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The Ubyssey Mar 22, 1923

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Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume V.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 22, 1923
No. 20
MAINLAND
CUP NOW
VARSITY'S
In Hard-fought Game Soccer Men
Triumph Over Veterans and
Secure Championship
(By "The Soccerite.")
Playing desperately at all stages of
the game, Varsity defeated Veterans
at Athletic Park last Saturday, 1-0,
and by so doing won the Mainland
Cup, and the right to meet the Island
teams for the championship of British
Columbia.
The fact that there was so much at
stake, deterred the players of both
sides from taking chances, and as a
result a brand of football lacking perhaps the brilliance of other First Division games was served up. Even
so, the game was full of thrills and
the record crowd of more than 4,000
fans had reason for much enthusiosm.
Veterans Play Strong Game.
The Veterans had most of the afternoon's play and were dangerous at all
times. It was only the excellent defense of Mosher, Crute and Baker that
kept the Soldiers from scoring. For-
gie, Kenny, Furguson and Kerr often
looked like goal-getters but the Collegians' backjdivision was impregnable.
Varsity won the toss and elected to
play against the sun. From the
whistle the Soldiers pressed and For-
gie tested Mosher with a terrific shot.
The Collegian goalie saved easily and
cleared well.
The Students now forced the play.
McLeod obtained the ball but was
fouled by Smith, and the two almost
came to blows. Referee Alan gave a
face-kick against McLeod, and Forgie
obtained the ball, passing to Furguson. The forward however, shot high
and the ball cleared the cross-bar.
Phillips now broke into the limelight by a rush and a shot from forty
yards out. It was a trifle high but
(Continued on Page 2.)
SCIENCE WINS
DEBATING SHIELD
Inter-faculty debating honors go to
the representatives of the Faculty of
Applied Science, Percy Barr and A. H.
Finlay, who defeated the representatives of Agriculture in a debate: "Resolved, that the United States is justified in refraining from intervention
in European affairs." A. Zoond and
Lisle Atkinson were the speakers for
Agriculture.
This debate was the last of a series
of debates arranged under the auspices of the Men's Literary Society,
and by their victory the Science men
come into possession of the Debating
Shield offered for annual competition
by the Men's Lit.
Officers for next year were elected
as follows: Honorary President, Prof.
H. F. Angus; President, Mr. Lome
Morgan; Vice-President, Mr.T. Brown;
Secretary-Treasurer, J.  C. Wilcox.
FATE OF
CUP IS IN
BALANCE
McKechnie Battle Draws to Close
with Prospect of an
Exciting Tussle
Mr.°.WILBUR G.  GRANT
A.T.C.M.  Conductor of the
Musical Society
H. TURPIN
IS ELECTED
SECRETARY
Successful Candidite Brings
Experience to her Office
From the four candidates nominated for Secretary of the Students'
Council, Miss Helen Turpin, Arts '24,
was elected by a plurality of 34 votes.
Helen Turpin matriculated from the
King Eldward High School in 1920.
Since entering the University she has
taken a keen interest in all student
activities. In her Freshman year she
was a member of her class executive,
and a "Ubyssey" reporter. During the
1922-1923 session she has not only
held the responsible position of Secretary of the Literary and Scientific
Department, but also that of Exchange
Editor on the "Ubyssey." The wide
and varied interest which Miss Turpin has shown in University affairs is
evidenced by her membership in the
Theta Epsilon Sorority, and the Letters  Club.
Miss Turpin possesses an attractive
personality, which, with her proven
efficiency, will enable her to perform
her new duties with satisfaction to
all.
The McKechnie series games to be
played on Saturday will decide definitely whether a play-off will be
necessary to settle the fate of the cup.
Vancouver and Varsity are at present neck and neck, with six victories
and one defeat to the credit of each
team. Vancouver plays Cowichan on
the Island and Varsity meets Nanaimo at Brockton Point. A victory for
Varsity in Saturday's game is therefore essential as it is extremely unlikely that the "Rep" team will fail
to defeat Cowichan.
Nanaimo has been improving steadily since the beginning of the season
and in the last game with Vancouver
held the Mainlanders to a 3-0 score
until half-time, though Vancouver were
able to obtain three more tries in the
second part of the match. Whatever
the result, therefore, Varsity's game
on Saturday should provide a much
closer match than the last encounters
with Nanaimo or Victoria.
SIR HENRY'S
SUBJECT IS
PATRIOTISM
Noted    Englishman    Addresses
Large Meeting and Reads
from His Own Poems
A NEAR-CHAMPION
To Varsity almost went the honor
Of possessing the champion scorer in
the City Basketball League. By the
narrow margin of one point, Les
Bickle, the flashy, hard-working captain of the Varsity Senior A squad,
lost out to Harry Johnson of the Native Sons. With the total of 72
points which he collected during the
season, he gave the champion a great
race for honors.
MUSICAL
CONCERT
ON FRIDAY
Glee Clubs and Orchestra Are
Well Prepared
Sir Henry Newbolt, poet and educationalist of international repute, was
greeted by audiences that taxed the
capacity of the Auditorium, when he
addressed the students and faculty on
Thursday of last week and on Monday last. On Thursday the subject
of Sir Henry's lecture was "Patriotism and Poetry," while on Monday he
delighted the audience by reading a
number of his poems.
British patriotism, said Sir Henry
in his first address, was based upon
three elements, the love of games
which extended even to that rough
game called war; love of the native
soil, and admiration for the men who
were responsible for the great achievements of the nation. The speaker
eulogized the fighting qualities of the
British race and paid a tribute to the
men who had fought so splendidly
during the late war, particularly several of the leaders such as Beatty, Jel-
licoe and Haig. So fruitful a theme
as patriotism had proved an inspiration to all the great British poets,
who had expressed their emotions at
one time or another, in the form of
so-called patriotic verse.
Monday's Address.
On Monday the distinguished visitor
read a number of his poems with appropriate feeling, yet with a reticence
and modesty that proclaimed the cultured Englishman. "Play up, play up
(Continued on Page 6)
To-morrow evening, Friday, March
23, in the ball-room of the Hotel Vancouver, the Musical Society, with Mr.
Wilbur G. Grant, A.T.C.M., as Conductor, will give its annual Spring Concert.
About a hundred voices will sing
in the chorus and there will be twenty
members in the orchestra. Choruses
and selections of variety and attractiveness have been prepared by the
Glee Clubs and Orchestra. The final
practices have been going very well
and everything points to a successful
evening.
The assisting artists, Miss Lillian
Wilson and Mr. Holroyd Paull, need
no introduction, both being well and
favorably known. Miss Isabel Campbell will act as accompanist for them.
A fact of which the Musical Society
may be justly proud is that Miss Nellie
Harrison, our own student pianist, will
appear with these artists. Miss Harrison, a pupil of Mr. Tripp, has already
been heard in recital and won very
favorable comment on her playing.
A section of seats has been reserved for University students, tickets for
which may be secured at the reduced
rate of fifty cents. These seats are
in a desirable position, about midway
in the hall.
NEW APPOINTMENTS
ARE ANNOUNCED
SENIOR   EDITOR.
Miss Lillian Cowdell has been appointed Senior Editor of the "Ubyssey" for the next session.
Miss Cowdell brings to her new position a wealth of experience in college journalism. During her Sophomore year and again this year, she
has held positions of responsibility
on the Publications Board. Her wtak
as an Associate Editor of the "Ubyssey," and as Editor of the Annual this
year mark the outstanding ability and
the eminent fitness of the choice of
Miss Cowdell for the position which,
she will hold during the coming session.
BUSINESS  MANAGER.
The responsible position of Business Manager of the "Ubyssey" has
been filled by the appointment of Mr.
H. O. Arkley. Mr. Arkley has been
connected with the business side of
the Publications Board where he has
acquired the useful experience which
is the necessary preface to this position. !■"'*' \ !■?■■ .^■'i-- ^';  ■■■,i!"
THE    UBYSSEY
March 22nd, 1923
THE VARSITY
CLOTHES SHOP
Spring Opening
15th, 16th, 17th of
March
Fashion Craft
Good Clothes for
Men
Thos. Fosler & Co.
LIMITED
514  Granville   St.
ONE   STORE   ONLY
Easter Suits
First lot of Spring Suits and
Overcoats just arrived and they
certainly are not very hard to
look at. The prices are moderate and the style—-well just come
in and slip one on.
Don't forget your Easter Hat.
□
Turpin Bros., Ltd.
Men's  Outfitters
629   Granville St.
Or ot Your
Grocet-'«"^
^DISTINCTIVE
Engraved Calling Cards
Dance Invitations
Programmes
Place Cards
n
J. W. Gehrke Co.
LTD.
Eaamwi. Priaten, Society Stanonen
Ul SEYMOUR STREET
(A£oina« Hudmi'iBar)
"Domtaanee throu&rh Bxahuiv
**********«^**«*«*»*«**««*
The Week's Events
Thursday—Vancouver Institute Lecture: "Mining Experiences in Many
Lands,"   Mr.   Nichol.
Friday—Musical Society Spring Concert;   Hotel  Vancouver,  8.15  p.m.
Saturday — Varsity vs. Nanaimo;
Brockton Point, 3  p.m.
Soccer. 1st Div. Varsity vs. Kitsilano, Athletic Park, 2.45. 3rd
Div. Varsity vs. McGibbon-Hodg-
son, Clarke Park, Commercial Dr.
and 15th, 2.30.
Tuesday—Letters Club, at the home
of H. C. Shaw, 1053 Nicola St.,
8  p.m.
Wednesday—Lecture on "Choice of a
Profession," J. Muirhead.
"Life  and  Work  of the  Electrical
Engineer."
Women's Lit., Auditorium, 3.15.
Election of officers.
Thursday—Vancouver   Institute,   General Meeting.
"David Thompson," Professor Sage.
~-•-•*-~'*-*-*■*-*■ **■*•*■*-***-*■**■**• *-<"L*
NANAIMO WELCOMES
PLAYERS' CLUB
The cast of the Spring Play, "You
Never Can Tell," was made welcome
in Nanaimo last Friday on the occasion of the presentation of the play
in that city.
In the afternoon they were entertained at a delightful tea given by
Mrs. Berkley at her home at Departure Bay. Miss Alfreda Berkley was
formerly a member of the Club, and
her performance in "Green Stockings"
will be well remembered.
After the performance of "You
Never Can Tell," which took place at
St. John's Ambulance Hall, the cast
were guests of honour at an enjoyable supper given by the Bastion Chapter, I. O. D. E.
GOVERNOR'S CUP
COMPETITION STRONG
There has been nothing in class
competition that has changed the
standing of the various years in the
Governor's Cup race, during the last
week.
Wednesday saw the track meet run
off, but the results will be tabulated
too late for publication in this week's
"Ubyssey." With two classes tied for
first place, and two more tied for second place, and with Agriculture in
third place with but two points to
make up, the race is anyone's until
the final  event is  decided.
This year's competition is one of
the closest ever run off at the University, and has brought to light much
latent athletic talent. It is unfortunate that the inclement weather that
has occurred during the season has
prevented events being run off as
quickly as would have been wished.
Even so, those in charge are to be
congratulated upon the way in which
they have handled a very trying schedule.
During the week a Rugby game between Sc. '25 and Sc. '23 leaders in
the race for the Governor's Cup, was
staged, but left the series as undecided as ever, the game being drawn 3—3.
Both teams played hard and a good
brand of Rugby was served. Sc. '25
pressed hard in the first half; hut were
slightly outplayed in the second, when
Sc.  '23  come to life.
Kant
By   Our   Neo-Post-Hegelian
Metaphysician
Kant
Under a big umbrella,
Walking about
Like an ordinary prof.,
But his mind is out
On truly transcendental ground,
While little imperatives
Chase around,
Where reason is pure
And men  are free
And of a priori
Pedigree.
The green umbrella
A trifle low,
At the turn of the path
He stubs his toe—
Crash!    The Kantian head
(On a post of mere empirical red)
And he's  carried  away,
Like a sack to his door
As the man
Who was drunk
The night before.
MAINLAND CUP
(Continued from Page 1)
caused Robinson to jump to clear.
The Veterans came back strongly, but
the interval found both teams on even
terms.
Varsity Hits Stride.
The second half found the students
defending the west goal and the sun
behind them. In spite of this disadvantage the Vets, played a determined game and forced the going. Crute
was forced to clear and in so doing,
conceded a corner. Irvine fouled and
the resulting free kick relieved the
situation. Varsity pressed, and found
themselves before an open goal but
the referee called for an offside.
The Vets, once more pressed. Baker
cleared strongly and Ternan obtained
the ball, with no one to beat but
Robinson. He misjudged his kick and
the ball went into the air. Lundie put
his head to it and put the leather over
the  cross-bar.
The Soldiers again became dangerous. Ferguson centered to Kenny, and
the forward shot hard. Mosher picked the ball out of the air and threw
it into p!<»3'. Time and again Mosher
was tested, but he played coolly and
brilliantly, and stopped impossible
shots with ease.
Varsity pressed now, with some five
minutes to go. Cameron shot from
the wing and the ball hit the cross-bar
and dropped before the goal. Lundie
was there and headed the ball past
Robinson for the winning counter—
the anly one of the game.
With but a minute to go Lundie
again brought the fans to their feet,
when he crashed the ball towards the
corner of the net. Robinson dived for
the sphere and succeeded in putting it
outside the post. Play had just commenced from the resulting corner,
when the whistle ended the game. The
victorious team was photographed and
presented with the Bowser Trophy—
the Mainland Cup—by Mayor Tisdall.
The Teams.
For the Veterans, Forgie was undoubtedly the best man, Furguson
and Kenny played brilliantly, and
Kerr needed constant watching.
The Collegians all played hard. Cameron, Phillips, Mosher, Baker, and
Crute all scintillated. Mosher perhaps was outstanding. His performance Saturday places him among the
foremost goalies in the province.
Allan handled a difficult game well,
and missed little. His work satisfied
both players  and  spectators.
THE TEAMS—Varsity: Mosher,
Crute, Baker, Cant, Phillips, Say,
Cameron, McLeod, Lundie, Jackson,
Ternan.
Veterans:....Robinson, Murray, Smith,
Irvine, Roberts, O'Donnell, Kerr,
Wylie, Forgie, Kenny, Furguson.
Students Loose Leaf Books
and Supplies
Drawing Sets,  etc.
THE VANCOUVER
STATIONERS, LTD.
Booksellers,   Stationers  and
' Printers
Sey. 5119 683 GranvilU St
!L"
' [          Chocolates
1       t" Home-made
|       r      Candy
ft Ice Cream and
\      (J      all  Fountain
{•
t^
_       Drinks.
R   (Afternoon
i      ■■      Teas)
;K0l
[TV
We   will   be
pleased to give
^WW
^M\ ]
special      rates
for    private
parties, special
V  -N.   "^^
classes, etc.
Vancouver's Young Men's
Store
Stylish Young
Men's Suits
A very large assortment of
Young Men's Suits just placed in stock comprising all
that is newest and up to date
in Young Men's Clothes.
Clubb & Stewart
Ltd.
623 Granville St
309 Hastings St. W.
THE GREAT-WEST
Life Assurance Co.
Head Office, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Result of Policy in Vancouver
A gentleman connected with
the Bank o' Commerce in Vancouver, on Sept. 1st, 1908, had a
20 Payment Life policy issued
to him by The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
The quinquennial dividends
were accumulated to lessen the
number of payments.
On Sept. 1st, 1922, fourteen
years from the date of the policy-
it was fully paid up, and he received in cash $20.65.
It was really a 14 Payment
Life.
He will receive dividends on
this paid up policy as long as lie
lives.
640 Hastings Street West
Vancouver Branch Office TTST?
March 22nd. 19-23
THE    UBYSSEY
3
J. W. Foster
Limited
Society   Brand   Clothes
Shop
New Location
557 Granville St.
Near Drysdale's
See the
New Models
And First  Quality Fabrics
Prices $30.00 to $50.00
Also
Fit-Reform   Wardrobe
345 Hastings Street, West
Ajfter You Graduate
Remember
Mutual Life of Canada
Est. 1869
Strictly Canadian
Purely Mutual
Annual Dividends
Reducing Premiums.
For Full Information Apply
WILLIAM J. TWISS
Manager
402 Pender St.  West
Vancouver, B. C.
Get a
YARSITY PENNANT
For the
FOOTBALL   MATCHES
"We have them in stock
SHAW & McGILL, LTD.
SPORTING GOODS
658  Robson  8t.
8ervlce   Bldg.,  4   Doors   East  of
Granville  St.
The Saver
It doesn't take a master of
mathematics to "figger" that
$700 a month off the rent of
a shop will reduce the cost
of doing business.
Practical demonstrations
are going on now at 1020.
For instance a sports coat
that sells everywhere at $6.00
is $4.50. The $9.00 grade is
$7.50 and 25c fishing spinners
are 20c.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
Wholesale and Retail
1020 Graville St.
Xjook  It   Up   NOW
'badminton championship
PLAYED
The   Varsity   Badminton   champion-
■ ships were decided last Monday even-
■ ing at the K. E. gym. after some very
spirited tournament play. The following are the champions for the year:
Men's singles, O. Woodman; women's
singles, Gladys Weld; mixed doubles,
Miss Weld and H. Cantelon; women's
doubles, Gladys Weld and Helen
Kloepfer; men's doubles, O. Woodman
and Bee cher Weld.
Men's  Singles.
O. Woodman beat G. Kerr, 15-8, 15-
13; H. Cantelon beat Craig, 15-1, 15-
10; beat W. Argue, 18-15, 15-5, 18-14;
B. Weld beat H. Offord, 15-5, 15-0; O.
Marrion beat Schaffer, 15-8, 15-6; O.
Marrion beat O. Marrion, 15-4, 15-11;
beat B. Weld, 17-15, 4-15, 15-11 (semifinal) ; O. Woodman beat H. Cantelon,
15-9, 15-1 (semi-final); O. Woodman
beat F. Marrion, 15-9, 15-5  (final).
Women's Singles.
Miss Weld beat Miss Allan, 11-1, 11-
A ; beat Miss Caspell, 11-1, 11-3 (semifinal); Miss Caspell beat Miss King,'
11-6, 11-2; Miss Archibald beat Miss
Haines, 11-5, 6-11, 11-5; beat Miss Lewis, 11-5, 11-2 (semi-final); Miss Weld
beat Miss Archibald, 11-2, 11-0  (final).
Mixed   Doubles.
Miss Russell and O. Woodman beat
Miss Haines and W. Argue, 15-5, 15-
7 (semi-final); Miss Weld and H. Cantelon beat Miss Russell and O. Woodman,  15-8,  8-15,  15-6   (final).
Women's   Doubles.
Miss Archibald and Miss Caspell
beat Miss Haines and Miss Lewis, 15-
4, 15-2 (semi-final) ; Miss Weld and
Miss Kloepfer beat Miss Russell and
Miss Tatlow, 15-7, 15-8 (semi-finals);
Miss Weld and Miss Kloepfer beat Miss
Archibald and Miss Lewis, 15-12,
15-9.
Men's   Doubles.
O. Woodman and B. Weld beat H.
Cantelon    and   H.   Offord,   15-12,   15-1
(final).
Good   Badminton   Played.
All games were run off without a hitch
and the tournament committee are to
be congratulated for their work in
this connection. Good Badminton was
on tap throughout the whole tournament, and many close contests were
featured. In the ladies' doubles, Miss
Weld and Miss Kloepfer, and Miss Russell and Miss Tatlow played a close
game. The finals also in the ladies'
doubles were productive of close
play. Another hard fought contest
was the game between W. Argue and
H. Cantelon in the second round of
the men's singles, which went to the
latter after three gruelling sets of the
hardest fought and closest play of the
tournament.
The tournament on the whole was a
huge success, and judging from the
standard of the Badminton displayed.
Varsity lias every reason to look forward to the time when representatives will be entered in a regular
league.
TRACK   ANNOUNCEMENT.
There is a possibility that the TJ.
B. C. Track Club will compete with
the Washington Freshmen next month.
Track men are advised to keep in condition for the event.
PENTATHELON EVENTS
RUN OFF
The compulsory four events of the
All-Around Pentathelon Track Championship were run off last Friday afternoon at Brockton Point. The four
events were the shot put, broad jump,
220 yards, and the mile, the fifth
event being optional on the part of
the competitor. Cliffe Mathers of Sc.
'23 and Hughie Russell tied for first
place with nine points each in the
above four events. Les Buckley of
Agriculture was one point behind, and
Doug. Rae of Sc. '23 fourth, with 12
points, the winner being the one with
the  smallest  total  of points.
As the totals of the various men indicate, the competition was exceedingly close, the issue being in doubt
right up to the last event, the mile,
which was won by Buckley. Mathers
by coming second tied his count with
that of Russell, and as both these men
are practically sure of grabbing a first
place in their optional event, at the
time of writing it looks as though
Russell and Mathers will each have
a total of ten points after yesterday's
meet. Russell is practically certain
of the high jump, and Mathers of the
discus.
The dope was upset in the Pentathelon 220 yards in which Mathers,
who had grabbed two firsts in the shot
and the jump, came last in this event,
being nosed out by both Buckley and
Rae, whilst Russell, by coming first,
obtained a much needed point lead
over the Science man.
The results of the events were as
follows: —
Shot Put—Mathers, Rae, Buckley,
Russell.
Broad Jump — Mathers, Russell,
Buckley, Rae.
220 Yards—Russell, Rae, Buckley,
Mathers.
1 Mile—Buckley, Mathers, Russell,
Rae.
The Eliminations.
The outstanding event of the eliminations for the track meet was the exhibition jump of Hughie Russell. Russell cleared the bar at 5 ft. 6% in.,
creating a Varsity record, which future contenders will have to do some
tall jumping to surpass. The record
is one inch above the Canadian intercollegiate record.
WANT   A   JOB?
At the next meeting of the Engineering Discussion Club on Tuesday
noon, addresses will be given on where
and how to get work for the summer.
These speeches will be given by
those who have worked at different
places in the province, such as the
mines, canneries, lumber camps, surveys, etc. They will tell you where
to apply for a job, what the work will
consist of, experience required, and
what your chances for employment
are.
This meeting will be an open one,
held in the Physics Building. Everybody is welcome, so breeze in and
get a line on your summer job.
Professor — The most wonderful
men in the world come from England,
and they don't need to prove it.
Student-^No, they admit it.
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and   Bicycle
Dealer
829 Pender St W.
In Gloves
Gauntlets are the  Fashion
Chamoisette Gauntlets with
all-around wrist strap; beaver,
grey and mode color, at $1.25
pair.
Novelty Chamoisette Gauntlets, grey, beaver, mode and cinnamon—At $1.75 a pair.
12-Button length Chamoisette
Gloves, tan and grey—At $1.75.
Novelty Silk Gauntlets—$2.50,
$2.75 and $3.50 a pair.
Kid Gauntlets witli wrist strap
and dome, all sizes in brown—At
special, $2.50 pair.
-frMvflfgP'
575  Granvlllo   8t.
SEYMOUR   3540
JOG&Cr&GMD
printing
Invitations
Dance   Programs
School Annuals
Magazines
Lionel Ward # Co. Ltd.
PRINTERS
Phone Sey. 195
318 Homer St.     :    Vancouver, B.C.
BROADWAY TAXI
D.   A.   RITCHIE
Res, Bay. 2884-Y
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THE    UBYSSEY
March 2'2nd,  1923
(Member Pacific  lafcer-Collejiste Preu
Association)
Issued   every   Thursday   by   the   Publications
Board  of the University of  British Columbia.
For  advertising   rates,   apply  Advertising
Manager.
Sir Henry's address may have expressed 1923 English feeling, but we
are not in touch with it. We recognize our lack of sympathy, but it is
unavoidable—arising as it does from
our divergence from that point of view
which Sir Henry took for granted.
EDITORIAL   STAFF:
Kditor-in-Chief H. M. Cassidy
Senior  Editor A.  G.   Bruun
Associate Editors Miss P. I.  Mackay
C. C. Upshall
Eric.  W.   Jackson
Feature   Editor Cliff   Dowling
Literary  Editor Miss  Lucy  Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Helen Turpiu
Sporting  Editor H.  B.  Cantelon
Chief Reporter A. A. Drennan
Feature Writers J. C. Kelson
RBPORTORIAL   STAFF:
k A. McLachUn.   Eve   Eveleigh,       K.   Schell,
Jean Faulkner, Grace Hope
L.    Buckley,    H.     B.    Ooult, H. E. F. Olark
A. Hugo Ray.
BUSINESS   STAFF:
Business Manager  C. S.  Evans
Assist.   Business   Manager G.   F.   Hagelstein
Advertising Manager R.  E. Walker
Circulation Manager  F. J. Brand
Business  Assistants  H. O. Arkley
T. J. Keenan
Editor for the Week Mias P.  I.  Mackay
A    MISCONCEPTION.
Sir Henry Newbolt is a cultured and
interesting Englishman, but his address to the student body last Thursday brought home to us forcibly the
fact that WE are Canadians. The
presence of a gulf that we had never
before appreciated was forced upon
us, the unavoidable difference in the
points of view of two nations, which,
despite any amount of common ancestry, have a different background and
different problems. The Canadian is
not an Englishman; and for that reason Sir Henry Newbolt's address last
Thursday went wide of its mark.
The President's introduction reminded us of the inadequacies of the
present day systems of education, and
the dissatisfaction with the public attitude towards it; after being told that
Sir Henry Newbolt was more or less
spreading the gospel of advanced educational reform, we were rather surprised at the nature of his address to
us. We credit the majority of the
students of the University with an intelligence more or less awake to the
practical problems, educational and
social, of the world of 1923. Such students would have welcomed a serious
discussion of the questions advertised;
and to such students it came as a disappointment that the subject of the
anticipated address was: "Poetry and
Patriotism."
We felt at that moment no sympathy with his choice of subject, and
positive rebellion against his treatment of it. The full-blooded patriotism of the days of Nelson is gone
forever; and Sir Henry did not sufficiently stress the sublimated variety
to make us feel that there lay a constructive suggestion of practical value.
Sir Henry may have had "education"
in his mind at this point, but he did
not forge the connecting link. The
emphasis of his speech fell on the
glorification of the past, and the glorification of the past has never appealed to those whose present is in a
state of flux. As Canadians we have
more urgent practical considerations;
our present is a jealous god.
CHAIR OF EDUCATION AT THE
UNIVERSITY.
Earlier in the year we had occasion
to advance several reasons why, in
our estimation, it would be a distinct
advantage to the students of this University and to the Province to incorporate a Normal Course for teachers
in the curriculum.
Under present conditions a graduate, after obtaining a B. A. degree
here, attends the Normal School for
three months in order to qualify for
a first-class teaching certificate. As
the majority of the students in attend-
ence at the Normal School are High
School Matriculants only, the course
offered there has to be adapted to
their requirements and entails a considerable amount of recapitulation for
Varsity graduates.
It appears to us that if a chair of
education were established here it
would be possible to adjust the curriculum so that a student might elect
the necessary units during the four
y_-ars of the B. A. Course, and might
graduate with a degree and a teach
ing certificate at the end of that time.
This would not only effect a saving of
three months but would permit a closer integration of studies; and provision could also be made to allow a
student so desiring, to graduate with
honors in, for example, History and.
Education.
We feel that we are voicing a genu
ino need and desire of the students
in urging that the feasibility of this
project be considered at the earliest
possible moment.
By the Way
We take off our hat to Sir Henry
Newbolt for expressing the things we
often say, but cannot feel.
* *    #
An Oxford professor once said that
students should remember that the
Day of Judgment and the Spring Examinations are two events, not one.
* *    *
It  pained  our  patriotism  to  notice
that   there   was   not   a   single   Union
Jack to greet Sir Henry.
»    •    •
It must have pained his patriotism.
*    *    #
We suggest that in future elimini-
nations be held to reduce the number of candidates for any given office.
ESTELLA M. TULLY
Teacher of Piano
225  LEE  BLDG.
Corner Broadway and  Main
Phone  Fairmont 3699-L
Have Your Eyes Tested
by our Graduated Optician
All Testing, Grinding and Fitting
Glasses are Backed by the
Allan Guarantee of Absolute Satisfaction.
0. B. ALLAN, LTD.
THE HOUSE OP DIAMONDS
480-486 OzanTlUe St. ftt Fonda*
BALLADE   OF    BOBBED    HAIR.
I own that too often I rather lean
To filling my pages with silliness,
And critics  say, who my works have
seen,
That I have a failing to overstress
The little things, that I should suppress
A desire to follow on idle wings
A whimsical fancy—but I digress;
Bobbed hair has a place in the Order
of Things.
When  writing  my  verses,   I   do   not
mean
To try for an instant to impress
The reader's mind with the fairy sheen
Of Truth dolled up in poetic dress
(My didactic verse is an awful mess,
And the solemnest moral amusement
brings)—
But did you ever, unaided, guess
Bobbed hair has a place in the Order
of Things?
For if your judgment is calm, serene,
(And   yours   is   impartial,   more   or
less),
If you have  the wisdom to walk  between,
Medio tutissimus, you'll  confess
That   a  poet  meets   with  no   small
success,
If he  sees  that  all Art  is  One,  and
sings
Of the  latent meaning of trifles—
yes,
Bobbed hair has a place in the Order
of Things.
L'Envoi.
Princess, a curious world will bless
The  poet  who  shows  what  mystery
clings
To   an   object   frail   as   a   severed
tress;
Bobbed hair has a place in the Order
of Things.
NANCY LEE.
HIGHLIGHTS ON PAGANISM
The distinction between a Puritan
and a Pagan is that a Puritan's principles are better than his life; and a
Pagan's life is better than his principles.
It is folly to trangress against conventions unless you oan transcond
them.
There are two kinds of Pagan:'
Pagans by grace and Pagans by adoption.
417 Hastings Street West ^
J. N. Harvey
Sells Good Clothes
We have a gentlemanly Suit
for each and every one of you.
"Suits that have distinction
and individuality."
Single and double breasted;
one, two and three button models.
Red                 Quality
Popular
Arrow          Without
Prices
Store      Extravagance
y
t
J. A. tag, IM.
417 Hastings St. West
Also  614  Yates  Street,  Victoria
. look for the Bis; Bed Arrow J
See the
Doctor of Pens
Fountain   Pen     and   Eversharp
Pencil   Service  Station
Complete    line   of   Dennison's
Merchandise and Crepe Paper
Students' Loose Leaf Books
Drawing   Instruments,   Etc.
Mitchell.Foley, Ltd.
Printers and Stationers
Sey. 1085      129 Hastings St. W.
PHOTOGRAPHY
The kind of Portraits that you
and your friends will appreciate.
We make them at most reasonable prices.
Broadway Studio
BROADWAY  AND   MAIN
Phone  Fairmont 3831
N.B.—Save   25%   by   letting   us
do   your   films.
ANGELL ENGRAVING CO.
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confedtionety,
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served also
Afternoon Tea.    -      J*
Phone Fair. 377
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
DR.
H. WOOD
Dentist
*
215
LEE  BLDG.
Corner M
ain and  Broadway
Phone
Fairmont 1581
Discount to
University Students
'
Our     display     of     "Golflex"
clothing invites your inspection
in these garments by Americas
foremost makers of sport clothes   stand  unrivalled  for quality
and comfort.
Q
C&
SS6
QRANVH.LE  8T. ■ Vi  •    ''I    -       '-
■SJfift
March 22nd. 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
'Varsity' Hose
at 50c to 1.50 a pair
Specially made for this store,
by the best cashmere hose mills
in Great Britain. Hose that fit
neatly at the ankles, and with
that elasticity in the ribbed top
that prevents them running
down at the heels.
Shown in plain colors, heather
mixtures and fancy stripes, in
all  sizes  at
50c to $1.50 pair
HUDSON'S BAY COY.
«Penonel Correspondence
It is not necessary to point out
tne need for care in ones choice
of personal correspondence paper. We can only call to your
attention two papers of splen-
id quality which may be had
from stationers everywhere at
very moderate cost.
The next time you need paper
ask for
KENMARE  LINEN
OR
OUR    ENGLISH    PARCHMENT
VELLUM
Smith, Davidson k Wright
Manufacturers of Sohool Supplies
Teaoonver       -       -       -      Tlo*ori*
Evans & Hastings
BttttrQuality
PRINTERS
We make t% specialty of
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students   would do well to give
ua a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St    Phone Sey. 189
BEFORE   THE   NEXT   DANCE
Have   Your   Suit   Cleaned   and
Pressed  by
WM. TEMPLETON
101  Broadway E., West of Main
Fairmont 1666-R
Correspondence
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
"FEB-TTP"
March 17, 1923.
Dear   Ubyssey:—
Don't you think all this talk by Senior
and Gown about Overalls is rather
trashy? It looks to me as though these
three or four, who, ever they may be,
are rather fond of seeing the products
of the:.r minds in print— that's all.
When I say I am heartily sick of it I
am voicing: the sentiment of a fcreat
many. Cannot you think of some cutting reply to those attempts at correspondence which would, vulgarly speaking, shut them up? That would leave
more room for our valuable Muck-A-
Muck, or better still, the .Literary Corner.
I still do not see anv improveinent
in the behaviour of the co-eds during
the lunch hour. I expect we had better
put  it down to  that vernal  impulse.
Yours   sincerely,
SNOW  FLAKE.
A CANADIAN UNIVERSITY
IN PARIS
Paris is to have a new Cite Uni-
versitaire, by which she hopes to revive the great scholastic traditions
of the Middle Ages. A piece of land
of a little more than 20 acres has
become available through the demolition of old fortifications and has been
transferred to the University of Paris.
The agreement provides that the university shall erect buildings which
shall furnish comfortable and healthful quarters at reasonable prices for
both French and foreign students at
the Sorborne, the plan being to allow
sites to foreign nations for their own
colleges.
The London Times says: "It is the
desire of the British committee to
place the British College by the side
of the  Canadian College	
Already applications have been made
by several nations, and the ground allotted to Canada, about an acre, has
already been reserved."
THE   POLL-TAX
Editor "Ubyssey."
Sir:—
1 received today from the municipality of which I am a resident a Foil Tax
Bill more closely I find that if you are
Bill for $5.00 Upon scrutinizing the
over 21, you are liable for another $2.00
Road   Tax.
Returned men are exempt, hut what of
the University Student, who, working
his way through college must part with
$5.00 or perhaps $7.00. Those who are
in that predicament must clearly realize
that this tax is unjust.
Can not the student body, or the Alma
Mater Society do something to have
students placed upon the list of exemptions.
Sincerely,
"Dum vivimus,  vivamus!"
S.  C.   M.   ELECTIONS.
Elections for officers of the Women's Section of the S. C. M. will be
held at noon on Monday, March 26,
in Room 33. All members are urged
to be present.
POSITIONS OFFERING
The Royal Bank of Canada
have several openings for
junior clerks. Young men between the ages of 16-19 wishing to follow a commercial
life should make prompt application to the Supervisor,
Royal Bank of Canada, Hastings and Homer Streets, Vancouver, B. C.
1^
PENUS
PENCILS
em largest selling Qaatitf
pencil in the world
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Ave.
New York
Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
Venus Bvebpodtted
Mechanical PencflB
Sprott - Shaw
Students
Win in Typewriting
Championship Contest
Miss   Marchese   who   studied
typewriting    at    the    Brittania
High   School   and   later   at   the
Sprott-Shaw secured the
Inter-Provincial   Championship
of  Canada
Miss McLeod also took all her
course at the Sprott-Shaw write
for the full 15 minutes with an
accuracy of 95%.—This is something really wonderful.
Other Sprott-Shaw Students
won in the championship class—■
1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 11th, 12th,
13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 20th
and 22nd places.
It Pays to Attend
the
SPROTT-SHAW
Are you Reading
The Sportsman?
Now on Sale—10c a Copy
1
The livest weekly on
general topics in "Western
Canada.
High-class writers giving
high-class opinions on the
things every thinker is interested in.
You do not have to be
concerned with football
competitions to appreciate
The Sportsman
Get this week's oopy—
you'll be glad to cultivate
the habit.
The Sportsman
'' Frank—Fearieas—Fair''
The Very Latest
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DRIVE YOURSELF
Brandon Auto Livery
Cor.  Georgia and   Richards 8U-
Sey. 4777
Day and Night  Service
(EattaiMatt lExtettatntt 1Kmii?ratig
69-73 FAIRFIELD BUILDING
445 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C.
Special Coaching for University Examinations
Mathematics, Latin, Greek, French, Spanish, Physic*,
Chemistry etc. ?^5^
THE    UBYSSEY
March 22nd.   1923
JOSEPH BONNET
Great French Organist
St. Andrews Church
Monday,   March   26th,  8.15   p.m.
Special  Students Tickets, 85c.
Including Tax
These   Include   AU   Seats   Except
 Regular $2.30 Seats	
SAN CABLO OPERA CO.
AFBIL 2nd & 3rd.
Seats   Now   on   Sale   at
WAITER   T.   EVANS   MB.
657 Granville St. Sey. 729
GET ACQUAINTED
WITH OUR CLEANING
AND PRESSING
DEPARTMENT
Special Acquaintance
Society Rate   —   Club Rate
The
Parisienne Dry
CLEANERS AND DYERS
571 Broadway West
Phone Fair. 5223
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Brsaiway and Heather St.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone Fair. 84*
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Exercise Books
Looseleaf Covers
and Refills
Waterman's Peas
Eversharp  Peneds
ED. DA MOTTA
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
3556 Heather St.
THE
CLARKE & STUART
Oo., Ltd.
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers—
Educational Stationery.
Students Note Books in
Genuine Leather and Tex-
hide Bindings—
Drawing Instruments and
Materials.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
550 Seymour St.
SIR HENRY NEWBOLT
(Continued from Page 1)
and Play the Game," "St. George's
Day," "Clifton Chapel," he read first.
Then came his war poem "Follow the
Fife and Drum" which caught the
fancy of the audience to a marked degree and was accorded great applause.
"The End of the Emden," which has
the metre of a sailor's chanty, was received even more favourably. The
last selections were the well-known
"Drake's Drum" and a group of several "Poems of the Navy."
A  CRITICISM.
The students were greatly impressed with Sir Henry Newbolt's pleasing personality and liked him immensely for his evident sincerity and
gentlemanly qualities. But their reaction to the ideas that he expressed
on Thursday last was on the whole
unfavourable. In conversation afterwards a great many who had heard
him expressed themselves as distinctly disappointed that he had lauded
warlike spirit, that he had criticised
the French, the Americans, and others
of our late Allies in rather severe
tone, that he had endowed British
fighting men with .almost superhuman
qualities and that he had in general
exalted British characteristics so far
above those of other nations. Others
thought that Sir Henry had failed to
learn the spirit of Canadians and particularly of Canadian University people, and had in consequence not been
able to put his ideas in a way that
would be pleasing to them.
On Monday, however, the students
caught the spirit of Sir Henry's poems
and agreed that he had a remarkable
power of interpreting a sentiment that
has had a potent influence on British
people.
President Klinck presided at the
first lecture and greeted the poet in a
short address of welcome. At the
second meeting Dean Coleman was in
the chair.
SPECIALTY  FOOTWEAR
Just as you propose to make
some well thought out plan, your
life work, so have we built from
a small beginning to success in
specialty shoes. No matter what
branch you follow you will find
Paris footwear will SHOE you
for it.
Specialists in
Cruisers
Surveyors
Loggers and Farm  Boots.
Ladies  Hiking Boots  in all
leathers
PIERRE PARIS
51 Hastings W. Vancouver
PlMas:   Fslrsnont i.
T. J. Kearney & Co
Jtaural 8tr»rtor«
Private Ambulance Service
Mt   Irsttwiy   W. VAMCOOVBK
The
Literary Corner
THE    PATRIOTS.
Sometimes  we  watch  them  arrogantly  ride
Among the conquered folk that hate>
them so,
And hear the scornful foreign trumpet blow
In our own market-places, there beside
The statues of the patriots who died
To save our land, and drive our ancient  foe
Back to the border.    Ah, how base
and low
I   felt   beneath   their   gaze!    until   1
spied
My  neighbour   there  with   that   slow
smile of his,
Watching me kindly.    "Bitter memories
Come to us all    .    .    .    .    but,  did
you know there came
Another   ship   with   arms?"     O   hero
dead!
Pray for us now, for soon the embers
red
Shall   burst   into   an   all-consuming
flame!
G. B. R.
EXTRA-MURAL WORK
The British Columbia Teachers'
Federation are taking up the matter
of providing extra-mural instruction
under the auspices of the University
of British Columbia for teachers in
service. The first step they have
taken in furthering this idea, has been
the circulation amongst the 3,000
teachers in B.C. of a questionaire
seeking information as to the instruction that would be desired by the
teachers.
According to the proposal set forth
in this questionaire, qualified students, subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors, will be permitted
to take extra-murally between October
1 and May 1, 1924, one full three unit
course. In the spring of 1924, properly qualified students will be permitted to register for two full three
unit courses. These courses Involve
extra-mural study during May and
June and attendance at the University
summer session.
The adoption of the Federation's
plan would give to teachers In service
the opportunity of covering the work
of the first two years of the University Arts course In three years if they
were of exceptional ability and industry, though they might proceed at a
Blower rate if they cared to do so.
People nearly always say
we do good work, but you
never can tell. They may be
just joshing us.
Anyway they always come
back again!
How about bringing in your
next films to be developed
and printed? You cannot go
wrong as the prices are easy
and we give away a free enlargement with every $5.00
worth of work.
C. Bannister
Developing: and Printing
Specialist
1154  Robson  St.
Vancouver, B. C.
WILLOW HALL
806   Seventeenth   Avenue   West
One Block West of Heather St.
Have you seen this new hall
for dancing and private parties?
We have accommodation for
two hundred dancers. It is like
a big "chateau" with beautiful
lounge room and open fire place,
card room, spring floor for dancing, fancy lighting effects, ladies'
and gents' dressing rooms, with
fully  equipped  kitchen.
It is for rent to clubs and
private parties at $15.00 per
night up to 12 p.m. One dollar
per hour after.
F. S.  LOCKETT, Proprietor
Phone   Fair.   77  or   Fair.  2885-R
A  NEW  PLACE TO  EAT
Good meals served from 7:16
a.m.   to   10:30  p.m.
Sundays from 9 a.m.
University  Boys  welcome.
A   full   line   of   confectionery,
soft  drinks.
Matches FREE with smokes.
LEONARD'S
1469   BROADWAY   WEST
(Just Off Granville)
It's  Time  You  Had  Yours
Taken
Your  Photograph,   a   really
good one, by
F. L. Hacking
Leigh-Spencer  Building
553 Granville Street
LANGTRY
The Tailor
Suits $25.00 up, to Measure
Overcoats, $25.00 up
318 Hastings St., W.
Union Label Mabch 22nd, 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
MUCK-A-MUCK
—®~^
?£<2*
IN  HIS LATEST.
Oh, young Lochinvar came out of the
West,
With  fur  on  his  pants  and spots  on
his vest.
He twirled a mean rope, had a good-
looking beak,
And now he's in movies at a thousand
per week.
(Ex.)
*    »    *
It is the earnest desire of the Editor of Muck-A-Muck, that he may never
crack a joke or break a reputation.
(Hffattttrker   (Eharolatea
The Best to be had
75c per pound
Bulk  or  packed in
'l-lb., 2-lb., 3-lb., 4-lb., 5-lb.
Boxes
(Eljanttrlm
774 Granville Street
"Where the Cock Crows"
Orpheum
Coming' Wed. Evening-, March 28th.
Four Nights and Three Matinees
Matinee 2:30 Evening 8:20
DON   VA1EBIO   &   CO.
Italy's  Premiere 'Wire Dancer
LEONA THURBER and HARRY
MADISON
"A Shopping Tour"
EARL,   LINDSAY'S
Dance Creations of 1923
HARU ONUKI
Japanese Prima Donna
HAL SKELLEY
"THE  MUTUAL  MAN"
A Comedy Skit with Music
Joe—BOLI.EY Sc I.AIBD—lee
 "AT  PALM  BEACH"
THE   SHEIK
Direct  from Arabia
Not a Motion Picture, but a Real,
Live  Son  of the  Desert
IDA MORRIS, L.R.A.M.
Former Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Teach   of   Piano   and   Violin
Special Course for University
Students,   May-September,   1923.
Residence Studio: 1131 Haro St.
Tel. Doug. 2173 Y
POLICY—To Thieve, to Cull, to
Create,   and all to laugh.
WEATHER—Rendered Dull and
Threatening by the Looming Examinations.
MUCKLETTES
"I hope I make myself clear,"
said  the  water  as  it  passed  through
the filter.
* *   *
The slogan of some of our professors about this time seems to be,
"They shall not pass."
* «    *
One   of   the  grandest   things   about
nature  is  that there's  no  such thing
as a pair of lips that won't fit.
»    *    *
We have often wondered if there is
any danger of getting splinters in
jour throat when you drink wood
alcohol.
• * *
We know a gentleman in this College who is so narrow minded that
he could look through a keyhole with
both eyes.
* *    *
We deeply regret, that owing to a
lack of space, we are unable to print
any of Sir Henry Newbolt's speech of
last Thursday,  in Muck-A-Muck.
fc\ Vvfr^
ABOUT   MOONSHINE.
There are meters iamDie
And  meters trochaic,
There are meters in musical tone,
But the meter that's neater,
And  sweeter,   completer,
Is to meet her by moonlight alone.
(Ex.)
Inmate of Asylum—"Say janitor, is
that clock right?"
Janitor—"Yes."
Inmate—"Then what's it doing
here?"
fa Vifrt1
McCLARY'S?
"My supper's cold!"
He swore with vim;
And then she made
It hot for him.
'W\ yPifrfr
He (with enthusiasm)—"I could go
on dancing like this with you forever."
She—"Oh, no, you couldn't—you're
bound to improve."
SPORTING  NEWS.
She-one^'Do you like indoor
sports?"
She-two—"Yes, if they go home
early."
ALUMNI NOTES.
The University of British Columbia
certainly does take an interest in its
graduates. We heard one of the Editors of this paper remark the other
day, that he would be very glad to
hear of the death of any of the Alumni.
frvikifar
Prof.—What do you mean by such
insolence? are you in charge of this
class or am I?
Stude (humbly)—I know I'm not
in charge sir
Prof.—"Very well, if you're not In
charge, then, don't try to act like
a conceited ass."
Henry's Horn
People in the Colonies, very far away,
(Par away and very far below),
So   they  sent  an  orator,  twenty  bob
a day.
All the way to Canada, you know.
Pounding on the tom-tom, hammering
the drum,
Telling how we vanquish every foe,
—Unimpressed Colonials looking rather glum,
(When the dickens will the blighter
go?)
i
Seven weeks in Canada, long enough
to see
(Far away and very far below),
How   these   poor  Colonials   are   "just
like you and me,"
Just  as  modest—till   they  start  to
blow.
Take the news to England—they'll be
glad to hear
How we worship Haig and Jellicoe.
Very patriotic, but a trifle too exotic;
You  know It really isn't  comme il
faut.
CRUELTY TO ANIMALS.
"My boy," said the fond mother,
"you must not shoot craps, for life is
just as precious to the little craps as
it is to us."
For that tired feeling take a taxi.
fcv Vvfrv
Prof, (in lecture before class test.)—
"Now class, if there's anything you're
t. hind in, now is your chance to
ciitch up."
All-in—"Well, Doc, I'm behind in my
sleep.    Goodnight."
TUT TUT.
Just because King Tut had all that
jeweleiy is no sign that he was a
king. For all we know he may have
run a pawnshop.
fevforfar
NEW  THINGS  NEEDED.
A spool for the thread of discourse.
A new track for the races of men.
A few matches for the fires of affection.
An open switch for the average
train of thought.
A megaphone for the still small
voice.
A dash of cold water for the old
llame.
A few less bare limbs for the family tree. (Ex.)
The He-dear—"Sweetness, I'd go
through anything for you."
The She-dear—"How about trying
the door?"
■fr\ Vvfev
TABLE   NOTES.
Don't tuck your napkin under your
collar;  tie it around your neck.
Don't scratch your ear with a piece
of celery, use your fork.
Don't eat off your knife, use your
fingers instead.
Be sure that the silver is not marked before you drop it in your pocket.
When leaving the table, don't jump
up; brace your feet on the table legs
and shove your chair backwards.
If the soup is hot, don't blow it.
Take it outside and run up and down
the porch with it.
CLASSIFIED   ADVERTISEMENTS.
Do you have trouble with your
memory? Do you sometimes remember things and people you want to
forget? Then do not fail to send a
stamped, addressed envolope to Box
72, Publications Office.
If your conscience bothers you at
all, we refund your money cheerfully,
courteously and hilariously.
FOR
Tasty Lunches
Afternoon Tea
and
Confectionery
TRY
The Home Lunch
"Down by the Car"
767 Broadway West
Autographic
Brownies
The Brownies That Fold
Eastman made Cameras
with Brownie simplicity.
Take the 2A, shown above.
It folds like a Kodak and has
the exclusive Eastman Autographic feature. Lens and
shutter are carefully tested.
Pictures are 2*^x4*4, and the
price,  $10.00
Other Kodaks  $6.50 up
Main Floor.
David Spencer
Ltd. 8
THE    UBYSSEY
March 22nd,   1925
Exchanges
TAXICABS AND THE
STUDENTS BANKROLL
(From   "The   Manitobian")
We have received several requests
from different sources to make editorial mention of the stand taken by
University of Toronto girls in connection with Varsity men taking them to
dances in tavis. These young ladies
have passed a resolution to the effect
that they do not wish to cause any
extra burden to their fellow students'
bankrolls, which they know are never
too fat, and accordingly wish to journey to dances via tramway rather than
yellow cab.
Such a move is indeed laudable, but
we may truthfully state that we do
not consider a formal resolution of
that nature necessary in our institution. It has ever been the policy of
Manitoba co-eds to give a thought to
the financial condition of the men and
they have never allowed the taxicab
customs to be established here. On
the contrary they have individually
opposed undue extravagance in such
circumstances. We appreciate the
stand taken by University of Toronto
girls, hut we also realize that a similar
attitude on the part of Manitoba co-eds
has arisen voluntarily, and for some
time past has been an accepted principle.
Queen's was the first Canadian college to introduce co-education, when
in 1870, amid prophetic mutterings of
disaster, a few classes were opened to
women. In 1878-79 women were permitted to register for a degree; the
following year the Women's Medical
College was opened. Mrs. Adam
Shortt of Ottawa, was one of the first
three graduates, who, by the way,
were called Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abednego, because of the fiiery furnace of criticism through which they
had to pass.
Spring and Summer, 1923
JUST ARRIVED—
Young Men's Sports Suits,
half belted models with patch
pockets in Donegal Tweeds.
Prices from $28.00 to $40.00
Thomas $ McDain
LTD.
Semi-Ready Clothes
656  GRANVILLE  ST.
"The Young Man's Store"
-DANCING-
Every Wednesday and Saturday
evenings, 9 o'clock.
ALEXANDRA
H   DANCING ACADEMY   H
Oor.  BobBon  and Hornby
The Alexandra Orchestra, featuring the Sousa Phone, always
In attendance.
A Dirge
O listen listen ladies gay
To the Ballad of Reading goal
For Drake is a thousand miles away
And Guest has a dinner pail.
No naughty feat of arms I tell
Forever singing as they shine
Alas, poor Yorick I knew him well—
The  diamond  lights   up   the   secret
mine.
Sad is the note and soft the lay
Of the Ballad of Reading goal
It ran a hundred years to a day
And this time it did not fail.
And   the   good   old   Abbot   of   Aber-
brothock
Had taken his little daughter
To  hang  the   bell  on   the   Inchecape
Rock
On the banks of Allan Water.
B. G. & H. A. M.
LETTERS   CLUB.
The last meeting but one of the.
Letters Club for this session was held
Tuesday last at the home of Dr. G. G.
Sedgewick. Mr. Geoffrey Bruun read
a short paper on "Paganism and English Poetry," which was followed by
a general discussion. Members of the
Club are reminded that at next week's
meeting elections of new members
and officers will be held.
DUM   VIVIMUS
We are the pagan children, that were
denied a soul.
Our  names  are  lost  to  Heaven,—are
stricken from the scroll.
We shall not see the City, in the gold
eternal morn;
But oh, the gold of moonrise above the
waving corn!
We are the pagan children. The Sorrows pass us by
Like shadows on the wheatfields beneath a windy sky.
And Death is but a silence, with lisping leaves above,
The silence of the noonday, among
the fields we love.
CHIROPRACTIC
A   Safe  and   Sane  Way   to  Health
DS.    GALLANT
408 Carter Cotton Bid?.
Seymour  8790
Branch   Office   at   Jubilee
Member  B.   C.   Chiropractic  Ass'n.
NEW  SPRING
STYLES and   FABRICS
HAVE   ARRIVED
ONB        «
PRICK
97.00    zr*
«* • MEASURE
We invite you to inspect our
values. Our suits are made to
your measure, and tailored to
fit, in any style you may choose.
Up-Top Tailors
301  Hasting* 8treet Wert
Vancouver, B. C
Opposite Hamilton Street
CHANGE OF SCENE SUGGESTED FOR BALL PLAYERS
Breaking windows continues to be
amusement for certain of the students
around the University, and the scattered glass in causing more damage
than the actual breaking.
"Should the student body be forced
to pay for the tires cut by broken
glass?" is a problem that faces the
Faculty and the Students' Council today. Ball players broke three windows in Mr. Boving's garage on March
16. The following morning when he
drove his car into the building the
glass cut and destroyed one of his
tires. Who is responsible? This was
not an accident; the students who
play ball are to blame.
Mr. Boving has justly complained,
and the authorities have insisted that
playing ball in front of windows must
cease. This is not the first occasion
for complaint. Last week three windows in the President's garage and
four in Mr. Boving's were broken in
one day.
"Why not play up by the tennis
courts?" says the Students' Council.
It has been suggested that gentlemen would at least report the breakages.
'Che New
PAIGE
Oxfords For
Young Men
are here
Black and Brown
. See these New
Spring  Models in   Our
Windows
$7-50 to $9-00
"Your mentality reaches
a high standard when you
stand up in our Shoes."
H
"Professional Shoe Service"
Seymour 3304
ICCLESTON
'CALLISTEIZ
^rlSHOEcam
771  Granville Street
Orpheum  Theatre  Bldg.
LOOK
THEM
OVER
Our Suits for Young Men
are Smart and Stylish without being too expensive. The
fabrics are good and the
prices are right.
$25.00, $29.50, $35.00
C. D. BRUCE
LIMITED
Cor. Homer and Hutingf Bta.
BOYS !
Patronize Canada's Finest Barber Shop. 18 Chairs. AU First
Class Barbers and  Manicurist*.
THB  ROGERS   BUILDING
Wm. BUK51V, Proprietor     ,
464 GRANVILLE 8TREET
Phone   Sey. 7853-0
"Sown   tiie   Marble   •tain"
'Say It With Flowers'
BROWN BROS. & GO.
LTD.
Florists,  Nurserymen and
Seedsmen
TWO STORES:
48  Hastings  Street Baat
Phones:  Sey. »88 and 671
665 Granville Street
Phones:  Sey. 9613 an4 1»1
Let's Go
THE   LAUNDRY  CAN'T   HURT
THEM
Because every time they are
washed they improve
THESE FINE ENGLISH TWILL
SHIRTS  put  money in  your
pocket, at  $2.35
Mann's Man's Wear
Two  Specialty  Shops
for Men  and  the  Young  Fellows:
411-474   QranvtUe   St.
Wilbur G. Grant
A.T.C.M.
TEACHER  OF PIAKO
Organist and  Choirmaster
First Baptist Church
Studio:      2213    Granville   Street
Phone Bayview 3140 R
LIONEL WARD Si COMPANY.  LTD..

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