UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1939

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125063.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125063.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125063-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125063-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125063-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125063-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125063-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125063-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125063-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125063.ris

Full Text

 PUB-COUNCIL
OAME
TOMORROW
®1jj> Hby00*tr
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
PUB-COUNCIL
OAME
TOMORROW
vol. xxn.
VANOOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 31, 1930
No. 17
C.S. A. To Hold Re-Election
As Hutchinson Resigns
Thursday Meeting- to Clarify C.S.A. Aims;
Third Conference to be Held in Quebec
Sheilah Hutchinson, elected to the chairmanship of the general
exeoutive of the U.B.C. branch of tho Canadian Student Assembly
last Thursday, resigned yesterday because of what she termed "a
general expression of doubt" concerning the aims and objects of
the Assembly by members of the meeting who elected her to the
position.
C.S.A. ELECTIONS  THURSDAY ~
A new meeting, which will clarify
the aima of the C.S.A. and elect offl
cere and exeoutive membera will be
held next Thursday noon In Arts 100,
Main  Issue  of  the   meeting  will  be
the   placing   of   a   proposed   amendment to the  C.S.A.  constitution  be
fore the members.
C.S.A. DRAFTS
NBW AMENDMENT
The amendment was drafted by
C.S.A. officials after laat Thursday's
meeting, whloh was marred by lack
of information on the part of assembled olub representatives as to the
aima and objects of the C.S.A. A
draft of the amendment whioh gives
a full explanation of the Assembly's
National and Local Alms, will be
given to eaoh member prior to his
or her attendance of the meeting.
COMMITTEES TO BE ELECTED
A new chairman of the Bxeoutlve
will be elected, together with a Prealdent, Vice-President, Seoretary and
Chairman of the Conferenoe Committee. Committees will also be
formed for Bduoatlon, Organisation,
and Publicity. Darrel Braldwood,
President of L.S.E., will be in the
chair.
On Tuesday, November 28, Professor Irving will address the Assembly
on "The Future of Democracy."
The Third National Conference
of Canadian University Students will
be held at Macdonald College, St.
Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, December 27 to 81, lt waa announoed by the
National Exeoutive Committee of
the  Canadian   Student  Aasembly.
Preparationa are being completed
for a atudent gathering of some two
hundred delegates, and twenty-five
leaders from faculties and from public life.
SOO TO  ATTEND
"The success of the Scholarship
Campaign was determined by the
unity and insight of the Second National Conference," aald Dr. Orant
H. Lathe In announcing the oonfer-
(Continuod on Page 8)
See C.S.A.
Benevolent Dictator
Venezuela Fuhrer
Assumes Role
Of Cupid
Decrees Special
Postal Rates for
Love Letters
Perhaps it ia the heat. Perhaps lt
Is a condemnation of Dan Cupid.
Perhaps lt Is a desire to re-establish
matrimony as a paying proposition.
The real reason is obscure.
But down ln Venezuela the current
dictator has decreed that henceforth
love letters be sent through the mail
at half price. Such co-operation ls
understandable. One can almost Imagine hia desire to aid lovers ln using
the printed page. The records would
be Interesting for posterity.
LOVE IS CATCHINO
There are, however, two catches.
Love letters must be sent ln pink
envelopes to ensure ready identification.
Second the government reserves the
right to open said letters for approval
or censorship.
Co-operation is understandable. The
records are interesting both for posterity and the government.
Admitted    love    is    love   the  world
over;    admitted   co-operation   ls   cooperation  whether  ir.  Caracas  or  ln
the University of British Columbia.
STUDENTS LOVE . . THEIR WORK
To the student the difference between a love letter and a thesis is the
difference between pleasure and work.
The boys and gals in Venezuela are
really fortunate they do not have to
submit duplicate copies of their thesis for filing and corrections.
Cameron Praises
New Curriculum
At Institute
Predicts Advance
In Educational
System
"Our Schools and Our Society" was
the subject of an address by Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron, Acting Head of the
Department of Bducation, before the
Vancouver Institute ln Its regular
weekly session of Saturday, Nov. 18.
Dr. Gordon Shrum Introduced the
speaker to a capacity audience ln
Arts 100.
Dr. Cameron found that the
schools of today presented a remarkable contrast In colour, Ufe
and movement to the schools of a
generation ago.
Tracing the reasons for this commendable change he praised a revised
curriculum which was elastic enough
to Include ln Its scope auch worth
while topics as Instalment buying, the
correct use of leisure time and vocational guidance.
Adult Eduoatlon Classes, Pro-Recs
and the Extension Department of
the University were splendid examples of this new attitude to
learning he found.
"I believe that there wUl be a
change ln the function of the school.
Dr. Cameron said ln referring to the
present state of war, "and that func
tion will be to teach democracy." He
spoke of the higher cost of university
education which eliminated poor students as being highly undemocratic.
This, he foretold, must and will be
remedied In the very near future by
Increased scholarships and bursaries
being made available.
B*nai B'rith Scholarship Available
The balance of a B'nal B'rith District No. 4 Hillel Foundation Scholarship, $83.60, relinquished by another
student, la still available for a graduate student in Applied Sclenoe or
Agriculture for the session 1039-40.
Applications should be ln the hands
of the Registrar not later than December 10.
MARY ANN
HITS BACK;
SUES CHANG
Mary Ann sues Chang Suey for
libel! This, the latest news communicated by the Law Society, will be the
occasion for a mock trial two weeks
hence.
Mary Ann insists that the meaty
bit of gossip concerning Mary Ann
herself, appearing in last week's column, was Inserted deliberately by
Chang Suey, after the copy had gone
to press.
Counsel for the plaintiff, Mary Ann,
is Don McOill, and for the defense,
Chang Suey, Ted Strongtharm. The
Judge of the Supreme Court of the
University of British Columbia will
be the official University lawyer,
Kenneth Beckett.
The difficulty in the case comes in
the fact that, for obvious reasons,
neither Mary Ann nor Chang Suey
can make a personal appearance.
The case will therefore be based on
the statements of the various witnesses.
Caught in the act I
Is this one of the Dirty
Nine who stands ready
to catch one of Pawn
Jeerson's famous Punts?
VCe couldn't say I
Or  was  he  fixing   the
basket  for  tomorrow's
Pub-Council Game?
We couldn't sayl
Bring a penny—
Ap needs many.
T
Players* Club Presents
Yule Plays This Week
Tickets Available
at Quad Office
Today
Students—1052 of them—will pack
the auditorium Wednesday night td>
hue the Players' Olub annual Christinas present' to Alma Mater, four
smooth one-act plays.
Tickets will be available at the
Quad box office today and tomorrow
at noon for the performance, on presentation of passes. The whole auditorium will be for students Wednesday, and 400 tickets for Thursday
night will be distributed aa well.
CAST  OF  PLAYS
Offered for sacrifice on the altar of
undergrad opinion will be four very
different slices of drama. As programs
are not being distributed, it ls suggested that you clip the following list.
They are as far as possible ln order
of appearance.
LAST MRS. BLAKELY:
Young fiance, Doug Wilson; Fifl,
Mona Hunter, and the four Mrs. B's,
Nancy Bruoe, Shirley McDonald, Josephine Kennedy and Margaret Morris.
MOTHER OF JUDAS
Maria, Mary McLorg; Oarloa, All-
son Cumming; Felipe, William Knox;
Conchita, Minta Bulgln; Don Antonio, Robert Haywood; Olvil Guards,
William Qrande, William Oimette.
OTHELLO i
Duke, John Seyer; Senator, Pat
Keatley; Brabantlo, Douglas Mllsom;
Othello, James Frazee; Desdemona,
Barbara Nation; Sailor, Jacques Metford; Messenger, Archie Bam; lago,
'Lister Sinclair; Roderigo, Robert
Menchions; Senators, Douglas Archibald, Dick Oook and Barry Sleigh.
THE RED VELVET OOAT:
Marianna, Nora Lyall; Bsteban,
John Enwrlght; Lorenzo, Bob McWilliams; Ramon, James Halcrow;
Don Pepe, Bruce Emerson; Donna
Berta, Ruth DesBrlsay; Lola, Stella
Davidson; Ester, Alison Mann; Carmen, Denise Darling; Lola 8ot,
Oeorge Milligan.
TIN GODS BECOME DESPERATE
AS ARMAGEDDON NEARS
Punster and Goon God Diplomats Return
After Secret Parley; Issue
Conflicting Reports
Step right this way folks! Crowd a little closer to the mike,
folks!
Soon within twenty-four hours the climax in the lives of the
Dirty Nine will unravel in a deathly snarl. The nerveless bodies
and the empty minds of the Tin Gods will rattle on the gym floor
as curios and relics of the most colossal, most stupendous, most
mystifying extravaganza ever put on by the denizens of the pun
world and the naive politicians of the never-never world.
Their Nemesis approaches, folks!
Watch it for one cent!
Have you any grievances, folks? Would you like to see the
Dirty Nine rubbed deeper and deeper into the mud, folks?
Would you like to gloat over the coffins of Pawn Jeerson,
Truth Cuttingsome, Sap Boberts, Dim Farmer, Barrel Driftwood,
Cosey Maulins, Widdy McHeel, Ahsill Bobbins, Rods Trembling?
You can gloat for one cent, folks!
The Robots will vise their Usvial Line . . . but read on, folks
. . . read on . . .
By PUNDERBIRD
With the grim shadow of the terrible Publications fighting machine
hanging over them like an avenging
spectre, members of the miserably Incompetent councU squad of puny
melon tossers today found themselves
faced with utter, complete, and certain annihilation as the prospect of
tomorrow's Pub-Council game looms
horribly near.
Usually reliable sources stated that
the council team members have resigned themselves to Inevitable defeat
at the hands of the Publications
steamroller.
COUNCIL IS DESPERATE
Grim faced and hollow eyed. President John Pearson sits ln the black
draped council den vainly racking his
brain for another flimsy excuse to
postpone the fiasco.
Down in the caf, Darrel Braldwood
can be seen slumped at a table recklessly drugging himself with quart
after quart of caf coffee—doom written in his bloodshot eyes.
Evan    apRoberts    furtively    sneaks
(Continued on Fare 8)
See PUNDERBIRD
'        By PAWN JEERSON
We are not committing ourselves.
Not that we think we are going to
not  win  the  game  but  that we  are
certain that we are not going to not
win lt.
COUNCIL CONCEIT
We are ready to put our steam roller tactics Into practise from the flrst
moment that we wing our way onto
the glossy surface of the gym floor.
Supers descended from Nietzsche,
Davids ready to spring our catapults
at the Ooliathan pubsters, in fact a
very Samson without meddlesome
Delllahs.
Our apparel will feature a nebulous
nothingness intertwined with fragrant calla lilies or pressed flowers
from dusty council rule books.
We offer to erect a tavern If we
don't make a 60 profit on our score
end offer to treat every member of
the audience to coke ... if we don't
win. Now you see how sure we are.
CONCEALS   FEAR
Victorious    councillors.    That's    us,
every time. During the past weeks we
(Continued on Page 2>
See PAWN JEERSON
Students Discuss Plans
For Aiding Red Cross
May Assist $3,000,000 War Chest Drive
by Waiving Excess Caution Money
for Red Cross Welfare Work
At a special Alma Mater Society Meeting in the Auditorium
today noon the students of the University will either approve or
veto plans of Council to contribute to the Red Cross $3,000,000
War Chest Campaign. Ways and means by which the Student body
can contribute to this campaign will be discussed. One of the proposed methods of assisting the Drive is through waiving of excess
caution monies by the students to the Red Cross.
■ RED OROSS WORK
The Canadian  Red Cross  Sooiety,
Davis Defends
Civil Liberties
In Forum Debate
Clashes with McGiil
Over S.P.C. Letter
Sent to Klinck
Stressing the horrors of war as he
maintained the necessity of retaining
academic freedom on the oampua,
Mervyn Davis defeated Frank Wiggs
ln a stormy Parliamentary Forum
debate Friday last In Arts 100.
Speaking to the resolution "That
this house ls opposed to any measure,
implied or real, tending towards the
restriction of academic freedom at
U.B.O.", Davis briefly traced the evolution of democracy up till the present crisis maintaining that "Democracy ls not something which can be
turned on at will; lt ls the development of the principles of Uberty over
the ages."
In advocating the necessity of retaining civil liberties as well as academic freedom on the campus he said,
"In the course of a long war a new
generation of youth will grow to maturity. If these are to undertake the
privileges of democracy then they
must be trained in the practises of
democracy."
CURTAILMENT  IS  NECESSARY
Bitterly denouncing the retention
of any liberties, opposition leader
Frank Wiggs asserted that restrictions were imposed to promote an
efficient prosecution of the present
war.
"The time for discussion on the
question of civil liberties and freedom
was before the commencement of the
war," he said.
"We should curtail the freedom of
those who, fearful of conscription and
embarrassed by their own weaknesses,
find lt necessary to attack those who
are engaged ln protecting them.
"The state," he continued, "has no
right to ask men to give up their lives
and still allow insidious and wasteful
attacks whloh tend to disrupt the
oountry at this time."
MoOILL CRITICIZES S.P.C.
Caustically ridiculing an open letter
sent by the Social Problems Olub to
rresldent Kllnck, Don McOlll speaking against the resolution clashed
with Mervyn Davis, president of the
S.P.C. and signer of the letter, ln a
fiery duel claiming that the students
would be wise if they kept their
thoughts on liberty and academic
(Continued on Page 2)
See DERATE
TIMID CO-EDS
DISILLUSION
SALISBURIES
"College co-eds are timid, bashful
and cannot take a dare" was the decision of disillusioned Salisbury
boarders this week, as replies to their
newly formed date bureau trickled in
in disappointing numbers.
So tar only three applications have
been received: One from a downtown nurse, one from a Point Orey
co-ed and one from Mary Ann. The
men of Salisbury were deeply moved
by the heroic pioneer spirit of these
three  dauntless young women.
"For the rest of the female student
body we have nothing but contempt,"
they told the Ubyssey. "But ln case
there are still a few kindred spirits
remaining, we Issue a last heartrending appeal for applications." A
postcard to the Lodge giving name,
phone number, address and remarks,
will immediately bring a telephone
call  of acceptance.
member of a vast International Organisation, is Incorporated by an
Aot of Parliament of 1900, but operated in Canada many years before
that date.
The Work of the Red Cross la
among non-combatant soldiers only,
pointed out K. Lauoks, superintendent of the Vanoouver Red Cross
Branoh, in an interview with tho
Ubyssey, He explained that by "non-
oombatant" the Red Cross means a
soldier who has been wounded, ta
siok, or is a prisoner of war.
Red Cross knows no regiment,
oreed nor olass, but takes charge of
the unseen oomforts suoh as hospital supplies, namely: pneumonia
jackets, bed-gowns, bandages, surgical dressings, sheets, and pillow
oases.
RED OROSS  REQUIREMENTS
Supplies and all Red Cross aotlvities oome under the Director Oeneral of Medloal Servloe. Branohea
are maintained throughout the Dominion, suoh aa at Vancouver, from
whloh scores of local Units operate.
In Vanoouver, alone, 4000 women
have Joined Units for the duration
of the 'war.
"Students' money given to the Red
Cross will be well used," said Mr.
Laucks. "The Organization requlrea
$1,000,000 for its peace-time aotlvities, $000,000 to repay a loan instigated by the outbreak of War, and
(Continued on Page 9)
See RED CROSS
They Oot Their Mow
Sadie Hawkins
Turns Conqueror
At Alta.
For a Week She Dates
and Entertains Joe
—and Loves It.
From the Oateway
It was the week of "The Women"
at the University ef Alberta, November 6-11, as Sadie Hawkins, in the
person of Betty Co-Ed, desoended
upon helpless male students and
bore them off as spoils of viotory.
SADIE BECOMES FORWARD
Alberta co-eds greeting the Week
with wild enthusiasm as they stormed fraternity dens, male rooming
houses and other masculine hideouts with a barrage *of phone calls
which Joe College was duty bound
to answer. Trembling males who
sought concealment were invariably
discovered and dragged piecemeal
from their lairs by the oampus Amazons.
Aooording to authoritative reports,
little  resistance  was   offered   by  the
majority of men who appeared to be
resigned to their fate.
SNARES HER MAN
Atrocity stories which were circulated widely through unofficial
sources met with official denial from
Sadie Hawkins headquarters. "The
men simply loved lt," Sadie Hawkins
said,   "And  I  do  mean  love!"
Men who receive a phone call stating "This Is Sadie Hawkins" were
bound to accept the lady in question
as their escort for the week. The
girls acted on a policy of "flrst come,
first served!"
AND PAYS
The consensus of campus opinion
as the smoke of battle cleared waa
"It was a good flght while it lasted."
Asked for a statement regarding the
activities of the week, Sadie Hawkins said: "It's the woman who always pays, and do we mean
PAY!"
Now as the fateful week has passed into oblivion, all ia once more
quiet on the Alberta front. Two
THB    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1939
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia
OfBooi   800  Auditorium  Building
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.80
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
John Garrett
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Arvid   Baokman
Phone  Alma   1884
Mall Subscriptions, $3.00
Friday
Jaok   Margeson
SPORTS
Lionel Salt
Editorials
EDITOR RESIGNS
A question of some interest has come to this office in the form
ef a series of news-stories in the University of [Washington Daily.
It appears that the Editor of the Daily had been forced to resign
after an article of a doubtful wisdom was printed on the front page
of one of his papers.
The story concerned the habit of 'necking,' and gave one or
two intimate hints as to a general procedure to be followed by
exponents of the art. But apparently the Faculty of the University of Washington rose in anger against the article, and decided
that in future the Washington Daily must be censored by a Board
of both students and Faculty, the faculty members being chosen
(so it seems), from the faculty of journalism.
But the point open to debate is hardly whether the article published was a mistake; rather is it the problem of faculty control
over a student newspaper.    Every college paper on this continent
}>robably faces, at least once in its career, such a situation as exits upon the Washington campus today, but few Faculties fail to
realize the actual power and importance of a university student
newspaper.
It is true that frequently these newspapers print stories which
might be far better thrown into the waste basket, and it is true
that radical thought and opinion often characterize the editorial
columns, but few papers, it must be remembered, have student
editors who are old and seasoned. It is the very youthful jubilance, and caustic crying of a college paper which makes it entertaining.
Yet the faculty of the Washington campus are going to put a
determined stop to any further student opinion which happens to
disagree with the ideas of the sage and sobre censors. The new
editor of the paper will be in the difficult position of desiring to
represent student opinion whilst simultaneously trying to satisfy
the demands of a part-faculty board.
Surely this type of situation should not have arisen from such
a childish article as that printed in the Daily. It seems impossible
that the freedom of the student press—which should be desired by
students and faculty alike at Washington, if the great American
democracy still stands true to form—for*the article—in our opinion, could have offended only the most narrowminded of "purists."
The unfortunate end of Editor Petersen is to be regretted.
M****™*
COUNCIL MUST RESIGN
Campus struggles are rare enough in the ordinary way, but
this year seems to have been an exception. Differences of opinion
are at present the most characteristic thing about many of the
student 'Gladstones' and it would appear that tho Ubyssey has
been treated to an overwhelming amount of attention.
But at last the Ubyssey is prepared to thrust forward its well
hacked neck in order to take up a little matter with the celebrated
Students' Council.
Frankly, the Students' Councillors this year are the most useless, the most degenerate, and the most inefficient group of legislators upon which this Alma Mater Society has ever laid its eyes.
Yet the Publications Board has remained silent till now.
At the start of the session the Council took at least three meetings to ascertain exactly what students comprised the body, and
after five weeks the membership had to be published in this paper
in order that Councillors could learn the names of their worthy
colleagues.
At the end of the first month this writer felt that it should be
pointed ovit to the Councillors that there was a Union Building to
be completed. It was too obvious that the entire matter had slipped the minds of Council, or possibly that 'SDirty Nine" had slipped their minds.
Be this as it may, the Council eventually managed to spend
five minutes of their twentieth meeting on deciding whether a
Union Building was necossary, Anally coming to the conclusion
that such a structure would be purely superfluous on this campus.
Again the University paper came to the rescue of the oppressed population, and, championing their cause, rose to the greatest
of heights by suggesting that the Union Building was already
built. Council survived this direct blow, and decided to alter their
opinion to one of favoring such an edifice.
Later this paper was compelled to oppose the Treasurer of the
Council in his proposal to borrow $200,000.00 this year, in order to
balance the budget. Accordingly the power of the Press prevailed
and the Treasurer agreed to economize to the extent of the deficit.
And now once again the Ubyssey is in a life and death struggle
with the Council. This time we of the Publications Board hnve set
ourselves the task—and easy it will prove to be—of smashing the
Council, on the floor of the Gymnasium,
In brief, the Council have had the audacity to challenge the
campus scribes to a game of basketball, or some such game, and
have suggested playing on Wednesday at noon.
So shall it be 1
We of the 'Pub' accept the challenge, and express our sympathy to the future fallen heroes.    May their ond be painless.
RED CROSS
(Continued from Page 1  )
$1,800,000 for the purchase of raw
materials to make hospital supplies."
These raw materials are purchased
direct from the wholesalers, government tax deducted, and are shipped
across the continent to Branches
free of charge by the railways. Here,
they are cut to workable sizes and
re-distributed to the working units
where the women volunteers make
them into the above-mentioned supplies.
Although the war is only ten
weeks old, the Red Cross has spent
$200,000 on  hospital  supplies  to date.
PEACE-TIME   WORK
Peace-time activities must not be
neglected because of the War. In
Vancouver, the Canadian Red Cross
Society   has   distributed   an   average
of 8,000 blankets and garments, per
year, to needy veterans and veterans' departments.
The Canadian Red Cross Society
In B.C. maintains five Outpost hospitals, and numerous First-Aid posts
along our highways. It also maintains such services as Seaport Nurseries, Nursing Stations, Home Nursing Departments, and ready machinery for organization at the outbreak
of war.
INTERNATIONAL   ACTIVITIES
The work of the Red Cross is international in scope. Monies raised
in Canada may be used in conjunction with monies raised elsewhere
for the alleviation of sickness, epidemics and distress, be it in China,
Spain,  or  elsewhere.
It is the only organization through
which clothing, food, and information regarding prisoners of war can
be obtained by all nations.
IT MUST BE DONE
I had hoped, when I started to
write this column last September, to
establish a record ln two ways. One:
I was going to stay away from University topics as far as possible; two:
I was not going to pan anybody—at
leaat no one on this campus.
But now, ln spite of what our pro
feasor of psychology claims to be the
advantages of constructive criticism,
I muat do my duty. That duty lies in
panning    the   disorganized   sooietles
under L.S.E.—the Pep Olub, or Ma
mooks, The Band, P.D.C, etc.
THE  KIDS  DID  IT!
I would never have mentioned this
If I hadn't attended two football
games last Saturday. The first was
oftr own game with North Shore In
the afternoon; the second was the
night-game at V.A.C. between O'Dea
High of Seattle and Vanoouver College. And the reason I mention it Is
that our Pep organization waa made
to look very foolish by a couple of
fifteen-year old youngsters from the
College.
The two or three hundred boya and
Girls who made up the College cheering seotlon made more noise than
twice the number of sclencemen
could possibly cause at an Arta Pep
Meet. And the motivating factor behind lt all was the Uttle lad ln the
white sweater who, wtth the aid of
his ridiculously large megaphone,
turned his school-mates Into a frenzied mob of blood-thirsty aboriginies.
WHAT ABOUT US?
At our own game, In the afternoon,   there   were   probably   more
than 188 students present. But, In
spite of the turn-out, there waa not
a single yell leader In tho plaoe. All
the credit we can give la due Hugh
Livingston, who finally, In absolute
desperation, got up on the platform
and pushed the students through a
couple of yells aa well as he knew
how. My hat's off to you, Hugh.
And where was the Band? I'll tell
you. The Band was ln the Auditorium
practising! The Band needs practice,
but lt should And some other time to
run over new numbers. The Band is
needed   at gameu   more   than   it is
needed  in the  Auditorium. And, Incidentally, the Band wouldn't have to
spend Saturday afternoons practising
if L.S.E. could give lt some place to
get together during  the week.
WHO'S AT FAULT?
I'm not blaming the Pep Olub for
Its Inefficiency, and I'm not blaming
the Band for Its absence. There ls a
reason for this disorganization that
lies, not in the two groups mentioned
or in their executives, but rather at
the door of L.8.E.
Two years ago, a man named Mai-
colmn Brown was president of the
Literary and Scientific Executive.
Brown started the Radio Society and
nurtured tt into being. He did the
same with the Band. He also helped
organize a Olee Club.
Last year, Struan Robertson had
the L.S.E. Job. Struan reorganized the
Pep Club, he inaugurated an Honorary L.S.E. Society, he made an attempt to give this Campus Phi Beta
Kappa. When Robertson saw something going wrong with a club, he
tried to do something about it.
I claim that the recent break-down
of the P.D.O. ls not the fault of Frank
Wiggs. It ls the fault of his Council
superior, who ls supposed to cheok on
clubs which are not functioning as
they should.
How many of the newcomers to
the oampus have ever heard of
L.S.E., or know what It means?
SO WHAT?
If we are to save ourselves the embarrassment of another "168" Olub,
if we are to make any kind of money
out of our football teams, if wo are
to make sure of greater public support of our athletics, we must have
the oo-operatlon of L.8.E. Student's
Council should realize this. The Men's
Athletic Directorate should realize
this. L.S.E. should realize this.
If the Band isn't out at the game
next Saturday, and if there aren't at
least three cheer-leaders wearing Pep
Olub sweaters doing their best to
keep the crowd Interested, somebody's
really going to have something to sue
somebody about.
BELOW
THIS
HEAD
By. NEMO
A NOTE OF APPRECIATION
Nero, when he ruined my column
last week, must have unconsciously
remembered the old epigram; "When
In Rome do as the Romans do." No-
one knows why.
Nemo solemnly hopes that tha
powers that are bslow will see to it
that the next time Nero fiddles he
does so in a modsrn counterpart of
Dante's Inferno and not 'Below This
Head.'
But thanks, Nero, you did a good
job.
WE HAVE AN
ORCHESTRA NUCLEUS
Students have In the past attempted to form a Varsity orchestra
whloh they hoped would at some
time merit the approval of the majority of the student body as well as
the approval of Students' Council.
Their attempts, valiant and praiseworthy though they have been, met
with failure. It does not matter why.
But this year Ollmour Clark, third
year Arts student, has organized a
nucleus of eleven men and three coeds Into the Varsity Dance Orohestra.
Those students contributing their
time and tholr efforts in a desire
to form this orohestra are: Johnnie Fletcher, Byron Straight, Leo
Foster, Bob Murray, James Ho-
Gullooh, Sidney Poulton, Dennla
Leong, Leonard Korsch, Rosemary
Collins, Ruth Wilson, Valerie
Oardlner, and Jim Collier.
Aa yet their efforts have not been
officially recognised by Counoil.
IT NEEDS SUPPORT
Perhaps Council does not realize
the advantages of this orchestra.
Perhaps Council does not realise
that It will In the long run be an
asset to the University.
Nemo suggests that Darrell Braldwood In his capacity as L.B.E. president, Investigate its possibilities with
a view to giving It offlolal recognition and financial support.
True the A.M.S. Is operating this
year under a curtailed budget, but It
ts quite obvious that this orohestra
will pay for itself In the long run.
How?
Here is what it can do:
1. Play at a series of Informal
Saturday night dances in the new
Brock Memorial Building when it ls
opened In the spring.
The admission fee to these dances
will ln some measure more than return the Initial outlay by Council.
2. Contribute to the welding of a
University spirit among those students who live on or closs to the
oampus.
'8. Develop, if given proper encouragement, into an orchestra
whioh in the future will be able to
play at all Varsity functions.
Nemo congratulates Oil Clark and
those students who with him are trying to form this band.
WHEN IT APPEARS
Nemo was at one of the rehearsals
last week. When he realized that
they had practised for only six
weeks, he thought they were good.
The students will see and hear the
Varsity Danoe Orchestra next week
at a Pep Meet to be arranged by the
Mamooks.
The students should not expect to
hear Ole Olsen or Stan Patton.
They will hear Oil Clark and his
10-piece orohestra featuring Rosemary Collins as songstress.
PAWN JEERSON
(Continued from Page
ll
Englishman—"I say, what are they
doing?"
American—"They're  dancing."
englishman — "They   get   married
later,  don't  they?"
OOTTUM TOTEM
have practised pitching, putting,
darning, threading, whipping cream
until we are regular olive groves. We
promise good clean fun, and wholesome dead-end manoeuvres. We doubt
very much if there will be any opposition, but I wUl appear clad ln
you-know-what to make the annual
kick-off, anyway, just in case there
is a slight attempt at opposition.
OF PUNSTERS
But those puling pubsters with
their futile efforts will be mopped up
by our mighty men and beautiful
women. Don't quote me but we all
had our fortunes told by a palmist
and soloist who affirms our confidence tn ourselves.
Our line-up on washing day on
some line or other Is captlng Jeerson,
first half Jeerson. third half Jeerson,
net man Jeerson, guard Jeerson,
Goalie Jeerson so look out you pestiferous mosquitoes of pubsters.
OOTTUM  COFFIN?
If we don't win, we won't let you
Into our tin heaven. Ugh! Council
has spoken. Let the pale squaws of
ink cover their hides ln burial holes.
Ugh! Council has spoken.
jf if the god* were doting,
Smoked Plcobac while thu* reposing.
• Youth has the world on its shoulders—all
Its future. But Plcobac Is a great aid to burden-
bearing, fer a pipe relieves strain . . . And*
when you consider that Picobac ls the pick of
the Canadian Burley crop—always a mild, cool,
aweet smoke—its price is amazingly low.
HANDV MAL-TtOHT POUCH   •   1 %*
i/i-LB. "LOK-TOP" TIN   -   60*
^^^^ elso peeked In   Pocket  Tint
Kicobac
<-%
ll DOES tsote good in a pips I
//
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.* o smb. to 8 p-m.; Saturdaya 0 nan. to noon
LOOSB LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Oraphlc Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
XMA8 CARDS
NOW  ON
BALE
PUNDERBIRD
(Continued from Pago 1)
from hall to stairway, dragging hia
unbalanced budget behind him, whUe
Basil Robinson bites his lip in bitter
chagrin as the sand ln the hour glass
slowly but surely filters through.
The only possible manner by which
the council worms oan hope to attain
viotory Is by nefarious means. Naturally the Publications Board will play
its usual clean fair game.
It is too muoh te expect that the
Dirty   Nine,   who   for  the   paat  88
years have resorted to the basest of
skullduggery, will aUow tho conflict
to proceed long without tainting It
with rabid displays of trickery and
poor sportsmanship,
Even now there is a ounnlng leer ln
tlie eyes of James Harmer who sneers
wickedly  as  he slithers by  the Pub
stronghold.
PUNSTERS  CONFIDENT
But although the councU has repeatedly tried to crush the morale of
the Shrdlu Btaolns, their indomlnable
spirit remains unbroken. Several attempts to bribe cub-reporters to put
arsenic in the printer's Ink have met
with utter failure owing to the letters' unswerving loyalty to Joe Thoth.
Down in the Ubyssey fort, the Publications Wonder Team which haa
reigned undefeated throughout the
years, ls preparing to set the Tin
Oods in their place once again.
Last year the journalists trounced
the oouncU 86-2. This year, they expect to inflict a crushing defeat
vhlch the governmental tyrants will
never live down.
Backbone of the team and chief
shock absorbers, will be Ozzie Durkin
and Lionel Salt. Jack Margeson, Duh
Owatt and Dune (Westminster) McTavlsh will be In the front une
trenches. The wounded will be under
tne oharge of Mary Ann. A suitable
triangular one-piece garment has
been chosen as regulation strip for
all combatants.
THE PBICE OF DEATH IS CHEAP
Tomorrow at high noon, trembling
oounoil squad will face the Pub Wonder team, as a blood thirsty mob
leans forward to watch the kill. The
simpering smiles of Rosemary OoUins
are of no use now.
Not even the alluring femine wiles
of Biddy McNeill, as she rolls her
eyes upward ln a last desperate appeal for mercy, can save the council
goons as they face their Nemesis. We
can only hope that the end comes
quickly as the Garret machine swoops
down, and proves for all time that
the Pen ls truly mightier than the
Sword.
CORSAGES
These fall affairs are happier events for both, when
your lady fair Is embellished by a smart corsage
from Brown Bros.
Joe Brown (Arts '88), Mgr.
PHONE SEy. 1484
OS.
& CO.LTD.
068 Oranville Street
Letters To Th« Editor
Editor, The Ubyssey.
Dear Pawn:
In the forthcoming Pub-Council
Armageddon,, one of the staunohost
Pubplayera Is to be a prominent bas-
keteer who qualified with an article
on the Sports 'page' headed "By By
Straight."
If "By-By Straight" has become a
pubster this way, might lt be too
goony to suggest that one "Barrel
Driftwood" whose article in the blue-
and-whlte edition of Nov. 14 had that
by-line, is none other than a Councillor ln by-line's clothing? and must
now play for the Publications team?
Chang Suey has sent me this interesting note by wing-Jing post:
"Ballell Dliftwood actually none other
than Counclllol Dallel Blaidwood.
Might this unworthy person suggest
that if Blaidwood does not play under Pub colours in forthcoming clash,
will receive personal O. S. wing-J. in
small of back."
Is Braldwood on the spot?
WlU he dare play for the Dirty
Nine Wednesday?
Sincerely,
PRO BONO PUBLICATIONS.
DEBATE
(Continued from Page 1)
freedom   to   themselves   during   the
present crisis.
In his rebuttal, as he re-emphasized the need for democracy in the
war time, Davis maintained that civU
liberties on the campus were seriously threatened If members of the opposition sincerely believed the opinions they expressed.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR BUDGET  PLAN
Seymour at Dunsmuir
__: Tuesday, November 17, 1939
THB    UBYSSEY
Three
CO.T.C
ORDERS
Orders by Lieut.-Col. O. M. Shrum,
M.M., Commanding U.B.C. Contingent
C.O.T.C.
FART ONE
No. SO NOVEMBER 17, 1930
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1.  DUTIES
Duties for week ending November
smi, leaoi
Orderly Officer, and Lt. R. 8. F.
Robertson.
Next for duty, and Lt. H. F. O.
Spring.
Orderly Sergeant, Opl. Lamont, R.A.
Next for duty, Sgt. Guthrie, J.
3.   PARADES
1. The Monday-Wednesday group
wUl parade on Monday, Nov. SO, and
Wednesday, Nov. 88, at 1000 hours.
3. The Tuesday-Thursday group
will parade on Tuesday, Nov. SI, and
Thursday, Nov. S3, at 1000 hours.
3. NOON LECTURES
During the week commencing Nov.
30, lectures will be held on Monday,
Nov. SO, Tuesday, Nov. 81, Wednesday,
Nov. 83, and Friday, Nov. 34, at 1830
hours.
4. TRAINING
Training will continue aa per syllabus posted.
0.  DRESS
Those members of the O.O.T.O. who
have been issued uniforms will wear
them to the Monday and Tuesday
parades.
(W. H. Barton) and Lieut.
for A/Adjutant,
U.B.O. Contingent, O.O.T.O.
Luxembourg Student
Report Available
A report of the First International
"Conversation" of Students, held In
Luxembourg in 1038 on the topic "Education in the Modern University" has
been published by the International
Institute of Intellectual Oo-operatlon
and oan be obtained International
Affairs Literature Service, 134 Wellington Street, Ottawa, at $1.00.
Co'Ed Sports
—By Oarry Armstrong
Saturday saw the Blue and Oold
grass hookey eleven win by default
over Pro-Recs 8. Having turned out
with new sooks and all, the girls
staged a practice game anyway. Our
star oentre-halfbaok, Incidentally,
reoeived thunderous applause from
the military sideline.
Captain Myrne Nevison revealed
that the team to play Washington in
the Spring will be picked on the
basis of attendance at praotioes.
Scoring their 3rd consecutive win,
our Senior "A" basketballers downed
Excelsiors 40-18 In Friday night's
tilt at the Y.W. With skipper Ruth
Wilson on the floor only a short
time, the others managed very well.
The girls are only hoping their luok
will last.
VARSITY) CoUlns 8, Wilson 6,
Thompson 18, Eokhardt 10, Harris
0, BeU 14, Orchard.
THE LOW DOWN
Echoes of Kamloops: Joyce went
to the danoe ln style! A real high-
class truck . . . the escort's chaperon! . . . the referee was O.K. after
the game, wasn't he, Jean? . . .
Oraoe's "cute kid" was the envy of
all . . . having gone to steep in an
empty smoking room, imagine
Ruth's embarassment on waking to
And herself the object of a million
gases ... on the train, the conductor told the girls to make more noise
with their yells. (Can you believe
it?)
GET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THB
CLARKE & STUART
00. LIMITED
Stationers and Printers
M0  SEYMOUR  8TREET
VANCOUVER, R.C.
Little Theatre
Presents 'Of
Mice And Men
Russ (Gordon) Keillor, former Varsity student, will take the leading role
ln John Steinbeck's powerful drama
"Of Mice and Men" whloh wiU be
presented at the Little Theatre, 037
Commercial Drive, for four nights
this week, commencing tomorrow eve
nlng at eight-thirty.
"Of Mice and Men" won the Oritlo's
award as the best play of 1038 and
Vancouver audlenoea will havo an op
portunlty to decide its standing for
1030.
Oarfleld A. King, director ot the
production, reports that he has assembled an unusually able oast and
feels that lt will give a moving and
persuasive performance.
Tickets may be reserved at Kelly's
on Seymour Street.
Student  Passes
Engineering Inetitute
C.N.R. Expert
To Discuss
Transportation
"Engineering ln# Transportation"
will be the aubjeot of Guest Speaker
8. W. Falrweather'a address at the
annual dinner and meeting of the
Vanoouver Branch of the Engineering
Institute of Canada on Friday, November 34, at 0.30 p.m. In Hotel
Georgia (Patrlola-Connaught Rooma).
Chief of Researoh and Development
of Oanadlan National Railways, Mr.
Fairweather is an expert on the many
phases of railway operation in Canada. He graduated from MoGlU University in Engineering In 1018, and
has held the positions of structural
engineer and office engineer with the
Department of RaUways and Canals.
Members are requestsd to telephone
dinner reservations to tho seoretary
not later than 0 p.m. Thursday, at
SEy. 0283. Tickets are $1.00 eaoh.
Dress Is informal.
Immediately following dinner ant!
preceding Mr. Falrweather'a address
the annual business will be transacted.
Bridge Design Contest
Burnett First
In America;
Wins $200.
Daniel A. Burnett, '80 graduate in
civil engineering at U.B.C. has been
named as the winner of the first student prise of $300 In a timber bridge
design contest sponsored by the
American Forest Products Industries, National Lumber Manufactures Association and Timber Engineering Company of Washington,
D.C.
Burnett is at present engaged aa
junior engineer on a Provincial Oovernment road work project near Nelson.
Sherwood D. Ford, who also graduated this year from the U.B.C, was
awarded a $10 prise. Ford Is at present employed with Boeing Aircraft
of Canada Ltd.
Prof, J. F. Mulr, associate professor of structural engineering under
whom these men studied, reoeived
honourable mention In the major
competition open to all practicing
engineers and architects, of United
States and Canada.
Salisbury Lodge
Hops Tuesday
Tuesday night, the boys of Salisbury Lodge, will make merry at the
annual Salisbury Lodge Fall informal. The danoe will be held this year
In the  Peter  Pan Ballroom.
Approximately thirty Salisbury
men will be in attendance. A limited
number of outsiders will also be admitted for $1.00 a couple. Tlokets
are obtainable from any Salisbury
resident.
A statement from the Lodge urged
co-eds, who wished to attend the
dance, to plaoe their names on the
Salisbury Date Bureau as soon as
possible.
OOTTUM  TOTEM
The following students are
requested to pick up their passes
at Council Office as soon as possible :
Allan, J. A., Baker, D. O., Ball, H.
W., Ballard, A. O, Banford, Pauline,
Barton, E. O, Blrkeland, Elisabeth,
Butler, Irene, Bradner, F. B„ Brown,
Viotorla.
Campbell, Jean, Carlisle, Don, Oar-
son, John, Carter, Evelyn, Christie,
Oeorge, Olark, A„ Cleveland, Don,
Coburn, Robert, Cochrane, Ruth,
Cochrane, J. S„ Collins, J. A.. Kerr,
8. A., Klaasen, W.
Ladner, Dorothy, Millard, Robert,
Moore, William, MaoDonald, Margaret, MoLeod, R., MaoMUlan, G. A.
Narod, M., Nasser, D„ Pbelps, J. L.
Darley, Harry, Elliott, A. H„ FUteau,
J. F., Finch, Marguerite, Finlay, Graham, Finlayson, Jean, Gaudin, S. D„
Oobel, Margaret, Gordon, Michael,
Gwyn, A. Hammersley, C, Hatch, J.,
Holden, R. C„ Hudson, A. G.
Johnston, Lorraine, Johnston, J., A.
Raoey, D. R. Rand, J. A. Rattenbury,
A. Richardson, Darwin Robertson,
Betty Rutherford.
Roy E. Selby, H. O. Spring, Hattie
Staghall, 8. Stamer, Margaret Taylor, Edwin Tuley, J. 8. Twining, Hortense Warne, O. E. White, J. W. Wylle, O. B. Yip.
Editors Fume
Over Student's
Handwriting
"What Is your flrst name, please?",
and "How do you spell your surname?". These and other seemingly
Impertinent questions were asked by
edltora of the Student Directory when
their overworked optioa oould no
longer decipher the hieroglyphics
which purported to be handwriting
on the registration carda.
The Totem flies were supposed to
be used for compiling the directory,
but these were Incomplete. Many people had obviously deolded by the time
.hey reached the Totem card, last ln
the registration booklet, "What's the
use? If they don't know my name by
now, I give up."
EDITORS DESPAIR
The editors wanted to give up, too.
Especially when they could have access to the Student Council flies only
one hour a day because they were
being used ln connection with the
issuing of the Student passes.
Trying to And a Smith ln the Vancouver telephone directory is no joke,
especially when you discover ln the
end that Joe C. Smith; home address
Is Kalamazoo and that he doesn't
know the phone number where he Is
boarding. However, this la nothing
oompared with the difficulty caused
when the poor student apparently has
no home whatsoever, and will not
even give the number of the door
step whioh he frequents most often.
DITCH DIGGING
Typing 3400 names, addresses and
phone numbers means lifting one's
Angers approximately 80 times per
student, including the punctuation
marks. If this ls multiplied out it
results ln 130,000 taps. Now If you
add the number of repeats occasioned
by the Inadequacy of the Totem flies
and the changes of address whloh
were included In the last week ln
spite of deadlines, and multiply out
Into pounds of energy expended—if
you still follow us—you will have tho
reason why six students were found
to be suffering from nervous exhaustion and physloal inertia.
OOTTUM TOTEM
Ex-Kitsilano Dance
To Be Held Thursday
The annual Ex-Kltsllano Reunion
Danoe will be held Thursday, Nov. 33
at the Alma Academy. Dancing to
the music of Stan Patton and his
orchestra will be from 0 tUl 1.
Tickets at $1.00 per couple may be
obtained at the dance or at Kitsilano
High School.
Don't trust to luok
Hold your Totem with a buek.
Lady: "So you're on a submarine;
tall me, what do you do?"
Sailor: "Oh, I run forward and
hold her nose when we're going to
dive."
—Manltoban.
Reserve
SALISBURY  CAFE
BANQUETS AFTERNOON TEAS
LUNOHES DINNERS
±
We know when a tuxedo or tail suit is proper . . .
when you can wear a derby or a "Topper . . . when
your studs should be black and when they should be
white. You'll find us an informal haven when you're
confronted with formal difficulties . . . a practical
guide when you're puzzled about just what is right.
Tuxedo
Impeccably correct single or double breasted,
conventional and drape models.    SS9.S0
. . . with stiff bosom with pleats   SS.OO
. . . blaok Barathea tied bow, with square or
pointed ends _ - 7Ss
. . . black vest of groagraln patterned In a
neat, conservative all-over design.  - SB.OO
. . . smoked pearl studs ahd cuff links, smartly styled.  _._ - SB.SO
. . . handsewn chamois gloves.   SS.OO
. . . white silk handkerchief. 7Se
or Tails
Tailored perfection In smooth fitting, faultless
conventional and drape models.	
. . . with   white   dress   shirt   with   starched
bosom.  -   SS.OO
. . . with blrdseye pique pointed tie.   78o
. . . with single breasted white vest that la
backless for added comfort.    SB-OO
. . . with white pearl cult links and studs. SS.SO
. . . with gloves of white kid    SB. SO
. . . with luxurious scarf of white crepe with
fringed ends.     —S3.SO
Men's Shops, Main Floor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
"Always the Best At Spenoer's"
C. S. A.
(Continued from Pago 1)
ence location.
The  Third  Conference   will   again
consider    national    and     university
problems   and   direot   the   activities
that are to follow it.
LARGE  REPRESENTATION
Thirty   campuses   from   Charlotte-
town to Victoria will be represented
at the -conference.    A large French-
Canadian delegation has been assured.     The   National   Exeoutive   Committee  report*  that  already  several
of the local  Assemblies have  asked
that their delegations be increased.
Local delegates will be  selected
on the basis of their contribution
to   university  life.    The  ooat   per
delegate,     Including     the     pooled
transportation rate, will be ln   the
neighborhood    of     twenty-five    to
thirty dollars. It waa stated by the
Conference Committee.
This   will   give   assistanoe   to   the
delegates from the far West and the
far  East,  -who  otherwise  would  not
be able to be present.
— Classified—
RECORD RECITAL
A programs of classical music selected from the Carnegie record library will be presented Tuesday noon
in Arts 100 at 13:40 sharp. Program
in the next issue ot the Ubyssey.
BADMINTON
Varaity Badminton players drop-
pod a close contest to University
Hill Club 7-5 at the Varsity Oym
November 0.
LOST
A Oerman 1 book In Arts 100 with
Esme Caydslen's name ln It. Will
finder please return to Mr. Home's
office.
LOST
Large red fountain pen—somewhere near University gates or on
the Campus, Tuesday, November 14.
Return to Geoffrey Caine, Pub office.
THE Photograph Club will not meet
today because of the Alma Mater
Meeting. The next meeting will be
held on Thursday, at 13:30 ln Arts
106.
Copy of Hamlet lost; with notes. Return to Ruth Hutchinson A.M.S.
offloe.
NO TOTEMS WILL BE SOLD
AFTER, Wednesday, November aa.
Orders will be taken in the Pub
Office up to 8 p.m. on that day.
Arthur Lang, director of the Safe-
way's Food Division, will address the
Aggie Discission Club Wednesday at
8.30 in Agriculture 100.
Indian Student
Called To Bar
Raghblr Singh Bans. M.S.A. 1036,
formerly a student at U.B.C has
completed the law examinations of
the University of London, England,
and has been called to the Bar. He ls
sailing at once for his homeland, India, where he plans to make use of
his training ln Agriculture and Law.
OOTTUM TOTEM
LOST: 4 OF 8 KEYS IN CHEV. KEY
case; on the bus on Friday; Return
to lost and found dept., Mr. Home's
office. Reward.
Le Cerele Franoalse, se reunlra mardi,
le 31 novembre, chez Dr. D. O. Evans,
5663 Chancellor Boulevard, a 8 heures.
CRICKET  CLUR
The annual general meeting of the
B.C. Cricket League wtll be held on
Tuesday, Nov. 38, at the Pacific Athletic Club, S31 Howe St., at 7.30 p.m.
It ls Important that members of
the U.B.C. Cricket Club make every
effort to attend.
OOTTUM  TOTEM
Varsity Band: An Important practice
will be held on Thursday, November
33, at 13.30 ln the Stadium. A full
attendance ls requested.
'Das  Fllegende  Klassen  Zlmmer"
Lost  Arts  100 Tuesday.  November 4.
Return to Esme Oaydzlen, pub offloe.
"You sold me a car two weeks ago."
"Yes, sir."
"Tell me again all  you said about
it.  I'm  getting  discouraged."
—The Sheaf.
OOTTUM  TOTEM
VWWAVWVWVWVVVVWVVWWA
MART KENNEY and His Western
Oentlemen . . . available for private
engagements.
HOTEL
VANCOUVER CCERMEN   TROUNCE   LEAGUE   LEADERS   3-1
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
VARSITY 12—LIONS 0
ENOLISH RUOBY
VARSITY 33—MARPOLE 3
UBEECEES 3—ROWERS 6
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1939
Varsity   Plays   Victoria   In   Final
Varsity Play
Maple Leafs
At Gym
Looking- for Win in
Wed. Nite Game
Against Champs
It will be students against the
grads when the Thunderbird hoop
team takes the floor against the
strong Maple Leaf team In the gym
tomorrow night, In quest of their
seoond win In four starts.
The ex-Varsity students haven't
lost a game this season but the
Birds ars not afraid of thslr average. The Birds have been beaten by
individualistic teams who break up
the Varsity sone defenee with long-
shots by shooting stars.
THEY'RE  DD7FERENT
But the Maple Leafs will be different. It Is a team club>v Varsity
hopes to hold the Forum team's
offence by alternating aone and
man-to-man defence.
With the brand-new double-
screening playa the Van VUetians
are using along with Flynn's bucket-shot, the Thunderbirda might
cause an upset that would stand
the  downtown   klbltsers  on  their
The Maple Leafs will have Matthison, Art 'Willoughby, Jimmy
Bardsley, and Dlok Wright, all stars
for the Varsity team In their day.
YOU
ALWAYS
GET
THE
NEWS
FIRST
in the
News-
Herald
HAVE IT
DELIVERED
AT HOME
READ IT
ON THE
BUS
50c
PER MONTH
CANADA'S
FASTEST
GROWING
NEWSPAPER'
'Birds Blank Lions 12-0
In Ninth Straight Win;
Play Revellers For Cup
-With the Lipton Cup hanging in the balance, Varsity's Thunderbirds of the grid-iron, an undefeated and untied army of
athletes, will entreneh for their final battle of the season, next
Saturday, when they clash with Victoria Bevelers at Athletic
Park. The Collegians qualified for the game by trouncing North
Shore Lions 12-0 last Saturday.
No one was much surprised as the Student forces went
through their paces last week for the benefit of a thousand-odd
fans in the process of trimming the rubber-toothed Lion, last
year's champions, and winning their ninth straight game, a record
in Big Four and Campus circles.
Touchdowns  by  Teagle   and   Harmer did the trick with Teagle con-
FIERY FORWARD
Pictured above Is red-thatched
Evann Davies, fighting sorum man
for Coach Carey's Varsity rugger-
men. Evann is a sophomore, playing
his seoond season of flrat division
rugby, and Is proving to be a real
powerhouse In the somewhat anemic
scrum this year. Watch him go
places In future games.
ENGINEERS LOSE
Last Saturday the Engineers, a
newly-formed team of soienoemen
went down to defeat before a team
of Seaforths 9-0. The soore is not
Indicative of the play, however,
since the Slipstickmen really pulled
a surprise and turned In a good
brand of ball. There are a goodly
number of fair ball toters on the
squad, and with a little tuition the
lads should form quite a classy aggregation.
ROWING CLUH
There will be a general meeting on
Thursday, November 98. Plans for
Spring activities will be discussed.
Watch the notloe board In the Quad
for the Room number.
BADMINTON CLUB
The Badminton Club wlU  be able
to play at the Oym on;
Thuraday nights at 7: SO.
Saturdays from 3:30-9:30.
v. *,.l***'*k*ww** + *4l
Fraternity  and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Speoialty
DANCE PROORAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOME,'
LETTERHEADS  and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
56s Seymour St.
verting both with perfeot drop-kloks
to pick up the two extra points. .
WILLIAMS FLASHES
No one was particularly brilliant
for the Collegiate crowd although
Tommy Williams, playing fifty-five
minutes did Trojan work In the
backfleld, and helped set up both
scores. As usual, Johnny Pearson
shone at end.
First Varsity score oame as the
result of a North Shore fumble In
the first quarter, before the fans had
had time to sit down. Lucking dropped the ball on the Lion forty, and
Freddy Smith, coming up on the
play, dribbled the ball for fifteen
yards, falling on it as It rested on
the  twenty-five yard stripe.
Tommy WiUiams and Lionel
Fournler pushed the pigskin down
to the three yard line, and Teagle
knifed through the Une to soore.
Employing rugger tactics, Teagle
then booted the convert with a
perfect drop-kick.
Williams figured in the only other
score of the game, when, ln the final
frame, he galloped forty-five yards
through the Lion secondary, to be
hauled down by Bill Bishop on the
five yard line. On two plays Williams
progressed four of those five yards,
setting up the play for Harmer who
scored on a straight line buck,
Teagle again converting.
OLEANINOS: Varsity pulled the
"play of the day" in the seoond quarter when Pearson recovered a North
Shore fumble, lateralled to Harmer,
who passed to Tucker, who, In turn,
gave the ball to Foulton. Four men
on the play and 69 yards their reward. . . . Twice North Shore missed
set-up scores when passes Into the
end-zone went wide of their mark.
. . . Varsity was penalized yards In
the contest, more than they have
had oalled against them all season.
. . . Bullock clicked for twenty yards
on a version of the old Statue of
Liberty play. . . . Oraham Finlay,
out with a bruised shoulder, played
only the last five minutes. . . . The
O'Dea gridders from Seattle witnessed the contest, remarking on Pearson's kicking, and the size of the
Canadian ball . . . they also liked
the hard hitting Varsity guard,
Freddy Smith. . . . Bob Brown ought
to do something about this Pete
Mauro , , . the somewhat slap-happy
Al Schact of Big Four football
should be signed to a long-term contract .
—L.H.S.
Palommar
DANCE   FRI.   AND   SAT.
From 9-1
VERN MoINNIS
His Trumpet and His Orchestra
Pat Oidney, Vocalist
Friday:  Ladles 25c, Oents 40c
Saturday: Ladies 35c, Oents SOo
Enquire   now   regarding   rental
of   ballroom   for   club   dances.
You'll  meet  friends.
Have Your Shoes
DYED
In the New Fall Fashion
75o
PRICE  LIST
Men's Half Solea   75c
Men's Rubber Heels SOo
Men's Leather Heels   40o
Ladles'  Top Lifts    SOo
Ladles'  Rubber Heels    35c
Full  Solea, Rubber  Heels
and  Shine    $1.95
Shoes Dyed Blaok  40c
Empire Shoe
Rebuilders
713 W. Fender TRin. 47S8
Soccer
Premiers Held
Scoreless In
Second Half
Ubeecees Tie With
St. Regis 1-1
The Varsity soccermen came Into
their own Saturday at Cambie Street
Orounds when they completely outplayed the league-leading New Westminster Premiers and emerged victorious by a 3-1 score after a stirring second-half offensive.
The feature contest was to have
been played on the oampus but at
the last minute It was switched to
Cambie Street, and this may have
proved the margin of the viotory for
the speedy young Blue and Oold
team.
From the first peep of Referee
Ooodall's whistle, the oolleglans had
the upper hand, and it was only a
sudden breakaway that gave the
Premiers their lone goal within the
flrst ten minutes of the game.
Thla relapse made all tbo difference to the campusmen and they
pressed throughout the majority
of the flrst half without being able
to beat Howser ln the Royal City
net.
ROUGH *N TOUGH
The game soon began to roughen
up, and the Referee gave several
fouls against the league-leaders
much to the chagrin of their whole
team. In this part of the game Fred
Sasaki was scintillating In his position at left half and kept up his
calm and effective playmaklng
throughout the contest. Basil Robinson was slightly injured before
half time and Temoin went to inside-right where he once again gave
evidence  of his versatility.
Stew Roach, playing only hts second game ln the forward line, tied
y_e game up In the flrst minute of
the second half when he blasted one
home from close in after a lightning
movement on the right.
Only ten minutes later, Doug Todd
registered the ultimate winning
counter on a freak shot, whioh rolled slowly but awkwardly to the
Westminster goalie and then obligingly Jumped ln between his legs
Into the  goal,
HOT STUFF
This break was followed by Te-
moin's counter with 20 minutes to
go. The checkerboard passing movement originating from Sasaki on the
left which resulted in the soore had
hoary old critics standing around ln
spasms of delight.
With nothing to lose the Premiers
gave everything they had for the
rest of the game but even at that
the locals kept them off without
much trouble. Rush, Robinson, and
Wallace were steady on defense
throughout,
The wholesale switching of positions seemed to work wonders
with the Blue and Oold team.
Doug Todd, after a shaky atart,
was more than adequate In his
new right half position, whUe Ben
Herd showed possibilities at. centre.
ANOTHER  TIE
The U.B.C. aggregation, meanwhile was tying with St. Regis on
the campus, 1-1. The college boys
looked as though they would be
crashing the win column by virtue
of Campbell's second half counter,
but  lt  was  not  to  be.
A poor call by the referee, 'Which
that worthy gentleman almost admitted after the game, gave the
Hotelmen a penalty which they converted not many minutes before the
end. —ROBINSON.
OOTTUM  TOTEM
AFTER  THE  SHOW  .  .  .
Visit  Vancouver's Most  Beautiful Cafe
CHRIS'S GRILL
BELOW THE COMMODORE
After-Theatre Teas Fascinating Teacup Reading
fi double delight
* PIN 1ST ROASTID FILSIRTS
JIRSIY MILK CHOCOLAT1
Snjotf a bar dally
THE  BEST MILK  CHGCDLATE  MADE
Rugger
Varsity Trims
Marpole 33-3;
Ubeecees Lose
Hy DOUG WATT
Varsity's "A" team again hit its
stride last Saturday at the Oval
when lt downed the squad from Marpole 33-3. The win keeps the Campus
lads in a virtual flrst place tie with
the Meralomans who also copped the
decision in their contest, although
the Kitsiemen have a game In hand
over the students.
The Marpole aggregation made It
a contest for about the flrst ten minutes, but then Just seemed to fall
apart at the seams, practically giving the game to the Careymen on
a platter.
The flrst tally of the game came
with Richards clearing to Howie
MoPhee, who, after making one of
his snappy runs, slipped the leather to Alan Wallace for the soore.
MANY SCORE
By the end of the frame, Tom Mc-
lachlan, Lyman Day-Smith, and Carl
Chapman had all gone for a try
apiece. Chapman, Incidentally, added
6 more points to his quota by converting these three tries.
With the resumption of play McPhee, Chapman, Richards, Day-
Smith, and Mason each .tallied once,
with but a single reply from the
Marpollans. The final score thus
read Varsity 33, Marpole 3.
Rumour has lt that now the Canadian football schedule has run its
oourse but for the playing of one
game. Coach Carey ls trying to entice the former English players back
to the fold.
However, lt seems that the lads
feel somewhat tired after a. rather
strenuous season of tough play, and
are not Inclined to turn out until
after Xmas.
NEED NEW RLOOD
On the other hand, with a McKechnie Cup tilt with Victoria looming up early in December, Coach
Carey is very anxious that the men
put in an appearance before the holidays. So at present things seem at
a deadlock between the two groups,
but it seems hardly likely that the
Canadian men will turn out for Just
one game this season.
CLOSE   ONE
The Ubeecees on Saturday put up
a hard flght before going down to
defeat beforo a strong Rowing Club
team,   6-3.   The   Rowers   lead   3-0   at
the half-way mark, by virtue of a
smooth three run, but the studenta
fought baok at the start of the seoond canto, and replied with a try by
Alan Ross.
The Rowers however, proved too
good, and got the clincher late In
the frame. The Ubeecees showed
their  best  form   of the  season.
+*+++****l-*++*+*+********
VARSITY SERVICE        I
STATION ±
"AT THE GATES" +
"Our   Service   Means  Happy      *
^ Motoring" 4*
* Tenth  and  Blanca ' ♦
■5I-+******************* *■•*■-*•+$
Going Out?
Consult Esquire
UNIVERSITY
MEN
KNOW
STYLE
COUNTS
that's <why
ESQUIRE
SERVES
SO MANY
OF THEM
Tip Top Agents
For South Oranville
Esquire Men's
APPAREL
2G64 Oranville
BAy. 9680

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125063/manifest

Comment

Related Items