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The Ubyssey Feb 17, 1939

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 FILMS TONIGHT
8.15 P.M.
AUDITORIUM
UtrosBtftt
CANADIAN  TRIO
TODAY NOON
AUDITORIUM
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The Universtyi of British Columbia
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1939
No. 33
from . . .
THE OUTSIDE
... by Darby
HOW IT STARTED
Now that the Union Building seems
to be a reality, lt might be well to
glance back over time and acquaint
the freahman and sophomore mind
with the facts surrounding the proposal that has Anally blossomed into
faot.
First mentioned by A.M.S. president Bernard Brynelson, the building waa to have served as a memorial to the late Dean and Mra. R. W.
Brock, tragically killed In the summer of 1086. In the flrat week of
January, 1030, Brynelson Inaugurated the "Brock Memorial" campaign, leaving most of the work of
organisation to .L.S.E. member Jay
Oould,  later A.M.S.   prealdent.
A grandiose scheme for raising
money waa announced, with $150,000
as the objective, Studenta were asked
to contribute $30,"000, and alumni,
faculty, and business men were to
be systematically canvassed for the
reat.
Herein arose a difficulty which set
the campaign back, and nearly
brought about the abandonment of
the scheme. Restrictions covering the
raising of money by students hampered many enthusiasts, and there
was a  notable  lack  of oo-operatlon.
Following lines that have been
established as tradition on the U.B.C.
campus, the Brock campaign dawdled along in the doldrums through
the spring of '36, with the policy of
the steering committee becoming a
flrst class student political football
that is still revived today.
Gould was nearly defeated in his
campaign for the presidency on the
Union Building Issue. Although his
only opponent was Wilson MacDuf-
fee, Inexperienced ln campus affairs,
Gould climbed into the president's
chair  with  only  a  24-vote  margin.
In the fall of 1936, the Union Building Issue turned up again, this time
minus the Brock theme. Throughout
that year, the building gradually became a forgotten issue, used only ln
A.M.S. meetings to embarrass Students' Council. The Issue of the day
was the Stadium, which was carried
to completion with more success. In
1037-38, the Union Building moved
from the public eye, and last aprlng,
the Campaign Committee, and Carson Macguire In particular, carried
on the work towards erection ot the
building. The rest of the story is
known, and although much that has
not been revealed regarding the flght
for the building will remain in the
minds of those Involved, students owe
no particular debt to any student
executive for the successful end of
the  three-year flght.
NOW FOR THE MORAL
There must be a moral somewhere
In this story, and I think I've found
lt. Those who are Inclined to get
impatient with progress ln any
division of student affairs can stop
to realize that ln order to get a big
job properly done—It takes  time.
For three years student leaders
have worried about the Union Building. Plans have been changed a
dozen times. A dozen financing
schemes have come and gone. This
had to be, for had the flght been
given up at any time, the building
would never have come. It was wise
too that work on the building was
for the most part carried on by a
selected few. Only after the Union
Building Issue was taken out of the
light did lt proceed forward.
FINAL CAST
CHOSEN FOR
SPRING PLAY
GLEN AND HOLMES AS
LEADS
After three weeks' hectic competition the Ave coveted Spring Play
parts  have been  Anally  awarded.
At the final try-outs on Tuesday
the cast for the Players' Olub streamlined 1030 production was chosen by
a committee of Producer Sidney Risk,
Miss Dorothy Jefford, Mrs. F. O. C.
Wood and Professor W. Oage.
FINAL CAST.
Heading the cast will be Cicely
Holmes, secretary, ln the part of
gilded Elsa, the girl who gets her
man. John (Judge Lynch) Olen will
have the sympathetic role of Franz
Kernmann.
Anne  Carter,  Club  President,  Is
to   be   Thona   Landorf,   fiancee   of
Rudolf Dortmund, played by Dacre
Barrett-Lennard. Thla  billing couple  will  clinch  for some  35  kisses
during the three acta.
The   great   Meissenger,   heart   beat
of a million Viennese femmes, will be
Jim  Frazee   (Three  Hundredth   Performance)  and his newspaper friend
Arny Zander is to be T. McDowell.
DIRECTOR   AND   UNDERSTUDIES.
Understudies will be Mary McLeod,
Pat Keatley, Alice Mather, John Carson, and Archie Bain.
These are the six Thespians on
whose shoulders will rest the success
of "The Curtain Rises," but the unseen Atlas will be Director Sidney
Risk.
Students will see  the production
on March 15 and 16.
Friday and Saturday 17 and 18 the
auditorium will be packed with the
tired businessmen from down town,
looking for the fast-an'-furlous 3n-
tertalnment which they will get
when "The Curtain Rises."
FEMININE LEAD
pm*fa*\
Cicely Holmes who will
take the leading feminine
role in the spring production "The Curtain Rises"
to be presented by the
Players' Club March 14-
17.
I     ,f s     t
MAMOOKS TO HANDLE
ALL CLASS PARTIES
COMBINED WAA-WUS
MEETING TO DlSCUSS
ATHLETICS AND CO-ED
Two momentous questions will be
discussed at the combined W.U.S.
and W.A.A. meetings Friday, February 17, at 12.40 in Arts 100.
Plans for a Womens' Athletlo Directorate have been drawn up by the
W.A.A. executive, and at Friday's
meeting this project will be put before the women of this campus for
their approval.
The proposed Directorate has been
organized along the same lines as
that of the men, which has proved
Invaluable to their athletic organization this year.
The outstanding W.U.S. business is
a discussion on the why and wherefore of the "Co-ed Ball." All women
planning to attend this social highlight of the year—especially freshettes—should be present at Friday's
meeting.
MUSICAL TRIO HAS BROAD
OUTLOOK AND INTERESTS
TODAY'S PROGRAM
12:30 pan.—Aggie  Hay  Ride-
Campus mall.
18:30 p.m.—Canadian Trio, Aud.
18:30 p.m.—W.U.S. and W.A.A. Meeting, Arts 100.
8:15 p.m.—News Broadcast,  CJOR.
8:15 p.m.—Film Showing, Aud.
9:00 p.m.—Aggie Barn Dance, Marine Oolf Club.
Sophs Travel
On   Exchange
By LEWIS ROBINSON
How would you like to travel, to
meet new friends, to see other sections of Canada?
I know, you would Just love to, but
you cannot because you have to attend University. Now if all Sophomores will listen carefully, I'll tell
you how you may do both.
INVESTIGATION.
The answer ls the N.F.C.U.S. Exchange Scholarships. If you haven't
heard about this generous offer, or
hadn't taken the trouble to Investigate lt, you had better rush right
over to the Registrar's office and get
all the particulars.
Students at U.B.C. are in the
unique position of being able to pick
out any other University in Canada,
providing their courses can be arranged.
QUALIFICATIONS.
However, there are certain qualifications to prevent the Second Year
from migrating ln a body.
Thla   scholarship   gives   you   the
privilege   of   spending   your   third
year at another University with NO
payment of tuition fees.
The fortunate people who take ad
vantage   of    this    chance   will   find
themselves well rewarded for the time
stolen from home and loving parents.
EXPERIENCE.
Being an exchange student myself
I know what the scholarship has
meant to me. New environment, new
ideas, and new friends, are all influences in forming a pleasant memory
that one never forgets or regrets.
So   all   you   Sophomores   with   a
wanderlust who want a broadened
education, a memorable trip and a
glorious  adventure,   begin   thinking
hard,    because   March    1st   Is   the
deadline   for   applications    for   the
N.F.C.U.S.  Scholarships.
You  have  a  little  over  a  week  to
consult the Registrar's office for exact   details.     This   opportunity   only
comes once. Are you going to take it?
NELSON SISTERS APPI
AS  PASS  SYSTEM
FEATURE
Due to the general Inefficiency
which has attended class party organization ln the past, Its future
conduct has been delegated to the
Mamook Club.
The Mamook Club which has Just
undergone a reformation from the
Pep Club of other days will supervise
all class parties making for greater
uniformity  and efficiency.
The idea, brain child of Evan apRoberts, Is yet in its formative stage,
nothing definite having yet been decided.
only 10 more days to
buy your totem
By LESTER PRONGER
Although the Nelson Sisters are
keen admirers of Bach, Beethoven
und Brahms, they won't quarrel with
you for preferring "Sugar Blues" or
"Ol' Man Moae." This we learned
yesterday when Interviewing the
sisters, who form tho Canadian Trio
which is playing ln the Auditorium
today noon.
Ida, the youngest and violinist of
the group, spoke enthusiastically,
"Swing is fine — for dancing —of
course one doesn't want to dance to
Beethoven. One really can't compare the modern swing with classic
compositions. Those who argue
about their relative merits are wasting their time." Having disposed of
this problem we began to question
the girls about their Interesting career.
FIRST VISIT
Although they havo toured Europe,
Australia and South Africa, this Is
their first visit to Vancouver. "It Is
very English here" they agreed,
"there ls such a peaceful atmosphere."
Born In Winnipeg, the girls have
lived ln Kngland for the last ten
yeara except when on one of their
numerous concert tours.
Their flrst public  performance   in
Canada   this  trip  was    In   Winnipeg
where their home town gave them a
very flattering reception.
HOBBIES
The sisters admit that music is
their chief interest ln life, although
each of them enjoys a hobby.
Anna, the pianist, Anda relax-
a'.on In needlework while Zara,
tnu 'cellist, goes In for sporta when
she craves diversion. Ida writes
poetry and haa recently had aome
of her work published In England.
MUSICAL ANCESTORS
Their love of music is Inherent
slnoe they come from a Russian family that has always been musical.
Their grandfather was an opera singer in Russia and their father is a
graduate of the* Petrograd Conservatory.
When aaked If they had a favorite composer they said that each
had   hla  points  but  perhaps   they
enjoyed   playing    Tsohalkovskl    a
little more than the rest.
They have one brother  15,  who is
studying   commercial   art,   although
he,   too,   ls  naturally  musical.
All agreed that touring was very
interesting but that it had its disadvantages. One of their chief worries ls the effect of a variety of climates on their sensitive instruments.
TOUR AGAIN
After the concert today the Musical Society Is tendering the sisters
a luncheon to which musical members of the Faculty have been Invited.
They   leave   for   Victoria   to   fulfill  engagements after which  they
will   return  to  Vancouver  to   play
downtown   next  Wednesday   afternoon.
Their   Canadian   concerts    will   be
continued until March 31 when they
are   sailing   for   London   where   they
are   scheduled   to   play   for   concerts
and   broadcasts.
Their Vancouver appearances are
under the auspices of the local Committee of the National Council of Education.
Indian Motif
For Potlatch
Next Thursday
The Indian motif with Totem
poles, tomahawks and tooters will
form the background February 23
for the Indian Potlatch sponsored by
the Mamooks, formerly the Pep
Club.
The  proceedings  will   take  place
at the Palomar from 0 to 1 under
the mastership of Big Chief of the
Mamook tribe, Bus Ryan.
Proceeds  from  the   dance  will   be
almost   clear   profit   because   of   the
generosity  of  Mr.  Hy  Singer,  owner
and manager of the Palomar, who is
donating the hall and Dal Richard's
orchestra ln the cause of the Brock
Memorial Fund.
TICKETS TODAY.
Tickets for the dance will be on
sale *t the foot of the Oaf. stairs
from noon today. Twenty-five cents
buys you admission to the Palomar
and twelve bricks and a slap of mortar for the some-day-to-come Union
Building.
The Potlatch will not conflict with
"Serenade" because student night
comes  on Wednesday, Feb. 32.
'LAST LAUGH'
FILM SOCIETY
IS INGENIOUS
TO      BE
PRESENTED
TONIGHT
OUT OF TOWN
STUDENTS TO
GO ON  AIR
The Radio Club has decided to
bury "Varsity Time" and ln Its stead
will feature - a four program-a-week
schedule. In co-operation with OJOR
there will be a half-hour drama
every Sunday at 2.30 p.m. under the
direction of Rod Poisson, and a news
bulletin Fridays at 8.15 p.m.
Ozzle Durkin, the man power behind the new Radio Club, Is planning a "Home Town" series of programs, which will likely start next
year.
These programs will be under the
C.B.R. Provincial Network and are
to be dedicated to the towns of interior B.C.
The Varsity students hailing from
"way up thar" will participate In
their particular home town program.
It has also been suggested that the
S.O.M. hold a weekly program, but
this ls as yet undecided.
The Radio Club ls still a mere
framework and is open to all who
wish to Join. There will be further
announcements as to the plans, organization and meetings of the club.
"The Last Laugh" will be presented
this evening at 8.15 at the Joint showing of the National and University
Film Societies in the Auditorium.
This film constituted a revolution
both In technique and - theory.
Hitherto a discontinuous method off
pictorial narration had beon In
general use.
Films were composed after tho
photographic process had been completed, by Joining together the various shots taken with a stationary
camera and shifting camera only between scenes.
NEW METHOD OF NARRATION.
In "The Laat Laugh" a new and
continuous method of narration was
used, for here appear prolonged
stretches of uninterrupted and uncut
images, ln which the camera Itself
has moved to follow the progress of
the action.
It Is the Joint product of four
men—Murnau, the director, Freund
the cameraman, Mayer, the 'scenarist and Jannlngs, the principal
actor.
The film took final shape before,
not after, "shooting", and was played
in sets specially constructed to permit continuous action and photography, with the camera mounted on
perambulating trucks or swinging
cranes.
INGENIOUS SETS.
The ingenious sets in "The Last
Laugh" look singularly convincing;
they occasionally suggest the influence of Adolphe Appia ln their broad
surfaces, simple Illumination and absence of detail.
Jannlngs' performance has rightly
been much praised and If his movements occasionally seem unnecessarily mannered this may well be because his acting ls still largely ln the
expressionist tradition, whereas the
film as a whole ls in another style.
Tickets are on sale today in the
quad box office at twenty-rflve cents
for the rest of the term.
ECONOMIC MILLENIUM
INSTITUTE SUBJECT;
SPEAKER PR. CRUMB
The lecturer at the Vancouver Institute '.n Saturday evening at 8.15
ln Arts 100 will be Dr. Joseph A.
Crumb of the Department of Economics at the University. His subject
ls "Planning for the Economic Millenium.".
Dr. Crumb's address will largely
deal with the economic fallacies underlying recent organized efforts by
which lt is hoped to attain financial
security, and a settled and stated
income by political means. It will be
presided over by President John
Ridington.
The B.C. Electric Railway provides
buses at Sasamat Street, which go
directly to the University and wait
there until the close of the lecture.
Institute lectures are free to the
public.
STOP PRESS
(Editor's Note: These CUP press
despatches come through the
courtesy of J. Pool of the Dully
Callfornlun and H. Ncwmark,
Managing Editor of the Stanford
Dally.
PALO ALTO, Cal., Feb. 16, 1939
(CUP)—The University of British
Columbia debating team of Morris
Belkin and Struan Robertson lost to
the University of Stanford debaters
Brooke von Falkensteln and John
Bates In a debate on the Anglo-American alliance with respect to world
peace  here on  Feb.  14.
BROCK  BALL
FLASHJ>LAN
The   first   faint   flashes   of   news
about   the  Brock  Memorial  Ball  are
released,  and have  been collected  to
make   up   the   following   Information.
It will be held In the Vancouver
Hotel, all  over It,  In  fact,  for  the
four—yes, four—orchestras will play
In the Grill, the Crystal Ballroom,
and   various  other  sections  of   the
building.
The tentative date set ls for April
28, Just after exams,—a really swish
way in which to wind up term activities.
The  price  per couple  ls only  $3.50.
COMMERCE FACULTY
CREATED BY SENATE
By joint action of the Senate and
the Board of Governors the Department of Economics, Political
Science, Commerce and Economics
officially became two facuJ*ties
Wednesday night when official
ratification to the scheme was given
by  Senate.
In place of the one Department
in which students formerly were
able to work for both Commerce
and Arts degrees, there are now
two departments, that of Economics, Political Science, nnd Sociology
and that of the Department of
Commerce.
CALIFORNIA    SYMPOSIUM
BERKELEY, Cal., Feb. 16, 1939
(CUP) U.B.C. debaters Morris Belkin and Struan Robertson obtained
a non-decision result in ei symposium on the Anglo-American Alliance
conducted by California University
debaters Norman Lowensteln and
D«.an   Atwood   here   yesterday. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 17, 1939
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Offloe: 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Grey 206
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.50 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Irene Eedy
Friday
Jaok Mair
Sporta Editor: Orme Dier
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Lester Pronger Ted Underhiil
Associate Sports Editors:  Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevlson.
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Ossy Durkin       Florence Hurndall       Helen Hann        Joan Thompson
Bill Backman.
Assistant Sports Editors i Lionel Salt, Jim Harmer, Austin  Frith,
Charles Craig.
C. V. P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Van Perry
PUB. SECRETARY
Virginia Oalloway
Assistants
Ann Jeremy
Joyce Cooper
CIRCULATION MGR.
Harry Campbell
RBPOBTORIAL  STAFF
Jaok Margeson, Pat Keatley, Joan Haslam, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar,
Janet Walker, Brlta Vesterbaok, Bob Manson, BUI Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Dlok Jarvis
Advertising Office ,
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vanoouver, B.O.
Telephone: SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
FRESHMEN
The class of Arts '42 have every reason to be thoroughly
ashamed of themselves, and their parents have every reason to
wonder at what they were spending their time when they should
have been teaching their offspring the rudiments of consideration
for adults. The freshmen class executive will, we hope, blush
when they hear that as a result of their conduct at their class
party last Thursday, a treatise is being prepared on "How to
treat patrons at University parties"—"for class executives."
A great deal has been written on the self-centred adolescent
of today but there has never been a more justified occasion than
the Freshman class party. The entire executive, who look as if
they had come from at least average homes, wero so concerned
with having a good time themselves that it never entered their self
interested little heads that their guests were sitting alone on the
balcony, unregarded and unfed.
Never before has there been such a barefaced display of bad
manners at a university function.
FRIENDS
We are certain now that there will be a union building but we
are not certain as yet whether there will be any furniture in its
rooms. However, things do not look as black as they might for
the student body still has good friends; and next week one of
their very best friends has donated the Palomar ballroom and Dal
Richards' orchestra, so that the students may raise money for their
furnishing fund.
Tho students cannot possibly show how much they appreciate
the generosity of Mr. Singer in donating the means by which the
students can sponsor such a remunerative undertaking.
TOTEM INFORMATION
All Seniors Fill In—Puleeae
NAME 	
FACULTY   	
OLUBS BELONGED TO
FRATERNITY or
SORORITY BELONGED TO.
HOME OITY
HONOUR OOURSE or
MAJOR SUBJECTS 	
PLEASE RETURN TO UBYSSEY OFFICE OR TO BOX
AT FOOT OF CAF STAIRCASE.   THANK YOU.
along/ ^Lr
By PROXY
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. the Bus Depot
m
BALI'S
On Tuesday, through no fault of
mine, readers of this column had to
put up with—or did you?—a strip
of drivel very facetiously (it nearly
killed me) called "Around The
Halls," by "Roxy." I spend four
months building up a reading audience, only to have my reputation
ruined by a temporarily toney Transit Tramp.
And all because of the Science Ball.
For the last three daya people
have been saying how disappointed
they were In my last column. Thsy
don't realise how they insult me. And
then, when I've explained how it
came that a Scienceman took over
for me that day, they Jump on the
chance to change the subjeot—and
ask me if I'm going to the Ball!
I ask you!
When this Issue appears, most of
the men of Science—including the
professors—will still be in bed, sleeping off last night's party. So I oan
murmur a very polite, but equally
sincere "FOO" to Science, Science-
men, and Science Balls. The only lad
of science that's worth a darn is a
fellow named Paul. I never learned
his last name, but I know he's taking mathematics.
But—and you don't know how it
hurts to admit this—I waa at the
Science Ball laat night. And to tell
the truth, I never enjoyed anything
quite so much. It's the beat party
of the year—either because of, or in
spite of, the fact that Science la behind it. If you didn't go, you really
missed something.
MOO
And tonight—Ah, this gay social
whirl—comes it the Aggie Barn
Dance yet. I oan give you some firsthand information about that, too. I
went to it last year. Sure! I get
around  a bit!
There must be very few people left
who don't know what "Corn" and
"Corney" mean. But occasionally
someone asks me, and I try to explain. The term was originated by
the brotherhood of dance musicians,
to designate ond differentiate a certain type of muslo germalne to that
part of the U.S.A. In which corn Is
grown—the mid<-west. The music
played ln that part of the country is
just a bit more "trying" than any
other—even worse than Cowboy stuff.
The mid-western farmers are a retrogressive lot, and their music is
Juat as backward and old-fashioned.
And ao, gradually, "corny" came to
mean any musio that waa old-fashioned or dated. The term slowly
spread to include anything at all
that is out-of-date. Thus trousers
with a particular stripe, loud-colored
ties and shirts, a certain type of
ttraw hat, yellow shoes, etc., etc.,
may be called corny. Or a gesture
or phrase might be corny. That's
the best I can do, without examples.
Now do you understand?
The Aggie Barn Dance ls conceived
in corn and dedicated to corn. Just
as the Sciencemen have a motif for
their Ball, so do the Aggies have one
for theirs. But the Aggie motif Is
always the same. It's CORN right
off the cob.
You'd be surprised how effective lt
can be. The musicians uae corn-cobs
for mutes. (In other words, they try
to be as corny as possible). The dancers wear farmer's clothes—or the
dress of a City Slicker. Straw ls
scattered around here and there—
and if the Hallelujah boys don't use
lt, some of the woo-pltchers will.
Lambeth Walk and Shag are forgotten, and make way for Schot-
tlsches, Reels, and what have you.
At least for a while. The majority of
the dances will be pretty close to
modern.
The Aggie Cow will give punch
part of the time, and coffee for supper. Food, last year, was nothing
more than plain, every-day, homemade doughnuts. But anything else
would   have  been  out  of place.
Well, that's the picture. The Barn
Dance is a good time, and the moo-
boya are just as proud of their do as
the Redmen are of theirs. And Incidentally, Aggies aren't so hard to
get along with as Sclencemen. Of
couise, that's only the Arts point of
view.
Conservatives
Win Abolition
Appeals    Bill
Conservatives    under    Don    McOlll
won their first major issue of the present session at Tuesday's meeting of
the P.D.C.  when their  bill for "The
Abolition   of   Appeals   to   the   Privy
Council" was passed with a minimum
of opposition by house members.
Supporters  of  the   measure   felt
that abolition was necessary to ensure  progress of Canada In legal
and  political  fields.
Continued settlement of the Privy
Council of major Canadian disputes
was felt to be a deterring factor in
the nation's progress.
The next meeting of the P.D.C.
Monday ln Arts 100 will be a private    member's    day    when    eaoh
may promulgate private bills.
Those desiring to do so are asked
to get in  touch  with  the  secretary
Frank Wiggs as soon as possible.
APRIL DEADLINE FOR
SCIENCE FELLOWSHIPS
The Imperial College of Solenoe
and Technology of London, announces that their twenty-sixth election of
Fellows will take place on or about
the 7th day of July 1938, for which
the applications must be received by
April 6, 1930.  '
The annual value of every Fellowship, of whloh there will bo
three this year, Is 340 pounds.
A Fellowship is good for two years,
and ls open to every man and woman of European descent, under 36,
who has taken a degree at any University ln the British Empire approved of by the trustees.
INFORMATION NECESSARY.
Applicants should give full Information as to their academic standing, their previous career, and the
type of research they Intend to carry
on.
They should also state whether
they would be able to earry on their
research for the two years-without
a Fellowship.
Fellows will be attached to a department of the Imperial College of
Science and Technology, and will
work under the supervision of a Professor ln accordance with the arrangements to be made by the head
of the department.
Any further information may be
obtained at the office of the Registrar, ln the Administration Building.
ECONOMIST TO SPEAK
HERE ON FEB. 24
Dr. Harold S. Laski, Internationally
known economist, lecturer and writer
arrives in Vanoouver from Washington to lecture at the Vancouver Auditorium the evening of February 34.
Dr. Laski is a member of the National Executive of the Labour Party
in England, a lecturer at the London
School of Economics and an outstanding British Economist, Constitutional Authority and writer.
Attempts are being made by Struan
Robertson, Council member, and
Darrell Braldwood, president of Arts-
mens' Undergraduate Society, to have
Dr. Laski lecture ln the University
Auditorium for the benefit of the
students. As yet they have reoeived
no reply to their communications.
LETTERS CLUB STILL
TAKING APPLICATIONS
FOR  MEMBERSHIP
The Letters Club announces that
application for membership can now
be made to President Bob apRoberts,
Secretary Marion Vance, or through
the A.M.S.  letter rack.
Membership Is limited to men
and women of Arts '40 and Arts '41,
and should be students who are Interested not only In the appreciation of English literature but also
In Its production. The honorary
president of the Club Is Prof. Thor-
lief Larsen of the English Department.
"That's one way of 'Breaking the lee'I"
"But the best way is with a Sweet Cap."
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form In which tobaeee ten ha tmoktd."
I
•HMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIIIMIIIIUIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIHIIIIIIIIMUIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIIIIIIIIIIIHII*
A Birks Challenger Watch will time your good times
and keep you on sohedule all through the year
SILVERSMITHS
GOLDSMITHS
BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
OFFICIAL FRATERNITY JEWELLER^
•■■■Illll (■■■■■■IHIIIIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIHUIIMHIHUIIIIIIUHIIIIIIHIUHHIIIIUHIIimUUIIUHUIIII,
•IIIIIMtMIMIIHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMMMIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIH1
behind   the
MIKE
iiimmmtitim-m-umH-mim**iii--mii-%'*'i''ii'ii'iiii'*l
The flying telegraph key of Canadian Unlveralty Press will be on the
air again tonight, as the third edition of the new 18-mlnute program,
"News on the Campus", goes before
the microphone. The time of the
newscast has been put ahead to 8.16,
and it will be presented over CJOR
from the Extension Department studio ln the Aggie Building.
Basil Robinson, assistant announcer and recently sports commentator,
has been forced to leave the air for
the remainder of this term, and plans
have not yet been oompleted regarding any new arrangement.
Fast-talking news editor Van Perry
may have to take over the entire 16
minutes unl|ss a substitute can be
found for the sports' department.
Another program wiU bo Inaugurated by the University Radio Society
on Sunday, when Rod Poisson takes
his Thespians before the nuke ln a
half-hour of hilarious comedy. The
name of Sunday's play will remain
a deep secret until the program actually goes on the air, at 3.30 Sunday
over CJOR.
OREEN  PEN  LOST
Will the person seen picking up by
mistake a green mottled Shaeffer
pen ln Chem. 2 lab. Wednesday p.m.,
please return same to Chem. storeroom or Mr. Horn's office immediately.
SPRING CONFERENCE
FOR S.C.M. NEXT WEEK
The S.O.M. annual Spring Conference will be held Saturday afternoon
and Sunday, February 38th and.36th
at White Rock.
The theme this year will be "Techniques of Religious Living" and discussion will be led by prominent
speakers.
Applications should be made as
soon as possible in the S.C.M. Room,
312 Auditorium Building. The maximum price Including transportation
will be $2.00.
S.C.M. VESPER SERVICE
Dr. Oeorge Pringle will speak at
the S.O.M. Vesper Service Tuesday
at 4.40 p.m. ln the Union Oollege
Chapel.
LOST
Black eversharp pencil with gold
band. Eclipse make. Please return to
Publications offloe.
OET YOUR TOTEM IN THE
OAF, PUB OFFICE OR
COUNCIL OFFICE.
LOST
Biology Lab. Book. . . . Will finder
please return to Margaret Mollard or
hand ln to Mr. Horn's office.
COAT  LOST
Will the person who took by mistake a blue overcoat from the foot of
the caf stairs on Saturday, please
return same to Students' Council
Office.
PENS  LOST
On Tuesday one black pen with
many colored spots, probably in Library. Return to J. H. Whellans, Men's
Arts Letter Rack.
Black fountain pen, gold trim
Parker. Lost Tenth Avenue near
Sasamat Saturday, February 11th.
Return  to  Pub.  office.
V. C. V.
The following open meetings will
be held ln Arts 206 at 12.45 p.m.
Friday, February 17, Mr. Jas. Forrester, B.A.. Secretary for Western
Canada of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Tuesday, February
21, Rev. Elbert Paul, minister of the
First Baptist Church. All welcome.
BOOKS LOST
Dear friend and fellow student,
please behave like a true pack rat
and return the Geometry and Bnglish books you removed from a locker In the Arts common room—Mr.
Horn's offlce.
'' MOMMA LL BE PLEASED
A8 PUNCH"
thinks Elmer as lie waves good-bye
to tbe Old Man. "She's been trying
for years to get Poppa smartened
up, and now I've worked the
miracle)"
Yes, and If more up-and-coming
lads like Elmer would put thelr
fathers wise to our reasonable
. price* and careful personal servloe
there would be more smart-looking
poppas and more satisfied mommas.
We know.
BOND
CLOTHESSHOP
I *> ~T     Will      >l M I I N (• t
()PI»   I'KllVINd    IM DC.
THE FRESHMAN'S
TRAGEDY
Kindly Fate had arranged a
romance . . . she was in a
hurry ... It was raining . . .
the bus had gone . . he gallantly offered her a lift. Alas,
he had forgotten to fill up
with HOME OAS . . . and
after two miles on foot this
romance was definitely soggy.
Other   Freshmen   now   take
, warning . . . the successful
swain keeps his tank Ailed
with
HOME
GAS
You   Can Buy   No Better! Friday, February 17, 1939
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
"Compiled by Editorial Staff of the
Viotorla College Weekly Microscope"
VICTORIA STAYS AWAKE
In order to keep awake after the
Varsity Invasion, a monster Pep
meeting was arranged by Vic College
students. An evening affair, the show
took the form of a radio program,
and was used to boost the "CRAIO-
DARROCH" (Victoria College's Annual).
A major orlsis occurred at the start
of the affair, when the Microphone
went dead. Attempts at artificial respiration failing, students commandeered an auto, and a meroy flight to
the nearest electrical establishment
produced a new mike In the nick of
time.
Highlights of the evening were:
the College 5-pleoe Swing Band, the
MICROSCOPE'S Review of the Year
(The College Blunders On), Women's Satire on Men Students, a melodrama by the Annual Board, and the
Olee Club.
The meeting concluded with a Jam
session by the orchestra, and refreshments supplied by the Co-Eds.
Students at the College have become so enthusiastic over this meeting that it is probable that a similar
affair will be held in the near future.
CO-ED DANCE LOOMS NEAR
Victoria College is in its annual
fever of excitement over the approach of the CO-ED Dance, This
affair has gained more publicity this
year than ever before. For the laat
month it is the Co-eds who have
held the whip hand.
Men can be seen drooping around
the halls with wistful looks on their
faces, while the gala gleefully chuckle
to themselves. To the girls It is a
huge Joke. To the boys lt is a major
crisis.
The  Dance  takes place on  Friday,
Feb.    17.   A   sigh   of   relief   will   be
heard escaping from the Men's Commons, when the fatal day is over.
COLLEGE  PLAY COMES
OFF IN MARCH
On March 4 and S, the College
Players' Club will present J. B.
PRIESTLEY'S comedy "SPRING
DANCE." With a cast of 13 the play
promises to be the most successful
presentation yet. Tickets are selling
fast.
Plans for the Players' Club reception are now under way. This year
the reception will be on a separate
night from the night of the play,
and arrangements for dancing have
been made.
OLOVES LOST
Would the person who took by
mistake a pair of brown fur-lined
gloves from the shelf ln the lower
Arts washroom last Friday please
return them to Elisabeth Houston or
to Mr. Horn's office.
Vancouver
Symphony Society
ORIOORI OARBOVITSKY
(Ouest Conductor)
Orpheum  Theatre
Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3 P.M.
Tickets:  25c  to $3.00
at M. A. KELLY CO.
009 Oranville   Trinity 1638
BOOK  SEATS NOW
Only one week 'till the big Ski Carnival up Hollyburn 1 ... to be
really in the ski swim outfit yourself at Fred Holmes' 284) Granville
St. . . to enable you to attend these events in style Mr. Holmes is reducing prices on a lot of his snappiest toggery . . . men's Downhill pants
in airforce blue gabardines . . . light, waterproof, windproof ....
brilliant scarlet Jigger jacket with covered zippers! . . . and heavy wool
sox. . . . The address is 2845 South Granville for ski togs. . . .
Recent revellers who appeared before the discipline committee
over a week ago spent the whole of the invasion trip composing songs
and singing them on the back deck of the "Norah" . . . one went like
this . . .
It certainly makes you-think
At twenty-five bucks a drink.  .  .
it is a good moral worthy of any good classic writer. . .
fi ft ft
Never put off until . . . etc., is a very good maxim . . . and co-eds
are advised to make their dinner reservations at the Dolphin on Marine
Drive . . . right now ... a limited number will be cared for on the
evening of the Co-ed Ball for the pre-dancing dinner parties. . . .
Valentine's Day brought a fragrant onion-perfumed card for one
of the invading councillors . . . while Chang Suey let us in on the price
of the valentine he favored us with, by leaving the price tag on it. . . .
Undergraduates will remember what a success the dinner party
was last year, while those who were too late making their reservations,
will profit by that lesson this year. . . . phone Point Grey 103	
Spring is approaching and when passing the Dolphin, drop in and enjoy
their special afternoon teas . . .
fi        fi        fi
Gay printed silk jackets over the one color dress, the reversal in
spring fashions, is a fashion topper for co-eds. . . . One model for
spring at the Lora Lee Dress Shop, 2815 Granville Street, features a
tailored one-piece frock of dark navy and multicolored light silk jacket
with shirred belt effect and peplin. . . .
The little freshette who wasn't in the class party draw received
orchids for Valentines. . . . Soft green print on silk is another popular
light style with the gathered waistline and skirt of uhpleated fullness. .
Emerald green clips relieve the plain neckline and is repeated as a
buckle for the matching belt. . . For all styles in chic afternoon frocks
and sophisticated evening gowns visit 2811 Granville Street. . . .
fi        fi        fi
One council member went out Saturday evening . . . the girl
had a car . . . when asked, if that was all she had, he replied, "Oh no,
she has a lot more beside" . . . cars? . . .
fi        fi        fi
Most practical for the uncertain climate of -February and early
March are the mudguard footwear at the Mezzanine Floor of Raeson's
Shoe Store where special values are to be found during the stock
removal sale ■ . . 644 Granville Street is the Toot wear paradise for smart
people. . . Suede, leather trim, is featured in brown and black, as well as
burgundy and other rich shades. . . . There was a famine in the land,
the D.U.'s were going on a party and only two had partners, but a
little Joseph in their midst arrived in the nick of time with all of five
Alpha Gams. . . . While the removal sale is still continuing, an opportunity, not to be missed, co-eds may match their spring ensembles with
distinctive style footwear at _44 Granville Street. . . .
fi fi fi
Queen's blue is featured in the new shipment of spring blouses
that have just arrived at Mrs. Paton's Lingerie Shop, 2793 Granville
Street. . . . Another favorite among the newer shades is fuschia . . , and
chartreuse . . youthful sports waists are in spun silk with vivid and
colorful stripes all colors of the rainbow. . . . The queen's blue first
mentioned is slightly deeper than the poudre blue and will blend with
the light grey flannel two-piece suits. ... It appears that the Kappas
preferred the green pastures of the D.U. formal in the Grill rather
than their own formal which was also held in the Hotel Vancouver . .
so they all adjourned to the grill. . . . These sports brbuses have the
natty waistbands and some have tailored collars, while one has an
entirely pleated front . . . 2783 Granville Street is the address for
distinctive blouses. . . .
fi        fi        fi
A perverse dan cupid of union college film and musical executive
arranged a blind date for a friend but refused to divulge the names of
either parties . . .' then he himself went out for the evening . . . and to
this day neither the girl nor the boy know whom it was they were
to have had the blind date with. . . .
70a*?*""
New
Spring Samples
of Distinctive
TIP TOP CLOTHING
at
Esquire Men's
Apparel
360-1 Oranvllle Bay. 9080
IIHMMIHtllMMMHIIIHHIMIHMMIMMttMMMMllHI.MIMiMMMMI
MHtlltlllHHIIIIIIIIItimtMMMMMIMMHMtHMMMMMfMMIMHn
there  is a  tavern  ln  the  town
known as the CAF
and there
my *
true love
sits him down •
and sits him down
and sits him down and sits him down
ad infinitum.  . . .
The  Hotel  Vanoouver
presents
MART KENNY
at  the  Spanish  Orlll
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At Popular Prices
PAPERHANOER
PAINTER
Neat,    Clean     Workmanship
Minimum of Muss and Upset
JOHN ADAMSON
FRASER  1818-L
New  Season's Wallpapers
NORMA LOST
One silver eversharp, Norma, in
the Bacteriology Lab, Had four
barrels of colored lead, and was Inscribed with the name E. D. King.
Finder please return lt to Mr. Horn's
office.
Solenceman:    "Betcha   five   bucks
you can't say the Lord's Prayer."
Theolog:  "That's a bet.    Now I lay
me ....'"
Scienceman:     "Here's      the     five.
Didn't think you knew lt."
— The Sheaf.
LOST
One slide-rule In Soience Bldg.,
Library, or any points east. Needed
at once by Charlie Nash. (What waa
I doing ln the Library?) Return to
Mr. Home's office when you are finished with lt.
«imtimmilllH'IMMM«IIHMIIt«Hm,|tlHflMIIII|H*HMHIHMI
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT  THE  OATES"
"OUR   SERVICE   MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
HMHHtHlltlHIHIIMtlMmilMHimilHIIHHtlHItMIHHHtHltH
•Jill tlIMMSMI MMMMtllllf II tlltttllt limit IMtlllMIIMIIIMSMItlll^
j H.   JESSIE   HOW,  B.A. f
I Public Stenographer 1
I 4451 West 10th Ave. 3
3 Unsays and T-iesas Typad
|,M»tHIHlllIMIMHMHMIUHMIIMM1|IMMMIMMIIIlttlHIMIMMM
CHICKS FOR
AGGIES^ GALS
Live baby chickens will be given
as souvenirs to all ladies present at
the Aggie Barn Dance tonight. Another feature of the evening's program will be the European peasant
medley dances, to be oalled by M. C.
Professor Boving, himself a live-wire
Aggie.
At noon, a hay-rlck ride by ardent Aggies through the university
area will remind artsmen that there
are still a few tickets available for
the evening's dance, to take plaoe at
the Marine Drive Golf Club.
STAGE CREW
All members of the Musioal Society Stage Crew must be on stage today at 4 p.m.
^K It has a delightful satisfying flavour—
this new mixture of
choice Virginia and
Burley tobaeeos,
blended wtth Perique
ond Lotokla. Try it.
PHILIP MORRIS
PIPE TOBACCO
The newcomer knooked on the
pearly gates and St. Peter's voloe
oalled:
"Who's there?"
"It Is I," answered the newcomer,
"Welt, get out. We don't want
any more sohool teachers."
—Queen's Journal
There is only a short tlmo left for
you to order your 1939 Totem.
NOTICE
AU women who will be eligible for
sorority membership next fall, but
who did not receive Pan-hellenlo
letters, please apply for suoh a letter
at Dean Bollert's offloe.
OET YOUR TOTEM IN THU
OAF, PUB ornoE OR
OOUNOIL OFFICE.
SPRING...
and the Parade
begins at Spencer's
Meet the
New Spring
College Town
Suits
$20
Budget Plan Terms
If desired.
Many U.B.O. men need no introduction to College Town Suit*—the suits that were
record breakers from the atart. Since we introduced them, Oollege Town Suits have
constantly won new friends—friends who liked their style and stamina, their comfortable flt and their sensible prioe. And now tbe College Town Suits for Spring set
a new record for style.
Top Your Suit With a
Colle
(Hat
T
own
»__.
.93
When you see the new College Town Hat you'll
agree that a hat does not have to be expensive to
be a OOOD hat—or a SMART hat. We're featuring
new shades of green, brown and blue to wear with
the popular suitings of the coming season.
College Town Shirts
*15S ___or*3°°
Spenoer's introduced the College Town Shirt to
U. B. 0. men and to city-wide aoceptanoe. Now
we present the new shirtings for Spring.
Of course these new Oollege Town Shirts have all
the features which made their introduction a suooess
from the first. Soft, "Fused" attached collars in
plain whites, browns, blues, and stripes, patterns
and checks.
Men's Shops, Spencer's Main Floor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
"Always the Best At Spencer's"
■JW£. *\&)     'H
4 MoKEOHNIE RUOOER
STADIUM—2.30 P.M.
VARSITY vs. VANCOUVER
pfPO\XT
BASKETBALL SATURDAY
VARSITY vs. WESTERNS
V.A.C—8 P.M.
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 17, 1939
McKechnie Cup Tilt For Varsity-Reps
Rugger men In Last Ditch
Stand Agaist Vancouver
Every so often, reporters (?) even on the Ubyssey hnve an
urge to write something original. You get the idea, less of these
super super superlatives and more plain facts, even true ones are
appreciated, so 'tis said.
Well the purpose of this pounding is to convey to you students
the fact that the Varsity Rugby Club are going to play Vancouver
Hep tomorrow, at our fair stadium.
MATHEMATICAL CHANCE FOR
VARSITY'S HOPING HOOPERS
BASKETEERS   MAINTAIN   HOPE   BY   DOWNING
ADANACS WEDNESDAY NIGHT 44-18
Now we could rave on for hours
telling you of out- mighty Thunderbirds, revealing such features as
their practically impregnable fullback John Bird, their scintillating
wings Leggat and Tremblay, their
meteor-like insides Howie, McPhee,
Daddie Robertson, sparked by that
colossus, five-eighths Ted McPhee.
And we could go on to add mind
you, if we wanted to, that Sandy Lang
at sorum half is nothing less than
sensational, that in the front line
row of Robaon, Long, and Gardiner
are three of the toughest hombres
in the loop, especially to knook heads
against.
WE WON'T TALK
We could also spare you by omitting the fact that Jerry Mason and
Henry Stradlottl, second row behemoths are the two ton terrors of the
league. Then there is Norm Stewart,
that chappie who wanders around
with dazed look on his map all the
time. Norm ls Just about the hustl-
ingest bit of baok row man ever
turned out around here, but do you
think we would tell you that? Not
much.
Then as for the wing forwards,
everyone knows that Varsity has the
lousiest breakaways (but Helen loves
me) ln the city but just to be orthodox and have fifteen men on a team
Coach Carey stuck ln Mattu and
Harmer.
So you can see how considerate the
Ubyssey ls of Its readers by skipping
all  that  slosh  and   presenting a  few
facts of  the situation.
ONE,  TWO, THREE
First, that Mr. Carey has been
carefully grooming his charges for
the past two weeks and figures them
smooth enough to topple the mighty
Rep  aggregation.
Second, that If Captain Strat Leggat leads his men off the field without a win wagging behind them, the
historic McKechnie Cup crosses the
Qulf to repose in that quaint bit of
misplaced England called Victoria.
Lastly, that for eighty solid minutes, a brand of civilised mayhem
will be committed on our turf as
fifteen leather luggers from the University of B.C make a last stand In
defense of the old mug, and fourteen
of these playing their heads off for
their gallant skipper Strat Leggat,
making his last McKechnie Cup appearance under Blue and Qold colors.  Amen.   .  .   .
A HERO AND ONE THAT WILL BE
Them men la here again 1 It la largely a matter of conjecture but we
think the chap on the left la starry Brud Matheson who pulled the basketball game out of the Are Wednesday by scoring no less than no points tn
the last Ave seconds of play. The other Is Ted MoPhee and his duty Is to
do the same only better ln the rugger game tomorrow afternoon.
PURCHASERS STILL
CHASING THE PUCK
Don't  look  now   but  the  Varsity
Thunderbirds   of   the   lee   are   still
taking the game seriously and after a stiff workout yesterday morning, the men of the steel blades are
ln  tip-top shape to play  Dumonts
next Tuesday night.
This Is the flrst in a two-game total goal series between the two squads
for the right to meet the non-travelling  New  Westminster  Cubs  for the
League championship.
No changes in the lineup are being
made, but Angi Provenzano who has
been out with a crocked shoulder,
may get back ln uniform for the
crucial test. With the big fellow back
on the d- "ending line, lt ls likely that
Jim Harmer will be moved up to his
old spot at centre between the two
Oulguets.
TRAVEL  ON.
Manager Maury Lambert ls at
present working to get another trip
to Spokane to get revenge from the
Oonzaga Bulldogs and also to drop
into the Interior for a game with one
of the leading teams there.
Nothing definite has come out of
the  bag  yet,  but lt  ls  fairly  certain
FROSH HOOPERS DROP
PLAYOFF TILT
By   IGNUTZ
The Frosh Inter A. finally dropped one In the same grand style as
they have been winning all season.
Shores trounced Varsity last Tuesday   at   the   Y.W.CA.  gym   by   the
colossal score of 62 to 27.
This was the first game of a best-
of-three   series   for   the  City   Championship.   Don't   be   misled,   however,
as   myself   and   a   few   others   (one,
anyway) really don't think the Frosh
were outplayed as much as the score
would indicate.
flOHT.
They were, more or less, ln the
fight throughout the whole game and
with a few of the breaks (all of
which were going the way of the
Shores) could have made a much
better game of lt.
The first quarter witnessed their
only real fight. They held Shores 11-
10 at the conclusion of this frame.
From here on they gradually slipped
into the mire, half time score was
32-14. In the second half Shores added 30 points to Varsity's 14 to make
it 62-37 at the final whistle.
Ignutz was so completely taken
aback by the result of this game that
he was retired to bed without another
word. Thus it was, that in order to
get an idea of the next game, tonight
at 8.00 p.m. at Y.W.CA. gym, a
snooping snooper was sent out to
interview a few of those more closely
connected with the Frosh.
FAITH,   HOPE,   CHARITY.
The snooper, not having Ignutz'
ability, was unable to arrive at anything definite. The general opinion
amongst the Frosh is this, "Wallll—
were at a helluva dls-advantage now,
but we haven't given up yet and still
hope   to  come  through."   (We  hope.)
Led by the rookies, Varsity's basketball squad retained a
slight mathematical chance to hit the play-offs of the Senior
League when they downed the Adanac quintette 44-18 at the
Campus Gym, Wednesday. The game was Varsity's all the way,
with tho hapless Yellowshirts never in the game. Varsity led 24-11
at half time.
All Varsity hopes for a play-off
berth now rest on the sagging shoulders of Bus Haugh's Staoey team.
They're the boys who taokle Munros
in one of the regular Saturday night
double-headers at V.A.C. and unless
the Shoemen oome through with a
win over the Furriers the Blue and
Gold will be definitely out of the running. Not even a victory over the
Canadian champs, Westerns, in the
second game Saturday will sneak
them ln.
ROOKIES COME THRU
Last night, with Maury Van Vliet
benching the regulars, the rookies
led the way. Doug. Alexander, Don
Livingstone, Wally Johnson, and
Dick Miller with veteran Rann Matthlaon making the playa got all but
two points of Varsity's total of 44.
Wally Johnson was the only rookie
not to play the full game, as he
was sent off ln the last quarter on
fouls.
The Collegians were never headed
ln their race for a play-off spot last
night. Adanacs were hopelessly baffled by the new Varsity zone defense which the rookies utilized to
great advantage. Kept out beyond
the blue line all night, they were
forced to fire long shots and were
definitely off.
On the other hand, Varsity worked
smoothly around the bucket, passing
nicely and shooting with a deadly
eye. Matthison had an "on" night
and sunk seven baskets, all swishing
through without touching the hoop.
Doug Alexander flashed some swe'el
ball to grab off nine points, while
the other three rookies each potted
six. By Straight was the only regular
to score.
The win puts Varsity two points
behind Munro Fur with each squad
having one game more to play, ln the
regular schedule. Both games are
played off Saturday night when
Munro plays Staceys and Varsity
tackles Westerns. Should Munro and
Varsity both win their games, Munros will get the play-off spot with a
two point advantage. Should, however, Munro lose to Staceys and Varsity beat Westerns, then both teams
will be tied for third and 'will have
to play off between them. , From
which it can easily be seen that Upper Mongolia stands a hell of a fine
chance of whipping Transcaucasia ln
the seml-flnals of girls hop-scotch.
LAST NIGHT SCORES:
Adanaos—Douglas 4, R. Fraser 6,
K. Matheson 1, King 3, Smith 4,
Scott, McLellan—18.
Varsity—Straight 2, Matthison IS,
Livingstone 6, Alexander 9, Miller 6,
Johnson 6, Turner, Matheson.—44.
ROWERS NOTE
Rowing Club Practice Saturday
afternoon 2.30 at the river. Flrat
and second crews and all others.
Three coaches ln attendance;
crews to be arranged. It shell be
done.
Important—all out!
at least that the Blue and Oold
knights of the ice will travel south
to Seattle fdr a return game with the
Washington Huskies some time next
month.
lltlllMMMIIIIIItlllllltHIIIIMIIIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIIHIIIIIIII
CO-ED MURALS
By  GERRY  ARMSTRONG
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIItllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIimillllHIMIIIIHIIIIIHI
The flrst game to count for points
ln the Mixed Murals was won by the
Aggies on February 6th when they
downed the Theologs and Schoolteachers by scores of 15-12 and 16-14.
Last Monday an unexpected audience of enthusiastic supporters saw,
on one court, the Education lasses
and Theologs defeat a team of promising Juniors to the tune of 15-10
and 16-5.
The Anglican boys, spurred on after last week's defeat by Ted Scott's
erstwhile Victory ln the Mall Race,
proved too much for a team of rugby
players—Basil Robinson, Lee Straight
and Tom Williams, and basketball
players Adie Collins, Pauline Scott
and Barbara Avis.
On the other court a team of ambitious Sophs, after winning the first
game 15-7, succumbing 13--1B in the
second to the smashes of a certain
towering scienceman, finally won the
odd game 15-6.
Noticed: Politeness the order of
the day, while the ball lands ... a
basket almost shot . . . several males
tripped and trampled on. . . .
Next Monday Science and Nurses
take on the Theologs and Education
while Aggies challenge Sophs ln what
promises to be two fast and furious
encounters. All players are asked to
be on the floor at 12.30 sharp.
Postponed Tilt On Tap;
Hitchensmen Play St. Regis
Varsity's Hltchens-coached soccer
men will go to Cambie street Batur
day to play St. Regis ln a postponed
league fixture. The scuffle was scheduled for last Saturday, but as you
probably remember, there was the
small matter of a snowball which
rather Interrupted the progress of
sporting events generally.
YOU TELL ME.
This Saturday, then, barring the
approach of plagues, snowstorms and
sudden death, the two teams will get
together. At present lt looks as
though St. Regis have a good chance
of finishing on top of the league, and
if you haven't gathered it before, we
might as well tell you now that Varsity look to have the chance of aspiring to the doubtful distinction of
fetching up in the league cellar. In
English, all the above signifies that
St. Regis have been consistently
good this season and Varsity have
noe   been   so   consistently   good.   Or
does that simplify matters?
JINX  JUNK.
For the last two years, the Hotel-
men have been the one real Jinx
team to the Blue and Oold outfit.
This week Manager Dick Clark vows
that it'll be a different story, and
there's a strong possibility of an upset victory for the collegians.
Although Jim Robinson ls out for
this week serving a suspension, the
rest of the team is in shape for the
game. It is rumored that one or two
new faces, perhaps from Junior ranks
will be in the lineup. Oame time is
set for 2.15.
BADMINTON TOURNEY
The annual University badminton
tournament will start Monday evening, February 20, in the gym. There
will be the usual Ave events, ladies'
singles, men's singles, ladles' doubles,
men's doubles, and mixed doubles.
Everybody welcome. Non-members'
fee, 25c.
SKI TOURNAMENT TO BE
HELD FEBRUARY 24 - 25
Ten star U.B.O. skiers don their
planks ln the near future for the
biggest Intercollegiate meet to be
held on this side of the line for some
years.
Representing the Blue and Oold
will be Mickey Pogue. starry skipper,
Bill Sharpe, Cliff Ware, Phil Thomas,
Al Fraser, Oerry Harkley, Campbell
Kenmulr, Al MacDougal, Wally
Thomas, Jack Wyard and Bill Smith.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS
Badminton,    Tuesday,   Feb.   21
12.30. Seniors vs. Sophs.
at
MURAL JOTTINGS
At noon, today, a super basketball
game ls scheduled when the Bombers
of Soience '42 meet Science '30 for
the seml-flnal birth. Next Wednesday the winner of this 'crucial' will
play Arts '30 and the victorious squad
will go into the long awaited finals
with Arts '41. The Artsmen got a
bye into this desirable spot.
Two games played and two class
teams eliminated! That'll the story
of the flrst two games of the rugger
tourney. Aggies were hard put to
beat Arts '30 5-0 on Tuesday and in
Wednesday's battle, Anglicans went
down fighting to Science '40 by an
8-3 margin.
Arts '41 play Science '41 today at
noon. All games are on the upper
field, rain or shine!
     PASS?    	
YES—We mean Examinations! You can help yourself to better
grades by consulting "College Helps"—a catalogue listing hundreds of aids to courses for college work. Get your free copy now.
THE BOOK EXCHANGE
"Canada's aook-Olsartng  Sons*"
370 Bloof St.  W., Toronto,  Ontario
la's i
oV S
w/m 600*9 i/6i/rm
Good eyesight it a preeious asset
through life... don't strain it by poor
lighting. Nave your ohildren enough
light at home?   Get a oheok today.
!VrV*«
U6HJ
Send for the girl with the Sight-Savtttg
Kit. Phone B.C. Electric, Seymour 5151

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