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The Daily Ubyssey Nov 2, 1948

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 The Daily
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1948
No. 24
Homecoming Rites Link Traditions of B.C's First Culture With Her University
TOTEM PRESENTATION was made at the halftime period of the Thunderbird-Coyote foot-
ball game, Saturday afternoon. Shown above i s Ian MacKenzie, Homecoming chairman introducing Chief Billy Scow to the fans. Others in the picture, from left to right' include Dave
Brousson, AMS president, Chief William Sco w, Patsy Jordan, Homecoming princess, Alfred
Scow and Mrs. E. Neel who aided her husband in carving the totem. The chief was flown here
Friday from the Queen Charlotte Islands for t he presentation.
SYMBOL OF FAIR PLAY,
22-foot Thunderbird Totem
pole will watch over UBC
campus from lawn in front of
Brock Hall. Carved by Mr. and
Mrs. E. Neel, magnificently
colored pole was presented to
students Saturday
LOVELY PRINCESS Patsy Jordan, who ruled over UBC's
Homecoming festivities will treasure memory of her reign,
a miniature thunderbird totem pole presented Saturday night
by Chief William Scow. Close to 3000 grads and undergrads
jammed the festive-decked armories, danced, frolicked, and
cheered an Indian tribal dance, feature of floor show. Theme
of three-day Homecoming reminded British Columbians of
highly cultured Indian race which once' flourished in B.C.
Point Goes To Indians
For Homecoming Daze
'.-^Bi'-"■ .. ^'^!^j^>>. (-•,■'&?>•**■■*?*    v - ■-■- "^i   V   ■*'.= "   '-*1"* *■-*"■ --\i'~ "'    •'   ■-";"'■   ■
Chief Scow Presents Totem,
Colls Indian Floor Show "Good"
Point Grey was given back to the Indians Saturday.
Disturbed only slightly by a mauling from horde§ of
American coyotes UBC alumni enjoyed a Homecoming that
was as Indian as a cigar store dummy.
'Tween Closses
. New Government
Club on Campus
Unique to Canadian universities will be the UBC branch
of the Hansard Society of Canada which will be formed
Wednesday noon in Arts 206.
Students in government courses
will find discussions of parliamentary procedure helpful, officials stated.
*        if- H-
Reginald Sorenson, member of
British Parliament, will address an
open meeting in the auditorium today at noon.
He is vice-president of the National
Peace Council and International Fellowship  league.
Cheques This Week
For DVA Students
Pay parade for UBC's 35O0 student
Veterans will be held Thursday and
Friday of this week, DVA officials
announced Monday.
Students with names form A to M
Will be paid Thursday, 9:30—4:30 in
tho Armories, Remainder will receive
cheques Friday,
—*> Ceremonies began with the presentation of a 20-foot high three and one
half ton Thunderbird Totem polo presented to the university by Chief
Billy Scow.
Carved and donated by Ellen Neel,
of Chief Scow's tribe, the totem was
unveiled  before  a  crowd  of  5000  at
the afternoon football game,
BROCK LAWN
Later this week the pole will be removed to the lawn in front of Brock
Hall.
Following the Grad-won basketball game, the alumni and undergrads moved to the Armory for tho
biggest Homecoming dance in years.
Highlight of the evening was an
Indian floor show, which Chief Scow
described as "very good, very authentic."
The   audiences   approval   was   less
' estrained.
PRIZE WINNERS
Raffle prize winners lead hy F.l-
lanor Hall 5505 and L. C. Hoel 0433
who both won blazers were: Roy
Slakov 7868, Millie McLean 8580, Don
McColl 3907, M. A. McLean 6725, Pam
Hodson 338, Don Duquid 8024, £. Phillips 8022, L. H. Fransen 8019, Mrs. R. J.
Pop 5836, R. C. McMordie 8286, M.
MacLeod 4787, J. H. Blois 5968, Walt
fclwing 2089, Bill Rosene 204, Tony
Barker 4710, Adella Woogmen 6860,
Danny Kowal 2622.
National Secretary of the United
Nations Association of Canada, Eric
Morse, will discuss the UN and it's
future at noon today in Art 100,
Manitoba Students
Take Over "Big
Time" Government
Winnipeg, Nov. 2, (CUP)
The Politics Club of the University of Manitoba has been
granted permission to take over
the provincial legislative chambers for their mock parliament.
Tlie three day session to be held at
the end of November will include
members of all four campus political
clubs.
Of the fifty-five seats, one will be
given to each party and the others
decided by vote of all students.
This guarantees that every party
will have at least one voice to ring out
in the council chambers.
Alberta Faculty Seizes
Control Of Speakers
--$>
Career at Sea
For Fifty
Canadian Grads
Students interested in a naval
career will have their big opportunity this spring, according to Naval Headquarters at
Ottawa.
.Thirty undergraduates at Canadian
universities are to be given an opportunity to enter the RCN in com-
misioned ranks upon graduation this
spring or in 1950.
Student Application To Sponsor
'Red Dean' Brings President's Rule
Special To Tlie Daily Ubyssey
EDMONTON, Nov. 2—President Robert Newton of the
University of 41berta told campus clubs today that he mast
pass on all speakers before they will be allowed at the
university.
Tlie ruling applies  to all non-uni'-$-
versity   persons   who   are   lo  address'
Audience Under Fire
For Indiscreet Silence
.EGION GIVES FURTHER
'CLUE ON MR, PIGSKIN
Legion officials issued the second clue in their "Find
[. Pigskin" contest yesterday. Here it is:
v.   A horse, some grass' a candle,
V Now use your brain and eye;
■Beard Mr. Pigskin in his den
And you will win ihe prize.
Twenty-five dollars  awaits the first ticket holder  lo
find him.\
By GEORGE SIVERTZ fr
Three hundred faculty members
and students committed a gross discourtesy when , they neglected to
applaude Mr. Adaskin and Frances
Marr as they mounted the podium
to begin a violin recital.
The reverent silence in Brock Hall
Sunday night suggested prayer to
Professor  Harry  Adaskin. c
In the silence, the UBC director of
music, set his violin upon the piano,
turned to the audience and said that
he had never before in his career
come upon a concert stage unap-
p lauded.
He admitted the group was, in effect, all one big happy family, but,
lluu tl.at wa:; not sufficient reason
for such  extraordinary behaviour.
He went on to say that at one time
Debaters Try
For Cup Team
Failing UN, disunified Christian
Churches and a Canadian Bill of
Rights will be topics for debate when
IVTneGoun Cup debating tryouts get
under way November 15 and 16.
Students will vie for the honor of
representing UBC in the final debate
v. ith University of Alberta in January. They may choose either the negative or affirmative side of any of
the  topics,
Sir Thomas Beecham told him if ever
such an occasion arose one should
turn to the audience and in reverent
tones suggest that we all pray.
After Mr. Adaskin's mild, entertaining reproof he received a solid
round of applause.
student  clubs  or organizations. |
The president's ruling came as a!
result of an attempt by a student I
group to bring Hewlitt Johnson, "Red i
Dean of Canterbury" to the campus.
At UBC, Don Lanskail, president
of the United Nations Club is negotiating with the Council for Soviet
Friendship in hopes of bringing Dr.
Johnson  to  the  campus.
No definite word has yet been received.
Lanskail has been assured, however,
that if Dr. Johnson comes to Vancouver, he will speak  at UBC.
Dr. Johnson would find it difficult,
it was explained, to work in a Vancouver appearance between engagements   in  Seattle  and  Denver.
Last Rites Held
or Mother Of
Popular Professor
Funeral service for mother of Professor G. G. Sedgewick was held Monday  afternoon at Vancouver.
Mrs. Sedgewick was born in Nova
Scotia, and has been a resident of
Vancouver for the past 32 years. She
was: in her 90th year.
Rev. Thomas Bailey of the Anglican
Theological College officiated at the
service. Interment was in Ocean View
Cemetery.
Writer
Never
By ART WELSH
I did a "slow roll" in the Aero
Club's new Link trainer,
After a great deal of coaxing by
several of the Aero Club members
and some members of the Daily
Ubyssey staff I was convinced
that I should take a ''trip" in the
trainer.
I started flying to "the horizon"
al first and I thought I did pretty
well. Harry Kolcler, who assembled
the machine and i.s instructing on
it, said that 1 was going to do
my slow roll. "Put your head on
your right shoulder and bank the
plane to the right. Now put your
head over on  your  left  shoulder."
QUART OF RYE
I   relied.
It  was the same sensation gained
as it I had just finished a quart ol
rye and taken a fast ride on a
merry-go-round.
It seems that when the hood is
down you are already in the air.
The machine can he grooved to
any distance scale and draws a
detailerl route ol' where you travel.
The plane is operated by radio
signals, or ''blind."
Best part of the trainer i.s that
you can have it on! of control and
even  crash  and siill   stay  alive.
When I arrived John Hobtrtsoi.
was taking the ship over the Vancouver International Airport. The
ship simulates the feel of the
actual air. It can he made to deit'i
with Ihe wind and any oilier air
C'lnplical ions
Il   will   he  UsvA   l'--r  I".  uiiu".   l ; n--
peel ivo  I'k er-,   in   ihe   fundai lenlai,
irporf;
Campus
of flying by instruments in the
same way it is used to train commercial pilots.
FLYING RY INSTRUMENTS
The club was in a bad way for
some time for after they had
bought, the machine they found
they had no one who could assemble  it.
DURING  WAR
After a prolonged search they
discovered Harry Kolder who had
instructed on links during the
war,
When the machine came in, the
club had im place to set it up, The
C'OTt'   donated   their   store   room.
When the machine is in perfect
operating order it will be open to
ad   inlc-iesled   students  on   a   noil- Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,,   November   2,   1943
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized  as Second Class Mail,  Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 {xsryeftJ?
Published Wro'iijjhout the university year by the Student Publications BQWd of the Alma Mater Society ot tne
™      University of British Columbia.
if if- *
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the edit >rial staff of Tlie Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily yiose
of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices iti &ock Hall. Phone ALma 1024 For dj^play advertising phone ALfflalWJ
EpiTOit-IN-CIHEF. -   -   -   -   RON HA0fJABT
MANAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SfcARS .
GENERAL STAFE: News Editor, Bob Cave, Novia Heberl; Features, Ray Barnes; CUP Wltor,
Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall; Sports Editor, Chuck Marshall;
Editors This Issue - CHRIS CliOlVtBlE-LAURA HAAHTI
n Search of a Responsible Press
Thursday's debate at the Parliamentary
Foirum, a discussion on the service offered
by the Daily Ubyssey, brings to mind the interesting question of a newspaper's responsibility td the community it serves and the control which that community can, or should exert on the press.
Few newspapers enjoy the opportunity of
gleaning from their subscribers the first hand,
objective criticism which the Forum will offer this week. Newspapers have sought in the
past to discover the real needs of their customers, they have established expeifeive commissions on a "free and responsible press" to
find the anwers. but today's citizens still only
one weapon against a wayward press; "Tell
the boy to stop bringing your rag."
The force of public opinion, or more exactly
subscriber opinion, is obviously insufficient
guarantee against journalistic malpractice.
The newspapers of the world which seem less
objective, least responsible ahd least fit to
lead their communities still boast seven digit
circulation lists and bulging revenues.
What other course is open to assure the
ideals of factua} reporting which otir laws
guarantee but do not assure? Oiher public
utilities, railways, power corporations, even
radio stations must answer to public boards
and commissions established by government.
If such public bodies could ever be divorced from the politicians who appointed
them, or even if objective • journalism 'could |
ever be defined, rtewspaber "cohimissiohs''
might bring to the press the saitie restraints I
now held over railways and other public
suppliers.
No government has ever succeeded in this
task, and presumably hone ever will. Only
an alert and intelligent audience can excer-
cise the control of the press which chctatoi-s
have been the first to usurp.
Propose souutiows for pReueNTiou oc CftF-CRDUQIMa
SOUR 660*6
EUKWi
atiom ttvices
Vii
TKfCHMW   MJt> V**
_(>ATfUTj »»Ptl8D tori}
iljte) .^'ej^HHfssioMAifte*
to it a iiTri? more ssvoee
IV U&C $6M6 SuiTl£ <«<M OP
mm
mrmm
peopl
e are
GREAT SHOCK
Dear Sir:
I was doubly shocked when I
read Les Armour's column about
the degressive Conservatives, Jim
Banham's revie'.v of Hamlet, Time
magazine arid my last week's letter
abcut plagiarism. For one thing
I was classed as one of the three
Pro. Cons, left on the campus.
This will ruin my career. Hbw can
I teach beer drinking now? I was
more shocked to learn that there
are so few Pro. Cons, left! Before
the last one dies of over-eating
he Should be'pickled in Les Bewley's full beer barrel and kept for
all posterity to see like the Ere-
whonians kept their machines. Perhaps the class cf '49 will do this
as their gift to the Alma Mater.
The specimen could be stored in
Paul Plant's safe along with tho
UEC, the library ladder and thu
counci lroom key. When my younger brothers arrive at UBC I want
to be able to sho.v them the la.it
cf those vacuum-minded albeit
well-groomed class of people—Pro.
Cons.
Please   don't   spell    my    name
wrong   again.   Have   your   proof
readers return to Queens'. In order"
to keep things clear politically, 1
remain
Socialistically   yours,
ROLAND BOUWMAN
ENGINEERS ER SONG
Dear Sir:
Columnist Les Bewley is to bc
commended fcr his public spirited
offer t'o underwrite financially any
engineer who can make good the
boast contained in his faculty. . .cr
. . . song: "wo can, we can, demolish forty beers."
However, it seems to the writer
that Mr, Bewley being, a.s he affirms, full of Christian Charity,
has allcwcd his magnanimity to
carry him away. Although the t'he
icjfnneci'';; capacity for boasting is
well known it is hard to believe
that any of them, ever, can have
dared to assert their individual
ability to consume two score ales,
even at five cents per.
It is mere likely that the forty
beers in question were intended to
constitute the declared imbibing
capacity of the entire engineering
faculty. The thesis is supported by
a little simple arithmetic. With
something like 3300 odd engineers
presently enrolled in the (acuity,
forty beers work out (with benefit
of slide rule) to roughly .01212
beers, per engineer. While still an
optimistic quantity with regard to
the average engineer Mr. Bewley
will perhaps cencedo (with Christian Charity) that it may be within
tho capacity of a few cf thc morn,
practiced individuals in the'r final
year, especially these whei have
had ccnsiderab'.e ccr. •■..' with
artsmen.
However, in fairnc:;:- [■< your
columnist it should 1 " y '.tiled
out that at the time cf :'e..er...
song was written the feiril'ment
figures were probably mere like
400 than 3300. This gives a declared
consumptive capacity of .1 beers,
per engineer—an impossible and
insupportable boast which most
certainly should not have been allowed to go unchallenged for so
long.
Yours fcr more objective engineers,
Peter L. Hepher
Arts  4
OVERLOOKED
Dear Sir:
Obviously Hal Tenru'iit is net of
the female sex or he would have
noticed that thc Womcei's Washroom in Brock north1 is equipr.eel
with a drinking, fountain. Ho
might inferm hip Anje.vtcon university student friend that at least
the    women    aiv:    not    driven    to
quenching   their   thirst   with   200
proof.
Yours truly,
A.A.
LOOPHOLES
Dear Sir:
With regard to Les Bewley's
challenge to engineers, I have no
doubt that an engineer may be
found who can demolish forty
beers. An engineer riiay even be
found who cstn cteiftoiisk forty
mere than Mr. Bewley can.
however—before said ^Ir. Bewley makes such characteristically
fool statements about the boast-
fulness of engineers, he should
follow the example of "vile engineers," and glance about him for
a fact or two. He would then note
that the engineer's song makes no
mention of ho'.v many engineers
tar "demcli'jh forty" nor docs it
state any time limit v.-r.atsoever
fcr doing so.
Mr. Bewley is apparently not
very well acquainted with engineers or he would knew that they
arc given to only the most conservative statements, of which that
made in the song is one. It is
reasonably certain t^t;at anytime
1's.rty engineers can be found who,
during the course of their four
years in the science faculty, have
consumed one beer each thus fulfilling the requirements of thc
song. Even the child of the "Children's Hour" should not have overlooked such obvious loopholes.
Come honest engineer may bc
found lo accept Mr. Bewley's twisted challenge but personally I see
no recason why any engineer
should waste his valuable time
trying to prove, to the not-so-
valuable satisfaction of Mr. Bcv-
ley, that he can do something the
song doesn't say he can.
AN  ENGINEER
The Childrei/s H
our
News item.
Roeland Rag Apple Lilly, a holstein cow
owned and operated by John W. Greenwood
of Maple, Ontario' .set a new world's record
for two year old cows. Lilly produced 827
pounds of butter fat from 18,501] pounds of
milk.
This great young cow is a daughter o the
famous Geraldine Pabst Alearlra, whose 305-
day record as a five-year old was 866 pounds
of fat fronn 21,956 pounds of milk.
End news item.
If there is a point to all of this it must be
found in that key word "Pabst.''
A BLUE RIBBON N/IME
The blunt fact of the matter is that "Pabst"
is a blue-ribbon name in brewing circles. Add
to that the riven! discovery that many prize-
winning cow-owners are feeding their bovine
beauties on beer and ale for greater hutlerfat
production and you come up with a significant conclusion.
Even a two-year old holstein nam;1 of Lilly
can out-drink and out-buttcrfat a twenty-one
year old engineer,
Helpful hints Department: Those of you
who are searching for Mr. "Pigskin" may as
well lay off members of the Student Council,
son, approached official bloodsuckers in turn
Fool columnist, overcoming natural revul-
last week, largely on strength of "one and
nine" clue let slip by Legion. He now reports
that "dirty nine" are still dirty, but they ain't
it.
MUST BE ENGINEER
Fool columnist is now, convinced that "Mr,
Pigskin" must be engineer; in which esse he
will never be found as engineers, skulking
around in dark alleys in craven attempt to
avoid making good on forty beer boast, have
pulled cloak of oblivion over red faces and
disappeared from public view.
Mail Bag Department:
"Dear Bewley:—You wouldn't know il
hul your weekly regurgitations make deeenl-
minded people want lo throw up. In fact you
Fouhd
ngs
THE PAGIPIC BADMINTON CLUB
at 25th and Oak has vacancies for a
few players, men preferred. For information contact the club secretary,
Stuart Thomson at MA. 55??.
TECHNOCRACY STUDY GROUP
will hold a meeting in Hut A4, 12:30
noon, November 2 for purposes of
organization.
MEETNG O^ HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Wednesday, November 3, 7:30 p.m.
Place, Men's Lounge, Brock Building.
Speaker: Dr. W. N. Sage; "Trends in
British Historical writing during 19th
cinfury". All those interested are
cordially invited to attend.
UBC FILM SOCIETY. UNIVERSITY
Theatre (Auditorium) Tuesday, November 2 at 3:45; 6:00; 8:15 p.m. "Stone
Flower" A Russian legend in color.
Admission 20c. Thursday, November
4th at 3:45; 6:00 and 8:00 "Ave Maria''
a musical film classic with Beniamino
Gigli. Admissjon 25,c.
ATTENTION ALL AP. SCIENCE
students. If you enjoy singing come
and join the Engineer's Music club
meetings on Fridays at 12:30 in the
Brock stage room.
CRDER OF THE' GOLDEN E. WE
excavate by skip this weekend. If
you can come, phone R.B.
GLEE CLUB. TUESDAY, NOVEM-
1 or 2, HM 1 at 12:30.
ATTENTION TEACHERS AND MEM-
bers of UTA. Hear Mr. S. Evans
Asst. Gen, Secretary of B.C.T.F. on
the "Work and Objectives of the B.C.
T.F." Tuesday, November 2 at 12:3a
HM 9.
A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE UEC
Jass Society will be held today in the
dubrodm behind the Brock at 12:30.
Bob "Bop" Smith, of the CBC "Hot
Air" programme, will be the honored
guest. He will present a programme
o( his own recordings which promises
to bc very interesting. It is hoped that
anyone who is interested will attend
this meeting.
Wanted to Buy
USED COPY OF TREVELYN HIST-
ory   of  England.   Phone  Jim  at   BA
5745-R.
MEN'S BROWN "LEATHER GLOVES
on University Blvd. near Acadia. AL
1624.
NOTICES
©
THE NOON CONCERT IN THE
Men's clubroom November 3 will consist of the following selections: Iphig-
nenie En Aulide—Gluck; Oh Perfide
—Beethoven; Rosamundi Overture-
Schubert.
THOSE INTERESTED ARE REMIND-
ed that today i sthe last day for placing entries in the inter-university
photography 6alon at Hart oHuse,
Toronto. Last minute entries may be
left at the ARIS desk.
BIOLOGICAL DISCUSSIONS CLUB
presents Mr. C. C. Lindsey speaking
on "The movement of fish in an Ontario Lake." and Mr. T. Butler speaking on "Commercial sjirimps in BtC."
7:30, November 3 in A.P. 101. A cordial invitation to attend is extended
to all. Refreshments will be served*
Transportation     '
2 RIDERS WANTED FROM WEST
Vancouver for 8:30's. Phone Bob at
W 1986-R.
RIDE FOR. 8:30'S TUES. THURS.
aSt. rfcm 28th and Granville. Phone
Dave BA 0160.
WANTED URGENTLY. A RJt>fc TO
Eroadway and Granville at 12:30
Monday through Friday. Phone Marion Smith Hut lt aft<?r 6:3Q p.m.
PASSENGERS WANTED FROM Vicinity of Burris St, and Dougla^, iW,
for 8:30's each day. Phone NW 3»5-Ll
J&tjSiaMMd?
DIRKS
VANITY STEiltING
Hand-crafted by Birks own silversmiths, Birks Vanity Sterling
has a timeless beauty which brings
elegance to your dressing tabic.
A wide choice of patterns and
matching accessories are now
available.
Edgewood 43.00
Victoria 30.00
Lady Josephine     45.00
PriccB shown are for three pieces
—mirror, l^ir brush and comb.
I Each piece may bc purchased
separately.
Purchase tax extra •
JEWELLERS
VANCOUVER
by les bewley
do make mo throw up. If fool columnist is a
Christian, I am a pig; and if you continue, you
will make the whole engineering faculty
throw up. (Signed) 3rd year Arts."
Ans: He is, you are, and they will, 3rd year
Arts, if they ever try to get past the first
twenty beer.
"Dear Uuclc B,:—When I was at Magee I
heard so much about the terrible engineers,
that I deliberately registered late for UBC
and paid the late registration penalty, rather
han undergo their manhandling during freshman week. Now I see what big bluffs they
really are. I want you to know lhat I am not
afraid of them anymore. Yesterday I walked
right past the Ap. Sc. building and snapped
my fingers at them. All my friend ; 'eel the
same way. (Signed) - 1st year Art::;."
Ans:—-Bully for you 1st ye:ir Arts, Someone once said that life's greatest tragedy was
Ihe murder of a beautiful theory by a gang,
fo brutal facts. Tally of them in act. So snag
away hoy, snap away.
"Dear'Sir:—May thc Lord help you in your
good work' and perhaps save some innocent
little university girl rom the fate that befell
nee. My late husband was an engineer; and
he always sang that silly song. One night,
quite out of control after two bottles of beer,
he made his usual pass at the waitress in a
downtown restaurant. The girl slapped him
so hard that a filling came loose rom his teeth
fell into his throat and choked him to death
in an hour. (Signed) Widow of engineer."
Ans:—Thank you Madame, and well rid of
the louse too.
'Dear Scum:—Your crack that engineers
will reach the can. before long before they
reach (he forty is a filthy lie. Moreover, it is
entirely uncalled or. Take it back, scum/.
(Signed)  Mci-h. Eng."
Ans:—You are right, Mech Eng. It was uncalled for, Fool columnist does take it back.
All he says now is that engineers will l^each
tl .' wr !n!i<; hi'.'i.iv thoy resell the can, t.ack-
iug evidence io (he cuil rare. ! i ucsa;:
i .oveml
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
piftcori Dollars
i"' '■
Two Charged In
Alberta Liquor
Rule Crackdown
Edmonton, Nov. 2, (CUP)
Two students have been charged in a liquor crackdown at
the University of Alberta.
;A ruling passed by the student's
council at the Alberta Varsity are to
be rigidly enforced by si'udents disciplinary committee according to student union presiden, Bernie Bowlen.
JUVENILE ATTITUDE
Ute of liquor on the campus has
become increasingly brazen. Council
vas told that the indiscriminate students with juvenile attitudes behaved in a manner which could do
much harm to the university.
The ruling reads, ", . . use of and
bringing liquor to the campus is
strictly forbidden."
The opportunity to handle the liquor situation on the campus was
fiven to tho council by the University
of Alberta authorities.
The council has the power to impose fines up to the sum of $15 or
may dismiss the student from any
student activity. Failure to comply
with the diciplinary decree will be
constituted as a new offence,
Briefly Noted
... by leon lipson
SIGNBOARD
Starving Students
Problem Of Care
Now York, November 1 (AP) —
European university students living
en one meager meal a day present a
challenge to their fellcws in the United States and Canada, Milton. L.
Smith, educational chairman of CARE
told a news conference here.
"University student as a group
present the greatest single area of
need in Europe today," he said.
He called upon American and Canadian students to give all possible assistance to these students "whose
conditirn is so bad that many aro
corrrr.L'ling suicide."
IF YOU ASK ME
Mr. Pigskin is still at large and ?25
is still waiting for thc first person to
find  him,   For   the  benefit   of  those
who missed thc first clue, here is the
University Legion's jingle number 1.
Nineteen is the answer,
If you're very quick with clues,
Acquire the art of finding him,
And thc money you won't lose.
Now, nineteen could be Mr. Pig- i
skin's age, it could be a letter of the
alphabet, or it could be room 19 in
the Arts building, (the word "art"
in the third line is another clue which
might indicate this). Also, art could '
possibly be Mr. Pigskin's first name.
If  that  doesn't  help,  here  is  Mr.
Pigskin jingle number two:
A horse, some grass, a candle,
Now use your brain and eyes,
Bcnrd Mr. Pigskin in his den
Tine first line I will leave to you,
And you will win the prize,
bul   the  word   "beard"  in  the  third
line intrigues me, I  wonder if anyone has asked Dr. Birney yet.
The Indian "Passion Dance" at the
Alumni Dance has received favorable
comment from Chief Billy Scow. He
considered it a very good interpretation of the original Indian dance.
Another member of the audience,
(Indian  blood  not   determined)   was
even more enthusiastic, "Brother!"
he said, "The reservation was never
like this."
FQH  VETS
Best news first, payday is on Thursday and Friday.
Mike lakes. Legion president, is
looking for the meanest man in the
world. This man was at the Alumni
dance on Saturday night. Mike almost wept when ho couldn't find an
item of personal property which he
had hidden under the table and four
people were soon on Iheir hands and
knees locking for it. The result—enforced prohibition and Mike's angry
comment, "Next time I'm going to
nail it to the floor."
A note on Veteran's Insurance offered by DVA. The time limit on
inriking application has been extended
three years. Veterans across Canada
have already taken out more than
20,000 policies averaging about $2,500
per policy. 20-payment life policies
continue to be the most popular.
For Sale
'37 MORRIS "8" ROADSTER. CLOS-
cst offer to $550. Phone BA 7613-M
after 4:30 p.m.
MOTORCYCLE FOR SALE. FRAN-
cis Barnctt 250 cc. See D. A. While
Room 16 Hut 5 Fort Camp.
1929 STUTZ SEDAN ¥250. PHONE
J. Molliet. AL 1913-R.
1936 PACKARD CONVERTIBLE
coupe. Excellent condition. Phone
Jack CE 4331 mornings.
4 CLEAN WOOL BLANKETS. T.C.
Jones, AL 0016 after 5:00 p.m.
MAN'S CCM BIKE SIZE 24"-22" IN
good  condition.   KE  2513-Y.
UniVERSITV BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon ^
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS
AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC   ENGINEERING   PAFEIt,   BIOLOGY   PAPER
LOOSE  LEAF  REFILLS,  FOUNTAIN  PENS  AND  INK
AND  DRAWING   INSTRUMENTS
OWNED AND OPERATED BY HIE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Miscellaneous
LET ME HELP YOU GET A FIRST
class by typing your essay, report or
thesis* Reasonable rates. Mr. H, Morgan BA 4199-R.
Peter S. Mathewson
SERVICE SUPERVISOR
GOO Royal Bank Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Telephone
PAc. 5321
West 1619-L-l
SUN LIFE OF CANADA
>liP>
No More Ironing
NRy|0" $1.35up
Briefs  ^
Npy'°?. $1.65 ^
Panties
Ny|on $5.50 up
Slips     ^
Dairjty nylon undcrthings will last
and last without a single ironing.
MX.
better magnets
make Jobs
for Canadians
In ancient days; the lodestone was the available
permanent jnagnet and was known in almost every
country. In 1492, a piece of this mineral actuated the
compass which guided Columbus across thc Atlantic.
Today man, through research, has learned to make magnets to suit ma'ny of his
requirements. Recently a small experimental magnet was made which lifted
4450 times its own weight. This magnet
was made of "Alnico" an alloy of
aluminum, nickel and cobalt with iron.
Because of its increased efficiency, this new magnet is
being employed for a wide range of uses. It has
brought about a revolution in the design of meters,
instruments, radios and generators, and is finding
its way into numerous other industrial
applications.
The growing demand for magnets of this ^x^?*-^
kind provides an entirely new market for *&gy -/
Canadian Nickel. This new market creates
new jobs for Canadians both in the Nickel industry
and in industries which make magnets and products
containing the magnets. Thus does research develop
better products, create more employment.
%
mt
:m
xxMk
I a
575 Granville St. j
Just Up From Pender      MA. 6942
Public   Stenography
Manuscripts, Mimeographing
Typing,  Theses
CATHERINE   STEWART
KErr.   1407R
-<£~x sy
,*s//y/yy'.
Your Brakes
Must Hold
Winter or .summer, In town
or on tin- Idglr.vay—wherc-
ever y:::i chive, your brakes
mu.'.t h;kl, Unchecked wear
can produce dangerous brake
conriitims with little or ihi
warning. That's why we believe in period inspection,
It's the r.no May to nreike sure
ycur brakes will he equal to
t!u  nc:.t sudden emergency.
,.Hll
\W3za
•a.  i.*
-ZJgS^
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£&■*&—
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i-*e3hJS
-*^r+&i=r£_^T__viK!Xifaw*-ilfta«fYMjaswrjia™ ... j-' r&»-*«-^»--
TO
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m
CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE
V. ,':,XJitHij.i •,..;;   a,      ■...., hi
P3tl
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in, ws"
1 nading ore into .
-J5   ton trucks at tht ,
'tooct of in I it near Sudbury .
jXg?"*/'//,■ Rum,in,: nf
I Mi iri" ii nl)-/i.ii;t
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Inih;/,,-;'/// /■: sent •
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THE  INTERNATIONAL   MICHEL  COMPANY  OF  CANADJ
Ms
ITED,
'{{%
ING   STREET  WEST,  TORONTO iPage 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   2,   1948
The
Armchair
Athlete
By  CHUCK MARSHALL
Jack   Pomfret,  UBC's  new   cage
[coach,  is going  to  have  his  cap-
lable   hands   more   than   full   this
year with his basketballing Thun-
| derbird charges.
^       ilflfrlltti
First indications of
Pcmfret's task
I* w ere seen last
\\ eek when the
Birds opened
their 48-49
, reason in Port
| Albernie by
[losing the s.ec-
I ond of two tilts with an Island
| squad of mere senior B calibre.
However, the sad situation rcal-
ly hit home on Saturday when the
student cagers lost the first 'Bird-
Grad contest in  recorded  history.
It wasn't the loss itself that
really mattered but rather the
greenness that the present Thunderbird squad is displaying and
how it will affect the future of the
game on the campus.
Soup To Nuts
Tlie smallish crowd of spectators were treated with everything
from soccer to tag team wrestling
in the rough and tumble affair.
About the only things they did
not see was a brand of basketball
that will allow the 'Birds to make
a showing in the classy Evergreen
conference which they enter after
Christmas.
Most of the crowd went away
feeling that they had been entertained but carried trepidations
about the future when the 'Birds
start playing something more serious than a Homecoming tilt.
Whether the team's lack of polish can be attributed to the youth
of both the season and the players
is a pertinent question at this
time.
Mayb
e
Perhaps under thc skilled tutelage of Mr. P. the cagers will bc
able to irojft out some of the
wrinkles which held them up on
Saturday.
Signs of the 'Birds progress can
better be judged a couple of weeks
from now when they run up
against Seattle Pacific College in a
two game exhibition series here,
respective   belts   and   will   give ,a
By that time they should have
a lot more practice under their
better indication of what can be
expected from UBC's senior hoop
squad.
One thing that, can be said for
the ■ Grad contest was that the
student cagers showed plenty of
hustle and enthusiasm for the
game.
Unfortunately, that's not enough
however, to make up for tho hall-
kicking, free-shooting brands of
basketball that was displayed.
To Be Or Not To Be
If Pomfret can smooth off the
squad's rough corners in time for
conference play we can look forward to another successful hoop
season.
If he can't, basketball, one of
UBCs better efforts against teams
from the south, may degenerate
(and we pray not) to the state of
football off the campus.
It's up to you Jack, and every
sports enthusiast at UBC i.s plugging for your success'.
HOLY TERMOR of the UBC Thunderbirds la .si Saturday was Idaho's untopaole halfback
Tom Winbigler pictured above packing the ball. • Not only did Winbigler make over 300 yards
on the ground for,the visitors but personally went over for three touchdowns and set up two
more. Bringing down the galloping Coyote are Thunderbirds Webo Clarke (21) and Dougie
Reid (38).
Luckless 'Birds Swamped
By Rampaging Coyotes
Grads Subdue 'Birds
In Hoopla Classic
'Birds Lack Experience; Mitchell,
Forsyth and Southcott Promising
UBC's Thunderbird basketball team went down to defeat
in the UBC gym Saturday night in the annual Grad-'Bird
baskeball game by a 57-49 score.
Bodies all achin' and wracked
with pain a badly beaten Thunderbird grid squad faces this
Saturday's game against Lewis
and Clarke secure in the
thought that the last has been
seen in these parts of a fellow
named Tom Winbigler.
But hopes for a Thunderbird victory this year were dimmed with the
news that Lewis and Clarke, last
season's only victim had triumphed
over Willamette Friday night. The
Pioneers undefeated so far this year,
won by a count of 14-13,
There weren't any alibis when the
Birds lost to College of Idaho by a
40-6 score, Saturday. The Coyotes
were just that much better.
GOOD GAME
It was a good game from the point
of view of the fans for they were
treated to a sight of one of the finest
hacks  in small college ball  in  action.
Winbigler, already boasting an impressive 6.9 yards per carry average
boosted his stock with the people
who select the Little All-America by
carrying the ball 295 yards in 15 tries.
SPEED MERCHANTS
But Clem Parbcrry had more than
one prong for his vicious ground at-
Hack. Every one of his backs had
speed to burn and when they shook
loose there wa.s no UBC man on the
field who could even match strides
with them, let alono catch up when
they  were  away.
Tho Homecoming game played before some 4500 fans pointed-up more
than one basic deficiency in the Blue
and  Gold line-up,
SPORTS EDITOR CHUCK MARSHALL
Editor This Issue - DOUG MURRAY-ALLAN
But the story does not end quite
yet. In fact it has just' begun.
Most of the crowd that filled the
gym to near capacity went away with
the pleasant feeling of having seen
more good basketball than they
Vhcught they were in store for when
they   first arrived.
GRADS STRONG
It was a very powerful Grad team
that look the floor against the young
fledgling 'Birds the other evening. It
boasted such prominent and recent
Bird stars as Weber, Kermode, Haas,
Scarr, Bakken, Stevenson, Robertson,
was going to be the Grads turn to win
and others.
A very few pec.pie doubted that it
cine of the annual games and true to
foim they took their first victory.
Bui' if the Birds did not win they
looked like something that is surely
,'.:oing to develop into'a winning ball
dug.
INEXPERIENCE
This year's team is slightly on the
inexperienced side as fa.r as collegiate
ball is concerned. There are only six
men returning from last year's team
roster.
Reid Mitchell looked very good in
the game. Mitchell has still got' the
speed and fire so necessary to a top
flight collegiate guard and his accuracy of shooting will make him an
important factor in the sucess of this
year's club, „ [,.
<£-
FORSYTH BETTER
Big John Forsyth is very nicely getting over the reputation of being a
clown which the crowd has dubbed
him with in recent years. Some of
the lanky center's dunk pivot shots
were pretty to watch Saturday night,
KEID WAS GOOD
Dougie Rgid wiin I'ci-li'd off ill yila.
on that ground dmau"; the gam,'
seemed to ho ii.e an!;, a,an an the
field who cou'd coii.-issU nily make
gains   auaiust    tho   strong   opposition.
Ah'houuh badly hurl twice, he slid
carried the brunt of the sporadic UBC
attack.
Il was lack of experienced reserves
that helped beat the Thunderbirds.
Don Wilson had to play his first team
until they dropped and then replace
deem   with   untried   reserves.
Varsity Edges
Rowing Club
For Fifth Win
Varsity ruggermen edged out
Rowing Club 6-3, in a gruelling
tilt at Brockton Point last Saturday.
Thi.s win i.s the fifth straight
for the students, and it virtually
assures them of claiming the
coveted Miller Cup.
The game was slow and rugged,
neither team could seem to get go-
ign and it was well into tho end of
the first period before either side
scored. Rowing club hung up the
first tally when Barry Morris booted
a penalty kick. Shotly after, Ron
Grant broke away for a Varsity
marker. At half time the score stood
3-3.
Luck was with the students in tlie
aecoiid half. Both sides were held
scoreless until the closing minutes
nf Ihe e.aine, when Rus Latham wa.s
able lo hoot the deciding tally to
• ■:. !,a i' a. somewhat belated win for
Var.gi y,
Meanwhile, CBC was subdued for
'lee I'ii'lii lime in as many Si.irt' by a
powerful   South Burnaby  squad.
The students were hopelessly outclassed in the first half and it was
not until the econd that they showed
some signs of life. Tlie final score
showed South Burnaby on top with
a 14- 8 victory.
Soccer Teams
In Twin Loss
Over Weekend
Norquay showed the class that has
carried them to the top of the Vancouver and District' soccer league by
throwing the previously unbeaten
Varsity eleven for a 4-1 loss on the
Campus, Saturday.
More than 30 fans, biggest crowd to
watch a soccer game on the campus
in the last two years, were on hand
for the rugged, hard hitting contest.
Big Dave Thompson was brought
out of retirement to replace injured
Don Gleig, and played a whale of a
game at centre during the first half.
After the breather, Captain Jack
Cowan took over at center, with
Thompson dropping back to the fullback slot.
Cowan bagged the only Varsity
goal late in the second half after
Norquay had taken a 3-0 lead. The
first two Norqauy tallies were strictly of the horseshoe variety, and Varsity carried most of the play in the
first half.
In an intermediate fixture on Sunday, the UBC broke into the scoring
column for the first time this yew,
although they went down 5-2 to
Legion 148, Leon Umberto and Brian
Guinlan picked off UBC goals.
f        ',1
f yr   ^v y*     %   .   «.,
<*,'-<'       ^ "    A -;^"\ < >^ y<C >^$_
BASKETBALL
PRACTICE
Intcr-A. Will all those interested in
playing Intcr-A Basketball plea:e
sign their names at the g,\ in notice-
board.
MANAGERS   NEEDED
Frosh, Psy-Eds—Managers for
basketball are needed, Will anyone
wishing lo manage see Bill Wynne
or Dick Penn at tlie yym dining
luiu Ii hour or leave your name at the
gain  office.
Smart, Practical
NAVY BLUE BLAZERS
ENGLISH GREY WORSTED SLACKS
AU sizes in stock or carefully tailored to
your individual .stylo and measurements.
Richards & Smith
■ '   Limited!
:tl"4'a
577 HOWE ST.
PA. 6721
HOCKEY   PRACTICE
U lit.'  Thimdorhird-:  will   hold   jiraei-
icea,   every   Wedne.-d.,\    and   Tlmi ag,,-, ; ■
al ti. lii   m   the   Knriuu. I
"The  shop  for  men   that  tire  going  places"
They're an education in themselves!
They lighten the daily grind ...
put zest in the West and yeast
in the East. And when it comes to
pleasant smoking, frosh to faculty
go for fresh, cool Player's Cigarettes
CORK TIP and PLAIN
PAPER  DO  NOT  STICK  TO  YOUR  LIPS.

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