UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124966.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124966.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124966-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124966-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124966-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124966-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124966-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124966-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124966-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124966.ris

Full Text

 Slip IhtjaHpy
Issued Twice Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
<zpn
Volume VIII.
VANCOUVER. B. C, MARCH 19th, 1926
No. 37.
U.B.C. Men to Meet
With Pasadena
in Debate
The men intercollegiate debaters
of the U. B. C. are to have their
only chance this season to meet an
American team on home ground. The
crack touring team of the California
Institute of Technology have arranged
to meet a local team on Monday,
March 22. This is the last debate of
the season, and one of tho big inter-
colleglate arrangements of the year.
The Pasadena team will offer Varsity men stiff opposition indeed. In
addition to their record on tour, they
hold the distinction of having drawn
with the renowned University of
Southern California team on the same
subject on which the latter had won
seven straight victories, one of them
over U. B. 0.
The Americans will put two men
on the platform who are masters of
the U. S. style of debating. The
Ubyssyrlans will combine the American style with the brilliant method of
the Imperial debaters.
A new feature In debating will be
the use of four rebuttals instead of
the customary one or two.
The Varsity speakers are Eric Dunn
and Bert Bailey. Eric Dunn is one of
our most brilliant debaters, and has
distinguished himself on many occasions. Last year he debated against
the University of Saskatchewan in
the well-known discussion over the
Geneva Protocol. In the same year he
won the men's oratorical contest with
, a clever speech on "Vox Popull." He
Is President of the Men's Literary Society, and has already taken part In
several lnter-class and Vancouver Debating League contests. Unfortunately this debate is the last opportunity
of hearing him in a U. B. C. team, as
he has completed his course in education.
Mr. Bert Bailey is another outstanding speaker of this University. He is
Minister of Finance in the Older
Boys' Parliament, and was President
of the Victoria College Literary Society. This Is his first inter-colleglate
debate. He promises to have a great
career in debating during the next
session.
The subject of the debate is: "Resolved, that war, except in case of invasion, should be decided only by a
vote of the people." This has already
proved a very popular subject ol' discussion in American colleges, and Is
of great Interest  to all students.
The place of the debate if; the King
Edward High School Auditorium, and
the price of admission is twenty-five
cents, Tbe debate will take place at
8.15   (Monday,   March   22).
BERT TUPPER IS   '
CHOSEN CAPTAIN
Bert Tupper has been chosen captain of next year's McKechnie Cup
team The new captain was chosen
this year, In order that the experience
of players who will graduate this
year, could be used in the election.
Bert did wonders with the Kltsil-
ano High School team. It was the
team's first year In senior High School
company and was successful In winning the provincial championship, a
large part of the credit being due to
Bert's efforts aa captain.
Bert has had a lot of hard luck in
Varsity, having been kept out of
Rugby until lately by a broken ankle.
He made the McKechnie Cup team
almost ns soon as he turned out and
did exceptionally well.
Bert was chosen because he is a
good leader, a hard worker, he knows
what he wants from the players, and
Is a great student of Rugby tactics.
Varsity's English outlook for next
year surely Is very bright with a
man like Bert Tupper as skipper and
also the possibility of competition
with  University  of  Washington.
Bert's policy for next year Includes
the entry of two Miller Cup teams,
one from Science and one from Arts.
This would provide real competition
between the two U. B. C. teams. Science vs. Arts games next year ahould
provide good entertainment. It Is
also hoped that the McKechnie Cup
season can be shortened to finish
around  New Year.
CREWS READY
FOR REGATTA
Brentwood, V.R.C. and Varsity
to compete in different
events
Everything is set for the regatta on
Saturday. Months of gruelling work
have been put In by the Varsity oarsmen—work that has .taken time and
built up stamina und skill. Every
student and professor connected with
the Varsity should be down at Coal
Harbour on Saturday at 2 p.m., not to
root and yell necessarily, but to see
boat races In which this University Is
vitally Interested. This Is a sport in
which It is possible to excell and in
which the college can make a name
to be proud of. There is no charge
and the Rowing Club float 1b a good
vantage point from which to view the
races. Besides the regular scheduled
events between Varsity's crews and
th V. R. C, there will be sculling
races nnd canoe races. The canoe
races will be Inter-Varsity and open
to nil comers. For those who are Interested In LIpton and Chlptom, there
will be a tea dance after the races.
The crews are as follows: .
Senior VIII.—Norman, Millar, Me-
Lurg, Thorpe, Torgood, Davidson,
Eckert, Baln, Wainman (Cox).
Freshman VIII.—Alldardyce, Billings, Wilson, Ward, Tarr, Childer-
Stone, Elliott, Winter, Wood (cox).
Tackwefght IV—Winter, Madeley,
Hartley, Thurston.
It has been ascertained thut Brest-
wood College Is sending a 165-pound
iy. to compete In the regatta. This
Is good news as the Brentwood rowers are great sportsmen and will row
a fine race.
La Causerie Admits
Many New Members
At the final meeting of La Causerie, which was held Tuesday evening, new members of the club were
afforded the opportunity of seeing
what a remarkably peppy and enthusiastic group of students already
grace the membership list.
Officers elected for next, session
were as follows: Honorary President,
Dr. Clark; President, Mildred Campbell; Vice-President, Charlie Mcln-
tyre: Secretary, Lucy Ross; Treasurer, Pert Mlack; Press Itopresonta-
tive, Murray Hiddell. Plans for a
hike to he held in conjunction with
La   Canadlenne   were   arranged.
Following the business discussion
Miss Jean Woodrow delighted the
audience with a vocal solo.
A French crossword puzzle was
a novel feature of the evening, and
was only solved after the brilliant
wits of the assembly had been taxed
to the utmost. Tho successful contestants were Mildred Lynn and Charlie Mclntyre, who received In reward
of their united efforts, a small, green
pig and a diminutive watering can.
These will, doubtless, serve them as
mascots during the coming exams.
Meetings have been well attended
all session, and the remarkable
amount of Interest displayed at every
meeting Bays a lot, not anly for the
members, but also for the retiring
officers who have contributed in no
small degree to the success of the
club.
ARCTIC CONTEST FOR
TICKETS ALMOST WON
Students have continued to support
tho Executive of the Women's Union
Building Fund In their collecting of
Arctic Cake tickets for the $ 120 prize,
with the gratifying result that considerably over 8,000 have now been accumulated. It Is not known when the
competition will close, but It will end
some time In April, probably about
the middle of the month. The puzzle
of how to dispose of the steamship
ticket has not yet been decided.
INTER-CLASS DEBATING
SHIELD W8N BY ARTS '28
Les Brown and Bill Masterson Defeat Pseudo Teachers in
Unique Event
STOP PRESS NEWS
Mr. Leslie Brown was elected as
Junior Member to the Students' Council. Miss Dorothy Brown was elected
President of the Women's Undergraduate Soolety.
During expectations of the Twenty-
Ulghtor's were realized to the full
when Messrs. Les Brown and Hill
Masterson grabbed the Men'B Inter-
Class Debating Shield by overwhelming the omniscient Pedagogues in the
Inst round of the league schedule.
This triumph parallels the achievement of the Sophettes who have walked away with the Women's lnter-class
Debating Championship.
The debate was nn experiment,
brought about by tho appreciation of
the style of the Imperial team and by
the lack of time In which to prepare
a subject. Accordingly the contest
wns entirely Impromptu, with a subject announced at the debate Itself.
With the teams waiting in tear and
trembling, Miss Len Irwin selected
the paper that determined the fateful
subject. To the surprise of the debaters and the joy of the audience the
topic proved to be "Resolved that the
Rotary and other so-called Service
Clubs should be abolished for the ad
vancement of Civilization," A draw
for aides gave Educutlon the affirmative of the resolution. When tho debaters had recovered from the shock,
they were allotted a scant five minutes to withdraw and plan their campaign.
Mr. Craig was the first man called.
In his speech he proved himself equal
to any Imperial debater In brilliancy
and the witty handling of his subject
in the English style. Amid bursts of
laughter from the audience he outlined
the essential factors of civilization
and measured the Service Clubs by
these standards. He then went on to
paint a dire picture of a Service Club
meeting, Including the solemnity and
boresomeness of the gentlemen with
the funny hats as they tried to have
a good time. The speaker's most outstanding point was his list of the
terrible results of Indigestion caused
by club luncheons.
Mr. Leslie Brown thereupon sallied
(Continued on column tj)
Compulsory Military Training
There have been disquieting rumors lately that some movement is
afoot to force military training on the men attendant at this University.
Nothing, of course, can be done this year, but if an attempt is made In
the fall term to carry out any such tyrannloal ordinance, the student
body should oppose It with every means at Its disposal Military training may be all right for those students that Imagine they look like
heroes In a uniform, but to foroe such a nonsensical Idea as COMPULSORY military training upon men who are not willing to receive it,
Is certainly an extraordinary undertaking in an allegedly democratic
country. If suoh measures were adopted In the province aa a whole,
there would be a revolution. Then why the University? There has
never been any whole-hearted attempt to make militarists out of the
students here, since the war, for the simple reason that the returned
men at this college would not stand for It. ..Now that practically all of
them have graduated the tom-tom la beginning to beat onoe more. In
the Southern Universities compulsory military training Is enforced,
and Is cordially loathed by the greater mass of the men. Let us hope
that the Canadian authorities will have sufficient sense to refrain from
copying the glorious freedom of the greatest of Republics. If the older
people of to-day would put as much energy behind the League of
Nations ao they do making the unwilling youth of the world Into prospective cannon fodder, that organization would cease to be a political
football and become useful to the world. If the Gods That Be In British
Columbia intend to make our University a cog In the next diplomat-
made war, they should be opposed by every means at our disposal.
Think it over during the summer. Then come back ready to refuse any
order to don a uniform and trot around the campus with a gun on your
shoulder. Peace—not war—should be the aim of every educational
institution to-day.
em
Campaign Meeting
Poorly Attended
At a very meagerly attended meeting on Monday noon, the views of
the candidates for Junior Member,
Mr. Leslie Brown and Mr. William
Thomson, were heard. Mr. Brown,
In his speech, promised to give, as
this year's Council have done, his
whole-hearted support to inter-colleglate sports that will foster college
spirit antl to start some new form of
initiation which, while it will have
no "hazing" will, nevertheless, not
be ho tamo as was last year's and the
year before. Mr. Thomson said that
If elected he would try to represent
all faculties and classes with Impartiality and will forster Inter-colleglate
competition In, not only athletics,
but every other student activity.
Harry Seed then spoke for Mr.
Thomson, citing his splendid work on
the Rooters' Club and his organising
ability. Doug, Telford, tho next speaker, pointed out Les. Brown's qualifications, debating, business experience
and executive ability. He concluded
by a short dissertation which might
have been called, "How to Vote," or
"First Hints In Voting for the Feeble
Minded"
Louis Smith, Mamie Maloney, Eric
Huestis, Doris Shorney and Mary Carter also spoke for Bill Thomson; and
Carl Barton, Murray Hunter, Johnny Grace, Oerry Stevens, Bert Bailey
and Jlmmle Craig spoke tor Les
Brown.
Campaign for Women's
Building Started
The Students Council has started
a movement, which, it Is hoped, will
culminate In the erection of a gymnasium nnd Women's Union Building
at this Unherslty. They have appointed a committee of three students,
Allison Maxwell, Margaret Keillor,
nnd Oeorge Millar to confer with
Alice Weaver, a representative of the
Women's Union Building committee.
Alumni representatives, yet to be
appointed will also aid in organizing
a campaign for ¥250,000. The chairman of the committee will be the
President of the Alma Mater Society.
The duty of this committee will be
to organize students and Alumni to
work under a hired manager. The
manager's salary is to be $1,800 per
annum, plus a bonus, which 1b at
present undecided. The campaign
will probably extend over a period
of two years.
It was decided that this campaign
shall take the form of a "diminishing
chain." The committee, under Its
chairman, will select a number of
students outstanding In organization
and reliability. They In turn will
solicit from seven people a donation
of $100 each and a promise from
each person to likewise solicit a donation from six other people. Similarly each of these six people wll' approach five others, and so on to the
end of the chain.
(Continued on Page 4)
SIR H. LUNN TO
GIVE ADDRESS
Speaker Donates Fortune for
Peace
On March 22, the student body will
have the privilege of hearing Sir
Henry J. Lunn, millionaire English
hotelman, who is touring the world
in an effort to unite all churches in
an organized campaign to outlaw war.
Sir Henry is an enthusiast on this
subject, and has, but a short time
ago, donated his whole wealth in an
effort to further his purpose. Forty-
two years ago he was a Methodist
medical missionary in India, but
through ill health was forced to re*
tire. Going Into business, he was extraordinarily successful, and rapidly
accumulated a fortune. Sir Henry is
making this tour entirely at his own
expense, and the Univeroity has been
fortunate enough to acquire his services before any of the city organisations. He is an Englishman from
England—a man with a sensible outlook on life—a man who does not
metaphorically jingle the sword of
Imperialism—e, man whose aim is
peace, not preparedness for war. After the rumors of compulsory military
training that pervade the atmosphere
these days, Sir Henry should be an
Invigorating antidote.
(Continued from column 4)
forth on behalf of the Sophomores.
To the huge delight of the supporters
of Arts '28 he proved himself a match
for his worthy opponents In Impromptu wit and eloquence. As a
counter blast to the remarks on club
luncheons he described the sufferings
of a man having to stay at home with
his family, and contrasted them with
the relief of many of the real benefits of the clubs,
Mr. T. Charnley, Education '28,
went further Into the dietary aspect of
the situation, Boresomeness, he maintained, was a main feature of the
clubs and drove men to all sorts ot
crime. The speaker's main point waa
a discussion of Club "spirit," as it
exists "in many cases." Service Clubs
existed to make more service clubs
and to spend other people's money.
Mr. Masterson, Arts '28, was more
serious than the other speakers, although he proved himself at times
equal to any in humor. He dealt with
the work of the Service Clubs in connection with such things as Playgrounds, summer camps and clinics.
Hy Irresistible logic he proved that
Service Clubs were of benefit to civilization and  should  not  be abolished.
Rebuttals were short and sweet,
chiefly due to the fact that there was
nothing to rebut.
This debate was a more or less successful experiment. From the point
of view of "bringing" the audience
it was highly entertaining, because of
the humor of the speakers. From a
debating standpoint, Its worth Is
doubtful. Quick wit, Impromptu eloquence and original reasoning were
brought our, but the logical presentation of facts were lacking. Few real
arguments were produced on the rebuttal, and It was obvious that the
chief task of the speakers was to fill
In time.
Arts '28 won both on account of
the efficiency of the speakers and the
refusal of the affirmative to take the
debate seriously. Education, however,
was suffering from severe handicaps.
In the first place It wns agreed that
Ed. "26 would not put two veteran Inter-colleglate debaters In the field;
secondly the Educationists had to support the affirmative of the resolution,
In othor words, to prove that Service
Clubs were detrimental to civilisation.
A still further handicap wns that the
affirmative speakers opened the debate, and accordingly had less chance
to use rebuttals In their speeches.
Judges were Miss Dallas, Miss Mathers and Dr. Keenleysld«.« The letter
kindly gave the reason for the decision
SENIOR NOTICE
The Valedictory gift of the Class
of '26 will be a large trophy case for
the reception of the various athletic
and literary trophies held by Varaity.
This year the Seniors have voted
to hold a draw for the Annual Graduation Dinner. THE   UBYSSEY
March 19th, 1926
Sbr Vbgssrjj
(Member of Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press Association).
Issued every Tuesday and Friday by the Student Publications Board of the
University of British Columbia, West Point Orey.
Phone: Varsity 1434
Mall Subscriptions rate: $8. per year.   Advertising rates on application.
Editorial Staff
BDITOR-IN-CHIBF—A. Barle Birney.
Senior Bdltors—Miss Sadie Boyles and W. C. Murphy
Associate Bdltors—David Wardon, Don Culvert, Miss Marlon Smith, and
Miss Kathleen Baird.
Feature Bdltors—Brio Dunn, B. Morrison and 0. Vincent,
Assistant Editors—MIsb Florence Cassidy, Miss Alice Weaver.
Sports Editor—Dave Taylor.
P, I. P, A. Bdltor—George Davidson.
Business Staff
Business Manager—Harold 0. McWilliams.
Advertising Manager—J. Stanioy Alien.
Circulation Manager—Dlgby Leigh
Edltors-for-ths-lssus:
Senior, William Murphy;  Associate, Florence Cassidy
Assistant, Dorothy Arkwrlght
LESS THAN 60% OF STUDENTS VOTE
The most appalling evidence of aputhy und lack of student spirit
that has ever been known in this University, came out in Monday's
elections. Out of 1500 students, exactly 701 polled votes. This is
positively the worst blow that has ever been dealt to student politics in our University. It is disheartening to think that for every
student who takes enough interest in the elections to vote for such
important positions as these, there is also one who is too dead lazy
or spiritless to show even this small sign of interest. This in itself is
bad.; but coming directly after that washed-out, half-hearted Treasurers' Campaign meeting, it is positively unbearable. The average voting of the upper years was a little over 50%, which is bad, and in
itself oertainly shows a disgraceful lack of interest. But in the
Freshman class of 483 students a scant 150 turned out to exerciso
their franchise. Almost 350 who did not care enough or know enough
to come out and vote! And yet if someone suggests "Disenfranchise the Freshmen?" a voritable storm of 483 raucous und squeaky
voices roars out "No." But what then is to be done if no more interest than this is shown t The upper years are every bit as bad, considering the time they have been here. For an aggregation of three
upper years with a total of roughly 1000 votes to come through on
election day with about 550, is disgraceful. Every one who has
been here two, three or four years and docs not know enough to go
to campaign meetings and find out who the candidates are, should be
ashamed of himself. In fact the terrible results wnich were announced
on Wednesday in regard to the size of the poll, make even the most
optimistic despair. Arts! Science! Aggies! Frosh! Sophs! Juniors!
Seniors! Something must be done. Get out and show the world that
these statements are false, that they are palpable lies! This charge
will be retracted, not when some blustering Class President tears
raging into the Pub. Offlco and strews a mass of blood and bones on
the floor, leaving a trail of grewsome carnage, but when every olass
in every Faculty of our University gets out and proves it to be otherwise/
TUESDAY'S EDITORIAL
The intention of the editorial appearing in our last issue whs not
to suggest that a member of the faculty had made remarks, in .lecturing to a first-year class, which were designed to influence the vote in
student elections. The editorial's purport wns to maintain that, whatever the intentions of the professor's remarks—and he has assured
us that they were non-partisan in character—the comments were interpreted by several members of the class as partisan. Our criticism
is directed, therefore, not to the professor's intentions, but to the
fact that he did not make these designs clear to all the memhers of
his class. It may well be thai it is impossible for any lecturer to
make his moanine; clear to every member of his class, especially upon
such a delicate question as a student election. If such is ihe case,
however, we hold, that it is iii the host interests nf liolh faculty nnd
students for the professor to refrain from making any reference to a
particular election.
OUR SWAN SONG
With this issue the Ubyssey ceases its struggles for another year
and lapses once more into summer quiescence. In September a new
generalissimo will lead fresh troops, pens on shoulders, into other
wars. We are assuming—nay, we fear—of course, that pugnacity
will be a quality in next year's staff., as in this.
It is quite possible that one of the most important of next year's
conflicts will—if the gods allow—be a "war to end war." The retiring staff look with envy on those who may be permitted to take part
in such a pretentious nnd justifiable struggle. For this year our
critical powers have been hampered by a great preponderance of
motes over beams. We refer, of course, to motes and beams in eyes
other than our own. The reforms which we have advocated in library,
campus and grill,—have not satisfied our appetite for provocative
themes. The American footballers and 'the vigilants kindly offered
more substantial meat, but alas!—we could not devour—we have had
to satisfy our souls with frequent, muttorings of that adage so dear
to all journalists:   "The minority is always right."
We are envious, too, of our successors, in that they, perhaps, may-
escape many of the discomforts of pioneering, which have befallen
us. For the passing year has been one of wanderings in sens unchartered, with the Publications Hoard as well as with many other
student organizations. We have been compelled to attempt the
foundation-laying of a twice weekly I'liyssey and a re-shaped Annual.
No credit is due us, of course, for the pioneering. It must first be
proved whether or not any building can be erected upon our foundation.
Hut, whether next, year's staff can make use of our attempts, or
whether they must pioneer for themselves,we feel sure that their work
will be such as to raise, considerably, the standard of the I'byssey,
With such n belief in our successors, we can look with optimism to
the future. We paint fond pictures of a completed IMI.C, where all
students nre equal, where honor prevails, where the library shelves
are up-to-daro and student funds available at the beginning of the
year; where "class spirit," is unmentioned , where the Babbitts cease
from troubling and the vigilants are at rest.
|    Correspondence    {
ATTENDANCE AT GAMES
March 16th, .1926.
Editor the Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:—
With reference to the recent discussion on Increasing the attendance at
Varsity games and Increasing the finances of the A. M. S. at the beginning
of the term, the following suggestion,
though not original, might be adopted
with success at this University.
We think, that if, at the beginning
of Ihe fall term, when money is relatively plentiful, season tickets admit I Ing the holder to all Varsity
gumes, were sold at say $5.01) each,
considerable numbers could be disposed of.
The benefits ol this plan ure ohvl
ous and more discussion on the mailer now might give tho students
something to thing about during the
summer so that, should they bt
favor of It, a campaign could
launched when Varsity opens In
fall.
Yours truly,
HAROLD IRELAND, Sc. '29.
HAROLD W. HLACKETT, Sc. 79.
W. W. BLANDENBACH, Sc. '29.
in
be
Ihe
MISTAKE CORRECTED
March 1th, 1926.
Editor
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I wish to correct a slight error
which appeared In the issue of March
16. The Engineering Discussion Club
was mentioned in connection with the
lnter-class debates. It Is not a debet
ing society and took no part in the
contest,
Yours truly,
JAMES R.  POLLOCK.
Terrible Waste
Reduction A Absurdum, the Ubys-
ey Staff Statistician, has after months
of diligent calculation, arrived at the
conclusion that when this college year
closes the student body will have
wasted $199,360.00 worth of time In
travelling to und fro between the city
and the University.
Each student, spending an average
Of two hours on the street car per day,
passes seven weeks of 8 hours days
in that manner, which at. 40 an hour,
is worth $142.40. For the 700-odd men
attending this institution the bill
amounts to $99,680. Counting in the
women, whose time may or may not
be worth 10c an hour, doubles that
amount.
Transportation of students who do
not come In their own cars costs each
person about $35.60 per year, and
adds about $49,840.00 to the total receipts of the B. C. E. R.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
There will be a tea in the
Cafeteria next Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock for the old and
new members.
UNIVERSITY
ACADEMY
PREPARE NOW FOR YOUR FINALS
We Are Specialists
INDIVIDUAL C0ACHIN8 IN ALL
SUBJECTS
Phone, Pt. Grey 382-R
J.W.Foster Ltd.
NEW LOCATION:
435 GRANVILLE ST.
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
ft
See  US  Before Buying
Class and Club Notes I
8. C. M. MEETING
The last genera) assembly of the
Student Christian Movement will take
place Friday, March 2(1.
At this meeting the Constitution
will be discussed ind amendments
proposed. Considerable importance
Is attached to this annual gathering.
A synopsis of this year's work will
be presented by the retiring executive und recommendations for next
year's policy will be made,
The meeting will terminate a most
successful year of work by the S.C.M.,
uud a large turnout ot members Is
anticipated.
The business of choosing an executive for iiext year will occupy tho
greater part of the meeting,
Dr. Keenleyslde, of the History Department, will speak on "Toleration,"
In Room Ag. 100, on next Monday
noon.
IMPORTANT
(Meeting held Wednesday, March
17, 1926, ut the home ot Dr, R. Agnew,
3672 15th Aveuuo West).
Exeoutlve 1926-1927
Honorary President....Dr. Keenleyslde
President Bice  Clegg
Vice-President Kaye Lamb
Secretary-Treasurer Leslie Brown
New Members—(10)
Leslie Brown, Phil Elliott, Jean
Fraser, Vernon Hill, William Master-
son, Qwon Msugrave, Clare McQuar-
rle, Maxine McSwaln, John Oliver,
Jean Tolmie. (One place left vacant,
to be filled in the Fall).
ART8 '27
Notice is hereby given thai the class
elections will take place on Monday,
March 29. Nominations must be in
the hands of the Secretary, Margaret
Keillor, by Friday, March 26. The
offices that must be filled are, President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer and Deputy Treasurer, Men's and
Women's Athletic Representaives,
Men's and Women's Literary Representatives, Class Reporter.
ANNOUNCEMENT
EXTRAORDINARY
Invitations for tho Alumni Bridge
and Dance, to be held at the Ambassador on Tuesday, April 6th, are now
in the mail. Tickets may be obtained
from Bob Hunter, telephone Point
Qrry, 115. Tickets are $1.00 each,
and only a limited supply is available.
Make up your tables early.
VARSITY vs. CRU8ADERS
B.   C.   Championship
TO-NIGHT
Can. Memorial—16th Ave.
3  Blocks West of Granville
LOST—Theta Epsllon Sorority Pin.
Finder please return to Jean Graham, '26.
J,<-.-,^^.,-.-,.,.^>#^.,.aH.-a-a.
HOME'S
ServIceJJtation
OILS, GAS and
TIRE REPAIRS
Broadway and Alma
>»4
*v.»i!ii»ua-p."C*
MEN'S
FOOTWEAR
What the Man of Good
Taste Should Wear
for Spring
Stylish, good-looking oxfords
in rex corn tan and black calf,
on the new 'Shorty' last, made
by the Tctrauh Shoe Company (one of Canada's well
known maken). New styles
and new leathers for the smart
dresser.    Popularly priced
$6.00
Floor Two -- New Building
FAIR ISLE
BALLOONS
A large assortment
of colorings. Guaranteed all wool and
hand-tailored.
Special price
$5.95
CHARLES
CLAMAN
LIMITID
THE HOUSE OF STYLES
331 HASTINGS STRUT WIST
Between Homer and Hamilton
Drive Yourself !
PH0NI, 8IY. 802
RENT-A-CAR
LIMITID
Speoial Rates for Oanoes, eto.
585 SEYMOUR ST.
Rogers Building Barber Shop
Ths Finest Tn Canada
Ladies' *Beauly *Parlor
464 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER
StY. 7SBS-0 W. IRINNAN. »ao..
■^
A Gift always appreciated—
Your Photograph.
McKenzie Studio
619 Granville St.
Phone, Sey. 3103
ft
High-class work at moderate prices
DOMINION MARKET
Jackson Bros,, Ltd,
HI0HKST GRADE
MEAT, FISH, POULTRY
Phone, Bay, 1218
4th Ave., West, at Yew St.
010. W. JA0K8ON, Mana#«r
4>*a**a-»"a"<..a
•^V
IT'S
MIHO
VMISMMU
AROUNB,
y' oom'T
Our New
Stock of
LOOSE-LEAF
RING BOOKS,
Regulation size,
is of especisl
interest to U.B.C.
students.
"Believe me, Brother"
It*
GEHRKE'S
Stationers and Printers
566 SEYMOUR ST.
asir March 19th, 1926
THE   U
o v q a
EY
thing ii after! another.
ti-ittiten *w»i»"
Ljife
ottonbOT
AAJ.AAi.J.J.i.AJ.AAAi.AA A A .a. .a. A A.*. AAAJ
ff?TTTT?fTTTTTTfTTTTTTTTTTTl
I Graduation Time!
©o/j'/ /o/7 /o recon/ /A/s period in
your life with a picture of yourself.
DIES IRAE
O dark and sombre duy,
Bereft of every cheer,
Why art thou not more gay,
To drive away that teur?
The tear, which thought has brought,
Of past which now is by,
() joy in what I sought,
Not thoughts to make me nigh,
—Zip.
1st   Chimney  Sweep--Will  you  go
down flrst or will I?
2nd Sc, Urad.—Oh, soot yourself,
Tom:    Why do divers eat moro In
the spring than In the summer?
Jerry:   I'll bite.
Tom:    Why,  simply because  thoy
are fond of the spring board.
—DenlBon  Flamingo.
BIO  ELIMINATION  CONTEST
Starts April 12— Everybody try
Kid the profsl
Finish not later than April 28th.
Your finish May 7,
"They ahall not pass."
Specially Reduced Prices at
Bridgman's Studio
413 GRANVILLE ST.
************************************************
Meat UnWar.ltjr itudaaL h-tv* found,
•ad «t« now flndlni, that • Iralnlna In
on* of tho monjr cour.a. In tho
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
— of —
COMMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
IS RIALLV WORTH WHILI.
We stand ready to assist all who need
assistance.
Our Secretarial Course is one whioh
appeals to University students.
If interested, give us a call nt any of
our THREE BRANCHES;
336 HASTINGS ST., W. • {|°r 7*25
TOWER BUILDING - ■ . S«r. 7451
MAIN and TENTH ■   ■       ■   Fair. 41
The University
Book Store
Open from 0:30 a. m. to 1 p. m.
2   p. tn, to 4 p. m.
Saturdays, 0:30 a. m. to 1'J noon.
Loose-Leaf Note Books,
Exercise Books and Scribblers
At Reduced Prlc.,
Also, Graphic and Engineering Paper
Biology Paper, Loose-Leaf Refills
Fountain Pen Ink
Pencils and Drawing Instruments
All YOUR BOOK SUPPLIES Said Here
FRASER VALLEY DAIRY
MILK, CREAMO and ICE CREAM
ARE ON SALE AT
 YOUR GRILL	
NOTE.-A PRIZE WINNING COMPETITION :
SAVE ALL PICTURE CARDS
you find in Chocolate Ice Cream Glacier Bars and
Ice Cream Bricks.
— FIRST PRIZE —
A Week's Cruise for Two People, including Berths
and Meals, on the Union Steamship Co's
T.SS. "Cardena."
Many Other Good Prizes
Save
PR9^CERSJ|iASS0CiATi0M
«>.a-.a..a«a«*>*»a..a>a>a.-».a>a.>« n|i i|ii|ii|h|»i« a»a"a—*iSi
I    Ave Atque Vale
^. ......a-—..,..■■»-<".-«»«"♦... ..an."...a"."....-."»• ^-a•*
"Ave Atque Vale," or words to that
effect, For Boine six months the feature staff of this paper has endeavored to pander to the widely differing
demands for humor from the student
body, from Ihe slapstick, nnd occasionally borderline Inanities so attractive to the irei'liniei), to the subtle and
hophlsllcated disquisitions In which
senior students nnd professors revel.
In The LHany Coroner there has been
verse that has varied from the sloppily rotten "smartness" of under class*
men to one or iwo really clever parodies from the typewriter of our more
gifted members. The passion for satire has been satisfied by two serials,
more or less good, and two plagiarisms, neither good. For the benefit of
the barbarous natures of certain readers, we have Indulged In personalities, but they have never been meant
to wound, and if they have, such is a
matter for regret. Most of our offerings have been original, and as such
must be judged.
This serious review might go on indefinitely, but the point is, not what
the feature page has been, but what
of It, and what will It be next year?
On the flrst point there Is but little
to say. The importance and function
of a feature page Is one on which we
have personally very decided opinions,
but which, since they are merely opinions, cannot possibly interest the student body. On the second point, too,
we must refrain from comment, since
all the feature editors are resigning
as a staff this year, and we have no
right to prejudice the policy of our
successors. Therefore, to all intents
and purposes, this muckttorlal need
never have been written.
That Is why we wrote it.
- -  •*. - -
Murray Huntah's column has been
discontinued owing to the fact that
Mr. Huntah has had to go Into training lor his great athletic coiitest on
the Eiffel Tower this summer.
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
KONTRIBUTORS'
OLYUM
■■7a*a^vaB^aBBa*aar^^aa-a7*aaB|aa^*«aaBa*aya*^away*aiaB^^BJ*a*)^aV^*^H*^PVV^^^V*vWwVT ■»
RETALIATION
(With Melodious Intent)
Here lies our dear Sedgwick so loved
by us nil,
Whose gonial features bring back to
recall
The days In old Fairview when Sen-
Irs and Sophs
Were crammed Into musty old build-
lugs with profs.
Wherever tho genial Doctor Is found,
Proud Seniors are always loitering
round
In the hope that by knowing a man so
austere
They will cause the poor Freshies to
praise and revere.
As Goldsmith, that poor Irish songbird once said
In regard to Dave Oarrick, who's long
since been dead,
So now of the Doc If describe him
we can
"An abridgment of all that was present in man."
If Impplly It chances you understand
not
A line or a word of this vile tommy-
rot
Just speak to the Doctor and he will
Explain
In language perhaps a bit strong and
profane.
LOVE TRAGEDIES OF FAMOUS
MEN
Professor Terman breaks it off after
tho Test.
Elaine, no more I love you
Since I'm so far above you.
I hardly even like you.
You've such a dreadful I. & Q.
Alas!    You were not born like
McDougull, Gates or Thorndlke.
—E, A. B.
DEADLINE
OBITUARY
We regret to announce the demise
ol Mr. Hrtff Clown. He took the littlest editor down to tea, became jealous of himself and shot himself in the
loot, blowing out his brains.
)>***********************.
CabaretBelmont
DANCING and ENTERTAINMENT
T Granville and Nelson Sts.
***
b^ftftftftftftftftftftftfyftftftftftftftfttyftftft
I   ANATOMICAL  ROOT-MAKING  and  REPAIRING   $
4388 TENTH   AVENUE, WEST
PHONK:   POINT   OREY   604
t
t
****+******************++*****+*********+*+*********4
T. WIGGLESWORTH
ORDERS CALLK.D   FOR   AND   DELIVKRKI)
I
 .     ... ii I
You know, In sitting down to write
(his breosy and intelligent little column of mine, to which you all naturally (urn on Friday mornings with
scarce restrained avidity, 1 find myself almost sorrowful, and am nearly
tempted to begin a mournful solllo-
otioy to my Alma Mater, and to weep
stilt and bitter tears on the dear old
pub typewriter. For this Is tho very
lust tlmo that 1 am to see myself- Immortalized. It is tho vory last time
I will be permitted to mess about with
paste and scissors down at the printer's. It Is probably the very last time,
though Heaven forfendt that the'littlest editor will ask me If I love her.
and when I think of that I am indeed
melancholy. I think of the noble, but
frightful, Mr, Sauterne, and I think
ot the ancient and venerable Me-
Oookle, my colleagues, whom I have
alternately blessed and cursed
through so many long months... .Tbe
very thought of them brings a tear to
my eye! For in another few weeks
they will be merely the wraiths of a,
dead and bygone day. Above all I
weep for you peculiar congential oddities who read this page. Whatever
are you going to do on Fridays? The
only alternative I can suggest is that
you diligently read and digest the
Western Tribune. By the way, I see
that McQookle has written a column
for this page, and I fear I have got to
print it. Alas, it is indeed a weary
life! But it Is nearly over, and I suppose that next year some coy Imbecile
will have been inveigled into taking
over the dirty work. I weep for him
Indeed; but for him also I have some
good advice. My boy, or possibly, my
girl, when you embark upon your
muckatcrlal career there are several
things I want you to bear in mind.
The first, and most Important, is that
you must pinch as much yellow paper
from the pub as possible, this constituting your salary or honorarium. The
second is that Mr. Morrison is a kindly man behind and beneath his rugged
exterior, and is prone to lending
nickles and cigarettes if you approach
him properly. The third is that the
female element is always seeking to
lure muck editors to destruction, and
therefore remember to never accept
pie at the printer's. You will probably find a certain uncouthness your
best weapon ot offense. The fourth,
and last, is never sign an article,
however innocent it may appear. For
even though you only sign your initial
somebody will always find out who
you are, and your life will not be an
earthly paradise, and you will constantly be told by some officious egg
that you must "Cut out that personal
stuff," or that you swear too much.
Wherefore be wise, and live long.
Keep sober, admit nothing, take me
as an example of what a good man
should be, and you will not have lived
nor laboured in vain. Ooodby, forever. "G."
SERVING 19,500,000 customers
with sixty-five billion kilowatt
hours a year, the electrical industry
on this continent is one of the greatest.
B.C. Electric progress in the lest
29  years has also been phenomenal.
Prom the small beginnings of the B. C.
Electric system in those days, it has
grown to be one of the largest in
Canada and one of the six greatest on
the Pacific Coast.
Bmisn&)inMBm(®Eiic™cltoMFCo.
""x^se
VANCOUVER
iii.-a.i-, MnCT^^iagajaa
VICTORIA
11-30
BY  THE  WAY
"Bill Thompson has done a lot of
things around here that people don't
know about"—Miss Mary Carter at
Tuesday's meeting. "Out of the
mouths   . .  ."
I  SEEN  TO-DAY  has  stopped  because  it's   bad  grammar.
The route of all evil generally has
alluring curves.
IF,  WHEN you are
* climbing mountains,
you would like to know
your  altitude,  take   an
ANEROID
wilh you.
We have other
SCIENTIFIC
INSTRUMENTS
in stock.
THK
CLARKE
AND
STUART
CO.. LTD.
Stationeti, Printers, Engraven,
550 SEYMOUR STREET
=y THE   UBYSSEY
March 19th, 1926
Active Season
For Hockeyists
In this, 'ho final Issue of tho Ubyssey It might bo well to say a lew
words relative to the development of
grass hockey this year at ihe University. Harry Warren toolt chargo
of the club In tho fall and soon had
two team* In the Vancouver City
League. This is a game that develops
the men who play it. It Is a fust
clever sport that calls for the best
qualities in tho Individual, and depends on team work nnd combination
tor its success, As many people aa
possible should play games and jrrass
hookey has tho double advantage of
keeping the players fit, yet does not
take too much of tholr time. At least
two players have been doubtful this
year who will make the all star team
next year, these men are John Hul-
bert, half, and Charlie Wainmau, lore-
ward. The former unfortunately was
unable to make the trip to Victoria
last week, or probably tho score
would have been different.
Long Schedule
For Seniors
Varsity Soccer Aces have a long
and tiresome pilgrimage in the Pacific Coast League before the curtain
rings down on the soccer seaBon.
Three fixtures remain on the schedule, and will give the harassed students a chance to find recreation from
cramming for exams, by sitting in
on a couple of fine contests at Athletic Park.
On March 28, Varsity meets the
Strong North Shore squad, The team
Is at present heading the red-shirts
In the league standing, but dropped
the contest to them earlier In the season. North Vaucouver will be out to
boost their average, and the Blues
will be out to exact a sweet revenge.
On April 3, Victoria visits Varsity,
and after the exam, grind the pigskin chasers trek to Cumberland, to
teach the Invincibles a thing or two.
(Cumberland Islander please copy.)
The Annual Meeting of the Soccer
Club Is due. Watch for announce
ment of the date.
Inter-Class Baseball
An exciting inter-class baseball
game took place at Trimble Park last
Wednesday between Arts '27 and Arta
'28. Bill Clark's "Blue Sox," however,
were in fine shape and Arta '27 carno
out on the long end of a 9 6 score.
Ingledew put the gamo on ico for Arts
'27 hy knocking a home-run in the
third Inning with two on bases. Tarniy
Butler played a sterling game at first
for Arts '28, pulling a couple of impossible ones out of the air. The next
game Is between Arts '27 and Science
'28-'29, and this game decides the winner of the Governor's Cup. The batteries were: Arts '27, J. McLean and
Newby; Arts '28, Delbridge and Watson.
VARSITY vs7cRUSADER8
B.   C.  Championship
TO-NIGHT
Can. Memorial—16th Ave.
3 Blocks West of Granville
SOCCER TEAM IS
VICTORIOUS
Vurslty's ghullators took a gory victory from the Heaforlh clansmen lust
Saturday, tho fruits of victory renting
with the blue and gold clad "Hodgors"
after the smoke of battle had cleared.
It was the harden! fight the Juniors
have had In the throe years' experience ot the teum. Having a stronger
line-up than In their last appearance,
Seaforths hud the edgo nil the wuy,
und only tho determined tackling of
the winners, nnd the loose finishing
of tho losers, gave the former a 3-2
lead.
Seaforths started off well and tallied
early, their Inside right heading
through tor ono of the best efforts of
the day. But Varsity came back
strong, and tallied thrice in quick succession, Yolland locating tho spot
whore the net should have been
twice, and the Highlanders' back deflecting the leather over the line for
the othor. Varsity's defence, playing
a man short, was the raison-d'etre of
their victory. Anderson was cool In
goal; Allan did two men's work at
back, and Newall, Todd and Taylor
have never taken more out ot themselves. The forwards wero ragged,
but effective In mid-Held play.
The win gives Varsity a fairly creditable standing in the league table
after a serlos ot disasters before the
Logie-Duffell-Taylor Ministry came
into power. With one more game to
play their record reads:
17   6   10   1   24—47.    13.
They have cinched sixth place in
the table.
 -o»	
Track Tribe Treks
To Tacoma
The U. B. C. will bo represented at
the Cinder-grinding Carnival with the
College of Puget Sound by the following men:
Jumps—H. King, Newcombe.
Sprints—Pat Taylor, Burgess, Rex
Brown.
Middle Distance—McWIlllams, Mottley.
Distance—Selby,  Barton.
Weights—Whltworth, Pottlnger.
The men had a final work-out at
Brockton Point on Wednesday afternoon.
f}~
OVERCOATS
FOR
SPRING
All latest weaves and
up-to-date styles.
$35 and $40
U.S. BEACH
Up-to-date Tailor
4390 10th Ave., W.
Phone, Pt. Grey 131
Also, Dry Cleaning and
Pressing.
- Varsity Lunches -
SASAMAT ELECTRIC BAKERY
Near 'Bu» Terminal
Phone, Point Grey 507
Aulo Repairs
Tire Repairs
Battery Service
Ignition Work
Trimble Service Garage
GENERAL GAS
Oils and Greases
Accessories
Phons, Point Grey 606
4401 10th AVENUE, WEST
Vanoouver, B. C.
Phons, Point firey 129
Moodies'Meat Market
C. H. Moodie, Prop.
CURED MEAT SPECIALIST
Fresh Meats, Flth, Poultry, Butter,
Eggs and Chests
4395 Tenth Ave., West
B. C La. K.
WAITING ROOM
And Ticket Office
CANDIES, CIGARETTES,
SOFT DRINKS,
GLACIER BARS, Etc.
ON SALE HERE
ALL FRESH STOCK
For Your Convenience
Minimi l ll l iana il « a »". a » i a ill I a i|i |
FINAL GAME
TO BESTAGED
Basketers to Meet Crusaders
At 8 p.m. to-night (Friday the 19th),
at tiie Canadian Memorial Gym, the
Varsity  Intermediate "B"  Basketball
Team enters the B. C. Championships.
It Ih ihe only U. B. C. Team that has
won a pluce In tho playoffs, and the
players ure doing their best to uphold
the honor of the University, All othoi
teams ended their schedule a monl,
ago and have been able to got do v.
to Ihelr  KludlcM  hut thoMo  men   have
been practising four limes a week In
tiplle of the fact that the exams are
so close upon I hem.   They have siirrl
flood much for this game—a game In
which  there  are great odds  ugulmo
them, for they play the St. Andrew
Crusaders,   champions   of   the   S.
League  for tho laat   two yearn, mm
runners up for the B, C. Championship last year,   Varsity needs Ihe sup
port of the student body to win, T
have done much—they hhU very little
—only fair support to-night.
The Teum—\lpen, Nicholson, Stevenson, Swanson, Little, Rae, Williams,
Berto (Cant.)
Women's Building
Campaign
(Continued from Page 1)
This Is an excellent idea, and the
campaign will roach a great many
people and be widely advertised. It
is expected that the committee will
have workod out all details by the
opening of the Autumn term, when
the students will be ready to launch
the campaign.
Pt. Grey Pharmacy
H. W. Warner, Druggist
Your Patronage Appreciated
Phone, Point Grey ISO
10th Avenue and Trimble Street
HIGHEST GRADE
MEATS
FRESH DAILY
Your  Patronage  Solicited
POINT GREY
MEAT MARKET
Phone, Point Grey 14
Evans & Hastings
•:•     -:-     PIONEER     -:•     -:•
BETTER QUALITY PRINTERS
Prices Fighl
A     S4-Y-*a    6UCCt3'!PUL    aU!HHCS9    CIIUI
IN     VANCOUVtB     PRPVJS    CONl-LU SI» HI
THAT    Wt   API    fAVORro    1*0*1!    THAN
OTHtRS BY 1HI  t»ACTIN<i PUBLIC
WHfN   IMC   DISIRf   rutin
MOHIY J  WOHIH.
We make u tpeciulty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Danoe Programmes, Legal Forms
and
Genersl Commsrolal Printing
.Sta ut before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      876 Seymour St.
BUCK'S DRY GOODS
Men's Wear
SPECIAL-
LADIES' SILK HOSE
Point Heel, 8 Shade*
Per Pair   -    ■   $1.00
I Oth AT TRIMBLE
Phone, Point Grey 884
REDUCED RATES
FORSTUDENTS
The Vancouver Little Theatre Association Is renewing its offer of Student Tickets at reduced rates for tho
opening night performances and tickets for the first night presentation of
"Ho Who Gets Slapped" may bo obtained Friday of this week at the
office of Mr. F. O. C. Wood, between
the hours of 10 and 1. It Is hoped
that a good number of students will
profit by this special consideration of
Ihe Little Theatre Association by seeing sn excellent amateur performance
at a subHiantlal reduction In price.
Point Orey 134      We Deliver
Woolner's Grocery
Tenth and Trimble
rill LINE Of GROCERIES
AND PROVISIONS
Service
Qsality
VARSITY vs. CRUSADERS
0. 0. Championship
TO-NIQHT
Can. Memorial—14th Ave,
3 Blooks West of Granville
iVott; Showing
THE NEW
SPRING SUITS
-IN-
Greyw, Fawne, Blues, Stripee,
Chocks, Dice Designs, Etc.
$25.00 to $39.50
C. D. Bruce
limited
Cor. of Heeling* and Homer Si*.
Wear A Mann's Shirt i
British Shirtings !
SILK SHIRTS
$5.00 to $8.00
Featuring only the best in materials, workmanship and fit.
Every sleeve length up to 37 Inches.
SPECIAL SHIRTS, t*n Cf\
2 FOR   .... <pO.OU
Reg. $3.00 and $3.50
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
SHIRT SPECIALIST
Two Stores     -     -    411-474 Granville street
Wear A Mann's Shirt i
THE   AMBASSADOR
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarters for Service ——
Club Luncheons, Dinners and Banquets
Private Dining Rooms for Private Partiee.
Suitable for Meeting* and Socials. Fraternity Banquet* a Specialty.
LUNCHEON, Served Daily, 45c.
MUSIC and DANCING S&^r...,
A GOOD SCHOOL
TO ATTEND
TORONTO EXAMINATIONS FOR GRADUATION
INDIVIDUAL COURSES HIGH STANDARDS OF WORK
H. C. DUFFUS, Proprietor
B.C.  COMMERCIAL
f^L.t_^_     SCHOOL - 709 GEORGIA, W.
i\ew*M\9j.\\*/:K*j,i\em*/.\*j:
TWO
NIGHTS
ONLY
llli
MARCH
30th
llll
MARCH
31st
Edith
Wynne
ORPHEUM
THEATRE
Matt hi son
- IN -
"THE ADMIRAL"
A Comedy of Puopoto
By CHARLES RANN KENNEDY
.  .  AND  .  .
Miscellaneous Scenes
in Costume
{$ Scene* from Shakespeare,
$ "The Alcettet of Euripides,"
©   "The Servant in the House."
PRICES:  $2.68, $2.14, $1.61, $1.07 (Tax included),
Gallery (unreserved), 75c.
Seat Solo at Fletcher Brot., 833 Granville Street.
NOTE.   SPECIAL RATE FOR U. B. C. STUDENTS
THESE TICKETS MUST BE OBTAINED IN ADVANCE et
Fletcher*'.   Apply to MUe Kate Eastman.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124966/manifest

Comment

Related Items