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The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1950

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 COME
TO THE
MARDI GRAS
The Ubyssey
COME
TO THE
MARDI GRAS
vol. xxxn
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1950
No. 37
Legion Branch To Stay
Active Club on Campus
Committee Formed to Examine
Points Brought Up at Meeting
Male Chorus Line Shows At Pep Meet Toddy
lit Armory qt Noon Todoy
Frosh To Parade Queen
Candidate At Pep Meet
SEDUCTIVE MALE CHORUS LINE composed of male fraternity members will parade before
■tudent* today in the Armories at 12:30 p.m. Fr osh queen, "Madame X," a dark horse candidate,
Will also put In appearance, according to the Fr osh executive. As an added attraction, candidates for Mar4l Gras Queen will be presented. A (.mission is the purchase of a raffle ticket.
HAMBER HOCKEY
TICKETS GO ON
SALE TODAY
Tickets (or the UBC Thunderbtrd-
Alberta Oolden Bear hotkey games
are now on stile at the office of the
Graduate Manager.
Student prices are N cents without
_     , ,,,,,, ■ privilege pass and 25 cents with a
Freshmen are going to have their innings. privilege posn.
When the Greek Letter Societies stage a pep meet in the t   n0 student tickets will be on side
UBC Armory today at 12:30 p.m., Freshmen will be on hand  at the forum,
With mysterious Madame X, their candidate for Mardi Gras
%vma. « '.	
"•he's the most ravishing beauty on
the ownpiii," John fraser eecretary-
tmsurer of the Froth executive told
Tradltionally left out of other queen
contests, which break out like a rash
during the winter months at UBC,
Freshmen will drive their beauty into
the .Armories to parade with the
other nine sorority candidates.
The Mardi Oras, an annual fraternity-sorority do,' will be held this
week in the Commodore Cabaret.
Dates are January 19 and 20.
The beat sections In the Forum have
been reserved for students.
Phrateres Formal
Initiation Tomorrow
Phrateres formal initiation tomorrow at 7:45 p.m. will mark the fifteenth
anniversary of the organization on the
campus.
An invitation is extended to all
former Phratereans to attend the in-
tiatlon ceremony at which the dress
is informal. Aftsr the initiation, installation of officers for next term will
take place.
Those Intending to be present are
asked to get in touch with the AMS
office for purposes of catering.
University
crici
Critical
~ ■&**^^^&»j^&^H*Lx- „- .****•* s-*^
Conditions Blamed Upon Lock of
Of Preparation As Over $2000 Loss
Union finances at the University of Alberta are at a critical
stage, with a reported loss of more than $2000 already this year.
Condition of the budget has been^v
blamed mainly on the lack of prep
aration and analysis of club budget.
Union treasurer Gerry Watkins proposed a plan which would give more
responsibility to Individual club
treasurers, and less responsibility to
the central organization.
University of Alberta Union, which
compares with the Alma Mater Society of UBC, has lost $2465 already
this year. Their present surplus of
$281 is only a fraction of the budgeted surplus, which was set at
$2312.
Watkin's suggestion is that each
club treasurer keep records which
will  give  adequate   information   on
past expenditures. In this way, they I31,
could compare their expenses with
the amount allotted to them in the
Union budget.
The fact that they cannot control
their revenue has caused their present
crisis. Union organization revolves
around finance, and Watkins insisted
that their method is suitable for n
student enrollment of 1800 rather
than the three to four thousand of
today. Nevertheless, enrollment has
gone down to 3375 from the 3975 of
last year, a factor which may influence future budget decisions.
An additional one thousand dollars
is now required because of a change
which has moved their fiscal year
ahead to June 30, rather than March
'Twin Clossts
Fraternities
Spring Rushing
Starts Today
Rgistration for Spring Fraternity Rushing is now well
under way and will continue
until February 14.
Fee of $1.00 is charged each
rushee who applies to AMS
office.
*r V *r
'AT 18.45 HOURS this Thursday,
the Armories Squadron Leader Evans of the Northwestern Air Command
will discuss foreign alrforces to members of Squadron One and Two of the
University Air Flight. All ex-servlec
men are welcomed.
Sp Sf> Sp
INTERNATIONAL Students Club,
general meeting Wednesday, January
18, Hut A 4. 12:30 p.m.
Discussion: Meeting place for Sunday tea. The Outrigger or the Dolphin*?
Which CBR radio program to visit?
Which industries to visit?
Ski Trip?
NICHOLAS NICKLEBY will be presented by the Film Society at 3:30
p.m., 6:00 p.m., and 8:00 p.m. today in
the Auditorium..
Admission to the film is 25 cents.
*S* *p 9f
UNITED NATIONS CLUB will
probe the question of whether the
World Press is furthering or hindering tne cause of peace, at its regular
meeting today.
^Speakers on the controversial topic
"The Press, essence of Power and
Prejudice," Will be Ubyssey staffer
Les Armour and Peace Movement
chairman John Randall.
Discussion will be held at 12:30 in
Arts 100 today.
"OPERATIC SELECTIONS" will be
presented by the Music Appreciation
Club tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. in the
Men's Club Room of Brock Hall.
pj. if. if,
"HOW ADULT ARE YOU" is the
subject of Dr. Black's address to be
given to The Student Christian Movement in Arts 312 today.
This is the first of a series of discussion groups on the theme "Christian Views on Human Relations."
,   ¥ «        ¥
JIM MacNEIL, secretary of the National CCF University Federation will
report to tha CCF club Wednesday on
the recent convention held at Kingston. Meeting will be held at 3:30 in
the Arts Hut 5.
"DUST OJt DESTINY" a scientific
religious film will be presented by the
Varsity Christian Fellowship at 12:30
UBC's branch of the Canadian Legioq will not fold up.
Nearly 100 Legionaires jammed themselves into Applied
Science 102 yesterday and signified to their executive that they
wished to carry on in their present role,
i   Committee of nine Legion members •-
will   be  formed  to  examine  points
brought up at the meeting and  to
report   back   at   the   next   general
meeting,
Frank Lewis, chairman of the grants
and gratuities committee, stressed the
service that the Legion has supplied
to student veterans, and said tho
need is getting greater.
He stated that' he did not support
the suggestion of a seperate veteran
alumni. "There is already too much
segregation of veterarfs," he told the
meeting.
Veterans owe a great deal to the
Legion, Grant Livingstone, AMS
president, 1947-48, said. He also
praised the university, who, he said,
"have given us a good deal."
"It is our duty to repay that debt,"
he said?
He felt the debt could be repayed
in a measure by affecting a continued
connection with the university bj
means of an ex-service branch of th<
alumni.
He stated that students are in a
position to offer leadership to local
Legion groups after they leave UBC
President of Branch 72, John Haat
outlined a program for the futurr
to include the annual dance, a nationally sponsored student veteran:
wives' day and a possible banquet.
Legion officials last week told thc
Ubyssey they feared th#y might havr
to quit the campus because of the
lack of support from membership.
They proposed leaving UBC, carrying on in their present role, or setting
up an alumni service for vets whe
had graduated from UBC.
ROY KNIGHT, veteran CCF
member for Saskatoon City,
will address thi CCF Club tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. in Engineering 200 on "300,$$$ Joblets
—Where Do We Go ircttn
Here?" Mr. Knight, a, jgjtfJpr
high school teacher ieffi0faw
on a speaking tour fc&lhi Gd-
operative Commonwealth
Vouth Movement.
Srod Employment
Applications Dili
implications for permanent employment are now being accepted front
ejreduattog student* In all tet$l«*;
Mr. L. WjUougbby, of the employ-
nent Service will be aviiJalli "lor
interview  in Hut M7 Tuesday an*.
Thursday ot each week, commencing
1 January 17.
After A Lecture
#f I p.m. tomorrow in the auditorium.
Former Sun Managing Editor Says:
^m^memesmmm-^^m^--m^-^^^^^^^i^^^memmm-mem~^^^m~sm-smmmwm~m-^mtme^mmimm-m^
#
CoUege Giads Make Best Reporters
(Newspaper reporting is one of the j other activity possibly can. , his own college paper. ■ top men in the writing business,
best all-round trainings in the world. J    I say "no other activity" because j    in  particular,  those  students  who     R. T. "Bob" Elson was one of my
So says Hal Straight, for many years j there  isn't anything else quite like j intend to become life-time reporters I rivals at UBC when he was campus
can't afford  to  miss  the chance  of correspondent for the Vancouver Daily
Students Snowball
» .   s
Math Piofessoi
One throng which broke the ice amongst freshman Math
classes last week, was the snow siege made against Professor
McCormack in Hut L. 3.
The  /nath  professor  had  been  a&-
little slow in leaving the lecture
room, and to his amazement, was
met with a wall of snowballers when
he attempted to get out. His hut became his own Bastile for several
minutes, while his students struggled i
to keep him inside as long as possible.
SELF-PITY
"It's precipitating!" was the echo,
as a wet campus struggled to recover from extreme cases of self-pity
caused by the persistent attacks of
"old man winter."
The only thing left with a smile
on its face now, is the weather-beaten
Totem Pole, up to its knees in snow
in front of the Brock.
try is 'down south' to the Alaskans.
So far, we haven't reached the ttage
where we are hanging by our tongues
from the icicles, or being so hemmed
in that we can't get to Cocktail
Parties, even if we can't get to lectures.
And when students start taking
sleighs to school, then we can tit
up and take notice.
reporting.
managing editor of the Vancouver
Sun and now publisher of the Edmonton Bulletin. This article, reprinted from the Gateway, University
of Alberta student newspaper, contains the names of many Canadian; a royal
journalists who have graduated from   sciences.
On   a   city   daily,   a   reporter   can, getting  their  experience  while  they
cover anything from a sitting of the j are still in school,
provincial legislature to a fur breed- i    The reason is obvious,
ers show, from a formal banquet to |    On   any   daily    rewsrenp-'f   you'll
Province. Now he's chief of correspondents  for Time Magazine at  $45,000
a year.
Campus correspondent for the News-
commission   on   arts   and! find   that   the   editor   will   hire   as  Herald when Elson and I were under-
to bend though, is our plastic umbrella" said one co-ed, "and it usually
bends in the general direction of
somebody else's eye. The considerate
first   choice   the   man   who   started   graduates was Himie Koshevoy, now! soul   who   uses   her   rain-shield   like
B C Telephone
Rapped by Students
Residents of Fort Camp nt UBC have
rapped   the   B.C.   Electric   Company
for what thoy term "poor service."
Over 150 students turned out to a
"One thing left which is still able' Protest   »^>ting   held   at   the   camp
BLACK EYES
life.
And   reporting   enters   into   count-
The Ubyssey and UBC.)
By H. L. STRAIGHT
Publisher, Edmonton  Bulletin
Newspaper  reporting  is  the greatest all-round  training  in  the world.: less other jobs apart from the news-
You  can  find  leaders  of  men  all   paper  business,
over   the   earth   who   used   the   in- j    A doctor quizzing a  patient for a
valuable  experience   they   gained   inj case history   is  really  a  reporter on
journalism   as   a   stepping-stone   to   an interview.
In other words, reporting is a gen- writing f;>r hir, college paper, then
cial education due to the continual proved himself as campus corres-
contact with people in every walk of;' pondent for the daily.        ^ j
i     Second choice is the applicant who
wrote for his college paper as his
extra-curricular activity.
Third choice is any university graduate or student, whether he's written
before or not.
Because university graduates make
A   lawyer   cross-examining   a   witness is, too. !
success.
Winston Churchill was a foreign
cor' espondervt in hi.s twenties; Mackenzie King was a reporter on an
Eastern   Canadian   daily.
Prominent Edmonton lawyer and
'industrialist H, Ray Milner once
pounded a police beat.
WHAT VOCATION
No matter what your vocation will
be    after    you    graduate,    reporting   NATURAL PLACE
will give you experience and an  in-      The   natural   place
managing   editor   of  the  Vancouver
Sun.
COLLEGE GRAD
Bruce Hutchison, foremost analytical reporter in Canada, and writer
for the Saturday Evening Post and
Reader's Digest, is a college graduate.
Art Mayse, novelist and former editor of McLean's Magazine, was once
fcditor-in-chief of the Ubyssey.
So   was   Pierre   Burton,   McLean's
the best reporters.
That's been proved on every daily   present editor.
A scientist writing a paper on  his. paper for the past 30 years. |    The  CBC's  London  correspondent,
i experiments i.s reporting on his meth-      Tiie New York Daily News, which   Matthew Halton, was a Gateway ed-
ods and observations. has   the   biggest   circulation   of   any   itor.
That i.s why I believe that if a North American Daily, won't hire Don Carlson, managing-editor of
student can pipsibly spare any time anything but varsity graduates. That the Vancouver News-Herald, is a
away   from   his   studies   for   extra-   includes its copy boys. j University  of  Alberta  gold  medalist
curricular   activities,   he   can't   miss   HELD BY GRAD j and was Gateway sports editor,
by getting some experience as a re-      When   I   left   Vancuovor   Sun   two      And  these  are just  a  few  of  the
porter. yeas  ago,  75   percent   of  the  paper's   dozens who are plenty of proof that
executive   positions    'male   and   fe-   journalism  is a  wide-open  field  for
for   a   college   male) were' held by college graduates,   college  writers  who  really  want   to
a Roman used a war shield is still to
be outdone."
This is the possible explanation for
the number of banged shins acquired
last week, by these who ploughed
through snowbanks which disclose :1
carefully hidden guard rails.
DOWN SOUTH
But, it could be worse. This coun-
recently.
Clayton Bartley, resident at the
camp, and spokesman for the protest
group, stated that the Company supplies only three phones for the 380
residents.
During the four-and-a-half years
the camp has been operating students
have several times asked for additional
pay phones (or the camp, E'.irtley said.
A resolution passed at tha meeting
stated: "We condemn the attitude of
the company in asking for higher rate*
in view of the service rendered to us
and to the citizens of Vancouver."
sight    into   human   nature   that , no   student  to Ret  that experience i.s on      Take a  'ook  at  .some of Canada's   write.
GREEK PEP MEET TO ELECT
KING IN ARMOURIES TODAY
Royalty will bow its way through the Mardi Gras Pep
Meet this noon in the Armouries.
One of the more entertaining features besides the
usual queen car parade will be a take-off on the chorus by
the king candidates.
Admission is a Mardi Gras raffle tneket and there will
be voting for thc King of the Mardi Gras. w
Page 2
THE tiBYSSEY
Tuesday,   January   17,   1950
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized ns Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscription*—$2.00 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Bond of the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein- are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and nof
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1G24' For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOK-IN-CHIKP       JIM   BANHAM
MANAGING  EDITOR    CHUCK MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vie Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Editorial Asst. Les Armour
Senior Editor HUGH CAMERON
Associate  BETTY   HORT1N Assistant ANN LANGBEIN
A Sense Of Relief
It is with a sense of relief that we learn
of the Canadian Legion's decision to remain
on the campus—and to remain as a strong
constructive force in campus life.
With the influx of ex-service students,
campus activities not only became vastly
more complex—they took an entirely new
turn. Political activity swept over the campus and served* as an impetus to student
thought of a calibre never seen on the campus before. Students concentrated their attention on social problems, central .contemporary issues, and mature thought with grati-
fyingly significant results.
The outside world began to think of the
university as a training ground for thinkers
rather than as a sanctuary for playboys and
flutter-brained co-eds.
Behind this tremendous movement stood
the Canadian Legion, keeping ex-service students together, helping them solve the problems attendant upon a return to school, and
generally exercising a stimulating and moder
ating influence on campus thought.
But the ex-service students are almost
gone. The gap left by their passing is even
now being felt in every phase of campus activity. First clasg debaters are so scarce that
the Parliamentary Forum    is    considering groups such as USC have passed
, ,     ,    .     -    .   , ,., ..  _    mi motions of censure on Council, and
dropping back to fortmghtly meetings. The JJ^ c<mncll ^ ^ ^^ a
campus UN club is slowing down. Political harvest pf pubillclty from the whole
activity is only a shadow of its former self. !<»"** *« *»*««* what "■,t8lur9 a"d
Importance as an organization entitle
Unless the remaining veterans on the cam- j it to. At a result, and In an effort to
Letters To
The Editor
EDITOR, UBYSSEY,
A considerable amount of confusion
seems to exist in the minds of a
large section of the student body
as to the facta behind the recent decision of (he Student Council to grant
the Peace Council permission to form
as a group on the campus. The confusion is, I feel, only woraci confounding by. the inaccurate reporting
of the facts by the press both on and
off the campus. As a result, the
Student^ Council has encountered
what I consider to be quite unjust
criticism for Its actions, many stu
dents are puzzled as to where the
United Nations fits into the picture,
pus can lay the foundations for a continued
sound campus life along the lines of the one'
they developed we are doomed to become a
home for .playboys again.
In the laying of these all important foundations the Legion can exert a decidedly
worthwhile influence. The folding of the
Legion now would be a signal for a general
retreat at the worst possible time.
The, time is short and we shall need
the co-operation of every student veteran on
the campus—but the job must be done. The
future of the university depends upon it.
No Mushing At UBC
The UBC Department of Buildings and
Grounds is to be congratulated on its admirable work in clearing the campus of mountains o||pbw. The absence of headlines in
The Ubj$|jiy describing car and other accidents is^li flowing testament to the snow-
shovel tog abilities of Jack Lee, head of the
depat Hnnil, and his army of workers.
R<fi|sT paths, and steps have been kept
remarkiply clean — so much so that students
clear away some of the confusion, I
would appreciate the opportunity to
lay before the student body the actual
facts of fhe case as they are known
to the United Nations Club.
i
When the student body last spring
refused the Peace Council permhlson
to organize on the campus, <* was
largely on the understanding the. such
a group would only duplicate the
functions of the United Nations Club
and that there was, therefore, no need
for such a group. Consequently, just
before the Xmas exams, members
of the Peace Council committee who
had become members of the United
Nations Club, approached the executive of the United Nations requesting
permission to organize as a committee
within the United Nations, and submitted an outline of their alms and
objectives. Following a long and exhaustive discussion with the members
of the committee and a serious ap-
prailal of their objectives, the executive of the United Nations came
to the conclusion that the work the
Peace Council committee wished fo
carry on would NOT duplicate or
duty of the UN Club on the campus
was to arouse the students' interest
v y
by I
es armour
An article injast week's New York Times
magazine disinters, again, the question of the
supression of thought in the Soviet Union.
It points out the tendency to attack, on
every possible front, "cosmopolitanism" in
art, literature, and philosophy. Apparently
the Soviet definition of "cosmopolitanism" i.s
anything which argues that the USSR has
gained anyything whatsoever from the West.
The movement, it seems, is coupled with a
long series of near-ridiculous claims to the
effect that everything worthwhile was invented in the Soviet Union and every thought
worth thinking wa.s thought first in the Soviet
Union.
The article presents the thesis that the
underlying reason for the whole process
stems from the loosening of internal discipline
during the war years. That is, the Soviets
were forced to look with tolerance upon the
capitalist West during the war and, now,
lest the tolerance become permanent, they
are resorting to a resurgence of Russian
nationalism.
The New York Times' thesis may provide
some explanation of the phenomena, but for
those of us who still cling to a hope that the
Soviet experiment may not, after all, be a
complete waste, it is necessary to probe a
little deeper.
To add a little perspective—we might begin our probe by borrowing a historical thesis
from Toynbee's ''Civilization on Trial."
Toynbee argues that the Russian problem
stems, in large measure, from the heritage of
Bzantine-Russian civilization. When the Russians accepted the mantle of the Greek-Orthodox church they accepted with it, the
mantle of the Byzantine civilization and
thereby the einnily of Western Christendom,
Beginnin.e, with a series of raids by Scandinavians r.nr! following the coui-.se of wars
down the K'apolemi, the Kaiser, and finally
Hiller; Russia v.;.; invaded time and time
again by the We.-.I end appealed in Western
domestic- nuari'-k: alm..s; always as the ally
of one Western power against another.
Continuing to hear this  in mind, let  'ts
could walk around anytime in an ordinary
pair of shoes — without the fear of stepping
into a snow bank over their heads.
The situation at UBC can be contrasted
with that in downtown Vancouver, where !^,e11 £ work fl°£  ,*?£?£
,   , . .... . -Nations. The executive felt that the
pedestrians were left slipping, sliding an<f
mushing around in the mess.
~  „ .     ,     _    ,   _ , . , in the work being done by the United
Once agatn, to Jack Lee and his cohorts Nations throughout the world, to call
in snow-shovelling, congratulations. attention to the problems facing UN,
and to enlist the support of all peace
loving citizens on behalf of the UN,
for we feel that, imperfect as the
UN may be at the present time, if it
should fail, any hope for peace in.
out time will undoubtedly perjsh. On
Viic other hand, it became quite
apparent to the executive that the
objective of the Peace Council committee was to work toward peace
through operating as a "pressure
group" whenever it felt it necessary,
and to call attention to any wrong
it felt was being committeed by any
nation. In other words, although the
eventual ideals of the United Nations
Club and (he Peace Council committee may be to some extent the same,
the method of operating was decidedly
different.
As a result, the UN executive felt
that if the Peace Council was to
operate it would be far belter for
it to operate as an autonomous body,
subject to the regulations of the
AMS Code, than to operate as a subcommittee of the UN Club. Consequently, we approached the Student
Council requesting them to give
permission to the Peace Council committee to form as a group on the
campus. After giving consideration to
our submission the Council finally
gave this permission.
next examine the situation in whieh thc
USSR found itself immediately following the
revolution. Consider the vast hostility of the
western capitalists to the rising new state.
Consider the internal chaos caused not only
by the natural disorder following the revolution but also by the invasion, of the Soviet
by almost every western power—including
our dearly beloved United States.-
To combat this stern internal discipline-
dictatorship if you like—was necessitated.
Life in the USSR was far from perfect but
almost unbelievable progress was made in the
inter-war period even if miracles—naturally
enough—were not accomplished.
Then came the second world war with
destruction unparalleled in the history of
man. Much that had been gained was lost.
The west invoked its old quarrels with the
USSR and deep suspicion and distrust was
generated on both sides.
I think it should be pointed out to
critics of the Council that it is quite
Inside the USSR moral was remarkably
high if we may judge from the post-war reconstruction progress. But the people wore
battered and tired and, in many cases, had lost iwithin the jur*sf f°" of the Council
,,..,., to grant or with-hold from granting
much of their faith. (permission to any group to organize
In desperation, therefore, the Politburo 'on the camPus- Should its actlon not
. , A A, .    . .il   ,       ,    ,,  ,       t, meet with the approval of a majority
sought to renew this faith by glorifying Rus- of the gtudem, body ^ studems m
sian progress of the past. It was a pretty quite at liberty at the next general
shabby trick well known to social-psycholo- [ meeting of the AMS to reverse  the
gists.  But it achieved some of the desired  Council's action. I think it should be
result if the cost was incredible in terms of |further P°inted out that wh»e the
.   ,.,       , , .. , , i    .' I Peace Council committee may or may
art, literature, and thought lost. . ,    „   , ..     , „ ,
' ' B not be "red tinged," as you have put
With the growing prosperity generated | lt> lhey acted throughout the whole
, .       .. i ,i    ,   _    i    negotiations   with   the   utmost   pro-
by reconstruction we may hope that much *
of the nationalism will pass—if we of the j
West can learn to be more tolerant and less I   l trust that lhe foie«oins may help
,      ,.,      v.. . ,   .      i  .   .        A,      o     •  .    : to   disperse   some   of   the   confusion
hostile. It we persist in driving the Soviets >
into their corner the trend may  well continue und all may be lost.
and doubt that has so far surrounded
this issue. In conclusion, I would just
like to say that if the United Nations
could get one half the publicity for
some of its constructive work that
the Peace Council has had in the last
two weeks because it is considered a
But, if the world situation improves, we
may hope that the renewed confidence of the
Fast in the West will lead to a loosening of
the bonds and a more healthy and less pro- j menacc' then we would be more than
vineial attitude among the Soviets. The pre-i*1
sc nl wave of supressions may turn out, after j Yours  truly,
J.  F.  Maguire,
President,
dl, to be only a passing phase.
Let us hope so.
United Nations Club.
Robert A. Wenner b.b.
OPTOMETRIST
Announces the opening of his offices
for the practice of Optometry at
4580 West 10th Ave. ALma 3542
Eye Examinations — Visual Training
Consultation by Appointment
CHEMISTRY 100
COACHING
SHURPASS SCHOOLS
CEdor 3131
"Hold on, folks! Handsome Harry is saying
something to his opponent. Let's listen!"
(On the air.)—"Say, you lug! If you'd lick
Dry Scalp with "Vaseline' Hair Tonic you'd
have nice looking hair and get across with
the crowd, too."
Vaseline HA1RTONK
TVrfAOE   MARK
•VARILINE' IB THS  REGISTERED TRADE  MARK  OF THE  CHC3EBROUQH  MFO. CO. COMS'O.
rfwotd e6e (?a#t^
\ 1'/
"Now 1 have to make sure
my kid brother passes, toot"
With that kid brother of his in tow,
Egbert finds things are tough all over.
But — at the risk of being repetitious
— there is one problem he learned to
solve long ago. That's the problem of
how to make sure he always has money
for every emergency. He operates a
"fatality fund" at "MY BANK", never
runs out of cash any more, since he
started dropping his spare cash into his
B of M account. Now he's got the sav«
ing habit.
U4-7
Bank of Montreal
WORKING  WITH  CANADIANS IN fVIRY WALK  OF CIFI  SINCE 1817
Your Bank <»n the Campus — In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Tuesday,   January   17,   1950
THE UBYSSEY
P»g« 9
NFCUS Text Report
Ready Next Month
TORONTO - (CUP) - Big mark-ups
in American texts Imported Into
Canada can be understood more easily*
than any other factors that increase
text book cos* in Canada, reported
the Toronto NFCUS Committee.
The Committee reports that Investigations are going ahead about the
"apparent inconsistency in the Canadian Government's excise aad customs on books." The committee
learned that comics are tax-free while
law texts are not
Toronto reports the "inexplicable
classification of French as a 'foreign'
language for the purpose of customs"
by which French books escape taxes
applied to English-language texts
brought into this country.
| The report, of the committee, to be
published soon, also deals with cooperative students' stores now operating on Canadian campi
--Ubyssey Classified--
USING THE ELECTRIC ERASER in the library is Miss Denise
Boving, a clerk. Erasing numbers from the backs of books is now
a simplified process.
It'i Eltctrlc-
Librarians Beaming
» - °***ai .»__
Ovei New Erasei
Librarians beam when you
Gone for them are the days of
frujbby fingernails, jrubby hands,
and selling muscles. The eld, tiresome chore of erasing thousands of
nantes and numbera-on books and
cards, routine work in keeping a
library tip to date, is speeded and
facilitated by the electric eraser,
which makes Its manually operated
equivalent as obsolete as "Mule-
Train."
The library has several different
makes of eraser in operation. A typical conversation between two librarians might well happen aa follows:
"Mow's your Brunlng running.
Mary?"
"Not w .hot, must be the cold
weather. fl« only getting three miles
of erasurtdW kilowatt hour out of
it."
"1 guess it's the cold. Joan tells me
that her Seymour 4s pinging a little
on a heavy pull. Thank heaven my
Spedo Jr. Is still running well, although I was thinking of tying it up
for the winter." I
The electric erasers, so we were
told, are quite difficult to obtain.
Made in the U.S., they enter Canada
on a quota basis, and to this difficulty is added the trouble of getting
parts when they break down, as they
sometimes do. '-SJi^I'
We forgot to ask the librarians
what they do with the time they
save by using electric erasers. Maybe
they reminisce, with dewy eye and
wistful smile, About the old, hard
days before technology brought surcease from the most irksome of their
task*
ask to see their electric erasers.
To CBC
Students Submit
Musical Score
WINNIPEG,(CUP) - Regehr and
Friesen may soon become as famous
as the well-known-Rodgers and Ham-
merstein if the enterprising musical
team at the University of Manitoba
keeps up their present mood.
Two male students on the middle-
west campus have just submitted a
complete musical comedy script to
the CBC and are hoping that it will
be accepted for their Stage '50' programme,
t
I Script, which is titled "The Isle of
Nowhere" follows best musical trad-
I itions. There is a heroine, a hero, a
comedy team and of course a villain.
After many and dire happenings, there
is of course a happy ending for all
concerned.
Paul Friesen, the lyricist, hails from
Victoria, B.C., but the musical-minded man is Cliff Regehr whi is home-
I grown talent. Both boys are in their
fourth year, Paul In Arts and-Cliff in
.Science.
The  musical  has  taken  a  ycar- of
hard but  interesting work  and now
that   it   i.s   finally   finished   they   are
starting work immediately on a new,
, and they hope, better score.
To Attend Summer
Lost
SEMBONOFF RUSSIAN GRAMMAR
end Linguaphone Introduction to Russian Grammar. Left in Arts 105 -Wednesday, January 11. Finder please
phone AL. 3040Y.
BLACK LEATHER KEY CASE LOST
somewhere on campus last week.
Finder please return to Lost and
Found.
henceforth  on Tuesday noon hours.
Hut G 4. Everyone welcome.
VOC MEETING THURSDAY. JAN-
uary 19, 12:30 p.m. in Arts 204.
Notices
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY RE -
hearsal In UBC auditorium every Wednesday 6 p.m.
MIROSLAV FIC, CZECH STUDENT
attending UBC this year under student-contribution   plan,   will   address
BLUB PARKER 51 WITH GOLD CAP. The Historical Society on Wednesday,
lost on January 7. Please leave in January 18th at 7:80 in Men's Lounge,
Acadia Mail Box "8'
BLACK MOROCCO WALLET, CON-
talnlng identification and cheque.
Finder please phone Joan, AL. 0719R.
PIANO SCORE OF SHOSTOKO-
vitch Concerto. Needed immediately.
Return to Lost and Found or phone
Westl368R.
WOOLLEN KHAKI MTTT IN MUR-
cury sedan with broken chain on first
day of January lectures. Also Croft
edition of Anthony and Cleopatra
January 13 between Ap. Sc, HL 3
and HM 6. Phone Mike, CE. 7778.
LARGE BROWN LEATHER BILL-
fold containing SAE tickets. Phone
KE. 1&27L.
Brock Hall. His topic will be "Modern Czechoslovakia." All interested
students welcome.
VOC SWIM AND DANCE PARTY
Wednesday, January 18th. See notice,
board in Quad.
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB GENERAL
meeting of the Amateur Radio Club
Thursday, January 19th at 12:30 p.m.
All members requested to attend.
Room ond Board
TWO-ROOM FURNISHED SUITE—
(not basement). Half block from McDonald bus at 13th. Sink, rangette,
dishes, linen, etc., $12:50 weekly all
found. Suit quiet students or married
couple. CH. 6403.
LKJ«T  BROWN   W1AULET.   MUD; BOARD   FOR   MALE   STUDENT,
Identification cards,  etc.,  badly.  M faring large room, individual beds
and study tables. Home privileges.
Full' board, 955 per month. 4413 West
Richey Love, president of tiie National Federation of Canadian University Students* announced today that
one hundred students, two for every
thousand Canadian university students, will attend the Summer Seminar
at Fort Knox, Montreal.
This means that UBC, with its 1000
registration, will be able to sand II
delegates.
A "Survey of Canada" is the broad
subject of the seminar, divided into
three sections, Economics, History
and Geography, and Canadian Humanities.
Mr. Love stressed that the purpose
of the seminar is to lead comprehension of the various regional problems in Canada, and to direct thought
along the lines of national unity.
■ Arrangements for the seminar are
under the direction of the local
NFCUS Committee at the University
of Montreal.
found, please call Barbara, KE. 1485.
For Sale
KODAK   "35"   COUPLED  RANGE-
flnder, f|3.5 luminized lense. Phone
Jim Hughes, AL. 174BR.
PAIR MAN'S SKATES. SIZE 8. TUX-
edo, size 37, CE. 7895.
TUXEDO FOR MARDI GRAS! SI2B
40,   single-breasted.   Good   condition,
$30.00  including vest.  Phone  H.  B.
Van Home, AL. 0306R after 8 p.m.
COMPLETE    FORMAL    EVENING
suit, size 40. Phone CH. 0148.
ENGINEER'S   DRAWING   KIT   IN
good condition, $30 or nearest offer.
Phone Yorkshire and Canadian Trust
Ltd., 535 Seymour St., MA. 4211.
ZEISS   BINOCULARS,   3x80,   WITH
case. CH. 7823.
CAR HEATER, WORKS GOOD,
doesn't leak, 812.00. G. Wallis, Hut 4,
Room 17, Fort Camp.
TURQUOISE EVENING GOWN,
size 14, of brocade satin and nylon
marquisette. Price 15. Call Audrey,
OH. 8802, eves.
Meetings
PHILATELIC SOCIETY MEETS IN
Hut L 2 Wednesday noon. New members welcomed.
MEETINGS OF THE SCOTTISH
Country  Dance  Club   will  be held
Armouries
New English 200
ACTIVITIES CALENDAR
This Week
TODAY
11:30 - 1:30 — Mardi Gras Pep Meet
TOMORROW
7:45 — Phrateres Initiation — Brock
Noon — CCF Club - Roy Knight, MP
"300,000 Jobless, What Next?"
5:30 - 7:30 — UBC Symphony — Auditorium
Noon — Speaker on "Bridge River" — Applied Sc. 100
THURSDAY
Evening — Mardi Gras — Commodore
Noon — EUS Special Executive Meeting
FRIDAY
Evening — Mardi Gras — Commodore
8:00 -11:30 — McGoun Cup Debate — Brock Hall
E. 204
By Kay MacDonald
I'niiiii
Election Rules Foi Candidates Announced
Rules for candidates for election to
Student Council weef-released today
by M. Kay McDonald- chairman of the
Elections committee.
Following are the rules laid down
by them:
AMS ELECTIONS  SPRING   1950
1. Candidates mustglnquire re: eligibility at the AMS oilffee before commencing  thei<r  official  campaigns.
2. Nominations must be in the hands
of the Secretary of the Alma Mater
Society by the following times.
5:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 25th
for president and treasurer.
5:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 1st
for secretary, junior member, co-ordinator of activities and sophomore
member.
5:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 8th
for CUSC, WUS, LSE. president of
WAD, treasurer of WAD, president of
MAD treasurer of MAD.
Elections will be held from 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the following
dates:
Wednesday, February 1st for president and  treasurer.
Wednesday, February 8ih I >r see-e-
tary, junior member, co-ordinator of
activities and sophomore member.
Wednesday, February 13th for
CUSC. WUS, ISF. pree-id.n. of WAD,
treasurer of WAD. presidiv.t of MAD.
treasurer of MA|D.
I). Nominations mus! be signed by
not less than toil active members of
tho Alma Mater Society in goml standing and shall be posted on llie Student
Council Bulletin Board. No student
shall sign for more than one candidate
for any office.
4. Campaigning for each office commences at 8:30 a.m. the day nominations open and continues until 5:00
p.m. the day before elections. Each
candidate must secure the approval
of the Chairman of the Elections Committee before commencing any campaigning.
Each candidate may place one of his
pictures at each of the election booths
on -election day.
4. Candidates and their campaign
managers will be required to meet
with the Elections Committee at 5
p.m. on the day that nominations close.
6. Any campaign devices necessitating the expenditures of money shall
be subjected to the approval of the
Elections Committee. This amount is
not to exceed fifteen" dollars. ($15.00).
7. Candidates will be required to
speak to the student body at 12:30
p.m. on the following dates:
Monday. January 30th. president and
treasurer.
Monday,   February   fith.   secretary,
junior   member,   sophomore   mcmber„
co-ordinator  of  activities.
|     Monday,     February     Uth.     CUSC,
| WUS. ISF, president  of WAD. treasurer   ol'   WAD,   president   of   MAD,
j treasurer of MAD.
8. It  shall   be   the  responsibility  of
i each candidate t.) dispose suitably of
all campainnhi" deviees within four
(■!> clays .alter the election date of his
office. Failure to, comply with this
ruling shall be deemed an offense
' punishable by fine at the discretion
) of the Discipline Committee.
9. .Seconders must present their
platform and qualifications to tho
Editor-in-Chief of The Ubyssey not
later than 3 p.m. Wednesday, the day
of the closing of nominations, for publication in the Friday Ubyssey. This
material may not exceed 100 words
for president and treasurer nor 75
words for other offices.
10. Tiie candidates must present their
statements to the Editor-in-Chief of
The Ubyssey not later than 12 noon
on the Saturday after the closing of
nominations, for publication in The
Tuesday Ubyssey. This material may
not exceed 100 words for president
and treasurer nor 75 words for other
offices.
11. Balloting will be conducted in the
following places:
Foyer of Auditorium, Brock Hall,
South end of Arts Building, Engineering Building, Physics Building, Bus
Stop.
j    Election will be preferential voting
i and the secret ballot.
i    All student* are entitled to vote at
any polling station upon presentation
of their AMS cards.
,     12.  Any  candidate judged  to have
; knowingly violated or permitted  the
I violation of the above regulation will
I be ruled  ineligible. Such rulings will
be made by the Elections Committee,
an appeal to' lie with the Students
Council. Campaign managers will be
held jointly responsible with their
candidates for all infractions of these
riiles.
13. All candidates must comply with
Section 15, Article 2, Part 5, of the AMS
Code.
Elections Committee,
M. Kay MacDonald, Chairman,
Miss Moyls, Miss Plant, George
Cummings and Mr. Sutherland
18th. Phone AL. 0521L.
BOOM AND BREAKFAST, ACCOM-
modation for three. Close to bus. 4649
West 10th, AL. 210TM.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MALE
Students. Excellent meals. Apply Psi
Upsilon House,  1812 W.  19th Ave.,
phone BA. 1311.
ROOM     AND    BREAKFAST    OR
board. Excellent indeed at Mrs. Voss,
4553 W. 8th, AL. 1021Y. Gentleman.
Wanted
NOTICE TO 12TH AVENUE HITCH-
hikers-^Ridc to 8:30's every rhorning,
34 years of service
to the University of
British Columbia,
its Fraternities
and Sororities.
THERE'S A REASON
West along 12th from Granville. BA.
2339, Roy.
RIDE WANTED FROM CORNER
of Cornwall and Larch for 8:30's
Monday to Friday. Phone Marianne,
CH. 1822.
RIDES AVAILABLE FOR PASSEN-
gers from 41st and Dunbar for 8:30's
Monday to Saturday. Phone KE. 4382R.
TWO LONELY YOUNG GENTLE-
men desire feminine companionship
for shows, etc. Preference given those
with cars andior money. Phone AL.
0071. Ask for Joe in Room 19, Hut 6.
RIDE FROM VICINITY OF 12TH
and Oak for 8:30's Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Phone CE. 6270, Don.
HAVE YOU MADE YOUR CONTRI-
bution to the "UASEWMG"??? Contributions will be accepted up until
midnight, Thursday, January 19th.
Receipts supplied for income tax reductions! Call Ed, FA. 5613L or mall
to 95 West 22nd.
WOULD UKE TO FORM OR JOIN
car pool for 6 days a week, vicinity
4th and Alma. Phone CH. 3783.
Found
SMALL DARK BROWN LEATHER
purse with light brown stitching. Ladles' pigskin gloves and gent's. gray
leather gloves. Apply Bank of Montreal, Campus Branch.
ONE PARKER PENCIL, OWNfcR
phone Audrey, KE. 2329R between •
and 7 p.m.
Miscellaneous
TYPING: ENGLISH AND FOREIGN
languages. Essays, theses, card work.
Campus rates. AL. 0655R.
The Right Smoke
at the &sht Price
for ftung Men
J-
OiSllNC
MiMtlNG
STATIONIRY AMI
MINTING CO. ITD.
M« SSYMOUS IT.   VANCOUVIS S C.
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-Sqiiares, Protractors, Set Squares
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and  Index
From $2.09
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stuart
Co. Ltd.
Stationers  and  Printers
550 Seymour St.     Vancouver, B.C.
RENT YOUR TUXEDO
FOR THE MARDI GRAS
From
The New York Costume Solon
4354 West 10th Ave. ALtna 1360
Next Door to thc Bowling Alley
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
4180 W. Uth Ave.       ALma 0915R
Save Wisely TODAY ...
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sim Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
HAROLD COWH1G
SYD BAKER
LLOYD JACKSON
AUBREY SMITH
DOUG. KIBBLE
KEN DEANE
JIM BRANDON
JOHN TENER
ED. PECK
LARRY WRIGHT (Supervisor)
ROYAL RANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OF-CANADA -■.♦*-s-tftM
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   January
1950
Four Straight Wins For
Marks Success of Eastern Trip
Denver Last on List As Icemen
Take Both Games from Colorado
By HERM FRYDENLUND
The UBC Thunderbird hockey squad culminated one of the
rtWit successful tours in University history over the weekend
Strheia they handed the highly-touted Colorado College Tigers
a pair of convincing defeats.
The locals won 8-4 on Friday night and wound up their
(Colorado Springs stay with an easy 5-3 victory.
The Bengals took  to the ice for
a»—
Uie first game with a solid ten-game
winning streak and undefeated sea-
som behind them. They had two
victories over a tough University of
Saskatchewan squad plus wins over
the best College teams in the U.S.A.
*Birds on the other hand were
playing their third game in four
flijlhts and had just completed an
aj^Uous journey scant minutes be-
frr* game time.-
•Birds  struck  fast  in   the  initial
STU BAILEY
. . . two solo efforts
period and racked up a three goal
lead in the first ten minutes Of play.
The locals dominated the play
throughout the remainder of the contest and out-hustled the Tigers whose
big advantage was supposed to be
hustle.
POBTEOUS IN STRIP
Bjdb Koch and playing coach Mac
PphcOUS were the big guns in thc
'BiNi attack as they countered twice
each. Bob was the sensation of the
game as he displayed his top form
to a packed house at Broadmoor ice
palace. Koch left them limp with his
second goal which was scored after
he Carried the puck through tho
entire home team and pulled the
goalie out in masterful style. Thsy
eheered long for that one.
Even more surprising was the work
ot Mac Porteous who was not supposed to be a regular. He was Johnny-
games and drew the plaudits of the
fans and the press.
SOLO EFFORT
Minutes later classy Stu Bailey
clicked with a solo effort to pick up
his first |oal of the game. The third
and final marker of the period came
from the stick of hard working Fred
Andrew who turned in his usual
effective performance.
The Thunderbirds added two more
goals in the second period to take
a commanding 5-1 lead into the last
canto. Bob Koch garnered the fourth
local marker on another solo spurt.
His sizzling shot caught the upper
corner of the twine for the best goal
of the game.
BAILEY AGAIN
Stu "Gunner" Bailey wound up
the scoring for the locals to pick up
his second tally. His second effort
was also unassisted. His performance
was easily the most dazzling of the
contest.
The home-towners rallied shortly
in the final session but the locals
held them to a pair of markers. Dm
Adams rose to amazing heights to
turn back the eager Bengals.
Don was injured twice in the contest. He received a cut in the face
in a goal mouth melee. He returned to
action after repairs.. Minutes later he
WAGNER BECOMES FATHER
WHILE'AWAY WITH TEAM
UBC hockey winger Wag Wagner picked the wrong
time to travel with the team on their prairie jaunt.
Last Friday, Wagner's wife gave birth to a baby boy.
Wag would have been back by the time the baby arrived, but the tot was born prematurely.
Both mother and son are doing fine now. This is
Wagner's second child.
FRED ANDREW
. . . played usual good game
was  knocked  unconscious  when  hit
by a  butt end.  The game was re
on-the-spot  for  a   pair   of  Wagner j^med after a sh0rt rest with Adams
efforts. The entire third line was very
effective throughout the game.
SECOND GAME *
On Saturday night the second game
of the two game series was played.
Again the locals demonstrated their
class by jumping Into a three goal
\etfi in the first period and coasting
home from there.
The intial tally was picked up by
Hugh Berry on a pass from Bob Koch.
These  two were standouts  in both
continuing to play great hockey.
The Thunderbirds have now won
four straight contests in their current
tour. They resume action tonight at
Denver against Denver University.
HOME THURSDAY
The locals will return home on
Thursday night to rest for the resumption of the tough Hamber Cup
series against University of Alberta
on Monday and Tuesday, January
23rd and 24th at the Forum.
Next Rugger Match On
Jan. 28 If Snow Goes
Bad weather conditions forced postponement of the opening tilt in the McKechnie Cup rugger series last Saturday and if
this current cold keeps up, it may well cause another game
to be put off.
Cancellation of the opening garnet
between UBC Thunderbirds and Victoria  Crimson Tide was announced
late Friday night.
Next Scheduled game for the Thunderbirds will be on January 28, but if
the cold continues, it is doubtful that
the fields will be in shape to play.
Student ruggermen  are  trying to'
keep  in  condition over' what they
figure will be a long rugger layoff
until the snow melts off the grounds.
Practices are held for the named
members of the 'Bird team almost
every day. The boys work out and
run around even though they do not
have much opportunity for scrimmaging.
Thirty-five ruggermen turned out
for Monday's noon hour practice, even
though only fifteen will make up
the Thdnderbird roster.
Cold Moybe?
Northern Cage
Stars Too Rough
For Chieftains
UBC Chiefs after breaking
the twelve game winning streak
of the star Vancouver Clover
Leafs, travelled to Prince Rupert to take on the northern
city's Jets.
Friday night in the first of the
Exhibition games the Chiefs held the
Jets to a 4 point win with the final
tally reading 47-43.
The northern climate must have
undermined the zip of the student
cagers in the second game on Saturday night as they went down to a
65-37 trouncing in what has been
described as a one sided game from
start to finish.
Thunrol Seeking Cors, Welcoming Committee
UBC Piestige Rests on Welcome
7o Visiting Beai Hockey Team
Rv   RAV   FROST Kncto^ w., ik<, f„„»»v«*.:.:«= «_   n u..    i ,_
By RAY FROST
By the way that UEC's ice hockey team was treated during their
stay at Edmonton, one would think
that they were kings, not student
Thunderbirds.
IMPRESSIVE WELCOME
When the 15-man delegation from
this university stretched themselves
off the plane at Edmonton, they
were greeted by virtually the entire enrolment of students from
the University of Alberta. At least
it seemed as if there were that
many.
And the 'Birdmen were never
lacking attention while they stayed
at the prairie city. Luncheons,
tours and other entertaining activities were part of tho treats afforded the visiting UBC group.
Sights and sites of growing Edmonton were pointed out to the
members of the UBC delegation,
and a tour of the University nf
Alberta campus was also on the
agenda.
Various fraternities lent a hand
to make the visitors feel at home.
Full schedule of parties, banquets,
and BH-toRethers of all kinds were
hosted by the fraterhities.
Nothing was overlooked in seeing that the UBC group were contented.
Now when University of Alberta
Golden Bears come to Vancouver
to play the remainder of the Hamber Cu.) series with the Thunderbirds, Thunral wants to show them
the same hospitality which the
visitors showed UBC.
WANTS MEMORABLE STAY
Don Knight, head of Thunral,
wants to make the Bjars' stay
in Vancouver a memorable one.
First thing needed is a reception
committee which will go down to
meet the Bears when they step off
the plane at Sea Island at 8:15 p.m.
Sunday.
Thunral would like UBC students
from Alberta, if possible, to form
this vital committee, g: eeting the
visitors properly and escorting them
to their lodgings at Acadia Camp.
But if any group, in particular,
such as one of the fraternities or
campus clubs, would like to take
on this duty of UBC. their offer
would he readily accepted by
Knight.
As well as the welcoming committee, a number of private cars
will be needed to transport the
Bears and their staff to quarters
at Acadia. Private cars instead of a
chartered bus would lend a more
personal atmosphere to the welcome and make the visitors feel
more at home, especially if they
were being accompanied by UBC
students from their own home province.
Other plans for the visitors are
already made or will be drafted,
such as luncheons and dinners, but
the first and foremost task is to
meet the boys properly, and to
guide them around in their strange
new environment.
Knight feels that this is a "must"
for the prestige of UBC. He is Seeking help from anyone and everyone
who is interested.
LEAVE NAME WITH BAKKEN
All those who want to help out
in this cause, contact Don Knight
through Ole B'akken's office as
soon as possible. If Knight is not
there, leave your name and the
extent of your contribution with
the  secretary.
SPORTS EDITOR — RAY FROST
Editor This Issue  HAROLD BERSON
Snow, Losses Combine to
Sadden 'Bird Road Trip
By GIL GRAY
Old Maif Winter and UBC's Thunderbird basketball team
had "quite a little tussle over the weekend when the 'Birds
attempted a road trip south with unhappy results.
In order to get the jump on snow*'
forecasts and so forth, the Birdmen
left for points south on Thursday
night Instead of Friday morning.
Friday evening the 'Birds were to
meet the highly rated ball club
from Eastern Washington College, but
instead they were held up in Spokane.
HEAVY SNOWS
Eastern is situated 16 miles from
Spokane in a little town called Cheney
(If the Eastern boys are listening it's
a metropolis). The UBC team clambered aboard their bus for Cheney and
are supposed to have made it pert
way until they were forced to turn
back because of heavy snow on the
road.
So the Birdmen spent the evening
STANDINGS
Central   A 0' 247 160 1000
Eastern    .'.....   3 1   264 173 .750'
Whitworth 3 1   230 223 .750
P.L.C  2 1   152 153 ,666
C.P.S  2 2  207 217 .500
UB.C  1 3   187 232 .250
St. Martin's  .'.... 0 3   112 196 .000
Western    0 4   203 248 .000
of the Savages from Eastern, or maybe
even the fact that Eastern was a
ball club that had dumped Washington State by some 30 points, (the same
Washington State that licked the
Huskies the other day), the 'Birds
didn't do so well.
At half time the Salvages had a
39-21 lead. By the final whistle ths
Eastern quintet Had won "by a 81
point margin, 74-43. But the onlookers
would have to admit that the Eastern
boys were really on the bit.
HIGH AVERAGE
In 69 shots, th*,«Savages connected
for 29 good ones, that makes for a
42 percent average that either indicates a terrific team that only shoots
the sure ones, of a pretty lucky aggregation that h*j| a good night
At half time |he Savages had a
weary 'Birds were available for
comment. Next weekend the 'Birds
will again try' on a trip south to
meet CPS and St, Martins. Currently
CPS has a two-for-four league standing in fifth place and St Martins
has a nothing for three in last place.
in Spokane and then met the Whit*
worth   Pirates,   who   are   located   at
Spokane, in a scheduled game.
SOUTHCOTT HOT
In spite- of the efforts of Forsyth
with 17 and Southcott with 11 points,
the 'Birds dropped their first game
of the weekend 64-56.
The second half was a good one
for the 'Birds as they recovered from
a 31-17 half time score to outplay
the Pirates 39-33. But they didn't
quite make it'.
Then after getting the OK from.
Department head Osborne at UBC the
Birdmen finally made the trip to
Cheney to play the game on Sunday
night that was scheduled for Friday.
TOUGH WEEKEND
Whether it was the snow, the weekend, the tight man to man defense
HITTING STRIDE in game
with Whitworth over snowy
weekend was sophomore forward John Southcott. Potting
eleven points for the 'Birdmen,
his efforts were not quite enough to eke out a win.
Women's Intramurals
Basketball Tournament
WEDNESDAY - FIELD HOUSE
12:30-TT vs Commerce
PE 2 and 3 vs HE 1 and 2
1:00—Pre-med  vs SCM
Arts 1 A vs Arts 3 and 4
SWIM NOTICE
A notice regarding women's swim
classes fer Tuesday January 17 will
be posted on the gymnasium notice
board at M:30 a.m. on Tuesday.
TOACl^OTiCE V
All interested students turn .out to
meeting in HL 1, Wedensday, January 18 at 12:30 p.m.
CELEBRATING something besides his team's four-game win
streak on their eastern tour is
UBC iceman Wag Wagner.
Winger for the travelling 'Birds
became a father, for the second
time, while away on his trip.
BIG BLOCK
Big Block meeting will be held in
Art's 108, Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
Everyone in sweaters.
TO   AVOID   DELAY
ORDER NOW
AUSTIN DEVON $1445
Gordon Bros.
10th and Alma CEdar8105
AUSTIN  DEALERS
^*s*'?*',> ^J^s^iiisi^ "" , /;
—-/■

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