the characters to be portrayed, the
task of bringing these to life becomes an exacting one. That the
cast overcame these difficulties with
ease was conceded by all.
The  Jerome  version  preserves  the
(Continued on  Page a)
See  PRODUCTION
HAROLD LUMSDEN
_____■____ ■m%Wm>«'~
A*^<tjH
^________________F|r^
-i^^l
^^^^P"'                ,_£^^|
sH-_----L^
JOHN PEARSON
Aggies Collect Cash
But City Cop's Fine
Doesn*t Come True
This week, Aggie students
have 97.00 in the Aggie coffers,
and dont know what to do
with It.
The money was raised from
nickels contributed by students
after a city poUoeman stopped
an overcrowded Aggie oar and
told them that they had incurred a 910 dollar fine. The Agglea coUected money for the
fine but aa yet have received
no word of lt.
The affair occurred In the
vicinity of Alma Road where
the car, on the way to the Arta
'30 relay was stopped for
overorowdlng and traveUlng
through a school aone at 90
mile* an. hour.
who succeeds Pearson, retiring president of the Alma-Mater Sooiety.
Washington   Editor  Attacks   Fraternities
•   •   • •   •   •
Campus  Flares  Under Vogel's Blast
Attacks made by ex-edltor Elmer
Vogel of the University of Washington Daily, upon the existing fraternity and sorority system drew a storm
of protest last week from the 3,500
Inhabitants  of   Washington's   Greek
Row.
Prompted by a discussion of the
fraternity system in the Saturday
Evening Post, Vogel, in his editorial
of February 29th, heartily condemned
the whole institution of Greek letter
houses which he believed to be snobbish and undemocratic.
"We have refrained from comment
because we were convinced that they
will die a natural death within the
next few decades anyway," the editorial stated. "It is self-evident that
practically the only purpose the fraternities can claim is that of social
life and its development—oftentimes
to the detriment of academic pursuits."
Telephone calls beselged the Daily
offices all that day, while visitors
filled   the   editor's  office   agreeing  or
disagreeing with his editorial.
Dean of Men, Herbert T. Condon
and Panhellenic President Florence
Spinner took exception to the editorial charges. The Dean pointed out
that fraternity men boasted a higher
academic average than university
men as a whole throughout the continent, although the average at Washington was eight and seven-tenths
per cent lower.
In an editorial printed in the Daily
ol March 1, Vernon Peterson and
Ronald Bostwlck of the Daily staff
replied to Vogel's attack. Fraternities, they stressed, rounded out a
man's character and gave greater opportunity for leadership and government.
Snobs in fraternities were in the
minority, they maintained and selection was no more undemocratic ln a
fraternity than it was in the field of
sport.
"One must live in a fraternity to
see how it operates and what it can
do for the individual," the editorial
stated.
Editorial
ELECTION SELECTION
The recent Presidential election on this campus is now a finished story, and within a few days tho remaining offices on the
Students' Council of the A.M.S. will have been filled. There have
been many elections at this University which gave rise to discussions, and a moderate quantity of student 'interest,' but not one of
them possessed the remarkable 'aroma' of the present one.
During the past session much has been said presumably on
behalf of democracy, and many things have been termed undemocratic. If it is possible to inspire students to exhibit a slight interest in our precious democracy, then the C.S.A. should have had
some success this term, but it is becoming apparent that those who
have opposed the C.S.A. in some of its ventures are more worthy
of condemnation than was the C.S.A. itself.
In the March 8 issue of this paper an editorial suggested that
a president should be chosen who would act "in the best interests,
not of a small section of the student body, but of all students."
The results Of Tuesday's poll tend to show that the majority is
definitely behind the man who was elected.
The last three or four days, however, have seen certain octiv-
ities on the campus which aro to be questioned. It was rumoured
that tho C.S.A. were putting up a slate of candidates for the elections, and it was reported that another group, composed almost
entirely (if not totally) of fraternity men and women, were opposing the candidates of tho former 'party.'
No proof has been forthcoming that the C.S.A. executive or
assembly acted as a solid group or party; in fact little circumstantial evidence exists to support such an argument. A political party
rarely, if ever, runs more than one candidate in a single riding,
or, as in the A.M.S. elections, more than one candidate for the
same post! Yet there are three persons nominated for the L.S.E.
President, and all have backed the C.S.A. during the term!
Meanwhile it is almost common knowledge that a 'committee'
of fraternity students held meetings, drew up a slate of candidates
consisting of one man for each offlce. It eould be said that this
action is both legitimate and fair, but the further activities of this
so-called committee are unable to stand much investigation without loss of 'face.'
When other men than those selected for the 'Committee's'
slate displayed intentions of running, the campus Tammanies took
definite steps to dissuade these hopefuls. In consequence several
candidates, with nomination sheets filled out and signed, found
themselves being high-pressured into oblivion, while some other
puppet of the omnipotent committee was left an uncrowded field.
The women's portion of the election, moreover, has been all but
ruined by the efficiency of an 'elections' committee. So well were
several potential nominees dissuaded that election by acclamation
became the order of the day.
In brief this Committee took upon itself the right and privilege to select on behalf of the Alma Mater Society successors to
the present incumbents of the female positions on Students' Council.
Students at this University have sat idly by whilst this astonishing procedure went on unhindered. It is in all probability too
late to accomplish a great deal now, but it is faintly possible that
students will at last feel that their vote is their own, to be used
as they themselves desire. In the last election some voters were
under the impression that it was "sin" to vote a certain way, and
as a result voted the other. Is it possible that the old days of political racketeers are returning? This time appearing on the Campus
of a University made up of so-called intelligent people?
If it were possible to cancel all the nominations received on
Wednesday, March 13, it would be a beneficial thing to do, but no
doubt this is not within the realm of possibility. It is apparent
after all that some authorities have a considerable interest in the
present election!
And now the matter is dealt with . . . Again it is left to the
students to take any further action. What this action eould or
should be is unknown to this writer, but perhaps the 'legal minds'
on the Campus can decide.
In brief, 'Tuum est'.
Candidates will
Address Students
All students are asked to
turn out for election speeches
on  Friday  and  Monday.
Candidates for M. IT. S. and
M. A. A. will address male students in Ap. Sc. 100 on Friday,
March 15 at noon.
Candidates for the positions
of L.S.E. president, treasurer,
secretary and junior member
will speak on Monday, March
18  at  noon  in  the auditorium.
L.S.E.  BANQUET
At the Literary and Scientific
Executive annual banquet, to be held
Wednesday, March 20, In the University Grill, the honourary L.S.E.
awards will be announced.
Dr. J. Allen Harris will be guest
of honour. Other guests will include
Professor Soward, John Pearson,
Harry Lumsden, and the newly elected  prosldent   of  the  L.S.E.
All Varsity club presidents and
honourary presidents are Invited.
The work of the society during the
past  year will  be  reviewed.
Steps Into Traces
Lumsden Named New Prexy
By Majority Of 300 Votes
15 Men Contest Five Council Positions,
As Three Co-eds Get Acclamation;
Preferential Voting in Effect Tuesday
Qratifled by one of the largest presidential polls in U.B.C.
history, Harry Lumsden, A.M.S. president-elect, prepared this
week to leap into the traces and take over the hardest student job
in the University for the 1940-41 session. At the same time, stti-
dent groups plastered the campus with campaign posters as a
slate of fifteen male candidates went up for other council positions,
positions.
WOMEN ACCLAIMED '
Three women students were elected'
by acclamation yesterday to three
council offices. New council secretary will be Betty Bolduc, third year
Arts, while president of the Women's
Undergraduate Society will be Dorothy Hlrd, 1040 vice-president of the
W.U.8. executive. Ruth Wilson, well-
known ln campus sports, wlU be the
Women's Athletic Representative.
Lumsden obtained a total of 840
votes in Tuesday's presidential election. His only opponent Archie Bain,
received 020.
"I  am  gratified  by  the  tremendous   endorsement   of   my   policies
and wish to thank those who supported me," the new student leader
told   the  Ubyssey   yesterday   as  he
studied   student   oounoil   problems
and   commenced   preparation  of  a
program for the coming year.
Expressing himself fully  in accord
with    the    University's    war    polloy,
Lumsden stated that he would carry
out his presidential platform  to the
best   of   his   ability.     He   announced
that he would sacrifice a double degree ln Arts and Commerce ln order
that he might give more time to the
council work.
NOMINATIONS  HEAVY
The Alma Mater office was filled
on Wednesday afternoon as prospective candidates and their seconders
completed last minute details and
handed ln nomination sheets, campaign signs and platforms. Two most
hotly contested positions will be those
of Treasurer and Junior Member,
with six running for the former and
two for the latter.
Candidates for Junior Member are
Charles Nash, 3rd year Science, secretary of the S.M.U.S., and former
president of Science '42; and Ormonde Hall, 2nd year Arts.
Running   tor   Treasuser   are   Ar-
(Contlnued on Page 2)
See NEW PREXY
Students Sob ln
Caf Gas Attack
Tears flowed freely In the
cafeteria Wednesday noon when
two practical Jokers entered the
grill and let loose a vial of tear
gas on one of the tables.
Stalwart soienoemen sobbed
pathetically and fraternity men
soaked up handkerchief after
handkerchief as the deadly gas
Altered through the entire cafeteria driving a horde of escaping students before it. Even
genial Frank Underhiil was not
Immune from the fumes.
Caf loungers returned fifteen
minutes later to meet up with
a  second  and worse attaok.
PREFERENTIAL
VOTING SYSTEM
EXPLAINED
by NEMO
Charming Freshette i "I am keenly
Interested ln the elections; but Z do
not understand the preferential voting system. Can you possibly help
me?"
WHAT TO DO
Worldly    Senior:    "Delighted.   The
process ls rather simple. Suppose that
four men are running for president
of the A.M.S. These men we will call
Smith, Jones, Black and White.     *?*V
"If you want Smith to oome _||
flrst   you   put   the   number   ©ngs)
against his   name   on   the baUot,
Then    you   indicate   your   seoond
choice,  Jones,  say,  by  putting the
figure two oppoalte his name. You   .
continue    this    process   until   you
have   shown   your   relative   preference for all the oandldates."
Freshette: "I see. But how do they
find out the winning candidate?"
Senior: "Well, each candidate la
credited with the number of first
choices marked opposite his name on
the ballots. If any one should receive
more than fifty per cent, of the total
flrst votes cast then he or she la
declared   elected."
"And If no candidate receives more
than fifty per cent.?"
HOW IT WORKS
"Then the candidate with the least
number of first is struck off the list.
For instance, Smith may have 333
firsts, Jones 354, Black 423 and White
301. White is now out of the running.
The second choices on his ballots are
credited to the candidates for whom
they are cast. Smith may have 100 of
them, Jones 103 and Black 48. The
score is now 433 for Smith, 007 for
Jones and 471 for Black. Smith ia
now disregarded and the second,
choices on his ballots are credited to
Jones or Black as the case may be."'
"But what happens if there Is a-.
tie between two or more candidates,
during the distribution of the
choices? Just which of these candidates is struck off?"
"The Elections Committee determines, somewhat autocratically, I
fear, which and in what order these
candidates shall be eliminated."
"I see. By the way, must I Indicate
all my choices?"
"Oh, yes, or else your ballot will be
considered spoiled."
Co-operative Residence  Gains Success
*      *      * *      +      *
Prepare{To Enlarge System Next Year
Who  wants  co-operatives?
Forecast of another student campaign came yesterday as the Canadian Student Assembly Discussions
Club set its co-operative committee
to work and laid plans for a meeting on Thursday noon in Aggie 100
to discuss the formation of two more
co-operative residences on the campus  next  year.
Because of the astounding success
of the flrst student co-operattve residence, this year, the committee felt
that there was need for expansion.
Situated at the corner of Tolmie and
Seventh avenue, the house costs Its
13 boarders less than 20 dollars a
month.    Alf. Carlsen, head of the res
idence,   will    act    as     chairman    at
Thursday's   meeting.
The committee hopes to provide
for   one   feminine    residence     and
two male residences near the oampua  next year.
At the same time plans will be laid
for   Investigating   the   possibilities   of
co-operative bookstore, which will re-
tall book's to students at a minimum
cost.
It was felt that students who
would be otherwise unable to attend
University would be benefitted by
residences of this  nature.
All interested audents are urged
to   attend   Thursday's   conclave. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  15,  1940
THE   UBYSSEY
Ieeued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia
OSloe i Brook Memorial Building     ......     Phone Alma 1824
Oampus Subscriptions, 91.00 Mall Subscriptions, 92.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
John Oarrett
Tueaday
Arvid   Baokman
SENIOR EDITORS
SPORTS
' Lionel Salt
Friday
Jaok   Margeson
PRODUCTION
(Continued from Page I)
spirit of "Pride and Prejudice" very
admirably. One of Its weaknesses
arises from the faot that too few of
the more attractive qualities of Mr.
Davey are presented, making it
somewhat difficult to accept him as
an object of deep interest on the
part of the sensible Miss Bennet.
To these two roles John Olen and
Nancy Bruce brought conviction in
n deft and charming manner. Mr.
Glen's sincerity, so marked in his
work last year, gave dignity to a
most difficult part for a young Canadian to handle. Miss Bruoe revealed
the attractiveness and Intelligence
of Elizabeth ln a sensitive yet assured portrayal. These principals were
particularly effective ln the soene at
the end of Aot II, when their work
was given a richly deserved tribute
by tbe audience.
MEN OUTSHINE LADIES
Among the supporting players, the
men may be truthfully said to have
outshone the ladles. Seldom has a
player made a first appearance ln a
spring performance that won him
the recognition accorded Lister Sinclair aa Mr. Bennet, the odd mixture
of qulok parts, sarcastic humor and
caprice . James Halcrow in his
amusing sketoh of Mr. Collins adroitly saved him from being merely a
ridiculous carloature. In the small
part of Colonel Fltawllliam, James
fcsee gave further evidence of his
ttural grace and ability in acting.
A* Blngley and Wlckham, Robert
Haywood and Pat Keatley were
feshiifg figures, whilst Archie Bain
•nd Alison Cummlng tilled minor
roles adequately.
Margaret Morris played Mrs. Ben-
***net with a lively sense of fun, and
as her daughters, Josephine Kennedy
nnd Pauline Scott -vere well contrasted. As Miss Blngley, Mary McLeod used her clear-toned voice very
effectively, and Ruth Heyer lent
character to the two appearances of
Lady Lucas. Lorraine Johnston attacked the role of Lady Catherine
de Bough with spirit, succeeding in
giving life to that arrogant and vulgar woman. Shirley MacDonald as
Charlotte Lucas, pointed her lines
capably, and small parts were nicely
done by Mary McLorg, Bernlce Mclntyre and Stella Davidson.
SETTINGS  BEAUTIFUL
The technical expertness shown In
this 20th spring production was a delight. The beautiful settings designed by John R. Quigg mark him as
an artist of rare gifts, and he leaves
behind him in Players' Club records
the memory of having created some
of Its most distinctive sets. The work
of the stage crew headed by Roy
Jackson and Paul Matthews was expertly done. The oostumes -were aa
colorful as they were numerous, and
gave testimony to weeks of labour
on the part of Evelyn Barwlok and
her committee.
To Sydney Risk as director belongs a great measure of the credit
for the successful performance. With
a good sense of theatrical values, a
flair for design and grouping, and a
capacity for taking Ipalns, he has
made "Pride and Prejudice" one of
the most pleasant of Players' Club
memories. C. W.
NEW PREXY
(Continued from Page 1)
chle    Bain,    3rd    year    Commerce,
president   of   the   Sooial   Problems,
and oandldate for the A.M.S. presidency.
His opponents are Don McOlll, Mc-
Ooun Cup debater; Austin Delaney,
3rd year Arts; James M. Campbell,
2nd year Aggie; Peter McTavlsh, 3rd
year Commerce; and Arthur Fouks,
Law Society member, and one of the
Forum members who debated In Seattle recently.
James Harmer will defend the
presidency of Men's Athletics against
the determined attack of By Straight.
Harmer ls a star hockey, Canadian
football, and English rugby player.
Straight, who ls a drummer in Oil
Clark's band, won his Big Block ln
his  freshman  year.     Last   year   he
managed the Senior B basketball.
CO-ED  COUNCILLORS
Ruth WUson, who became president of W.A.A. by acclamation, ls this
year's vice-president of W.A.A., president ot the Big Block Club, Secretary of Arts '41, President of the Oolf
Club, and Captain of the basketball
team.
Dorothy Hlrd, acclaimed president
of W.U.S., Is this year's vice-president ot W.U.S., secretary of Pan-
Hellenic and was vice-president of
Arts '41 ln both her first and second
years.
Betty Bolduc, Counoil Secretary by
acclamation was treasurer of Arts '41
ln her first year, and secretary In her
second year. In second year she was
also vice-president of W.U.S. She ls
the newly-elected president of Le
Cercle francals.
Running for Men's Undergrad are
Todd Tremblay, 3rd year Aggie, and
Junior Member this year, and Charles
Parker, president of Science '41, the
Treasurer of S.M.U.S., president of
the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers, and a member of the Open
House committee.
L.S.E. candidates Include Bob Bonner, 2nd year Arts, vice-president of
the Parliamentary Forum, vice-president of the C.S.A., and member of the
Law Society and the old P.D.C.
Against him are Andrew Nash, secretary of the L.S.E., president of the
Newman Olub, and a student ln Forestry; and Alfred Carlsen, twice a
McOoun Cup debater, member of the
S.C.M. executive, and former secretary of the Parliamentary Forum.
At a late time last night,  Russ
Palmer   and   Ken   Eldrldge   were
declared     Ineligible     for     Junior
Member.
STATEMENT
It was very satisfactory to
see suoh a large expression of
student opinion. But although
a reoord vote was oast, lt Is
regrettable that over 1000 students apparently did not have
sufficient interest in the student government to cast their
ballots.
I sincerely hope  that Harry
Lumsden  will  have  a  successful year in the presidency.
Signed,
ARCHIE BAIN.
7M**#A
\**v*t
Issue: corsage, one, and type? . . . Roselawn of course; purpose:
C.O.T.C, Ball .... if you want a corsage that is different, dignified,
and at the same time, reasonable . . . phone Marine 1036 for a Roselawn corsage ... or if you're downtown, call at the 724 Granville
Street flower headquarters and make your arrangements personally . . .
to give her flowers that suit her personality, shows your discriminating
taste and good judgment . . . she's a lovely freshette and good-looking
but . . . she certainly isn't making herself popular ... by chasing
after all her friends' boy friends . . . and leading her own second year
boy around by the nose . . . and there are such a host of lovely flowers
at Roselawn's .... everything from crisp spring hyacinths to stately
orchids . . . aristocratic roses and college carnations . , . and the ever-
popular gardenia . . . and if she's Irish at all, she'll be appreciating a
shamrock inserted in the corsage . . . even tho' the Ball is several days
after St. Patrick's ....
fi fi fi
A \jo student who has a fondness for animals was wending her
way home one evening . . . and while waiting for the last bus ....
spent the moments stroking the bus-stand cat (and we do mean cat)
.... finally the bus arrived . . . and not wishing to have the animal
run under the bus and be killed . . , she very thoughtfully took it
around to the back of the bus' stand and very affectionately said,
"Good night, darling" . . . and to her horror , . , saw two shadows
.... spring apart ....
fi fi fi
It may be the week for the Irish, but it's the Dutch influence
that counts in shoes from Rae-Son's Mezzanine Floor . , . walled toes
and smart barrel heels are flattering accompaniments to the elasticized
gabardine pumps, and they're only 6.91 and 7,10 . . . another neat
style is of black kid, with a closed toe, and smoothly draped front,
to match the spring influence in all the spring gowns .... cherry
lizard with a slenderizing V vamp that makes your foot look sizes
smaller! .... a pre-med lad was going around the campus yesterday,
offering a cheek to any girl who might have a yen to . . . slap it. But
he only offered one cheek . . . the one he had frozen by the dentist
.... there are a few white sports shoes and gillie ties with smooth
non-gape insteps . . . and snappy colored oxfords to match all your
new spring costumes .... make a note of the address, 618 Granville
Street, for your white shoes for graduation.
fi fi fi
One fourth year girl has a good alibi for never going down into
the stacks . . . the last time she was there, she got lost ....
fi fi fi
With exams only a skimpy month off . . . free your mind of all
wardrobe worries with a new Easter suit from Lora Lee's Dress Shop,
2814 Granville St ... . there is one particularly effective suit of nubby
cloth, in a patriotic air force blue, with back fullness and peplum on
the jacket . . . the skirt is the ever-flattering gore . . . the coats are
showing the military trend, one beige model featuring the latest in
the new buttonless wrap-around style ... it is in a soft beige, the
sleeves are puffed all the way down from the flat, military shoulders
.... other models are spotlighting boucle materials with pin tucking
on the skirts and across the top . . . "aw heck, why did I have to be
all dated up when he asked me to the Science Ball" might well be the
theme song of an Alpha Gam, who lost her Sigma Phi Delt friend
over it ... he asked her room-mate . . . and so room-mate has been
tops on his list ever since . . . even including his fraternity formal
.... print is all the news now, and Lora Lee is showing gay sensational style and colors ....
fi fi fi
Well, who would have thought it! ... A sergeant . . . and a
shy one at that . . . in fact he's so shy . . . he hasn't mustered ub
enough courage to ask his freshette to the C.O.T.C. Ball yet , . .
JtfaA?***"
The Rowing Club will hold their annual banquet ln the Brock Memorial
Dining Room Tuesday, March 19 at
6 p.m. Professor Brand will be the
guest speaker. All members, active
and otherwise, are requested to turn
out.
Vancouver Natural History society
will meet on Wednesday, March 20
ln the Botany lab of the Applied
Science building. Members will give
a display of natural history specimens, microscopies, and photographs
symbolizing the year's work. Meeting
starts at 8 p.m.
Mrs. Crelghton will lecture on "Mod
ern Literature Looks at Values" at a
supper in the Faculty Room of the
Caf, Friday at 0.40 p.m. Admission
SOc. This lecture is under the auspices of the joint 8.P.C. and S.C.M.
"Art and  Literature" group.
$1.00 will sand 300 Sweet Cope
or 1 lb. Old Virginia pipe tobacco to
Canadian* serving In United Kingdom
•nd France only.
Addreaa—"Sweet Capt"
P.O. Box 6000, Montreal, Que.
"Let your cares float away on a song."
"Accompanied by a Sweet Cap of course.'
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can b* smoked."
t
My Eyes Come First!
That's n resolution! If they go back on me,
I'm sunk—and I've got a whole life ahead of
me. Right now I don't know just what condition they're in—
Yes, I Certainly Must See My
OPTOMETRIST
For Hire: Publio Address System. I Lost: Small black psychology note
Reoorded music for dances. Reason- I book and Oerman text. Needed Unable rates. Apply to Bill MoCarter, I mediately. Please return to Mary
2338 Dunbar St., BAy. 0140R. I Lister or to Mr. Horn's offloe.
Now Playing
WHAT'S PLAYING IN DOWN TOWN THEATRES
FRED  A8TAIRE  and
ELEANOR   POWELL
in
"Broadway Melody
of 1940"
also
SHORT SUBJECTS
CAPITOL
MArlne 2634
JAMES   CAGNEY  and
HUMPHREY   BOOART
M
»>
Roaring: Twenties
SONJA   HENIE   and
ROBERT   CUMMINOS
'EVERYTHING HAPPENS
AT NIOHT'
STRAND
SEymour '6816
CHARLES LAUOHTON and
VIVIAN   LEIOH
In
"Sidewalks of
London"
ORPHEUM
SEymour 1900
HUMPHREY     BOOART   and
ROSEMARY   LANE
"Return of Dr. X"
also
MAY  ROBSON
"GRANNY OET YOUR
OUN"
DOMINION
SEymour 0060
Film Sooiety members note: There
will be a general meeting of all members Monday. Maroh IB, at 12.30 in
Arts 106.
Everett Ward will address the V.C.
U, today in Arts 200 at 12:40. Everyone   welcome.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 0 p.m.: Saturdays, 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Oraphlo Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
ALL YOUR
BOOK SUPPLIES
SOLD HERB
Vancouver Institute
Professor F. Malcolm Knapp, Acting Head of the Department of Forestry at the University, will be the
■speaker at the regular Saturday evening lecture of the Vancouver Institute. His subject will be "Some Aspects of Forestry ln British Columbia". President Mr. Justice A. M.
Manson will take the chair ln Arts
100 at 8.15.
Professor Knapp has been at the
University since >he organization of
the Department of Forestry in 1022.
His familiarity with hia subject will
make his address one of undoubted
interest   and   unquestioned   authority.
Mamooks Elect Officers
Mamooks elected Harry Schon-
wald president for the 1940-41 season,  succeeding  Bob Marshall.
Jack Caldwell is the new yell king,
replacing Frank Proud. He plans an
organized cheering section for the
-jtadlum next fall.
The Mamooks are now settled in
their new club room in the Brock
Building. Anyone wishing a sign
made has only to All out a form,
end leave lt In a basket In their
office. From that time on the Mamooks  take   care  of   lt.
During the present election campaigns, the Mamooks have made
more than 180 signs for all the candidates who asked for them. They
are  absolutely  non-partisan.
P*
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
I7.SK   OUR  BUDGET   PLAN
Seymour nt  Dunsmuir
^JIB!^
4k* 30 *y*aA4> . . .
TAILORED-TO-MEASURE CLOTHES THAT CLICK!
Now Showing: Tho Greatest
British Woolon Uno-up in
Our  History
t*-Y.
SO
TTS-C3-40
rip top
IAILORS
I'.st-u/fJ
199 W.  Hastings Street        - 637 Oranville Street ^isri
Also 711 Columbia St., New Westminster Friday, March 15, 1940
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
BEARS PLAY 'BIRDS AT STADIUM WEDNESDAY
L.S.I5.
BOB BONNER
Among policies which I would
heartily endorse ls that laid down by
former L.S.E. presidents of maximum
freedom for action and development
of clubs consistent with good publio
relations.
Further I propose:
1. Establishment of a men's organization to parallel "Phrateres".
2. Organization of the Musical, Dramatic and Law Societies with the
objective of ultimate absorption
into the curriculum.
3. Greater club publicity for better
freshman orientation and membership Increase.
There remains but to thank my
supporters and to pledge impartial
discharge of duty If elected.
ALF OARLSBN
I propose to raise L.S.E. to its former state of efficiency by:
1. Restoring club budgets to an ade
quate level;
2. Holding    regular    meetings    and
thus  securing  closer co-operation   between   the   major   and
minor executive ln accordance
with Its constitution.
In addition I intend to:
3. Secure outstanding  speakers and
artists who at present are not
brought to the University;
4. Sponsor   Faculty-Student   panels
discussions on affairs of interest;
0.   Reduce the cost of books through
block-buying.
A. J. NASH
I am prepared to carry out the
duties of President of L.S.E. to the
best of my ability and to strive for
continued co-operation between olubs
under the L.S.E. The restoration and
Inorease, in some oases, of the former
grants ls necessary for the efficient
working of the clubs. I have the interests of the Alma Mater Society at
heart, but especially the welfare of
the clubs under the L.S.E. Jurisdiction.
We
Specialize
In CAMPUS
Clothes
And Don't
forget Easter Is on
Mar.  20th
698 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
M.U.S.
OHARLBS PARKER
I pledge myself to:
1.   Draw up a balanced program for
social functions.
2    Encourage the fullest possible use
of Brock Building facilities.
3. Promote Faculty spirit and estab
lish interfaculty competition.
4. Fulfill   the  routine  duties  of  M.
U.8. in an efficient and conscientious manner.
0.   Cast  an  unbiassed   vote   on   all
council matters.
TODD TREMBLAY
The following ls a brief outline of
a few points that signify the trend
of my aotlons If I am elected to the
position of Men's Undergrad:
1. Establishment of permanent dates
for sooial events.
2. Adjustments In the Brock Memorial Building concerning the
checking of coats and allocation
of refreshments at dances.
3. Re-arrangement of the eligibility
rules enabling third and fourth
year sclencemen to run tor positions other than Junior  member.
4. Co-operation with the Council and
the students to give greater benefits to the majority of the students.
TREASURER
PETER MoTAVISH
In running for Treaaurer I advanoe the same general polloy as I
presented ln the presidential campaign.
1. I favour a bettering of university life for all studenU; longer noon
hours; more pass features; co-operative residences and greater use of
the Brook Building.
2. Regarding student finances I
would Insist on a balanced budget,
would oppose the use of Pass Fund
money for purposes other than Pass
benefits and would co-operate with
club presidents in the distribution
of club budgets.
J. M. CAMPBELL
My Policies:
1. Complete  spending   of   the   pass
system funds on pass functions
—I consider It unethical to act
otherwise with this money.
2. An   organized   effort   to   augment
A.M.S. funds by a money-making program for athletic functions. This to be effected by
establishment of a publicity
committee of campus representatives of the press and other
suitable student members.
AUSTIN DELANY
My  platform  has three main
planks:
1. To apply  consistent and efficient
business methods.
2. To  work   for  a  more  democratic
campus.
3. To apply myself to bring benefits
to the broadest section of the
student body.
Specifically, I advocate:
(a) A gradation of deficit repayment
to prevent  the  burden  falling
in any one year.
(b) Special  efforts  to  bring  endow
ments,   research   or   otherwise,
to the University,
tc) A sound, financial policy—a bal
anoed  budget.
Students I
.%*&■
to**
05*
ANDERSON   FURS
cost
LESS!
808 HOWE ST.
SEy. 0460
CANADA'S    FINEST   VIRGINIA   CIGARETTE
ARTHUR FOUKS
In the ensuing year lt ls Imperative
that the treasurer realize hla grave
responsibilities. A balanoed budget
and a sane financial polloy are these
responsibilities.
The fundamental points I propose
are:
1. Partial restoration of budgets.
2. More even distribution of pass
funds to Increase social, athletlo
and cultural activities.
3. Formation of a publicity bureau
for the ensuring of the financial
success of all student activities.
4. Co-operation with administration
for reduction of book prices.
0. Co-operation with all organizations  and Students' Council,
DONALD MoOILL
At   this   time,   the   Treasurer's   task
must be twofold:
1. Campus Unity-
Friendship and spirit may be promoted through a large, democratic fraternity, similar to the
women's Phrateres, with fees
not more than $3.00 per man
per session.
2. Financial-
Each student should realize a fuller return on his A.M.S. fee by:
more liberal administration of
club budgets, more inexpensive
social functions ln the Union
building, suoh as weekly dances,
mixers, etc., reduction ln A.
M.S. fees for students unable
to participate fully ln A.M.S.
AROHIB BAIN
Very briefly outlined, my platform
as oandldate for Treasurer of the
Alma Mater Sooiety Is as follows:
1. Fairer allocations to clubs—
especially to minor clubs.
2. More effective control of administrative expenses of the Alma
Mater Sooiety.
3. Setting up of a fund to ensure
that the Brook Memorial Building Is
kept In  good repair.
4. Insistence on club budgets being in on time.
0. A careful program of financial
control,
6. A general policy of conservative expansion, tempered by the faot
that war exists, and that student
needs are increasing.
JR. MEMBER
ORMIE HALL
I propose;
1. More    business-like    methods    of
handling University problems;
2. Greatest homecoming ln the his
tory of the school,
(a)  An attempt at making lt a second,   smaller-scaled,   of   course.
Rose Bowl.
3. Better Pep Meets:
(a) More music;  less mouthing.
4. Increased utilization of the Union
Building:
(a) Evening  use of building;
(b) More Informal socials; less overdone big affairs.
0.   Finally:   Firm stand against any
attempts of patronage or browbeating  by  any particular  organization ln the University,
(a) The University first.
Letters To Trie Editor     MARCH MEETINGS
CHARLES W. NASH
I have been asked to run for the
position of Junior Member to put to
use the experience gained by three
years exeoutive work on the campus.
I shall press for extended hours'* ln
the Brock Building that it may be
used to greater advantage by those
to whom it belongs. Through Homeoomlng I shall strive for closer cooperation between the Alumni and
the undergraduates. Above all, I ahall
work solely for the benefit of the
whole student body.
M.A. A.
JIM HARMER
In accepting the nomination for the
poaltlon of President of M.A.A.
for the second term. I pledge
myself to the following program:
1. A  further development of Maury
Van Vliet's plan for promoting
athletics in the Freshman class.
2. Enlarged   and   greater   publicized
Intra-mural program.
3. Development of  a separate pub
licity department to promote
university games in the public
Interests.
4. Sports on a paying  basis.    Revi
sion of the managerial system
and further development of
training club.
3. Increased intercollegiate competition in all sports. Oreater
stress on minor teams. Wholehearted co-operation with the
Council members.
John Garret, Esq.,
Editor-in-Chief,
The "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:
An article entitled "McOlll vs.
U.B.O." which appeared ln the February 23 Issue of the Ubyssey has
recently come to my attention. This
article, a summary of a similar one
which had previously been published
In the McOill Daily, dealt with my
views on McGiil University and U.
B. O. and a comparison of university
life.
In this article I mentioned that
McOlll University had, in my opinion, more dignity and tradition than
U.B.C, — a very natural conclusion
when one considers that McOill has
functioned as a University for approximately three times as long as
U.B.C.
I also mentioned that the McOlll
students seemed to take. their studies a little more seriously than those
at U.B.C, due probably to the fact
that extra-curricular activity does
not occupy their time and attention
to suoh a degree.
The above opinions, being favorable to McOill, were more or less
stressed ln the article ln the McOill
Dally and have been cited ln the
Ubyssey. I wish to point out, however, that they were but two of several statements I made. I showed the
"Daily" reporter a copy of the "Totem" and went on to explain how the
student government at B.O. received
far more support from the student
body and was a much more powerful
student assembly. Among other statements whloh did NOT appear ln the
McOlll Dally were several ln whloh
I pointed out the facts that the educational standard at U.B.C. was, In
the faculties which both Universities
have ln common, every bit aa high as
that of MoOill; that U.B.C. students
had, on their own Initiative, been Instrumental in supplying buildings
valued at $200,000 to the campus;
that, for a $13 Alma Mater fee at
U.B.C. the students received Just
about twice as many privileges as
they receive for a similar $20 fee at
McOlll and that, lastly, when it came
to campus appearance ln general, I
would place the campus of U.B.C.
against any other in Canada.
The McOill Daily, to my regret,
printed only the opinions most favorable to McOlll and I would like to
make it clear, that after my interview, the Dally reporter had heard so
many complimentary remarks about
UB.C. that I feared that I had been
unfair to McOlll.
Sincerely,
Stewart E. Jamieson.
Montreal, P.Q.,
March 0, 1940.
Lost:   Brown   pocketbook   ln  Library.
Eileen  Marchanton,  FAlr. 6174-R.
Rhodes Scholar
Tells of Oxford
In Wartime
Chances that Basil Robinson, 1040
U.B.C. Rhodes scholar will travel to
Oxford at the end ot this term, are
pretty slim aooording to a letter reoeived by Robinson from Jaok Davis,
1930 Rhodes soholar and former student oounoil treasurer.
Davis told of war-time England,
minimising blackouts and food problems.
"Blackouts aren't as bad as usually made out and food here ls good
and plentiful," Davis wrote from Oxford. "After the war, Europe will be
a traveller's paradise beoause of
money values."
Davis stated that servloes in English colleges were getting increasingly slacker as undergraduates went
into war training.
"War has removed most of the
undergraduates except freshmen so
a lot of colleges are used for other
purposes,"   he   noted.
BYRON STRAIGHT
As a candidate for Men's Athletic
Representative I offer the ability to
fulfill normal requirements of office,
plus a desire to:
1. Revive NEGLECTED intercollegiate basketball, hockey, rowing,
golf,  and  boxing.
2. Restore  slashed   sports   budgets.
3. Install policies of (a) pure recreation ln minor sports, (b) recreation plus profit in major sports.
4. Put interfaculty rivalry on competitive athletic  basis.
5. Reorganize branches of athletics
to suit all  faculties.
6. Take a liberal but co-operative
stand in the Men's Athletic Directorate.
7 Lift hockey to the status it deserves (and with profit).
Three functions of importance for
the latter part of March were announoed this week by Student Council.
Arthur Benjamin, well-known Vancouver musician, will present a piano
recital and lecture March 26 at noon
ln the Auditorium. The program will
be financed by the Pass System.
The annual meeting of the Alma
Mater Society will be held ln the
Auditorium March 29.
Elections will be staged by the
Graduating Olass on March 21.
Graduation Class
Elections March 21
The Graduation Class elections
will take place on Thursday, Maroh
21. Members of the Oraduatlng Claaa
please remember the date; your aupport Is expeoted.
The   International  Relations   Club
will meet at the home of Dean M. L.
Bollert, 1180 West 10th, on Wedneaday evening, Maroh 20. Professor
H. F. Angus will speak on "Problems
of the Pacific" Prospective new
members are Invited to attend.
l"\/SSeS t*u*d ***** '*• '<"""' m-ondrom* fair and beguiling.
H* fiU*d hi* pip* with Plcobac and pa***d temptation smiling.
• This version cannot be verified. But may student, by pleasurable research, can verify th*
fact that Plcobac gives wonderful satisfaction
at s remarkably low price. It's the pick of
Canada's Burley crop and always s mild, cool,
sweat smoke — • far mon agreeable bar
•gainst distraction than Ulysses' trick of stopping the ears!
HANDy MAL-TMHT POUCH • lie
VW.B. "LOK.TOP" TIN   .  60s
^^^^ a/so packmd In  Pockmt Tins
Plcobac
It DOES taste sood in a pipe)
a
11 r _ ::~. l r __ ~ i r j r
U^U^AlAAVAATi
GIVE YOUTH
A CHANCE
YOUTH In Canada WANTS to do Its part.  Dr. Manion
believes ln giving It a chance I
Says Dr. Manion:—"If elected, I will appoint a Minister of Youth to head a department, the efforts and energies of which will be devoted exclusively to the aolution of
the problems of Canadian youth."
what it will do • • •
—It will employ the youth of Canada In a voluntary effort
to develop, conserve and re-establish our most productive national resources, Including a nation-wide,
long-range plan of reforestation to assure to Canada
a continuing supply of timber and pulpwood.
—It will extend our present system of vocational training
In all provinces, to ensure skilled craftsmen and technicians for the big Job facing Canada tomorrow.
—lt will Inaugurate farm training courses In modern scientific farming; It will expand the Dominion-Provincial
Youth Training Scheme, to allow re-oondltlonlng of
unemployed youth who have been rejected for active
servloe.
AND BECAUSE YOUTH MUST STEP INTO THE CONTROLS OF THE INDUSTRY OF TOMORROW, IT CONTEMPLATES THE VASTLY EXPANDING HORIZON
OF THE NEW, SCIENTIFIC INDUSTRY .... AVIATION, PLASTICS, METALLURGY, MODERN HOME
CONSTRUCTION,   ARCHITECTURE  .   .   .
DEVELOP CANADA TODAY
FOR  YOUTH  TOMORROW
Vote
NATIONAL
CONSERVATIVE M. A. A. Election Speeches
Friday, Ap. Sc. 100
Turn Out and Listen
Vote for M.A.A. Tuesday
i
Don't Vote Fraternity
Vote For Ability
Pour
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 15, 1940
CAGERS DEFAULT TO ALBERNI
Playoff Dates
Oath With
Lectures
Smiles changed to disconsolate
•cowls In the Senior B cage camp
thla week when it was announced
that the proposed trip to Port Albernl for the Provincial Senior B
finals was called off, and the Varsity
were forced to default to the Island
five beoause of the impossibility of
reaching a compromise on the playoff dates.
Dr. Frank Dickson, Faculty Representative on the Men's Athletlo Directorate, stated that all possible conciliations had been offered the Albernl team in an effort to change the
scheduled oonteat* from mid-week to
week-end dates, but that the foresters had refused even a proffered two-
game aeries at V.A.C. with a $100
guarantee.
SAD BLOW
The games were originally scheduled for March 10 and 10 at Albernl
on a two-game, total point plan but,
Dr. Dickson stated, these had been
changed to the 13th and 14th without
even consulting the Varsity officials.
The default came as a great blow
to bee net squad who were all primed
to make hoopla history on the Oampua by being the first Varsity Senior
B team to cop provincial honors.
Some men are born meek:
get married.
others
fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
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000  SEYMOUR  STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
California™, Here They Come;
Golden Bear Meets Thunderbird
on Stadium Turf Wednesday
JUMPING JACK
All primed to let one go at the Albernl net, Is Senior "B" star Harvey
Rees, flashy forward of the collegiate
squad. Rees has been a consistent
scorer for the Bees along with such
other notables as Jack Wyard, Art
Barton, and Demetrle Elefthery. And
needless to say, that faraway look has
been chased off his faoe by the news
that the Albernl games have been
called off.   Darn tbat dream.
From south of the border will come a hooping horde of Oolden
Bears next week In search of Thunderbird blood and perhaps a hold
of the World Cup whioh Varsity now holds. The Oolden Beara will
be sporting the colourful uniforms of the University of California,
and will tackle the Senior English rugger squad at the Stadium next
Wednesday In tbe annual International clash.
A formidable gang of Americans will amass on the turf next week,
and Included In the U. of C. roster will be several first string American
grid-iron stars who have taken to th> handling oode to escape from
the boring spring training sohedule of the gridders.
Chief problem of the local sorumsters Is the matter of Injuries,
with manager Charlie Long burning midnight oil with co-coaches
Stewart and Van Vllet, pouring over revamped line-ups.
NEW BLOOD
It is possible that Todd Trembley who has been out all year after
starring on last year's squad may turn out again, especially slnoe he
turned in suoh a smooth performance last Saturday against ex-Britannia. And, too, Basil Robinson, diminutive councillor, who deserted
rugby this year ln favour of soccer, may pinoh-hlt for Bert Hoskins
In the fullback spot. Hoskins has been bothered with water on the
knee, and may. skip Wednesday's tilt.
The aorum, aa always tbls year, will remain almost Intact,
with few changes contemplated. With Maury Van Vllet handling the training of the team, condition will be the chief factor
In the Thunderbird training grind.
Next Wednesday, then, at |the Stadium, with the price of two
bits (26c) plus a glimpse at your Student Pass levied against undergrads. Be there, and see the game of the year: the one and only
International Interoolleglate rugby game.
MURAL-GO-ROUND
Intramural basketball schedule for
the next week has Arts 42 playing
the Commerce class on Friday. The
softball tournament which Is to be
a sudden-death affair will be run off
shortly with a olass meeting scheduled for Monday.
A rope climbing event with each
class entering a 0-man team will be
held on Thursday, with a tug-of-war
saw-off slated for the Stadium next
Tuesday.
Last Friday, Arts 41 beat So. 41 ln
a mural cage battle that saw Jack
Ross, former Senior hoopster break
away for 20 points for the losers,
with Barton, Soott, and Hammond
shining for the winning Juniors.
Williams Shines As Track
Stars Swamp Prepsters
In Initial Meet
One bright stor shone in the tracksters' heaven after Wednesday's track meet between Varsity and an Inter-High School
team. His name is Campbell Williams, a speedboller who clicked
off wins in the hundred, fifty, and sparked the relay squad to a
win. Other touted features failed to materialise as L-ionel Fournier,
high and broad jumper de luxe, missed the meet owing to sickness.
Call ln at the
VARSITY
BOOKSHOP
A large selection of University
Books on hand.
4521 W. 10th Ave.
(Where the bus stops)
Williams was far and above tbe
class of sprinters In Wednesday's
show, and although the times he
turned In for the two solo events
were nothing to rave about, the kid
from Red Gap showed his heels to
the field, taking the hundred In 10.3
.seconds, and the short fifty-yard
dash ln 0.4 seconds, fair time considering the weather, which was
gusty  with  threatened  showers.
SURPRISE  STU
Actually the best competitive raoe
of the day was the 440, when Doug
Alexander oame from behind rounding the last turn to nose out Wilf
Pendray in a driving finish. Time
for the event was 03.4 seconds, way
short of the reoord. Surprise of thla
event was the running of freshman
Stu Madden who took a commanding lead at the flrst bend and held
lt, setting a fast clip, but fading before the drive of Alexander.
Madden wilted before the last turn
blast, but kept on coming to stumble
in a nice third, with Pendray inobes
ahead of him.
Somewhat a surprise was the
poor showing of Ted Scott ln tbe
mile event. Conceded by many aa
a shoo-in, the bespectacled theolog
ran far behind his usual time, allowing Bill Swinton, flashy frosh,
to grab a big lead and hold It.
Accustomed to coming trom behind, Scott waa surprised to find
that Swinton more than met bis
last half drive, and wound up a
very poor third. Bob Davidson was
sandwiched between Swinton and
Scott, the time being 4.-S..4.
Co*Ed Sports
—By Oerry Armstrong
AFTER THE SHOW . . .
Visit Vancouver's Most Beautiful Cafe
CHRIS'S ORILL
BELOW THE COMMODORE
After-Theatre Teas Fascinating Teacup Reading
VARSITY DAIRY LUNCH
Trimble at Tenth
OREETINOS! GALS AND BOYS OF SPRING SESSION 1
"GO OET 'EM VARSITV"
W.A.A. Prexy Rosemary Collins
teveals that In its flrst year the
Women's Athletic Directorate, whloh
operates along the lines of the
Men's Directorate, has proven surprisingly  successful.
The women, like the men, have
found that the Athletlo Exeoutive
becomes superfluous under a properly functioning Directorate. Accordingly, they are drawing up an amendment to the W.A.A. constitution
to do away with the members on the
Executive whose work overlaps with
that of the Directorate. This move
Is logical, as the same control has
never existed in the Executive as In
the Directorate.
Therefore a meeting of the
Women's Athletlo Association will
be held In Arts 100 at 12)80, Thuraday, Maroh 91, where the proposed
amendments will be put to a vote.
AU women Interested In athletloe
are asked to be present.
A double delight
PIN 1ST ROASTID PILBIRTS
J IRS BY MILK CHOCOLATI
Snjoif a bar dally
THE   BEST MILK  CHOCOLATE  MADE
_-__LAAAAAAAAAAj_iAAAAAi_b4_h4_kAi_kAi   ■
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
Tenth and Blanca
"AT THB GATES"
Our Servloe Means Happy
Motoring"
**4>4-4>4>4>4-*4-4>4>4*4>+4>4>+4>4-*+4-*«
H.  JESSIE  HOW,  B_%.
Publio Stenographer
44S1 Wee* loth Ave.
assays aad Theses **n~*a
♦♦4m>*4*«h**+****4**+**+*+*4-*
'VrV%SFWWSrVV_VVSftrVWrt%SVWd%%
MART KENNEY and His Western
Oentlemen . . . available for private
engagements.
HOTEL
VANCOUVER
fttf*rVWW%MiWWSMrVrV_WWV
BADMINTON CLUB
whloh cannot use the Oym on Monday, March 18, will hold a general
meeting next Thursday to elect the
new officers.
Don't be deceived by appearances.
A girl may have dreamy eyes and
•till be very wide awake..
A Different Afire
It's a truly enjoyable experience to attend a performance of "Pride and Prejudice."
To be carried back into the atmosphere of a century and a
half ago. But when the play
Is over there's real satisfaction
in knowing that your car is
waiting with a tank full of
Home Oas. You're sure of
a quick start, fast pick-up and
smooth driving.
HOME OIL
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The Independent 100%
B. C. Company
STUDENTS•TEAOHERS
CANADIAN
RAILWAYS
Announce
REDUOED
Easter Fares
Single Fare and One-Quarter for Round Trip
First Class Tourist, and Coach
Minimum Fare 25c
TICKETS ON SALE
MAR. 7 TO MAR. 27
Returning — leave destination
up   to   and   including   April   0.
' Certificate entitling you
_ to these special fares
j. may be obtained from
" your Principal or Reg-
{Istrar.
ASK ANY RAILWAY
TICKET AOENT

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