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The Ubyssey Mar 21, 1940

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 THUNDERBIRDS BEAT GOLDEN BEARS  11 - 5
BEARS vs. VAN REP
SATURDAY  P.M.
BROOKTON PT.  FIELD
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
WHAT'LL WE USE
FOR TEA DANOES?
OYM OR BROOK BLDO.?
VOL. XXII.
VANOOUVER, B.O., THURSDAY, MAROH 21, 1940
No. 38
Gold Medallist Goes To
Brown University Staff
William Sibley Sets Precedent in
Valuable Appointment
Signal honor was accorded the University this week when William M. Sibley, last year's winner of the Governor General's Gold
Medal for graduation, brought credit to his Alma Mater by gaining
an assistantship in the Department of Philosophy at Brown University for 1940-41.
The assistantship, which will pay
Sibley $900, has never been awarded to a graduate student who has
not been at Brown for at least a
year.
TRIBUTE TO DEPARTMENT
Officials of the Department ot
Philosophy and Psychology consider
that Sibley's award pays tribute not
only to the department but to his
outstanding record at the University.
The scholarship winner graduated
last year with flrst class honors In
Philosophy and Psychology, winning
the Governor-General's Oold Medal,
the University Oraduate Scholarship
and the Ahepa prise In Oreek.
ORADUATE WORK
During the current aoademio year,
Sibley has been working towards an
M. A. degree In Philosophy and
Oreek. His thesis, under the direction of Professor J. A. Irving Is on
"The Development ot Empiricism In
Modern Philosophy."
The assistantship at Brown University Is one of the most outstanding
awards ever gained by a U.B.O. student. It will enable him to continue
his graduate studies as well as giving
him valuable experience which will
help fit him for a university teaching
position.
LSE Amendments
Give Minor Clubs
Representation
Amendments to the L.S.E. constitution giving member olubs the right
to a hearing before the Major Exeoutive and providing for future constitution amendment were ratified
by Students' Counoil this week. Exact wording of the amendments follow:
1. "Any L.S.E. clubs shall have
the right to send representatives to
any meeting of the 'Major' L.S.E. at
whioh points relative to suoh clubs
are being discussed ln order that
they may state their case."
2. "The Constitution may be amended by a two-third vote of the full
membership of L.S.E. clubs, provided that ten days' notloe of the amendment has been given and copies
of the amendment be posted on the
University bulletin boards."
Second Student
Leaves U.B.C.
For Pats
Lyall Hunter Goes
To Join Regiment
In East
A special "contingent of one", the
second contribution of the O.O.T.O.
within a month to the Allied forces
left Vancouver Sunday evening on
an eastbound O.N.R. train for an unknown destination "somewhere In
Canada."
J. Lyall Hunter, and Lieutenant,
and now an officer In the famed
Princess Patricia Canadian Light
Infantry, terminated nearly Ave
years training with the C.O.T.C. to
the wall of bagpipes and the cheers
of his fellow offloers and their
friends.
The Soottlsh marching song "Road
to the Isles" reverberated through a
darkening railway station as the
newly commissioned officer, PJP.C.L.
I., waited to start on his new adventure for which he has looked forward to for several months.
SAD FAREWELL
There was a tinge of sadness ln the
air as Hunter waved good-bye to his
pals from the moving train which
slid hissing out of the station. Behind him waa Varsity and an incompleted Teachers Training course,
ahead of him the time honored career as a soldier in His Majesties Royal Oanadlan Forces.
The flrst contribution of the UB.O.
contingent of the Oanadlan Officers
Training Corps to the Dominion's
war effort was Lieutenant R. F. S.
Robertson who left several weeks ago
for a similar destination.
SO THIS IS SPRING!
Alum Group Planned
By Musical Society
Announcement la made that the
lormer members of the Musioal Society are going to form an alumni
association In the near future. In
faot, organisation work is in .progress at the present time, and plans
are being laid for a strong program
of activities.
All Interested ex-members are asked to communicate with Alice Rowe,
ALma 0837 or Oordon Heron, BAy.
670S-M. Notification will be given
soon  of a  general  meeting.
Undergrad Gowns Appear on Campus
*    •    • •    *    »
Tommy Williams Wears Formal Garb
By  PIERRE  BERTON
When turbulent Tommie Williams
strode into the Caf on Monday, clad
in a black academic gown, he started
something.
Yesterday, the cafeteria echoed
with undergraduate comment on the
mcrita and demerits ,of the formal
undergraduate vobe. Most students
were favorable to the Idea and several announced their Intention of
begging, borrowing, or stealing similar gowns to cany on the good work
of Scholar Williams.
WHY   THEY   WANT   IT
Exponents of the idea used the
following propaganda to back up
their arguments in favor of adopting the gowns which are requisite
in   most   Eastern   Universities:
1. Gowns  keep  clothes clean  (this i.s
the  main  argument.
ia) You can wear anything- you
want,   underneath   them.
ib) You only have lo press your
pants  up   to your  knees.
2. Gowns udd more dignity to upper
classmen, and to the University.
(a) Imagine Sciencemen fighting
Aggies, with both sides clothed
in academic  robes.
lb)  It hides the co-eds' waddle.
3.   If freshmen aren't allowed to wear
gowns,    upperclassmen    will    feel
pretty good.
ia) Freshmen will feel more like
freshmen.
(b) It will be an added urge to
them on their part to pass
final exams, so they too can
don  the sacred garment.
Meanwhile, Tommie Williams continues to stalk the campus, wearing
full academic dress as provided for
on the University Calendar, and
smoking a large fat cigar, not mentioned  in  the  document.
There   has  as  yet  been  no  mention
of  a  campaign   for   large,   fat,  cigars.
Ed.    Note:     By    Wednesday,    Mr.
Williams   had    chosen    an   austere
pipe  to decorate  his  oral  cavity.   .  .
He was also seen drinking tea.
This Is a stern view of Temperamental Tommie Williams, sole originator of the latest Gown erase, now
sweeping the oampus Uke wildfire.
Remember, Wednesday Is the day to
strike. If you have gowns, prepare
to use them now.
CAL PLAYERS
REFUSE to TALK
on U.B.C. CO-EDS
Ankle Socks Fashion
On Berkeley Campus
But Gowns Taboo
By THE CO-ED REPORTER
The campus Is swell, the scenery
Is swell, the Brock building is swell,
In fact everything about the University of British Columbia Is swell according to the enthusiastic California football players. That ls, everything about the campus Is swell except the co-eds. The friendly Americans refused to comment upon our
co-eds, using the excuse that they
didn't know much about women and
therefore could not offer any comparisons.
The consensus of the players' opinions was that we, on this campus,
are more formal in our dress and
manners than the Americans but
with all that, Just as friendly. The
boys explained that they are now
wearing the clothes that they wear
around the campus, denims, open
necked shirts, and sweaters. The
one thing that they noticed about
the local co-eds ls that they wear
silk stockings. At California the
girls wear short socks. When questioned as to whether short socks
meant knee socks, the unanimous
answer was, "No. A few girls tried
that onoe but never a seoond time."
Regarding the current subject of
interest here, the recurrent subject
of gowns, the boys decided that
gowns are too formal. "Oosh, I'd get
tied up ln one."
The spaciousness of the U.B.C.
campus has Impressed the Cal. boys
more than anything else that they
have seen while here. The lawns In
particular met with their approval,
and again brought forth the expressive adjective,  "Swell."  '
It is a well known fact that students in American colleges pay their
(Continued on Page 8)
See CAL PLAYERS
Gold Medal Offered
Outstanding Aggie
A gold medal, given by Sigma Tau
Upsilon Honorary Agricultural Fraternity in memory of Professor Wilfred Sadler, Head of the Department
of Dairying, 1918-1933, will be awarded to the student standing at the
head of the graduating class for the
B.S.A. degree.
STOP PRESS!
Official communique from
the Formal down Committee
announces that a major offensive will start Wednesday. All
in favor of gowns are asked to
wear them then. Basil Robinson and Darrell Braidwood announced themselves behind the
scheme. Only upperclassmen
may  wear   gowns.
Fraternity Men Predominate
In Largest Poll In Years
FOURTEEN GET
PRIZED L.S.E.
AWARDS
Professor Wood Included in List of
Persons Honored
At the 3rd annual L.S.E. banquet
last night, 13 students and one professor attained the highest honour
obtainable in olub activity when
they were named for the honourary
L.S.E. award. The award is parallel with the men's Big Block letters
In sport.
Those who will receive medallions
at the formal prise-giving next
month are as follows:
Professor F. O. C. Wood, for quarter century of work In the Players'
Club; Emllle Fraser, Women's Publio Speaking Club; Verna MoKensie,
Radio Sooiety; Dlok Jarvis, Film
Sooiety; Patrick Keatley, Players'
Club; Ted Soott, S.C.M., Marino Fra-
resco, American Society of Electrical
Engineers ; Sandy Nash, Newman
Club; Derek McDermot, Musical
Sooiety; Kenneth Shaw, Chemistry
Sooiety; Bernard Reed, Parliamentary Forum; Don McOill, Law Society; Len Zink, agricultural Discussions Club; and Darrell Braldwood,
President of L.S.E.
Dr. J. Allan Harris was guest
speaker.
ShoYowHtva Steals
Show in 1940 Totem
On Campus April 9
The sauoy, diminutive figure of
Sho-You-Hwa newly adopted
Totem mascot, will trip fairy-
like, throughout the 800-odd
pages of the 1040 Totem, to
make this year's book the greatest ever produced by the Publications Board.
Copies of the Totem will appear on the oampus on Monday, April 8, Ossle (Dollar
Down) Durkin announoed yesterday, as he reclined In his
swivel chair ln the Totem office
and tried to flght off the effects
of Saturday's Totem party.
Students who ordered a Totem should begin Immediately
to hoard their money In order
to make up the two dollar balance, whloh Shylook Durkin Insists on before he parts with
one of his masterpieces.
See Japan Free
JAPAN TIMES
SPONSORS
ESSAY CONTEST
Here is an opportunity for all
U.B.C. students to win a free trip
to Japan this summer, with all expenses   paid.
The Japan Times, Tokyo, one of
the leading English dailies, is sponsoring an essay contest open to all
university and matriculation students    in    B.C.,    Alberta.    Saskatche-
<Continued  _n Page 2)
See ESSAY CONTEST
Norwood Holds Service
In Brock Bldg. Today
An upper room in the Brock Memorial building has been secured for
tho afternoon Easter service that
Dr. F. VV. Norwood will conduct on
Thuraday  at  4:00  p.m.
The half hour meeting is being
arranged by the Students Christian
Movement as part of their regular
Easter programme. Soloist will be
Doug Fold, and other students will
assist on  the programme.
Four Council Positions Out of Five Go
To Fraternity Men aj_ Voters
Ignore Delany Charges
Despite charges of campus political control and Tammany Hall
politics hurled at fraternities during the past week, 1,300 students
saw flt to place four out of five fraternity men into student council positions, in a record election Wednesday.
Shortly after six p.m. on eleotion day, Basil Robinson ended
hours of tenseness when he announoed the names of the successful candidates t McTavlsh.
Bonner, Tremblay, Nash and Harmer.
Forum Debaters
Ditcutt Finnish
War Results
Peeved at the finishing touches the
Russian foroes put to the heroic defenders of the Finnish republic, Parliamentary Forum debaters today will
argue the resolution "That It was a
mistake on the part of Allied Policy
not to aid Finland."
This debate, whloh will be the final
debate of the year, will take plaoe In
Arts 100 today at noon. Veteran
speakers from the Forum Public
Speaking Olasses will lead both sides
of the argument.
F. House, recognised by Forum
officials as one of the up-and-coming-speakers, will attack the polloy
of the Allies. He will be opposed by
a former Inter-high debating champion, 8. Chambers—.one of this year's
freshman finds.
Arvid Backman, publicity director
of the Forum, said yesterday that
the Forum elections would be held
Wednesday, March 27 ln Arts 100.
Under a new amendment passed to
the Forum constitution the election
of president and all officers will be
by the preferential system.
"Don't Fossilize!"
Dean Warns Teachers
In a breezy, extemporaneous address to the U.B.O. branoh of the B.
C. Teachers' Federation on Tuesday
night. Dean Buchanan of the Arts
faculty warned the teachers "not to
fossilize".
"Fossillzatlon will arrive early in
life If you don't watch out," the Dean
warned.
"I've been fighting lt for the last
30 years but have always found time
to keep up with mathematical studies
and get out one research paper every
year."
Cautioning against too much radical experimentation in the way of examination papers and novel teaching
methods, Dean Buchanan urged the
teachers to remember "that you are
experimenting with and on, human
lives."
The elestlon was the most hotly
contested of Its kind for many years.
Marked by charges that fraternities
were attempting to oontrol student
government, It waa the flrst campaign to hint at party politics.
Peter McTavlsh, candidate for
treasurer, who In his eleotion speeches stated that If anybody voted for
him it would be a coincidence, waa
suooessful In a close poll over his
nearest opponent, Arohle Bain.
The eleotions oommittee were for-'
oed to oount the treasurer's ballot*
four times before a deoislon oould
be   reaohed.
Austin Delany, whose bitter tirade against fraternities during
Tuesday's election speeches, surprised the entire University, gained the confidence of only 88 students.
Only non-fraternity man to be
elected was Charlie Nash, member
of the S.M.U.S. executive, who defeated Ormle Hall by a large majority.
Bob Bonner will be new president
of the Literary and Scientific Executive. He nosed out his olosost opponent, Alfred Carlsen, by a narrow
margin. Bonner is a well known
U.B.C.   debater.
The two counoil membera running for re-election continued to
hold  the  students' confidence.
Todd Tremblay defeated Charlie
Parker for the position ot president
of the Men's Undergraduate Sooiety.
Tremblay was Junior Member of
this year's counoil.
James Harmer was re-elected to
the position of Men's Athletic Representative over his only opponent
By Straight.
Elected by acclamation were Dorothy Hlrd, president of W.U.S.; Ruth
Wilson, W.A.A.; and Betty Bolduo,
council secretary.
Carnegie   Hour   Degenerates   To   Jazz
•    •    * •    •    *
Dancers Swing It As Classics  Wane
By  PAT  KEATLEY i
Tuesday noon was trial by torture.
Classic-lovers cried out in pain as
they saw their Carnegie Recording
Hour of the best in great music degenerate into a truckin', schmaltzin',
smokln', lunch-munchln' Jam session
culminating in hair-pulling between
rival factions of the outlawed "Hot
Club" and ballroom dancing by Thespians.
During the playing of "Begin the
Beguine" a fund of $1.20 was raised
as temptation for two Players' Club
members who wanted to react violently against their recent "Pride and
Prejudice." Accepting the challenge,
they danced in the aisles, then beat a
blushing retreat.
Angry swing addicts descended on
Baker following ills game attempt
to give a representative concert of
modern music.
•They .should put that .stuff back
on the cob" was the contribution of
literateitr and Huxley-lover Llpnel
Salt.
"My criticism rhymes with -.strap',
commented another. "And why didn't
he play <1> some descriptive jazz;
and   (2)  some hot swing?"
Anger of the Jivers took the form
of subdued conversation throughout
the playing of the 'music', highlighted
by some hair-pulling and playful boxing In thp lower seats. The son of a
prominent downtown church organist
was noticed quietly truckin' near the
back of Arts 100.
The interlude of tympany was
marked by the angry exit of three
mild people to whom Tuesday noon
has previously meant delightful relaxation In the presence of the world's
masters.
Records for the debacle were lent
by Bill Campbell.
As swingstct-H writhed. Baker described Jazz as "the folk music of the.
modem  American  city".
Biggest problem today was finding
the $1.20 which vanished with the
Players' Club co-ed before her partner  could  split    the spoils.
Next Tuesday, according to Byron
Straight, there will he a. bang-up performance of the real el .stuffo. at.
w lilcli serious lovers of the .-.weet end
hot are invited to attend, dancing
pumps and upperclassmen gowns optional.
_L *wo
THB     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1940
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia
Offloe i Brook Memorial Building     ......     Phone Alma 1684
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.00 Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
John Garrett
.*+-
Tuesday
Arvid   Baokman
SENIOR EDITORS
SPORTS
Lionel Salt
Friday
Jaok   Margeson
Editorial
INCREASED TAXES?
Students' Council, the Board of Directors of the Alma Mater
Society, has been elected for next session. The 1940 Dirty Nine
have been chosen by the largest student electorate that has ever
been seen on this Campus—which is definitely n good thing.
"When thoughts ore turned to the coming session and to what
its problems or difficulties may be, the realization that the Alma
Mater Society of this University has reached a peak of expansion
becomes overwhelming. The whole question of student activities
in their financial aspect is one that cannot be talked into submission ; rather is it one that will demand severe, possibly painful,
action on the part of Council and their flock.
It is well known that the present A.M.S. fee of thirteen dollars
is divided into three sums, one of seven dollars, and two of three.
The Pass system takes one of the three dollars, the Building Fund
the other. In consequence there remain seven dollars per student
to finance the activities of the Alma Mater Society.
If an approximate sum of $14,000.00 ($7.00 x 2000) is taken,
then, as the income of the A.M.S. it soon becomes apparent that
expansion must soon cease. The administrative expenses of the
aoclety, whioh cover the office, the stadium and playing fields and
countless other large ^items, amount to almost $8,000.00. The
remaining $6,000,00 has to be divided up among the numerous
athletic activities, campus clubs, and publications. The Ubyssey
and Totem together cost approximately $3,000.00 dollars a year
to produce and operate. There is now but $3,000 left I
This meagre sum is supposed to pay the total costs of the
forty odd clubs on the Campus, and, in addition, of all Varsity
athletics . . . JYhat a hopei When the possible operating costs of
'Brock Hall' are considered, the future looks still less optimistic.
The furniture in the Union Building will have to be replaced, and
a depreciation fund established to finance same. "Whence will come
the funds?
And yet the ever increasing demands for expansion continue.
Students cry out for more teams in every sport, for larger budgets
, in every club, for more lavish and expensive activities and functions in general. The outcome of such behaviour is almost inevitable. There must be either a deficit in the annual operating budget
of the Alma Mater Society, or an increase in the Alma Mater
Society income. It is not a pleasant choice.
The Students' Council for the coming session are going to
be faced with this exact situation. During the elections recently
held many suggestions were voiced for decreasing the cost of
Campus life to the student. A reduction in the Brock Ballroom
'rent' was mooted, for example, lt was, perhaps, not realized that
the present figure is insufficient to do more than cover the costs
of the barest operating necessities of the Union Building. The sum
is for too slim to set up any depreciation fund. Would it be sanity,
then, to reduce this already inadequate 'rent'? This is a typical
example of the financial predicament of the A.M.S.
These are the problems. The solution to them is simple. It
consists of raising the income of the A.M.S., whieh eon unfortunately be accomplished in no other way than increasing the Society
fees, o procedure equivalent to raising the Campus taxes. Let this
Campus adopt a  'pay-as-you-go' policy now.
KLA-HOW-YAH KAL!
Spring is here . . . Easter festivities approach . . . ond sunny
California has arrived in 'sunny" Vancouver . . . Welcome to our
fair Campus California ...
No task is as pleasant as playing host to a visiting University
team. It is not often that we student westerners have the opportunity to entertain a team, as a matter of fact—and it would
behoove us to make the most of svieh a chance.
Yesterday we battled for the "World Cup. "At the time of
penning this particular mass of wordage, verbago, or rubbish, the
result of the game was unknown ... no matter ... It was a good
game, wosn 't it!
School spirit is always a trite expression that springs to mind
on such occasions as the present one, and always it is hoped that
the fever of joy and enthusiasm, which is exhibited when our local
heroes do bottle with foreign warriors, will continue unabated for
the remainder of the session. This time perhaps our college spirit
will earry on, for the present record-breaking poll in the Alma
Mater Society elections would leatl one to believe that students
here ore definitely 'waking up.'
And so once again we take pleasure in shouting "Kla-how-ya
California" . .  . "stick around and enjoy yourselves."
ESSAY CONTEST
(Continued from Page 1)
■wan, Manitoba, and the N.W. Territories.
The Essay Contest, which is being
held in commemoration of the 2600th
anniversary of the founding of the
Japanese Empire, Is to be 1000 words.
The topic, "Why Canada and Japan
should cultivate friendship," Is a
significant one In view of the close
proximity  of  the   two  countries.
The two first prize winners will
receive a one month tour of Japan
as guests of the famous newspaper
with all expenses paid. In addition
they will receive a round trip ticket
find $100 cash. Besides the two first
prize winners, two cash prizes of
$50 and five of $20 each are also being   offered.
Judges for this contest will be S.
J. Willis, Deputy Minister of Education; Prof. H. F. Angus, head of
the   Economics   Department   of   U.B.
Scholarship Notice
Applications for Medals, Scholarships, Prizes, and Bursaries, other
than those awarded for General Proficiency, must be handed in to the
Registrar by  April 26.
Information concerning scholarships, prizes, and Bursaries for returned soldiers, or their dependents,
must be submitted by the applicants
for these awards.
KEEP  THE CAF CLEAN
C; H. R. Cottlngham, President of
the Board of Trade; and Kenjl Nak-
auchl, Consul for Japan ln Vancouver.
All entries must be In by June 10,
1940, and should be addressed to the
Japan Times, care of tho Japanese
Consulate. 355 Burrard St., Vancouver. Further Information may be
obtained  at  the  consulate,  If desired.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
US1-.   OUR  BUDOET  PLAN
St'vmnur nt Dunsmuir
New Books Available
At U.B.C. Library
The majority ot new books ln the
Library this week deal with history
or international questions.
Two books with a local interest
are: Building the Oanadlan West,
Hedges; and The Origin and Meaning of Place Names in Canada, Armstrong.
Of particular Interest to students
of international affairs are the publications of the Fascist Confederation
of Industrialists, Fascist Bra, years
XV. and XVII.
The other historical volumes are:
Europe, Versailles to Warsaw, Kain;
Research Facilities of the International Labour Office, Rounds; The
Book of the States, 1030-40, The Constitutional History of the United
States, Letters of Henry Adams, The
Life and Times of William Howard
Taft, Pringle; The Codex Slnaltlcus
and the Oodex Alexandrlnus, British
Museum.
French books are: Peuples et Civilisations, Halphen et Sagnac, Napoleon, Lefebvre, Les Theories de L'-
Equlllbre Economlque, Plrou; La Vie
Eoonomlque de la France, See; Corona Benlgnltatls Ann! Del, Claudel.
GAL PLAYERS
(Continued from Page 1)
way .through Varsity by working
right through the session, however,
perhaps It ls not known that the
musically minded students there
make their extra money by playing
for university dances. With this in
mind, perhaps lt will be deemed fitting for our dance orchestra to be
given a little more encouragement.
In all, the boys think as Charlie
Oralnger said, "It's a wonderful Idea,
we're having a good time and we're
missing  lectures."
LETTERS CLUH
There ls still room for further applications for membership In the
Letters Club. Second Year students
are asked to apply to E. C. Barton
or Allison McCallem via the Arts
Letter Rack before Tuesday, March
26. All those Interested in literature
are  Invited to apply.
KEEP THE CAF CLEAN
Now Playing
WHAT'S PLAYING IN DOWN TOWN THEATRES
Deanna Durbln
"It's a" Date"
also
News   and  Donald  Duck
CAPITOL
MArlne 8634
Maurice   Maeterlinck's
"The Bluebird"
also
Frank  Morgan
ln
'The Ohost Oomes Home'
STRAND
SEymour 0816
Ring Crosby Bob Hope
Dorothy Lamour
in
'Road to Singapore'
plus
Galling Philo Vanoe
ORPHEUM
SEymour 1000
Mickey Rooney
in
Judge Hardy and
Son
also
The Saint's Double Trouble
DOMINION
SEymour S560
THANKS!
I wish to thank the students of
the Alma Mater Sooiety for their
strong support in the eleotion for
Junior Member.
Signed,
CHARLIE NASH.
Sorority Scholarships
Announcement has been made of
a $600 Kappa Kappa Oamma Scholarship whloh Is open to all women
students who will have graduated by
July 1, 1840.
Selections for the award will be
made by the head office of the sorority. These will be based on scholarship, personal merit, and plans for
the future. For further Information,
those Interested should Inquire at
Miss  Bollert's  office  immediately.
— Classified—
Lost: In Arts Common Room, textbook, lab. book, and a year's notes.
Please return to Mr. Horn's office.
Reward.  Bill  MacEwan.
WANTED: Four contact men for
securities house. All leads furnished.
Need not be experienced In this line,
but other sales experience helpful.
Must be of good character and ac-
ceptible to bonding companies. Company will grant growing aooount
according to ability and effort after
one month. 'Written applications to
Publications office.
Lost: "Oollege Algebra" by Nowlan
ln Applied Science 302 last Wednesday. Will the finder please return to
John Davies or leave in the A.M.S.
office.
Lost; Black purse In Applied Science
202. Please return to Horn's office.
Removed from locker In applied science basement: Two Slazzenger tennis rackets, one yellow, one blue gut;
five tennis balls; net, and pair of
crepe-soled tennis shoes, brown.
Please  return   to  Publications   office.
So it is ACTION"
youtli wants!
A statement outlining the program under the Ministry
of Youth, to be included in the Cabinet of the Hon. Dr.
R. J. Manion, Leader of the National Government Party.
The Ministry of Youth wUl deal with the following i
1.   Canadian Volunteer Conservation Program.
>.   Vocational Education.
8.   Farm Training Courses.
4.   Vocational Outdance.
0.   Apprenticeships.
6. Health and Youth.
7. Development of New Industries and
Territories.
8. Youth Employment Bureaus.
0.   Farm Placement Plan.
10. Uniform Provincial and Municipal Residence
Rules.
11. Scholarships.
18.   Unemployment Insurance.
It Is predicated upon the principle of aggressive,
energetic leadership.
It calls for co-operation with provincial authorities
and with respect to provincial rights In education
and expenditure.
It recognizes that the natural resources of every
province are the property of that provlnoe.
It Is not designed to be arbitrary in Its dealings
with either capital or labour or with the farm.
It requires complete co-operation with Industry,
commerce and agriculture, with employers and with
trude unions,
It recognizes the existence of all youth organizations, national or local.
A Program for Action!
Yes, and It Is the only suoh program ever put
before the youth of Canada.
It Is designed with three great purposes In mind
First, In recognition of the humanitarian needs of
the young people of Canada) and second, to make a
contribution to Canada In the present emergency of
war and to prepare for the emergency of peaoe to
come; and third, to pave the way for the great
development of thla Dominion made possible by the
events of recent years and the present.
The opportunity of Canada Is an unlimited opportunity.
No nation In history has ever had the opportunity
that Is ours to-day.
Only National Oovernment Speak*
for Youth
Elect a National Oovernment on Maroh 86th, a
government free of party lines and party ties, a
government that has but one object In view, the
energetic, forthright conduct of this war and the
preparation ln days of war for peaoe to oome.
On the shoulders of youth rests the responsibility
for the future of Canada.
HON. ROBT. J. MANION
Leader of National Oovernment
"Let   Fighting  Bob  Manion   Take   Hold!"
We have had enough, yes much too much, of the
payment of Up servloe to youth.
It Is aotlon youth wants.
It Is aotlon youth will get through a Ministry of
Youth In a National Oovernment.
There is an old adage 'he who pays the piper ealls
the tune.' And youth has paid the piper. The next
quarter of a century In this Dominion Is youth's;
youth has paid and youth will call the tune."
A NATION AT WAR NEEDS A NATIONAL OOVERNMENT
Vote for
NATIONAL GOVERNMENT
AND LET'S GET ON  WITH  THE JOB
Authorized by National Oovernment Headquarters, 140 Wellington Street, Ottawa
Qo&d J^B^2eO4KZ#fC0 • • •
DEPENDS NOT ON HOW MUCH YOU
SPEND  BUT ON  HOW YOU SPEND IT I
From coast to coast college men have found
It good  business to  be Tip Top Tailored I
%<*   ...ft SO
Hsarf-Cuf m*4 Curtsm
TWtoW-to-rour-
•torn and
I IP   TOP
TAILORS
TTS-C3-40
./ />«. VWr
190 W. Hastings Street        -        637 Granville Street
Also 711 Columbia St., New Westminster Thursday, March 21, 1940 THE     UBYSSEY Three
The Policy of the Liberal Party
as it affects Youth is three-fold.
1. Trade policies (i.e. United Kingdom and U.S.A. trade
agreements, etc.) create in Industry - Trade - Commerce
such conditions as will open jobs tor youth as they
leave school or university.
YOUTH DOES NOT DESIRE TO BE SPOON-FED
*\\*. (a) Training projects of an occupational nature.
(b) Learnership courses in industry.
(c) Work projects to combine training with restoration
of morale along with development oi natural resources.
(d) Physical training programs to maintain health and
morale.
YOUTH  WELCOMES THE OPPORTUNITY TO IMPROVE
MIND AND BODY
3. With Provincial Government's co-operation throughout Canada approximately 120,000 young men and
women have received training in dozens of different
occupations, 4-0,000 additional placed on farms.
THESE ARE ACHIEVEMENTS—NOT PROMISES
VOTE LIBERAL
Published By The B.C. Liberal Assn. ENGLISH  RUGBY
WORLD CUP SERIES
VARSITY 11; CAL. 5
ENGLISH  RUGBY
*
WORLD CUP SERIES
VARSITY 11; CAL. 5
Four
T H
UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 21, 1940
_—
McPtiee Leads Last Halt Rally
To Scuttle Cal Fifteen 11-5
The silverware in the Trophy Case can stay were it is for another year, and the "World Cup slipped back into its dusty niche.
Yesterday, on the sun-bathed turf of the Stadium, the Varsity
Thunderbirds successfully defended the twenty year old cup by
defeating California Golden Bears 11-5. After being down 5-3 at
the half way mark, the 'Birds powered their way to a goal nnd a
try, staving off desperate Bear rallies in the closing moments.
The "World Cup which was presented for play in 1920 was
last won by an American team in 1933 when a combined Stanford-
California team took the measure of the Canuck squad.
The   game   was   spotty   in   many"
places with the Varsity passing at
taok the weakest It has been tor
games. Countless times, the three
quarters threw away big gains by
passing wildly or dropping the ball
at their feet. The Oal Afteen displayed some of the most aggressive
tackling seen on the Stadium grounds
and their entire team was conditioned to a knife-edge keenness.
FORWARDS STAR
Best feature of the game was the
work of both forward lines, and lt was
the edge that Varsity held on the
wide open dribbling section of the
game, that gave the -Birds the Anal
edge. The Bear threes snapped their
passes around wtth gay abandon,
completely daasling their marks, as
thsy tig-sagged across the Aeld.
Another feature of the Oal attack
was the use of the "mark", something
that ls practically foreign to the Vancouver circuit. Instead of receiving
a kick and trying to run lt out, the
receiver catches the ball, and at the
same time raises one foot on the heel,
thus signalling for a fair catch, and
forcing enemy tacklers to stop. The
receiver  then  drops  back  ten yards
and kicks, free from the worries of
charging tacklers.
They used this because ot the alleged gain to be got from punting,
and with every man on the team an
accomplished kicker took good advantage of lt. One man In particular,
Charlie Grainger, captain and full-
baok, displayed great ability In lofting the pigskin, at one time booming
a forty-yard punt from behind his
own line.
Star of the Varsity foroes, If one
man can be singled out, was speedy
Howie MoPhee who scored both
U.B.C. tries, and pulled down Orv
Hatoher when It seemed that the
burly Inside three was away for a
sure score. Andy Johnston kicked
a penalty goal and converted Mo-
Phee's second try to snaffle Ave
points and complete the Varsity
scoring.
Of the many standouts on the Oal
roster, this Orv Hatcher stood shoulders above the rest. Countless times,
he dynamited his way through the
Thunderbird pack, and although robbed of a certain try by McPhee's desperate taokle after a Afty-yard burst,
set up the only Oolden Bear score,
dashing six yards through the Aeld
and passing to Bill Hutters, wing
three, who dove over near the flag,
Dick Folmer converting from a difficult angle.
RALLIED HARD
The Thunderbirds rallied hard to
overcome this Ave point lead but with
the three line bobbllng time after
time, could get nowhere, until Sandy
Lang burst through, and kicked to
the Oal six-yard marker where Referee Les Pope called a penalty against
the American ruggermen. Backing
up to the Afteen, Johnston pushed a
soft touoh through the posts to bring
the Blue and Oold to within two
points of the Bear lead.
At that, the 'Birds almost took over
the lead when Jim Harmer ploughed
his way to the one-yard line before
t-elng stopped by a horde of California tacklers.
After the middle breather, Varsity switched their three line, sending Ted MoPhee out to brother
Howie's wing spot, and bringing the
Olympic speedster Into the five-
eighths position. Here, Howie hit
his stride and began to click off
long gains, as well aa pulling down
countless ball carriers with hard,
clean tackles.
His Arst try of the second halt
came after the forwards had dribbled
the ball down deep Into Cal territory.
He experienced no Uttle difficulty ln
In getting past the last yard, and
didn't score until the  entire Varsity
4f£W/\it Know What You Want for Spring
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University  Men!  Simple economics will
tell you woolens ere going up.
BUY NOW snd SAVE
A grand selection of British tweeds and
worsteds In the latest pin stripes and
shades of blue, grey, green and brown.
Tailored to your Individual measure ln
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You will lead the Spring Parade when
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Perfectly cut from the most beautiful spring-like materials!
The Bond Clothes Shop features suits and topcoats- for
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$2095   $Z3«9S   and up
team had got behind him and shoved.
The convert went wide of the mark.
His second soore climaxed three
previous attempts on the part of the
'Birdmen to penetrate the Cal defense. Both Ted McPhee and Stradlottl came within an ace of scoring,
but lt wasn't until Johnston and Robertson had clicked off a nice twenty-
yard dash and passed to Howie that
the actual score was made, with John
ston making sure of the convert, right
in front Of the posts.
Rugger Ramblings — Every UJB.O.
man played good rugger, although
the threes were sloppy at times ....
Waddle Robertson, up from the Ubeecee ranks, showed to good advantage,
running well with Johnston and MoPhee . . . Harmer and Malnguy were
standout forwards, although bouquets
go to the entire front wall for their
performance.
Cal stars were Orv Hatcher, Charlie
Grainger, Jess Wilson, and Al Lln-
derburg, although, here again, a mention of the entire roster Is necessary
to be adequate In praise .... The
World Oup was presented to Captain
Ted MoPhee by Captain ( the army)
Dobbie, coach of the Wonder Team
three years baok .... and the klckoff
wss made by another former coaoh,
A. B. Carey.
Bury The
Dead
HUCKLEBERRY DUCK
Now that election fever Is over
(that neat phrase comes from a file
we have over here) and every one
ls settled back down, calming ruffled feathers, the only significant
thing emerging as far as the baok
page Is concerned Is the news that
Jinn Harmer was re-elected as Men's
Athletic Rep on Counoil.
Harmer's platform, on the strength
of which, we presume, he waa elected
bears muoh careful observance In
the coming year. The clause with
whloh we wish to deal at this time
is that stating that he Is In accord
with a "revision of the managerial
system."
Thla Is about the only thing his
unsuccessful rival, By Straight,
missed. It'a too bad that both oandldates were not of accord that
the system of managers on this
campus stinks.
We don't dare to mention namea
while our application to the Triangle Club is still pending but . . .
brother don't be an athlete and
sweat your way to a letter. Be a
manager and get one free. Alright,
boys, come and get me.
...
I hope every sport fan on the
Campus has an order in for this
year's Totem. I've seen proofs of
Lee Straight's sport section, and it's
a pippin.
—Lionel Salt
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
Tenth and Blanoa
"AT TUB GATES"
"Our Servloe Means Happy
. Motoring" ,
BOND CLOTHES SHOP
312 WEST HASTINGS
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Spring Sotiff
Yesterday was the first official
day of spring. That mean, it's
time to give your oar a spring
check up. Let your friendly
neighborhood Home Oas dealer show you what a difference
he oan make ln the operation
of your car with hla complete
spring check up service. Your
motor will sing a spring song
when he Is through.
HOME OH.
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The Independent 100%
fl. C. Company

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