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The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1959

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 vol. At,!
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1959
No. 38
hone Campaign Begins
Brochmann
— Ubyssey     Photo   by
WET SNOW made pedestrian life uncomfortable Wednesday for people like this chilly
coed who's having a hard time getting from class to class. Despite the snow no traffic
♦ip'irs were cauesd, and RCMP reported the re were no major accidents.
TODA Y'S UBYSSEY MA YBE THE
LAST ■ ■ BETTER TAKE TWO
Today's Ubyssey may be the last for an indefinite
period of time.
This is why it is so big (12 pages).
A jurisdictional dispute involving Ubyssey printers
,. College Printers and the International Typographical Union
,    at press time had not been settled.
ITU workers will strike at 4.30; p.m. today unless an
agreement is reached by then.
Should this happen, UBC Radio will implement an
emergency news service to all corners of the campus for
the duration of the strike.
Faculty, Administration
Hit Newsman's Claims
UBC faculty and administration representatives hotly defied Wednesday charges by
Vancouver newsman Jack Webster that there is a "lack of leadership" at the University.
Webster made the charge in
an address to more than 9,000
students Friday in the Auditor"
ium. He was brought to the
campus by The Ubyssey.
Dr. Malcolm McGregor of the
Classics department said if Webster was referring to the students "he is obviously wrong."
"I say this on the basis of
what- the Students' Council has
been doing and is doing," Dr.
McGregor continued. "And if
he is referring to the administration of the University he is
speaking without benefit of information."
Webster also stated there
was "a paucity of information
regarding the financial situation
of the University."
In reply to this charge Dean
G. C. Andrew, Deputy to the
President said "He is wrong.
The University isn't anxious to
raise its fees."
"There are many kinds of
leadership and not all are making statements on television,"
Dean Andrew said. "The University has taken an active lead
in this province and throughout
Canada in making sure that
those who are qualified and
who want higher education can
get it."
Psychology professor Dr. Ed-
ro Signori commented "There
has been as much leadership
shown or as we could expect to
be shown."
First Slate
Hopefuls
Nil As Yet
No candidates have yet filed
nominations for 1959-60 Alma
Mater Society students' council
offices.
Nominations for ail three
slates of AMS offices opened
Tuesday. Deadline for first
slate nominations is Thursday,
January 29.
Positions in the first slate
are: president, USC chairman,
secretary, and first member at
large.
Nominations for the candidates must be signed by at least
ten active mempaers in good
standing of the AMS, and posted
on the Students' Council Bulletin Board. However, no student
may sign for more than one
candidate for any one office.
The presidential hopefuls campaign from the time of their
nomination acceptance until 4
p.m. the day before elections.
All others start at 6 p.m. the
day before nominations close
until 4:30 p.m. the day before
elecions.
Polls will be open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. on that day. Slate
I will be chosen February 4,
Slate II February 11, and Slate
III, February 18.
Fee Hike Protest
Rallies To Be Held
Every UBC student will be contacted by telephone next
week by a Student Councillor.
Councillors will ask students if they have written their
MLA in Victoria protesting a possible fee hike.
Students will be told who their MLA's are and notified of
these MLA s addresses.
Students will also be invited to attend a special "Constituents   meeting Friday, January 30.
Separate meetings will be held for students from each riding. All meetings will be held at noon in order to ensure fullest
attendance.
Three students from each constituent's group will be
elected by the group to go to Victoria and meet with their
MLA, if necessary.
Following is a list of Student Councillors and their constituency zones:
AMOR, Wendy, AL 0470 — North Peace, South Peace,
Fort George, North Okanagan, South Okanagan, Salmon Arm,'
Similkameen.
FEAVER, George, AL 2120—Dewdney, Amenica, McKen-
zie, Prince Rupert, Skeena, Atlin.
EDGAR, Dave, AL 0743-R—All Vancouver Island ridings.
- HORSMAN, Jim, Afc 5088-R—Columbia, Kamloops, Yale,
Revelstoke, Lillooet, Cariboo, Delta.
BALLENTINE, Bill, HA 8691—All Vancouver and Burnaby and North Shore ridings, also New Westminster.
HASKTNS, Peter, AL 4331-L—Chilliwack, Cranbrook, Fernie, Grand Forks-Greenwood, Kaslo-Slocan; Nelson-Creston,
Rossland-Trail.
Constituents meetings will be held Friday, January 30, at
noon, in the following places:
Alberni, Bu 212; Atlin, Ag 100; Burnaby, BU 104; Caribou,
H.E. 100; Chilliwack, Arts 204; Columbia, PH. 201; Comox,
Bu 222; Cowichan-Newcastle, Eng. 201; Cranbrook, Law South.
Delta, Eng. 202; Dewdney, Bu. 226; Esquimalt, Bu 203;
Fernie, Law West; Fort George, Ph. 201; Grand Forks-Greenwood, Bu 320; Kamloops, Law East; Kaslo-Slocan, Ph. 201;
Lilloet, Bu 322; MacKenzie, Bu 205.
Nanaimo and the Islands, Eng. 201; Nelson-Creston, Ch.
400; New Westminster, Bu. 106; North Okanagan, Eng. 200;
North Peace River, Bu. 326; North Vancouver, F. & G. 100.
Oak Bay, Ed. 117; Omineca, Ag. 100; Prince Rupert, Ag.
100; Revelstoke, Bu 324; Rossland-Trail, Bu. 100;
Saanich, Bu 204; Similkameen, Ch. 200; Skeena, Ag. 100;
South Okanagan, Eng. 200; South Peace River, Bu 326.
Vancouver-Burrard, Auditorium (left); Vancouver Centre, Biology 100; Vancouver East, Auditorium (gallery); Vancouver-Point Grey, Auditorium (right); Victoria City, Bu 102;
Yale, Bu. 220.
POLL  REVEALS:
FEE  FIGHT
Ho-Hum
Results of a Ubyssey poll Wednesday show that more
than 80 per cent of students questioned have not written their
MLA's about the proposed fee hike.
More than half did not know
who  their MLA  was.
A MAP OF B.C. and a list of
MLA's throughout B.C. has
been posted in Brock Hall to
aid students in finding out who
their MLA is.
The Ubyssey polled 23 students, asking each who his MLA
was, if he had written him, and
if not, why.
Stuart Philpott, Arts 2, has
not written his MLA, does not
know his MLA's name.
He has not written because
"I only take two courses and so
I didn't think about it."
Collin Johnston, Afrts 1, has
not "got around to writing yet"
but  is   aware that   one   of  his
MLAs is Robert Bonner.
"I'M RICH" was the reason
given by Bert Knowlan, Commerce 3 for not writing his Victoria representative.
(Continued on  Page 3)
See POLL REVEALS
INSIDE
Editorial Page 2
Sports Page 11
Reviews Pages 6-7
'Tween Classes Page 5 PAGE  TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 29, 1959
non illigitimos carborundum   ...
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
Published three times a week throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices. AL. 4484; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,    DAVE  ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Al Forrest      City Editor, Kerry Feltham
CUP Editor, Judy Frain Chief  Photographer,  Colin Landie
Editor, Special Editions,    Rosemary Kent-Barber
SENIOR EDITOR,      BARB BIELY
Reporters and Desk:    Wendy Barr, Barbara Hansen, Diane
Greenall, Allan Chernov, Mike Jeffery.
GUEST  EDITORIAL
Money, Not Marks
This year the administration of this university have
asked the provincial government for $2.2 million more for its
operating expenses for 1959-60 than it received for 1958-59.
If the provincial government does not grant this money,
then the university will be fforced to increase tuition fees by
upwards of $100 per student.
This substantial increase in operating budget is the result
of: a) the implications of increasing enrollment; b) higher
maintenance and service costs; and c) increased salaries for
the teaching staff.
It has been estimated that approximately 30% of the
student population at UBC finance their education entirely
©n their own, while approximately 70% of the remainder
finance the greater part of their education. This is one reason
why the fees have been kept as low as possible in the past.
That is, to allow the financially limited but academically
capable student to attend university.     :
If a substantial fee increase,of $100 or more becomes a
-reality next year, then the many students who are already
deep in debt and who are livinig a day-to-day existence will
have to drop out of university.
The loss of valuable braisi power at this particular time
will be detrimental to the future development of this province
and of Canada. High tuition fees will also mean that academic
ability will be replaced as the criterion for entry to university by the financial status of the individual.
This, I feel, will be a great injustice to those in the lower
income group and will be a sad commentary on our way of
life.
It is my belief that a. substtantial fee increase can be
averted by bringing this crisis to the attention of the government in Victoria.
Students have already been asked to write to their MLA's
to inform them of the plight of UBC students. However, if
Lbur campaign is to be successful, it must reach out into the
highways and byways of this province so that the people can
join with their sons and daughters in adding their voices to
the already loud student protest.
The next few days will see the formation of Constituency Action Committees designed to bring students in each
electoral district together to discuss this problem as it
affects them.
These Committees will also be used to lay the groundwork for a mass delegation to Victoria early in February if
the government does not help UBC.
Never before have the words "Tuum Est" been as true
as they are now.    Each of us must do his or her share.
where NEWS rs HOT!
whereMUSICisCOOL!
WIRY   DAY   LISTEN   TG
UBC   RADIO
le Caf ard Rose
By  BILL  GROVES and
COLE HARRIS
In Le Cafard Rose we hope
to give you a delicate experience in modest journalism. To
provide a few moments of quiet
pleasure for the refined Ubyssey reader is our only aim.
We intend to offer some gentle comments on the European
scene, comments of such innocence and utter unsophistica-
tion that no feelings will be
ruffled, no nose disjointed.
Our first column is an analysis of the English character.
*  *  *
If Frenchmen must be in
love, Americans making money, Englishmen, we descov-
ered, must be keen. The
English collect beetles, go on
walking tours, rediscover historic trivia, with astonishing
ferocity.
Why? Is it a means of dodging bigger issues, specifically,
lovemaking?
Perhaps from a position of
absolute authority on the three
toed newt the Englishman can
regard the rest of the world,
even the female half, with complacence. Perhaps he can gaze
without flinching into his
sweetheart's eyes only if thinking of the new lepidoptra on
the pressing board.
On the other hand, keenness
may be nothing more than a
retreat from monotonous English reality. English dress is
uniformly drab, English houses,
mass-produced red brick boxes,
enlivened here and there by
the delicate tracery of wall-
climbing sewer systems. Perhaps it is escapism which
makes the Englishman keen,
which-keeps him treading reverently about in forests of
Chinese idols, Duncan-fife
tables, or history which traps
his life in a spiderwed of overlapping five or nine sided
chambers, all miraculously,
watertight, all insulated against heat.
For the Englishman is keen
about suffering. He thrives on
chillblane. An English fireplace, eight feet high, marble
mantled, contains a three-inch
helix glowing from a mixture
of Ohms law and embarassment
at being caught red-handed
feebly trying to undermine the
tweed industry.
Does cold produce hardiness,
virility? On the contrary,
when it is too cold for the
Englishman to take off his coat,
it is also too cold to remove
his pants. The net effect is
recognizable under the name
of British decency, or British
reserve.
In fact, can the Englishman
make love? We don't know
actually. It's a bit awkward
in buttoned greatcoat sitting
around the heating coil with
blue knockles extended to
think of anything as ethereal
as love, especially when the
sideboard contains Yorkshire
and bread pudding.
The Englishman survives instead on massive doses of heroism, and settles for being keen
about some extraordinary pet
to which he can dedicate himself in the warmth and dignity
of his overcoat.
Remedy Situation Mess Disappearing
Editor,  The  Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
Can the students of this university, faced With the current
financial crisis, rightfully expect some form of support (not
monetary, of course) from our
Chancellor, Mr. Dal Grauer?
Surely Mr. Grauer, in his responsible position at the U.B.-
C, cannot be totally ignorant
of the issues involved, and if
he does find himself thus uninformed, may we suggest he
remledy the situation—immediately. If he is, as we hope,
in possession of the facts, may
we look for some tangible evidence of his concern for the
students and the welfare of
the university.
Mr. Grauer, being very fortunate in his position of a
power behind the Socred
throne, could surely drop a
word here and there that
would benefit his old Alma
Mater. Or perhaps he might
be persuaded to make a public statement to the effect that
he supports our request of
more government aid to this
university. Before we trek to
Victoria, it might be more
profitable to march upon Mr.
Grauer at the B.C. Electric
Company.
A word to the wise should
be sufficient.
SYLVIA CARTER, Arts II
LIZ FRASER, Arts I.
Room and Board for female
student,   $65   per month.
Toronto Road
Call ALma  1124-L
after 6.00 p.m.
Favor Fee Increase
. Editor,  The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
As I am mentioned, if only
in passing, in Mr. John Helle-
well's editorial about the proposed fee increase, I should
like to answer him.
I appear in your editorial,
Mr. Hellewell, in Paragraph 5
as one of the "many students
who feel our obligation to pay
a certain share of the cost of
their University education in
view of the many personal
benefits received." I am flatly
in favour of a fee increase—
and a stiff one; say two to
three hundred dollars per year.
The idea implied by your
editorial, that scholastic ability, leadership and so on are
possessed only by; the poverty-
stricken leaves me singularly
unmoved. If anybody with real
ability and the potential of
making a useful contribution
to the world has to drop out
because of this fee increase I
would be genuinely surprised.
The mob of general progrm
Arts students (of which I am
one) generally have little
enough to offer the University
or the world in return for any
subsidy. If som|c of these
thousands have to drop out
and go to work so much the
better.
I like it here, and will do
what I can to remain, but I
see no reason wihy every taxpayer in B.C. should keep me
here. And when I graduate
and become a taxpayer in earnest, I do not enjoy the prospect of everybody of "University age" stick his, her, or its
clammy fingers into my pocket book, because the Country
Club is better than working.
Yours truly,
F.   D.   REDDYHOFF,
Arts IV.
Editor,  The  Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
It was with no small degree
of pleasure and anticipation
that we, who daily must traverse the ditches and their associated sea of mud and muck,
noticed, towards the end of
last term, that the mess was at
last disappearing, and we held
out hope, that perhaps by this
term, the chaotic wasteland
would, at least partially, have
given way to smooth pavement,
well kept shrubs and luxuriant
lawns.
It is now evident that our
fond hopes were completely
unrelated to harsh reality. To
my utter amazement, I find that
the moat which the contractors
saw fit to dig between the Physics and Chemistry buildings—
and then fill again (all of which
took place during November
and .December last) is now being reexcavated..
Once more, in order to reach
the Physics Building through
this contractors paradise of
filth, one requires the navigational enlightenment of Buck
Rogers, the balance of a tight
rope walker, and the intuition
of a woman.
As I possess none of these
assets (nor does it seem likely
that I ever shall), I, and hundreds like me, are left to
choose between hip waders or
wet and muddy clothes and
shoes.
Surely it is not absurdly impractical to suggest that the
redigging of ditches be put on
say an annual basis, rather
than the present bi-monthly
system?
Yours soddenly,
J. E. MADDEN,
, Arts   and Science IV
Campaign Will 'Flop'
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Since I am both a student at
the University of British Columbia and a Member of the
Legislature, I am in a position
to check the effectiveness X>f
the letter campaign to the
Members of the Legislature
with a view to preventing a
substantial fee increase next
year.
I have almost exactly 100
students attending the University from the Riding of Mackenzie. Up to the 16th January I have received only one
letter from a student protestirig
the possible increase. It seems
that the response of the students is about one in a hundred. This letter campaign
will turn out to be a flop unless every student in the university makes up his mind that
before the end of the week he
will write to his Member.
If you do not know the home
address of your MLA, write to
the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Yours truly,
ANTHONY J. GARGRAVE
Keep Him Informed
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I was relieved to see in your
Club Notes of Friday, Jan. 9,
that the Conservative Club will
be sponsoring two Model Parliaments and one election this
term. I had been suffering
under the misapprehension that
there would be three Model
Parliaments (Jan. 28, Feb. 16
and March 12) and one election
this term.
Club Notes must be one hell
of an asset to the people who
like to be kept informed.
Yours truly,
J. F. A. HOOD,
Pres., Parliamentry  Council
I . ,
1  :   »■   i
* J i i
HIMM3HMHI HMHUi
u t,*r;f tin
■r tM:;f#S!*'>MfM  '*»*»-, IMSB?M*»tir*?ai*#1* J «(»?!»* *?!*?»* Thursday, January 29, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Liberals Hold " \
Labor Seminar
(tJ.C. Liberals held a two-day seminar on Labour, natural
resources and social welfare at UBC January 17 and 18. UBC
law student Gerry Goeujon attended.    This is the first in a
series of Ubyssey articles by Mr. Goeujon on the seiranar).
By GERRY A. GOEUJON
Mayor Tom Alsbury, Mr. George Weyland from the I.W.A.,
and Mr. George Gregory, Liberal M.L.A., spoke about Labour.
Mr. Charles Campbell, mining
engineer, Professor Anthony
Scott, Economics Department,
.Mr. Albert Cheesegreen, forest
consultant, spoke about Natural
Resources.
Professor William Dixon, director of the School of Social
Work; Miss Margaret Leihton,
executive director Vancouver
Health League; Edward Watson,
Secretary Community Chest
Committee on Social Assistance;
Dr. Robert Watts, Director of
Mental Health, spoke on the
subject of Social Welfare.
The whole seminar was stim-
; ulating and very informative.    I
• feel that if we had more of these
sessions   our   politicians   would
be better informed.
Experts spoke as experts, and
did not pull any punches. Some
of these punches indicated to me
where our policies could and
should be changed.
In my next article I will write
on what was said in regards to
Labour.
Symposium
Forms Here
Application forms for the
Academic Symposium Weekend
will be available in the AMS
office or from heads of departments until February 4.
The symposium is an informal
gathering of selected students
and faculty who discuss the issue facing the university in determining its academic policy.
The intention is to examine
and evaluate the intangible conditions which affect the student
and, in so doing, make both
student and faculty more aware
of the importance of maintaining an environment in which
scholarship can be encouraged.
"THE BIRDS' PLAY
IN AUDITORIUM
University Workshop's
Production of Aristophanes'
"The Birds" opens tonight
at 8:30 in the Auditorium.
The extravagant farce
will be presented in the
style of a modern review
wdth original music com:
posed by John Ohapell.
Leading the large cast
are Gerald Guest and John
Brighton.
The "Birds" runs until
Saturday.
NFCUS Student
Day Held March 5
National University Student Day will be held March 5 at
UBC and across Canada.
NFCUS is sponsoring the special day as part of Education
Week in Canada.
Publicity for Student Day will feature:
The role of the student in so
VARSITY THEATRE
4375 W. 10th - Phone AL. 0345
One Complete Performance commencing 7.30 p.m.
LAURENCE OLIVIER    \&J '
Richard nt
RALPH JUCHAJtDSON    CLAIRE BLOOM    CEDRIC HARDV1CKE
ft* SmH Rntrvn) V(»TAVI»OH « tKMHCOtOft
•y William
UBC Man In
Big Concert
The New Westminster Civic
Orchestra will be playing in the
Auditorium Wednesday, Feb. 4.
Willelm Bertsch, a 4th year
Arts student, will be conducting the orchestra. Mr. Bertsch
formerly conducted the Victoria
Junior Symphony.
Marie Aimee Warrot, a pianist, will be playing with the
orchestra.
Included in the program are
Beethoven's Eighth Symphony,
Handel's Water Music and Chopin's First Piano Concerto.
Tickets are 50c and are available in the AMS office.
Wednesday evening the Caf
is featuring a special symphony
dinner at a reduced price for
those with symphony tickets.
Fort and Acadia Camp will
also be having a special symphony dinner.
ciety;
The financial barriers to
higher education;
Student problems today;
The acute shortage of student
accommodation.
Mortimer Bistrisky, President
of NFCUS, is planning a campaign on two levels.
With co-operation from CBC
radio and television and from
the press, NFCUS hopes to present problems.
PROPER SOLUTION
In a statement from NFCUS
headquarters, Mortimer Bistrisky says that "A proper solution
to the educational problem
would make it possible for the
son or daughter of any Canadian, regardless of economic
means, to attend university if he
or she possesses the aptitude."
The NFCUS statement concludes: "We believe that with a
properly informed public, the
problem will gradually disintegrate, the end result being that,
to quote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, (higher
education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of
merit)". '
It is hoped that National University Student Day will give
Canadians a better perspective
of university life common to. all
students, while leaving local
student bodies to explain their
own particular difficulties with
the help of debates, panel discussions, student newspapers
and radio broadcasts.
National University Student
Day has the support of 70,000
students from thirty-two universities and colleges whose representatives approved it at the last
NFCUS Congress.
POLL    REVEALS
(Continued from Page 1))
Arlene Wyper, Arts 1 does
not care "because I won't be
coming back next year," and
Don Kennedy, Law 1, does not
have an MLA to write to.
Hubert Thibault, Engineering
1, Richard Porter, Arts 1 and
John Hogarth, Law 2 have written their representatives.
VALERY RICARDO HAS
NOT WRITTEN and does not
know who to write to.
"I don't know enough about
it to  write,"  she said.
Tony Gargrave, MLA for
Mackenzie and UBC law student, ;'said in a letter to the
Ubyssey that he had received
only one letter protesting the
fee increase.
There are almost 100 students in his riding.
He predicted the letter writing campaign will fail unless
every student in the universty
makes up his mind to write his
MLA before the end of the
week.
WATCH
—     for  these   free  special   events
NOON HOUR SPECIAL EVENTS
FEBRUARY 9—The Gateway Singers, sensational quartet of folk singers from San Francisco.
MARCH 2—Stephen Potter, British humorist, author of
Gamesmanship, etc.
MARCH 3—Medical Undergraduate Society skit, written
by our own Rod Smith.
MARCH 4—Eleanor Roosevelt, great American states-
woman.
MARCH 5—Parenin String Quartet, one of the greatest
ensembles in the world.
MARCH 6—Dr. Margaret Mead, famous anthropologist
and educator.
MARCH 1C—John S. Badeau, President, Near East Foundation, speaking on the Near East.
MARCH 12—Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Irwin
Hoffman, conducting.
APRIL 7—Leonie Adams, American poetess.
SPECrAL CONCERT
The New Westminster Civic Orchestra conducted
by William Bartsch with Marie Aimee Warrot will play
a symphony program featuring Beethoven's Eighth Symphony, Handel's Water Music and Chopin's Piano Con-
ceito in the Auditorium on Wed., Feb. 4th, at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets 50c at the A.M.S. Office. Special Symphony dinner to be served in the Cafe.
MUSIC SERIES
The regular noon-hour Wednesday Concerts continue in Buchanan 1G6. Instrumental concertos by
Beethoven, Bach, Shostakovich, Stravinsky and Ravel.
ART GALLERY
JANUARY 23-31—The Massey Medals for Architecture.
The Pilkington Awards.
FEBRUARY  3-21—Northwest Painters  Today.
FEBRUARY 24 - MARCH 7—Ben Hill-Tout Memorial
Photographic Salon.
MARCH 10 - 21—Primitive African sculpture. Marsden
Hartley.
MARCH 23 - APRIL 18—Aecent Accessions of Paintings
by the National Gallery. Drawings
and Watercolours by Will Sohl. Stephen Andrews:    One-Man Show.
THEATRE
FEBRUARY 23 and 25 to 28—"The Boy Friend," University Auditorium, 8:15 p.m. Presented
by Mussoc. February 23 and 25 are
student nights. Tickets 75c at A.M.S.
Office.
FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 7—"The Bacchae" by Euripe-
edes, Freddy Wood Theatre, 8:30 p.m.
A Freddy Wood Theatre Workshop production, produced by Robert Orchard.
Tickets $1.50, $1.00, 75c (rush) from
University Theatre Reservations or at
Modern Music.
APRIL 3 AND 11—"Separate Tables" by Terence Ratti-
gan, Freddy Wood Theatre, 8:30 p.m. A
Freddy Wood Theatre Workshop production, produced by Yvonne Firkins.
Tickets $1.50, $1.00, 75c (rush) from
Theatre Reservations or at Modern
Music.
Under the Sponsorship of - STUDENTS SPECIAL EVENTS & FINE ARTS COMMITTEES PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 29, 195
Third Trek No Answer
Claims Past AMS Head
The guiding force behind
ested in helping in the fight a
Doug's
OqZOq
/6*€4£*&
the Second Great Trek is inter-
gainst the proposed fee increase.
Ben Trevino, past AMS President, feels, however, that a
Third Trek is not the answer.
"We can speculate — and with
good grounds — that the University will not get the grant it
requires. Therefore the issues
should be raised so that the public knows what is involved, and
can protest," Trevino said.
"However," Trevino added,
"by using the word "Trek" so
often we are causing it to lose
the force and impact it has had."
Trevino pointed out that the
last 'Trek-interyal', was thirty
years, and thus1 the use of the
word 'Trek' last year brought
forth a great' response from
alumni.   "■ , ■"
Over-use 'would cause its
meaning td'be lost, he said.
SHERWOOD the SHARK
Wjio&ys:
We, we sharks Hike a little
'"nip"#1 something now and
then but who doesn't? We're
'handing; you a lesson from
tone of our best schools when
v^S?i»ay... -   ;
'for a preview of spring
iwear drop  into  the  Shirt
J 'n.Tie Bar to see ,the new,
j^buttorih rough v^oveh car-
\ digan   with1 bell   sleeves.
; This exciting new high-
bulk orlon sweater comes
Jn five different colors and
sells for $10.95.
shirt 'n
tie bar
592 SEYMOUR
(at Dunsmuir)
"QomjL in. and. JtisL
onsL on."
The College Press: ■■
Canada'^ Liveliest
Newspapers
'
From high jinks to hard
news, college newspapers
stir up a whirlwind of
controversy. From ivy-
covered strongholds they
aim a barrage of spoofs,
puns and searing comment at a world that
notices them only when
they're in hot water—
which they usually are.
Maclean's takes you behind the scenes . . . lets
you join in the excitement
of the gay and gusty
world of the college press.
Holy Man
Lectures
Hindu holy man Parmanand
S. Mehra will lecture on "Lif
erature and1 Art in India" yd
Physics 200 today at noon.        '
He is a philosopher, artist,'
.autih||r,:jnaster^ri^ter andi#«jiif!
ineelfbr the N»bel!Prize. :IW.HI-;
r    ' .a"       '       I. i  ! ■ ,[??-■':»)
 -tr ——w   i   i —■ '.' ■!■'■- ■'■«
THE YiAR^ MOST
iXCITING CONCERTS
T j^^'lRVWQ GRAHZ pr#»ent»
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THE  NATION'S  NO.   '.
VOCAL  GROUP-Billboard
SHEARING
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INSTRUMENTAL GROUP • 8iilb°o«^
SHELLY
jV\ANNE ndh fEN
THE   WORLD'S
GREATEST   DRUMMER-Do
Georgia   Auditorium
Tonight at 8:30
Admission:  —  $3.85,   $3.30,
$2.75  and  $2.20, inc. tax.
Tickets at Kelly's until 5
p.m., after 7 p.m. at the
Auditorium.
FASH/ON MOLLS TRY
FOR POSITION M0N
All girls interested in
commentating for the A.-W.
S. Spring Fashion Show
come to the tryouts on Monday, Jan. 26 12:30 in the
Mildred Brock Room.
Bring 2 girls, for which
you have a prepared commentary on each.
Modeling tryouts Thursday, Jan. 29 12:30, in the
Mildred Brock Room.
Noon Music
Program Here
The concerto series featured
in UBC's noon-hour concert programme in room 105, Buchanan
building for the past season will
continue under auspices of the
Fine Arts and Special Events
committees.
Beethoven's triple concerto
will be played January 28 by
Esther Glazer, violin; Irene
Rosenberg, piano; and Ernst
Friedlander, 'cello.
Gideon Grau will play Bach's
E. Major concerto for violin
February 4.
Marie-Aimee Warrot, who opened the spring program, will
be heard in Shostakovich's piano concerto February 11.
Stravinsky's violin Concerto
will be played by Esther Glazer,
with Irene Rosenberg at the piano, February 18.
Connaghan   Considering
Cairn   Ceremony   Proposal
"The proposal for a massive cairn ceremony is still under
consideration."
This was the only comment
AMS president Chuck Connaghan would give regarding the
proposal made in the Ubyssey.
In an editorial Tuesday, it
was suggested that a ceremony
be held to honor the student
heroes of the First Great Trek,
and to show as well, that today's student possesses the zeal
and enthusiasm of his forerunners.
CEREMONY
Connaghan also reported that
his talk to the Vancouver, and
District Labour Council "went
very well." He spoke to a packed meeting of this group Tuesday night. ':;! '' i'1
LABOUR  COUNCIL
At this meeting the Labour
Council passed a resolution
"unanimously calling • ©n,;the
government to give the University enough money to prevent
any increase in fees; and pledging support to the Students'
Council in their fight to combat
the  fee increase."
Connaghan is still carrying
out and extensive program of
speeches, designed to strengthen support for the campaign
against fee increase.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
FILMSOC
RUSSIA'S ANSWER
PRESENTS
TO ENGLISH 200
IHE NEW GULLIVER
Russian version of Swift's Immortal Story
THURSDAY,   JANUARY   22
at 12.30 Noon      —      Admission 35c
TUESDAY,   JANUARY   27
3.30, 6.00, 8.00 and 10.00 p.m.
"TEN    DAYS   THAT   SHOOK
THE   WORLD"
High School
Classes Here
A group of Vancouver and
district high school students will
begin a series of : two-hour
monthly lectures on "public affairs at the university of B.C.
Tuesday.
Sponsored by the UBC extension department, the lectures
are designed to encourage student interest in public affairs,
according to Gordon Slman, assistant  director of  extension.
Principals of high schools in
Vancouver, North Vancouver
and West Vancouver wili select
two students to attend the' Tec-
/tures.
' "We hope to expand the pro-
'gramf to draw representation
from all high schools in the
Vancouver area,"   Selman  said.
Professor Charles Bourne,
UBC's faculty of law, will give
the first lecture in the series,
entitled "Development of the
Columbia River," in room 325
of the Buchanan building at 7
p.m..
Subsequent lectures will cover such topics as the future of
a divided Germany, the implications of metropolitan government for the Vancouver area
and Canadian labour unions.
The forums will consist of lectures or panel discussions by
university and community people followed by a question and
discussion period.
ALMA     CABS
ALma 4422
Affiliated with
YELLOW CAB CO. LTD.
MU. 1-3311
For  your "Mardi Gras"
Haircut come to —
Campus Barber Shop
* Brock Extension
* 5734 University Blvd.
m
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Appointments may be made through
your university placement office
R0YA3 CANADIAN AIR FORCE
THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Has flying, engineering and executive career
opportunities for University Graduates
...an RCAF Personnel Officer will visit your campus to:
INTERVIEW
Final Year Undergraduates
s for the following positions:
Aeronautical, Armament, Telecommunications,
Construction and Mobile Equipment
Engineering, Aircrew and other Administrative
and professional fields
ON
FEBRUARY 3 & 4
Wing Commander T. Joseph
MacKinnon, DFC, CD, of Ottawa and Vancouver, Assistant Director of Personnel
Manning at Air Force Headquarters, in attendance at the
University of British Columbia on February 3 and 4, will
also interview prospective
female university graduates
for the Personnel Administration Branch in the Royal
. Canadian Air Force. ...
William Caxton
Device used by Caxton,
1422-91, printer of the first
book in English.
duthie books
901  Kobson Street
Vancouver      -       MU.   4-2718 Thursday, January 29, 1959
THE      U B Y S S E Y
PAGE FIVE
'tween classes
Bird Films Featured at Biology Club
BIOLOGY CLUB—-Noon-hour
filmls: Birds of Canada, Birds
of the Prairie Marshes, Overlooked & Pt. Pelee, Nature
Sanctuary. Thurs. Jan. 22.
•I"       •!•       v
iAOAJA-SOC—Extremely    important meeting  today  in Arts
206. Election  of new treasurer
and discussion on B.C. Council
of  Divers membership fee. All
members please attend at 12:30.
v     v     v
LUTHERAN   STUDENT   ASSOCIATION—'Sects of Today's
Society'   discussion   series   continues    today    with    Jehovah's
. Witnesses   being   discussed   by
; Rev. Severson, Friday noon in
Hut L-3.   Discussion follows.
V V V
PHILOSOPHY   CLUB  —   Is
Everything I See Really Inside
My ifead:'—Dr. Peter Remnant
in Bu.104 at noon today. Non-
members 10c.
THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER
CLUjB-^—Band Practice today at
12:30 in Hut L-6. All members
out please.
v v v
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB — presents the Vice-President of B.C..
Electric, Mr, J. Carson, speaking on 'Industrial Relations' on
Friday at 12:30 in HM2.
'V *t* •¥• ■
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT —- General meeting at
which reports of the Christmas
conference will be given. 12:30
Friday in S.C.M.  Hut.
•T        •!• Pf*
PRODUCTION   CLUB—Field
trip to Canadian Summer Broadway & Lougheed Jan.  22hd at
1:30 p.m. sharp. Thurs. Jan. 28
trip to Canadian Western Steel
Boiling Division at Eraser and
iJWaiiae,   Trip   to   Westminster
/jgapei?  tentatively   planned  for
"Feb."*:"'.'"  "'■-•"-''";.
■'., J.iyft«S3ra^015Y'.Ct UB- — Mr >
M&fish'.% speak Friday "Distribution of the Athapaska Indians." in Bu.204 Friday nooh;
Lecture will be illustrated.
.:  ■'*■ '»■*..."
H3DS»    SCHOOL     COHFER-
SJfCE  COMMITTEE ^-General
meeting Monday noon in. Men's
Club Room, B*ock Hall.
*    *    *
LECTURE ON INDIA—Mr.
Parmanand Mehra, NobeL Prize
Nominee and Associate of San-
dhi, wiill speak on 'Indian Sacred Literature and Art', Thursday noon Physics 200. The lecture will be illustrated.
RAMBLERS ATHLETIC
CLUB—General meeting Friday
n Phy 301.
•I* *T*        *T*
COMMITTEE TO DISCUSS
NUCLEAR  DISARMAMENT —
VIeeting Jan. 22nd at 3:30 in
he Student Christian Movement Hut. All welcome
V *TT V
DEBATING UNION — Thursday noon in Bu. 106. Topic: Resolved that Politicians are an
adverse influence on Can-Am
Relations. Speakers: John Helliwell, Alan Brawn vs. Brian
Smith, Mike Butler.
V "*• •!•
PHYSICS SOCIETY — Lecture on High Speed Aerodynamics will be given by Dr. Parkinson (Mech. Eng.) in P-202 at
12:30 Thursday—a film will
also be shown.
Sfc if. rf.
FILMSOC—'The New Gulliver', Russia's version of Swift's
immortal classic. 12:30 noon in
the Auditorium, admission 35c.
if. rf. 2ft
NEWMAN CLUB — General
meeting today at 12:30 in the
lounge in St. Mark's College.
•ji •}• •**
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT—'The Life and Mission
of the Church'—a study group
led by the Anglican Chaplain in
SCM Hut Thursday at 12:30.
rfi rf, r£
REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT COMMITTEE —
Meeting will be held Thursday
Jan. 22nd at 7:15 in the Board
Room, Brock Hall. AH representatives please attend or send
a  substitute.
V        •T        •!•
P. SNIDER. STUDENT PRICES FOR CONCERT — special
student rates of 75c per ticket
will be given to campus music
enthusiasts for the Esther Gla-
?er & Irene Rosenberg concert,
which will be held Feb. 11th at
the Beth Israel Auditorium, 4530
Oak St., under the sponsorship
of the Beth Israel Adult Institute of Jewish Studies. Tickets
from Hillel House.
"*• V        V
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE—
exhibition opens at 10:30 a.m.
instead of 9:00 p.m. on the 23rd
of January.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION—will meet in Bu.
102. Films will be shown "The
Caribbean' & 'The New El Dorado'.
NFCUS Supports Lavaf
Student Journalist
OTTAWA (CUP) — National Federation of Canadian University Students will support Normand Lacharite, Laval University student, expelled for an article in the student paper Le
Carabin.
Lacharite attacked the university administration and supported the struggle of three
University of Ottawa student
editors from participation in
their paper, La Rotonde.
NFCUS president, Mortimer
Bistrisky has asked for the
formation of a commission to
investigate the circumstances
surrounding Lacharite's dismissal  froirii Laval last  month.
Bistrisky suggested the investigating committee should be
composed of students from universities other than Laval, and
a Quebec member of the Canadian Association of University
Teachers.
Lacharite wias first denied
re-admission to the University
of Ottawa in September after
he published an article in La
Rbtonde accusing that university's administration of "paternalism."
Publication of his report on
the controversy in La Rotonde
cost the three editors their jobs
in October. »
National conference of Canadian University Press also
supported Lacharite with a motion, condemning the Laval ad'
ministration for suppressing the
right of freedom of the press.
Lacharite has applied for admission to the University j of
Montreal. I
CHARLTON & MORGAN'S
VARSITY SHOP
Annuel    January
CLEARANCE
Clothing   and   Furnishings
Reduced 20% to 50%
20 SPORT JACKETS, Reg. to $45
SLACKS 	
 $19.95
$9.95
CASUAL JACKETS 	
HALF PRICE
CHARLTON & MORGAN
VARSITY SHOP       -       4444 West 10th
Davies To See
Commonweal!
A University of B.C. administrator will begin a year-long
tour of the Commonwealth July
1 on grants fromi the Canada
Council and the Carnegie Corporation.
He is Geoffrey O. B. Davies,
assistant to President N. A. M.
MacKehzie and an associate
professor of history.
During his leave of absence
Davies will visit New Zealand,
Australia, India, Ceylon, Pakistan, Kenya, South Africa and
Great Britain. His purpose is to
investigate recent, changes arid
developments within the Commonwealth and the new pafe
terns of political, cooperation
between its members.
Davies will also investigate
administrative developments, at
various Commonwealth univer-
saties.
SHIRTS
Profesiioncliy Laundered
3 for 59° CS
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I PAGE SIX
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 29,1959
At The Gallery
The very kindest thing I can
say for Mister Abraham Rogat-
nick is that if the Pro-Raphae-
lites had never banded together
in Arthurian fashion we would
have been spared the filthily
cunning lecture to which we
were exposed last Friday evening at the Art Gallery. A dear
lady was good enough to describe his lecture in terms of
"scholarship" and "exceeding
enlightenment," and her words
illustrated the whole rotten tenor of the one and a half hours
of smuttiness and nonsense that
followed Mister Rogatnick's nod
t.o the people whose drearily
bright and indirect daubs he
sells. This nod must have been
intended as a signal for at his.
movement these devotees of Art
For The Sake of Taking The
Sucker's     Money     burst     into
simian applause, and after a
breathcatching second all- the
people who had paid for the
lecture followed suit.
Mister Rogatnick very cleverly realised that some of us
would soon become bored with
the steady, monotone American
drawl that he uses before a
large audience, and from somewhere had acquired a box of
slides depicting the more horrible gaueheries of the period.
About these he wove the feeble
web of his discourse, and, for
those of us who wanted to retain our sanity and our tempers, the slides were left hanging upon the screen, thus enabling us to leisurely examine
what I am sure the artists
themselves would have willingly buried. In some instances,
of course, these slides were out
of   context   but   Mister   Rogat
nick, who knows little about
the Pre-Raphaelites, knows
even less about what they had
painted or why they had painted it, and he properly supposed
that his audience wouldn't
know any better. It says something for public opinion, however, that he didn't care to handle such a painting as Hunt's
picture, "The Light of the
World," too roughly. I am sure
that if he had done so the "Vancouver Sun" critic would have
given him a sentence less notice
than he did.
Next week, Mister Rogatnick
wall tell us What he does not
know about "Art for Art's Sake
—and the Passion for Decadence," and I will be there, with
my  bubble  gum.
Diogenes, from   his   tub
—M. P. SINCLAIR.
CRITICISM
EDITOR.
Watt, By S
The Right To Coffee
"Lousey coffee."
"Yeah."
"Think  fees  will  go   up?"
"Yeah."
"Dort't you care?"
"Yeah—the least they could
do is clean the urn once a year."
"The least you could do is
be concerned about the fees
going up—if they do a lot of
people won't be able to come
out here."
"That so bad?"
"It sure as hell is—everyone
should have a right to go to
university—aren't you willing
to do something about it?"
"Sure, I'll write JOHN tonight and recomlmend it for the
Bill of Rights."
"Come on now if you are going to'talk about this thing intelligently at least be  serious."
"Okay — my jaw is set, my
eyes are steady, intense, my
sensitive, tobacco-stained hand
is stroking my chin-—let's be
serious. With all solemnity I
ask:
Why should  everybody  have
a  right to come  to university."
"Because this is a democracy
—that's why."
"Well, everyone has a right
to work and you can see how
, that turns out."
"That has nothing to do with
it."
Russian Revolution
During the next few days
Filmsoc will be conducting a
sort of unilateral cultural exchange of its own with Russia.
Today a Russian propaganda
remake of "Gulliver's Travels"
will be shown. Next Tuesday
there will be shown a film
which dwarfs today's and most
others. It is Sergei Eisensteip's
"The Ten Days That Shook The
World," the story of the culmination of the Russian Revolution in February-October, 1917.
It was completed in 1928 and
although it is regarded as
propaganda   by   the   B.C.   Film
Censor, who won't allow it to
be shown in commercial theatres, it was for Eistenstein a
labour not of propaganda but
of devotion.
There are no individual actors in the film. The hero is The
People. Even Lenin appears
caught up in something, greater
than himself. The caricatures of
Kerensky and his supporters
are crude and obvious; but they
detract little from the high
sense of urgent reality which
the film achieved.
The film is considered one of
the Ten Best ever made.
"Well then give another reason why everyone should go tc»
university."
"The university molds the
life we live in. That's a fact.
There is no way of getting away
from it."
"That's mighty intuitive of
you. Just how does a university
mold the modern way of life?"
"People come here, learn
things, talk about things, have
intelligent conversations .   . .."
"Like this one?"
"Sure . . . now you've made
me forget what I was going to
say."
"Well let me help you. Universities depend more and more
on government grants don't
they?"
"Yeah."
"And on wealthy alumni."
"Yeah."
"And  on business."
"Yeah."
And to get the support of
these groups the university has
to  sell  itself  does it  not?
"Yeah."
"Okay—streamline the campus. Remember—whatever the
product if the package is crusty,
old, traditional, it won't sell,
—right?"
"Yeah, I suppose so."
"Then you have to have efficiency so nothing is wasted. To
do this you streamline courses.
Lectures have to be fast, interesting to the point. Nothing
extraneous."
"So? This is all part of the
modern  way  of life."
"Exactly. But who molded it
—the modern way of life or
the  university?"
"I don't follow."
"Quite simple. The University did not set up these standards and have them, mold the
present   way   of   life.
The standards were there and
the university had to adjust to
them."
"Okay, sure. But what has
this to do with the right to go
to university?"
"You made the connection,
I didn't."
"That's evading the whole
question. What I said was the
fees would go up and this would
keep people out of university
and this was against the basic
right of everybody living in a
democracy—the right to an education."
"Oh go write  your MLA."
—BARBARA   HANSEN
For the uninitiated, Samuel
Beckett is a Dublin born novelist and playwright who has established himself in Paris since
1938. The first two of his novels, "Murphy" (1938), "Watt"
(1945), written in English, are
not as widely known as the
trilogy: "Molloy" (1951), "Ma-
lone Dies" (1951), "The Un-
namable" (1953), written originally in French, and which, in
turn, are not as widely known
as his plays, "Endgame" and
"Waiting for Godot." It is
through the trilogy and the
plays that Beckett has achieved
his reputation as an eloquent
expositor of the implications
of life   without meaning.
Watt's tale is told to us by
an acquaintance of Watt's as it
has been told to him by Watt.
Watt goes, for reasons unknown,
to Mr. Knott's house, wcrks
there as a servant for a period,
and then leaves. This is all
Of course these events, the coming, the staying, and the leaving, are described extensively,
but not in any manner one
might suppose.
For the descriptions ar'i given from the point of view of
Watt, who according to the narrator "had not seen a symbol,
nor executed an interpretation,
since  the  age of  fifteen."
Let us expand a little on this
quotation. Here by an "interpretation" Beckett means an
explanation of why an event
occurred, either in terms of
natural laws, or human purposes, or teleogical schemes
Watt, unlike ordinary humans,
has great difficulty performing
this rite, with the consequence
that a large portion of his tale
takes the form of a list of apparently unrelated happenings,
to each of which Watt is totally
indifferent.
This indifference, incidentally, has as its source Watt's com-
iplete separation from human
ties: "Watt had seen people
smile, and thought he understood how it was done."
Accompanying Watt's peculiarly objective report of his
situation is a precise account
of     his     mental     convolutions.
Watt may lack some of
more endearing human pro
ties, but Beckett has him tl
as a formal logician, decom
ing arguments into hypoth
and conclusions, proving
elusions by reductio ad ab
dum, and so on.
Typical subject! matter
these solemn arguments is
various methods by which
remains of Mr. Knott's i
might be delivered to a fan
ed dog kept expressly for
purpose. I found such in
gruity startling ai-.d amusin;
the same way that Lewis i
roll's   syllogisms   are.
Most of the book is Wat
thought and deed but there
two thiry page speeches gi
by Arsene and Arthur, serv;
cf Mr. Knott. Both are hi'
ous. Arsene delivers a tii
about an incompetent maid,
Arthur tells of an acade
friend engaged in research
the "mathematical' intuition:
the Visicetts."
After Gertrude Stein, B<
ett's prose moves more slo
than any author I know. R
tition is used constantly, a
the results are at once en
ing, giddying, and fatigu
His writing is reminiscent
the great Victorian prose v
ers, such as J. S. Mill or
Newman. The sentences
long, well balanced, and o
have the verb at the end.
New    Swift      i.
Filmsoc's    feature    today    at
noon in the Auditorium is "The
New   Gulliver,"   an   old   (1935)   r
Russian   version   of   Swift's   satire,    now   aimed   at   monarchy   "'
and fascism.
And. on the same programme
1) Robert Benchley's dead-pan \
lecture to a ladies' organization,
"The Sex Life of the Polyp".
and 2) "Thursday's Children."
a movie about teaching deaf
children to speak which won an
Academy  Award in  1955.
Over 4,000 "extras" mourned
the death of Cecil B. DeMille
in Hollywood today.
"He was our last hope," a
spokesman said.
MR.  & MRS. ROGER PU!
the Literary   Oftice  of th
Harold Brochmann.    Mrs.
the art and drama column
author of the treatise on Se
is reproduced above. Tuesday, January-20,. 1959
THE     UBYSS E Y
PAGE SEVEN
.,rs*.
s l-Told-You-So
B1TCHANAN
el Beckett
: beautiful.
," is -not as tightly *;con- :
as  the hovels   of the
It' appears  thatr h ere
is in-the-process of dis-
Brave New World Revisited^ by Aldous Huxley, "togetherness" and the "Cult of
published by Harper, 1958. $3.50. Efficiency."    The  Organization
In 1931 when Aldous Huxley latest ills,    he    should turn to Men  are "normal  not  in  what
wrote "Brave New World" the "Brave   New   World Revisited" may be called an absolute sense
idea  of a  society  caressed into for some skillful speculation and of tne word; they    are    normal
unawareness,    soothed into un- a broader approach to the mod- only in relation to a profoundly
knowing  yet  abject  submission em dilemnas. abnormal     society.     Their  per-
to the state was    a    novel one. The most immediate problem fect adjustment to that abnormal
Huxley's critics hastened to tell Huxley    discusses    is    thought- society is a measure    of    their
their readers that the book was control; a science-fiction phrase mental sickness.    Because their
not a prophecy but rather a so- in 1931, but an accepted tool of human voice has been stilled so
phisticated fable, a bit of semi- everyone    from    Eisenhower to early in their lives they do not
intellectual    escape    literature. Ipana under the alias "motiva- even struggle or develop a symp-
The succeeding quarter century tional techniques" in  1958. tom as tne neurotic does."
has    realized    so    many, of the The use of chemical as well as "How can we preserve the in-
book's predictions    so    quickly psychological methods of persua- te8rity and reassert the value of
and a circle respectively, or a
circle and a centre not its centre in search of a centre and  that Huxley himself admits sur-  sion  is  also  imminent,  Huxley  tne human individual," he asks,
its     circle     respectively,     in  prise.    (The setting of the book  suggests.       Tranquilizers     (the   "A generation from now it may
boundless space, in endless
* what he wants- to'say- time (Watt knew nothing about
Kjvels, 'and for this rea- . physics),   and  at   the   thought
that it was perhaps this, a
circle and a centre not
its centre, in search of
a centre and its circle respectively, in boundless space, in
endless time, then Watt's eyes
re -are- more irrelevant
tan' in the later novels,
an 'example on-construc-
is   the   sixth   century .A. F
"After Ford").
Huxley's   latest
World Revisited,"
"soma"  Of  Brave New   World) be too late to find an answer and
have  great potential   as  subtle perhaps impossible in the stifl-
Brave   New  persuader^,  he states, and  just in8 collective climate    of    that
is not just a   to make them available to the future time even to ask the ques-
not stem, and they flowed
down ,his fluted cheeks
. unchecked, in a steady flow,
refreshing him greatly."
—ROGER PURVES
"dismal   exercise: in   self-indict-  public is a step towards quietly  tion,"
ment" (as the glibly inept Time  dispelling    political    awareness       Another threat is over-popula-
Magazine    reviewer    proclaims' and heightening    the    public's  tion-   Huxley points out the par-
from his    ivory    abyss); it is a   suggestibility.       He     concludes  adox  of  modern   medicine   and
m searching and   informed   assess-   that there is no good reason why   social services    increasing    the
filled"with teairsThat "he"could  ment  of western society,   1958.   a thoroughly scientific dictator-   world's misery as they practice
After one has heard Chisholm's ship should ever be overthrown hi the name of humanity. Each
lectures or read Julian Huxley's because "most of the men and medical milestone may be a
writings on overpopulation, women will grow up to love millstone. The thousands of
read "The Organization Man" their servitude and never dream Iives saved by penicillin and au-
and  "The Hidden    Persuaders"   of revolution." reomycin add to an overloaded
and is, in short, up on society's       Huxley also  inveighs  against   world of underfed.    The conge-
nitally inadequate, preserved by
medicine and encouraged by social services, survive to propagate inferiority. Yet the wholesale slaughter of the sick and inferior is neither ethical or possible   '
Huxley  concludes:    "We  are
on the thorns of an ethical dil-
emha and to find the middle way
will require all our intelligence
eleven  and all our good will."
The Lost And Loveless
s only" of her object of
i Erskine"s room was a
;, hanging', on the wall,.
i nait A circle, pbyipus-
:ribed'.by a: compass, and
l at its lowest point, oc-;
the -Ktiddle foreground,
picture. Watt had that
sion:,: In- -the - eastern
ound; appeared a point,
^T^ie circumference was
The peint was blue,
le!. .Tie .rest was white,
he effecu ,pf perspective
btained   Watt , did.  not
. . ..And he wondered
the. artist.had intended
•esent (Watt knew noth-
►out. .painting), a circle
its centre. in search of
tfc.er, or a circle and its
in  search  of  a   centre  shows you how lost I  am
cirfcte respectively, or a      According    to    critic    Mark
jfid its centre in search   Spilka  there  could  be quite   a
Twelve Original Essays on Great American Novels,
edited by Charles Shapiro. Wayne Slate University Press,
Detroit 1958, 283 pages, $5.00.
"Who do you think you are?"
I asked.
"Me," he replied, "I'm one
of the Lost Generation."
"But they were in the 1920's."
They are real, he says.
He contrasts the unLost writer in "The Sun Also Rises" with
the attitude of Jake Barnes.
When   Jake   sees   Brett  Ashley
"One generation passeth away
and another generation- com-
eth.  . •-.. ." :
Perhaps a battery will have
to be. re-charged before the
Generation of Love will begin.
The    book    contains
other  recent essays  on  great       This   last   statement   exempli-
centre and a circle re-
ely, or a circle and its
in search' of a center
s circle respectively, or
e 'and  a  center not  its
in search of its centre
'Oh,' he said, "well thatjust  sweep   in   accompanied   by   a American books notably Alfred fies a note of surprising credu
, ,_.. „ band  of  homosexuals    Jake   is Kazin>s  analysis  of Joe  Christ- lity recurring in the book.   For,
filled with a  good, clean, pure mas   as   "the  ultimate   person!- after almost fifty years of scath-
anger. The  unLost  writer  tells fication   of  modern   loneliness" inS commentary on human gul-
number of the Lost Generation
still around. The Lost Generation, Spilka says, were people
who fornicated without sentiment and with very little pleasure.
He says they were desexed.
They were incapable of romantic love.
In his recent essay "The
Death of Love in The Sun Also
Rises", Spilka says love was
impossible for the main characters of Hemingway's novel —
with the exception of the outsider, the  unlost  Robert Cohn.
This is Spilka's reasoning:
Jake:
in   Faulkner's    "Light   In   Au-
libility and weakness,  Huxley's
devout   invocation   of   a   moral
"Oh, how charmingly you get   gust."
angry. I wish I had that facul-      Also interesting is the discus-  ^^!!^Ct^^P!^g!^!o]^
ty-" sion by the editor Charles Sha
piro on the disintegration of
the   American  family  and   the
Barnes is with Georgette, a
Paris prostitute—another symbol of love without emotion-—
and the homosexuals cut in and
dance   with   Georgette   one   by
the world's problems seems out
of, character and Context. Perhaps even philosophers have to
maintain    a    certain  minimum
American   Dream!  as  portrayed   guilibility    to    maintain    their
in Dreiser's Jennie Gerhardt.      sanity
This is Shapiro's summary of
A
deed
Just   how   these   people   are   in the American family had ai-
War made Jake Barnes impo- in  which  the   Lost   Generation
tent emotionally as well as phy- managed to salvage some mean-
sically.  Lady Brett Ashley was ing in life. Jake had an almost
turned  by  the  war    into    "the spiritual   reverence   for   sport
freewheeling equal of any man" fishing   and   bullfighting.   Lady
with  the   "male   prerogative  of Brett Ashley got a good feeling
drink    and    promiscuity."    The inside  by   deciding   not  to  lead
,,..,,..       , .        ,. - - In such    a   brief, unqualified
one     in   deliberate   parody   ox   nrpispr'q tiipmo- * ^ ,    „ TT    ,    ,    j        ^ ■
,, J ureiser s ineme. statement of Huxley's ideas it is
normal love. «The  day  of the   patriarchal   difficult not to make him sound
dizzy   sexual   medley,   in-   grandfather at the head of the   iike, a fervent,  foaming apostle
table  was gone, the  older folk   of doom.
This is certainly not the case.
Though his discussion is one in
which it is easy to condescend
to rank emotionalism, Huxley,
save for one or two forgetful
nostril dilations, proceeds coolly
and admirably.
— BOB JOHANNES
to be converted to the loved and
the unlost is not made clear.
But   Spilka   points   out   ways
ready   begun   to   become   obsolete."
This was in 1911.
If Dreiser were writing today
he would probably decide that
we are  all  obsolete.
—ALAN FORREST
feta-
war killed her first sweetheart
and sent her husband home in
a dangerous state of shock. So
she puts a man's felt hat on her
boyish bob and wanders around
the Left Bank of Paris with fellow  "chaps."
Parading such examples,
Spilka sums up The Sun Also
Rises as "a dizzy sexual medley."
But, the critic says, these lost
people  have  some  good  points.
young men astray, in particular
the matador Romero with whom
she had run away and later sent
home.  Says  Lady   Ashley:
"It makes one feel rather
good deciding not to be a bitch.
It's sort of what we have instead of God."
It's also, Spilka adds, what
they have  instead  of  love.
Hemingway's faith was that
this situation would change
and     he     quoted     Ecclesiastes:
formally yesterday in
or "staff photographer
requent contributor to
ges; Mr. Purves is the
t's novel "Watt" which
Poetry Corner
They told me, D. Fitz-Gerald,
They told me you were "hung,"
With red and bloodshot eyeballs
And brown and furry  tongue.
Obsession with the Gothic
And alcoholic haze
Are one to the escapist
Who convinces as he prays.
And yet, because impermanence
Excuses more or less,
I'm happy that you're drinking more
Instead of going to press.
—SETH MONTENEGRO, JR.
/
/
BORIS PASTERNAK will not be able to attend the Mardi
Gras this weekend. "Owing to the light in which it has been
received by the literary authorities," he said, "I regret that I
shall not be able to attend." _      |j PAGE EIGHT
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 29, 1959
Matz arid Wbzny
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Uniforms
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modernized in the new
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CONTRIBUTIONS FEBRUARY 20
Deadline for Raven contributions is February 20.
Raven Editor, Desmond Fitzgerald, said he was interested in receiving any kind of fiction or non-fiction material.
Manuscripts could be left at the Publications Board
Business office in .Brock Hall, he said.
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
HOURS:      -
SATURDAY:
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-   9 a.m. io Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS  and SCRIBBLERS
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Aid Israel
"The University of British
Columbia is proud of the Canadian contributions to the development of the pioneer work
in Israel, and in particular in
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This message was delivered
by Joan Greenwood, third year
UBC student and "Miss Centennial Princess" to the new Hebrew University in Israel.
She was awarded a trip
through Europe to Israel in a
charm and beauty contest held
in conjunction with B.C.'s centennial celebrations.
T
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IF YOU WANT AN INTERESTING FUTURE . . .
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...RAPID  ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!
To meet our personnel representatives when they visit  the campus on
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You owe it to yourself, to give yourself a chance to reach the top. You owe
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SCHRAM WILL ATTEND
UBC MEDIA SEMINAR
Professor Wilbur Schram, director of the Institute of Communications Research, Stanford
University, wall attend a three-
day seminar at UBC January
30 to February 1.
The seminar will deal with
broadcasting, advertising and
research.
Registration for the seminar
directed by Alan Thomas of the
UBC extension department, is
limited to 35 persons.
Japanese Art
Show Here
Exhibition of Japanese art
and culture has opened at the
Anthropology   Museum.
The exhibition is the first one
of its kind at UBC, and includes
sections on Japahese *writing,
china, theatre and costumes.
Exhibition was arranged by
Thora Hawken, G. S. and Di-
anne MacEachern, Arts 4, under
the direction of Mrs. Audrey;
Hawthorne, Curator of the Museum.
i't ',t[
Sasamat    Cabs   !
— ALMA 2400 ~ r
Affiliated with
Black Top Cab (1958) Ltd.
MU 1-2181
Aid Hiked
For Quebec
Universities
MONTREAL (CUP)—A bill
for providing increased financial aid to university students
will be introduced at the current session of the Quebec legislature.
Quebec Premier Duplessis
said at a recent press conference that the government will
proceed with its intended programme to grant financial aid
to needy students.
He said that the value of the
bursaries and scholarships offered will be greater than those
granted by other provincial
governments at present.
The six Quebec university
student presidents met last
ntonth with Duplessis in an attempt to bring up the question
of statutory grants but no progress was made.
A brief put out by the Association of the Students Councils of the Universities of the
Province of Quebec was not
presented at the meeting.
Conclusions reached in the
brief were in part that the provincial bursaries be increased,
that the refundable portion be
abolished, and that a loan system be established for emergency financing.
p
1
z
Z
A
at the? SNACKERY Granvi 1 te at 15th
He says he does it by Steady Saving
at the Bank of Montreal*
*The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed.
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Thursday, January 29, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE NINE
Ihstifute  Equipment
Worth $61,000 Given UBC
British Columbia Medical Research Institute has donated its
research equipment, valued at
$61,000 to the University of
British Columbia's medical faculty.
The Institute has also njadfe
a donation of $95,000 to the
UBC Development Fund.
President N. A. M. MacKen-
zie made these announcements
Wednesday.
CONTINUE  RESEARCH
The university will continue
research projects of the institute in a new laboratory to be
known as the "G. F. Strong
Laboratory for Medical Research," located in the mdical
school building at 10th and Heather, where the equipment will'
be installed.
Construction of an additional
floor on the medical building,
to house the new laboratory,
will be completed by April  1.
Dr. Kenneth Evelyn, director
of the BSMRI, will continue as
director of the Strong Laboratory.
Mr. Norman English, president of the Board of Trustees
of the BCMRI said the decision
to transfer responsibility for its
research projects to UBC's medical school was the result of a
study mpde by a special committee which reported that the
functions of the institute, as they
relate to the provision of lab-
oraory facilities and personnel
for medical research, would be
fulfilled more' efficiently and
economically,by UBC's medical
faculty.     <;
I PRIVATE.. .TUTORING — for
| English '100.    Near   Campus.
Telephone ALma 3223-R.
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1200 —SUMMER POSITIONS—1200
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UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
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$245 to $305 a Month
For Under-Graduates
Up to $500 a Month
For Graduate Students
Plus travel allowances to and from positions and, where
applicable, subsistence in the field.
Most positions are for students with a background in
Engineering or Science, notably Forestry, Geology
and Agriculture, but some will be drawn from other
faculties as well.
Posters, Details   and  Application   Forms   at
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
and CivH Service Commission Offices
CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS JANUARY 31
Dr. G. F. Strong, for whom
the new laboratory is named,
was one of the founders of the
BCMRI in 1948. He was one of
B.C.'s leading heart specialists
and was active in = the establishment of a faculty of medicine
at UBC. He was the first clinical professor of medicine named
to the faculty when it was
formed in 1951.
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I
U PAGE TEN
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 29, 1959
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i §   Outer Space —
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Once, we thought, we were the
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549   Granville     MU.   1-4649
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ATOMIC ENERGY OF
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Chalk River, Ontario
Requires for its RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND
PLANT OPERATING PROGRAMMES for development of Atomic Power graduates and post-graduates in:
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NOW BEING ACCEPTED
Applications for the South
American Seminar held in
Sucre, Bolivia, May 3-23 are
being received ai 375 Rideau
St., Ottawa, Ontario.
Complete knowledge of
written and spoken Spanish
is necessary.
Conference will concern
Student welfare, relaiion of
the University to social and
economic problems, and problems concerning the international  student  world.
Biology
Business & Gen. Science
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
• Engineering' Physics
Electrical Engineering
Electronic Engineering
Mechanical  Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Physics
Applications for summer employment are invited
from both graduates and those 1 year from graduation.
Details  and  application  forms may  be obtained
from your University Placement Office.
Interviews will be held at your University on the
29th and 30th of January, 1959.
$ee"ffie
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CLUB  NOTES
"Canadian-American Relations" Debate
By PATIENCE RYAN
Thursday the Debating Union   at the  same  time,  to  keep  the
■will sponsor a debate in Buchanan 106 at 12.30. The topic is
the effect of politicians on Canadian-American relations.
Brian Smith and Dave Helliwell, UBC delegates to the recent McGill Conference on Canadian-American relations will
take part in the debate.
*     *     *    .
FILM SOC
Film Society    is    undergoing
negotiations    with     Toronto  to
mood of the novel intact.
This version is said to follow
the story well, and has English
sub-titles. There will be only
one showing, at 12.30 Thursday.
•k       k       *
OTHER FILMS COMING
Also for Eng. 200 students,
"Pride and Prejudice" will be
shown on March 17, and "Great
Expectations" on March 24.
Film Soc is trying to obtain
a film to be shown in conjunc-
obtain an uncensored version of tion with Arts Week, March 2
"Baby Doll." The Canadian to 7. During Arts Week a Nazi
Film Institute revealed that this   propaganda film will  be shown
version has no deletions, whereas the B.C. print of this picture
for the first time in Canada.
•k      ~k      k
had been shortened by  censors.   SLAVONIC
•k       ~k       ~k
"THE NEW GULLIVER"
Slavonic     Circle     "wishes  to
thank     the     German  Club   for
For the benefit of English 200 their  help  and  participation   in
students, Film Soc is presenting the Russian New Year celebra-
"The New Gulliver," a Russian tions, held January 13."
version   of   Swift's     "Gulliver's *     *     *
Travels." SAILING CLUB
This movie has attempted  to       This year, sailing at UBC has
translate the satire of the novel received a big boost from many
into contemporary society, and, quarters.    Plans are afoot to ex-
PUflc Wfaifs  Now
UBC Summer Course
The establishment of a school of public affairs as part of
the University of B.C.s' non-credit summer course program
was announced today by extension department officials.
pand the existing sailing team
into a full club incorporated
under UCC.
At a meeting held on Monday,
Bruce Taylor was elected to represent the new group in its affairs. A constitution is being
drafted and will be submitted to
a meeting of all interested sailors next week.
The constitution is subject to
approval by UCC before the
club can be properly recognized.
A brief outlining plans for
club expansion will be presented
to the MAC. At present there
is one main event on the club
calendar: the Intercollegiate
Championships to be held at the
University of Washington in
February. There is a very good
chance that this calendar can be
expanded to at least three meets
this year.
All those interested in sailing
as a competitive sport or as a
relaxation are urged to turn out
to the meeting next week. Plans
for the purchase of boats and the
preparation of the constitution
will be discussed in more detail
at that time.
The school will consist of lectures in the field of international and public affairs. A highlight of the 1959 school will be
a seminar on India.
Other innovations in the extension summer school program
will be courses in communications and dance. The communications section will include courses on film production, speech
for broadcasting, television production and acting for television.
UBC Students
Get Money
Athlone Fellowships, have
been awarded to four University of British Columbia engineering students.
Thomas Raymond Meadow-
croft, Kenneth Charles Wilson,
Stanley Ross Clark and John
Frank J. Clarke.
The Fellowships, which are
awarded annually, provide for
two years of advanced practical
work or research in the United
Kingdom. They cover travel
costs, living expenses and academic fees.
The students wall leave for
England this summer to do advanced work.
The Friends of Chamber Concert wtill present the fifth concert in the present series Friday at 8 p.m. in the Georgia
auditorium.
Dance course will De directed
by Jean Erdman, a former member of the Martha Graham
dance company. Courses will
include national dance styles,
history of dance and contemporary dance.
Jacques de Tonnancour of
Quebec, a well known Canadian
artist, will conduct arts and
crafts courses. George Schick
will again direct the summer
school of music and students will
participate in operas, and concerts of lieder.
A series of lectures and demonstrations by artists appearing
in the second Vancouver International Festival is also being
arranged.
Miss Dorothy Somerset of
UBC's theatre department will
direct the summer school of the
theatre. Courses in theatre history, scene design and directing
will be offered. One of the
summer school's productions
will be part of the festival program.
Guest director will be Dr.
Robert Loper, director of the
Oregon Shakespearean Theatre
and associate professor of drama
at Stanford University.
Special courses in children's
theatre will be directed by
Brian Way, director of the London Children's Theatre Company in England.
A highlight of the summer
lecture series will be daily talks
over a period'of three weeks by
Canadian author and critic Lister Sinclair. Theme of the program will be orientation in: the
arts.
1       fl^By\fp -
1   %^s£
IJ& 1
Madison Avenue...
Yes, up and down ad alley you'll find the
smartest account execs call for Coke during
important meetings. The cold crisp taste,
the real refreshment of Coca-Cola
are just what the client ordered. So up
periscope and take a look into the
situation. Ad men of the future!—start
your training now—climb into a gray flannel
suit and relax with a Coke!
BE REALLY REFRESHED... HAVE A COKE!
SAY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COLA'—BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF   COCA-COLA   LTD.—THE   WORLD'S   BEST-LOVED   SPARKLING   DRINK. Thursday, January 29, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE ELEVEN
BIRDS ON
THE ROAD
AGAIN
The Thunderbirds leave on
their four straight road trip in
three weeks as they head for
Cheney Friday night and for
Spokane Saturday. In Cheney,
the Birds will be playing the
second place Eastern Washington College. Saturday's fixture
will be with Whitworth College.
In conference play the Birds'
record is one win and three
losses to leave them in sixth
place in the seven-team league.
Injuries have started to
plague  the Thunderbirds.
In Tuesday's night practice,
Rookie Keith Hartley sprained
his ankle,'-ah injury that may
keep him out of action for at
least two weeks. Another injured Bird player is Norris Martin wfho has pulled a side muscle and is having trouble with
a bruised rib or two.
With both Hartley and Martin out of the lineup, Coach
Porojfret will have the headache
of building up his rebounding
triangle.
If Martin is not in strip for
the weekend games, Pomfret
will be taking along Doug Jennings ©ft he UBC Jayvees. Jennings has been working out with
the Birds in their last two practice sessions.
Both games this week will
be tough ones for the Birds, as
Eastern is about the strongest
team in the Evergreen Conference, losing only one game this
season. Whitworth will be also
just as hard to overcome. Whitworth holds a win loss record
of two-two.
NO SPORTS, MAYBE
STILL WANT STORIES
If the proposed strike of the
printers is carried out. there
will be no sports page Friday.
All managers who have game
reports please hand into the
Sport's Department of the Ubyssey or notice slots in the Men's
<|yia.
//
ExportA"
FI WE R TIP
CIGARETTES
DIETER WEICHERT, last week's all-round performer in
the Washington State Three-way Meet, will be on hand
as the 'Birds travel to Seattle for a meet with the gymnasts from the U. of Washington.
Sports  Car Club Rally
In Bellingham, Weekend
Rallies are still very much a part of the calendar for the
UBC Sports Car Club this term. After sponsoring a very successful event of their own, UBC rallyists are off to dominate
other Conference RaUieis.
SPORTS EDITOR,     BOB BUSH
WOMEN'S REP.: Audrey Ede, Flora MacLeod.
REPORTERS: Ted Smith, Tony Morrison, Alan Dafoe, M. Sone.
DESK: Irene Frazer and Elaine Spurrill, Larry Fournier.
Cup Series In Doubt,
UBC To Play Here
A team of four entries has
been entered in the Chuokanut
Rally to be held this weekend
in Bellingham. It is an overnight, non-stop event sponsored
by the Chuckanut SCC of Bellingham. With the snow that has
been falling for the last two
days, the Rally should prove
to be a challenge to all drivers.
Also on the agenda for the
weekend of January 24th is an
economy run being held by the
Evergreen Volkswagen Club of
Seattle. One car, a Sprite, is to
be entered by the UBC club.
It will be slightly modified for
economy driving and is expected to do fairly well in its class.
One of the big events on the
local sports car scene will be
held February 7 and 8. It is
the SCC of BC's annual Van-
Man^Van Rally. Over 150 cars
of  all   m(akes   are  expected   to
enter the Bally to Manning
Park and back. Each year the
UBCSCC enters one or two
teams. Last year their team of,
MGA's  finished second.
A very important general
meeting will be held January
29th in Eng. 201. At that time
plans for the election of next
year's executive will be outlined.
Two or three excellent films
are on the way from Toronto
and there may also be a guest
speaker. Thursday, January 29,
Eng. 201. Non-members will be
charged the usual 25c.
For drawing of illustrations
(charts, graphs etc.) and all
photographic assignments,
phone John Worst, DI 3331
(or U.B.C, local 265).
BIRDIE SMASH
Sponsored by [ ,_
UBC BADMINTON CLUB
BROCK HALL
FR1. JAN. 30
6-PIECE ORCHESTRA
DANCING FROM 9 TILL 1
75c Each $1.50 Per Couple
The future of the McKechnie
Cup series will be in doubt
even as the scheduled game
Saturday between UBC and
Vancouver is being played.
Saturday's game is scheduled
to be played at the UBC Stadium at 2:30 P.M. but the Vancouver Rugby Union has intimated that they do not want
to carry on with the series because the club sides are being
depleted. At present it appears
that the VRU does not intend
to carry out the series as laid
down by the B.C. Rugby Union.
To date, both Vancouver and
UBC have won games in the
three team, home and home
competition, w h• i 1 e Victoria
Tide, the third team, has lost
two matches.
Last week, a strong side from
the University downed Victoria
24-3.
Other English games scheduled for this Saturday are: in
First   Division,   Kats   and  UBC
Braves at Balaclava Park, starting at 2:30, in the Second Division, Ai section, at the Aggie
Field, UBC Physical Education
play UBC Totems at 1:15; in the
B section, UBC Tomahawks
meet West Van. B- at the UBC
Gym Field.
UBC Frosh will be playing
Western Washington College in
an exhibition game.
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3 ^ 59 ©
Birds After
This weekend the Birds will
try for revenge when they
again meet the Montana State
Mustangs along with Eastern
Washington. The double dual
meet will be held in Cheney^
Wash, on Friday evening.
Saturday morning the Birds
travel to Moscow, Idaho to tangle with the University of Idaho. That afternoon, they move
to Pullman where they will
swim against Washington State
College.
PHARMACY
KEPORTSR
By J.& M. BURCHILL
QUESTION: In what manner were bruises once treated?
ANSWER: Years ago, heated glass tumblers were
placed over bruises until the
suction caused skin welts.
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
\Vi Blocks East of Pool
AL. 0339
J. Paid Sheedy's* Hair Looked Fowl
Till He Pecked Up Some Wildroot Cream-Oil!
One day Sheedy's best friend decided to set him straight. "Paul", he said,
"people are starting to make yokes about your sloppy appearance. There's i
no eggscuse for such messy hair. Here you've got a built-in comb and
still your hair's a fright". "I know", clucked Sheedy,
"wattle I do about it ?" "Get yourself some Wildroot
Cream-Oil", advised his friend. So Sheedy got some and
now his hair looks eggzactly right all day. . . neat but
never greasy. Follow Sheedy's eggxample. Get a bottle
or tube of Wildroot Cre^m-Oil. Guaranteed to make
your hair look healthy and hensome!
* of 131 So. Harris Hill Rd., Williamsville, N. Y.
Wildroot Cream-Oil
gives you confidence PAGE TWELVE
THE      UBYSS EY
Thursday, January 29, 1959
p^wv'-gWWWay
SOLVING
ENGINEERING
PROBLEMS
§§>-■
From coast to coast, Dominion Bridge is solving engineering problems
in every major industry. Fourteen self-contained plants enable it to
meet the diversified and complex industrial needs of the times.
A leader in the field of research and technical development, the Company
has always been a pioneer in new engineering techniques and
manufacturing methods. Its long established system of training employees
for advancement helps to maintain high standards of service as well as
to provide rewarding careers for young engineers entering the Company.
DOMINION BRIDGE COMPANY LIMITED
PLANTS AND OFFICES THROUGHOUT CANADA
Top:
Twin lift bridges at Caughnawaga. This structure
consisting of twin lift bridges, side by side, is
designed to carry the two railroad tracks of the Canadian
Pacific Railway over the Seaway channel. Each movable
span weighs 1,000 tons, including counterweights,
and can be raised or lowered in 75 seconds.
Centre:
This catenary ore bin for Consolidated Denison Mines
Limited has a capacity of 15,000 tons.
The steelwork weighs 1,000 tons.
Bottom:
Iroquois Lock, showing one of six pairs of steel
sector gates built for the St. Lawrence Seaway.
Resembling a huge wedge of cake, each gate is 43 ft.
high and weighs 250 tons.
DOMINION   BRIDGE
Ad. No.   8016
McKIM ADVERTISING LIMITED

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