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The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1936

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 Tuesday Meetings
SENIOR CLASS-Ap. Sc. 100
PARLIAMENTARY FORUM
ARTS 100
Vol. XIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1936
No. 5
U. B. C. SNAKE PARADERS
DISRUPT CITY NIGHT LIFE
Don Parham Receives Serious
Injury tp Right Hand
With one student seriously Injured, several others suffering from cuts and bruises, and a good many Vancouver citizens complaining about damaged property, university authorities are faced with the grim aftermath of the frosh snake
parade that Invaded the downtown section of the city Tuesday evening.	
SERIOUS HAND INJURY
His band pushed through a car
window, Don Parham, of second
year Science, suffered severe cuts
about the wrist that sent him to
the hospital. He was on the operating table for two hours and 20
minutes, doctors making herculean
efforts to save the hand.
Parham waa hurt when tha parade was at tha corner of Georgia and Howe He waa one of a
group that attempted to atop a
ear from breaking through the
line. Deaplte the serious atate of
Parham's injuries, the paradera
continued on their mad way with
no eeasation.
LONGEST PARADE*
Thursday, it was reported that
the injured boy was progressing as
well as could be expected. He was
suffering a great deal of pain, but
high hopes were held that he might
not lose the use of the hand.
The parade, one of the longest
ever held, assembled at Cambie
grounds and wound its way through
the city for nearly three hours.
Few who tried to stop the onrush
escaped without some mark of their
folly. Cars were stopped, trolleys
removed from street cars, theatres
entered, beer parlors raided, and
traffic generally disrupted.
INVESTIGATION MAY FOLLOW
Hoodlums who took advantage
of the confusion on the streets
did a great deal of damage on
their own initiative, according to
police reports appearing in Wednesday's papers. This situation
was considered serious enough to
command the attention of the
university Senate. An Investigation may be held, following the
meeting of this body on Oct. 21.
It is not known what action may
be taken by the university, but it
might be pointed out that unfavorable public opinion caused by such
a disturbance could lead to trouble.
The snake parade fiasco will at
least serve to bring the question of
initiation to a head, it is thought
in many quarters. Out of the investigation will come, it is believed,
some definite statement of policy
regarding initiation. Although officials are not in a position to be
interviewed on the matter, the general expectation is that reaction to
the snake parade will have serious
ramifications.
PLAYERS
RESULTS
Those listed were accepted as active members of the Players' Club,
following the tryouts Tuesday evening. The judges were members of
the Advisory Hoard, and Eleanor
Goodwin Gibson, president of the
club.
Kenneth Bennett, obert Clark,
Albert Eedy, Robert Hayman, John
Ker, Geoffrey Mackie, Robert Mc-
Dougal, Robert McCormick, C. J.
McNeely, Milton Narod, Wm. Nick-
erson, Dave Morrow, Eric Robertson, Jack Stark, G. Shiles, Lester
Sugarmaii, Jack Zack, Pamela Yell,
Patricia Bibbs. Stella Bridgman,
Anne Carter, Adrienne Collins,
Mary Covernton, Kay Curtis, Betsy
Darnborough, Mary Fitz-James, Hy-
slop Gray, Lorraine Johnston, Rheta
Lesser, Kay Mann, Jean McLauren,
Mary McLeod, Elizabeth Norle,
Pauline Scott, Kathleen Patterson,
Evelyn Smith. Edith Spencer.
Honorable Mention—Reg Wilson,
Gordon Gray, Kay Armstrong, Bun-
ty Butters, Margaret Beattie, Margaret Findlay, Ailsa Braidwood.
Alberta Has
Athletic Pass
System
$5.00 Ticket Is
Good For 55
Sport Events
By LARRY ALEXANDER
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, Edmonton, Oct. 6 (WIPU)—Students
who have already been presented
with somewhat of a bargain ln the
form of the new $5.00 Athletic Ticket which entitles them to admission to some 55 sporting events,
have been presented with a further
bargain by a recent action of the
Student's Council. At a meeting
last week that body decided to accept Athletic Tickets for season
admission at the University Rink.
Since the Athletic Tickets, which are
optional,"cost only $5.00 apiece and
a season ticket at the rink last year
cost $1.50. It may be seen that this
represents a very considerable saving. The Council took this action
in the hope of inducing more students to retain their Athletic Tickets. It was pointed out at the meeting that there is some danger of
incurring a deficit on operation of
the rink this year under this system but the Council members decided to take that chance in the
hope of keeping down the number
of Athletic Tickets turned in for
refunds.
TROUBLES OVER
John Witbeck, whose troubles
cease tonight as frosh are denuded of their regalia. Witbeck
has had a busy time during initiation period, being on the
committee arranging affairs and
at the same time a member of
the Discipline Committee.
MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY HEALTH
8ERVICE
1936-37 Session
All students entering the University for the first time, and
all students who have not been
examined by the University medical examiner within the last
five years, ai'e asked to report
with their class timetables to
the University Health Service
for registration and advice as to
procedure.
Monkey Love On
The Campus
Screaming, "No! No! A Thousand Times No!" two female forms
hurtled from the roof of the Science
Building at an early hour Tuesday
morning, rather than meet a fate
worse than death, while the villian
of the piece snarled, "Foiled again!
Curses!"
The three actors in this dramatic
tragedy of love and death were
"Peggy," "Pauline" and ".Micky,"
three simian inhabitants of the Bacteriology department zoo. Apparently unhurt by their three-storey
hop, the two maiden monks continued their Heglra, one disappearing in the direction of the Applied
Science Building, nnd the other
seeking the cloistered seclusion of
the Union Theological College. Neither has been heard from since.
The excitement commenced when
the villainous "Micky' stole into
the ladies' boudoir, stroking his sinister mustachios and gloating, "I
have you now, my proud beauties!
Marry me or . . ." Blushing in
sweet confusion, the ladies departed
through the chicken wire door without bothering to open it, and soared
over the parapet of the roof, their
respective honors still stainless.
Interview in his love nest later
in the day, the villain glared morosely at the battery of cameras and
refused to make any statement to
the press until he had seen his lawyer. Meanwhile the Provincial Police and local Fire Hall have been
notified of the disappearance of the
monkeys, and students are asked to
keep an eye open for the bashful
monkeys.
TOTEM STAFF WORKING ON
LARGER BOOK FOR 1937
On the reference desk of the Library there are three University year
books, Selected from colleges in
Canada and to the South. These
books, generous-sized, richly pictorial, tastefully edited, the Totem
staff is displaying as somewhat enlarged models of the Totem that
they hope to produce this year.
Look them over.
COMING OP AGE
For U.B.C, this is a coming-of-
age year. One way in which we
can record our growing traditions
and recapture the pleasant zest of a
birthday year is by creating a Totem really worthy of our brash but
promising Alma Mater. Other Canadian universities, equal or smaller
in size, publish year books that are
actually artistic accomplishments.
With many of these, our undernourished Totem unfortunately cannot rate.
But this is another year. With an
intensity of heart and soul that approximates cardiac condition, the
Totem staff is planning its 1937 triumph. Enlarged individual pictures
of upperclassmen  in  all faculties,
and, we pray, lowerclassmen too;
a wealth of action shots from stadium, track and gym; pictorial impressions of the social year—par
ties, theatre nights, parades, fights,
taverns, club meetings, every side,
legal and lurid, of campus activity.
WAIVER CAMPAIGN
These features, plus fraternity
and sorority pages, personalities
pages, bigger, fresher layouts, will
be incorporated in an enlarged Totem of new design and cover.
Our success depends, of course,
on you. On the prompt co-operation of classes in submitting timetables and adhering with Iron will
to photograph appointments.
Tuesday we will explain the proposed waiver campaign by which
we launch our Totem program. It's
a new, convenient sales method
whereby we can judge the prospective success of Totem sales without demanding immediate cash payment.
Meanwhile — scan the copies in
the Library, think of what you'd
like to see ln your own Totem.
We're going to try and put it there
this year.—THE TOTEM STAFF.
A. M. S. Meeting Breaks Up
As Powlett Harangues Crowd
Ejected Once; Excited Speaker
Returns To Continue Pass
System Attack
Spanish Govt.
Is Upheld By
Forum
Much Interest Shown
at Opening
Meeting
Outnumbered two to one in
the voting, the affirmative
side was decisively defeated
in their attempt to uphold the
resolution, "Resolved that in
the interests of Spain, the
Fascists are justified in attempting to overthrow the existing government of that
country."
FOUR POINT ATTACK
After a short preliminary address
by Professor Day, in which he expressed his regret at the loss of several speakers from the Forum, Tom
Marshall led for the affirmative.
Pivoting his argument around the
controversial phrase, "the interests
of Spain," Marshall attacked the
democtratlc government on four
points. He charged them with seizing power unjustly, with violating
the constitution, with instigating a
reign of terror, and with affronting
the educated class by wanton acts
of confiscation and destruction.
Al Carlsen, following for the negative, cited the many reforms of
the government In controversion to
Marshall's claims.    Speaking with
more polish and precision than last
year, Carlsen supported his claims
with well-authenticated statements,
as he denounced the reactionary Influences which had opposed all reform and which had brought on the
present ruinous war.
REIGN OF TERROR
"In a moment when a duly
elected, constitutional government was bringing about reforms
long needed in Spain," he charged,
"the army, the privileged classes
and the church, to salvage their
own material interests, attacked
the government, deliberately unloosing a reign of terror."
Xo fewer than eighteen impromptu speeches followed. Of the newcomers. Prof. Day singled out several for praise in his "post morten"
criticisms. Several of the new
speakers were rather upset by some
ill-timed and rather unfortunate
heckling on the part of the negative
side, but nearly all had something
worthwhile to contribute.
Election of officers will take place
next Tuesday noon in Arts 100, at
which time the subject of the next
debate will be announced. Prof.
Day also stated that there will be
an Imperial debate in December,
when two University students will
oppose a team from Oxford and
Cambridge. Needless to say, this
is expected to promote great interest in Forum work this season
among all members. Further Information will be published later.
At the conclusion of the Alma Mater meeting on Wednesday a motion
to delay dlscuaalon of the Pass System to November 4 waa patted by
the students. The motion, at drawn up by Jay Gould, waa moved by
Ludlow Beamish and seconded by Len Martin.
NOTICE TO STUDENTS
Monday, October 12th, haa
been proclaimed Thanksgiving
Day. The University will be
closed.
L  S. KLINCK,
President.
While nearly a thousand students hooted and
jeered, Armand Powlett, waving his arms and taking
obvious delight in trying to make himself heard, spoke
for twenty minutes at the Alma Mater meeting Wednesday, was forcibly ejected from the stage, returned
and continued his harangue until the meeting was
adjourned by mutual consent of Council and the
audience.
Calling the Council "saucy" and labelling fraternity men as "lotus eaters of the campus," Powlett,
probably speaking for a motion designed to shelve the
Pass System, waved his arms and paced across the
platform as he caught the spirit of his own enthusiasm.
As he drifted further from
his subject, and commenced
to mix up historical, religious
and political references, Powlett roused his listeners to the
pitch where they demanded
that he stop and sit down.
Shouts of "Shut u p,"
"You're  off  the  track" and
"Throw him out," were mixed | quorum present, the annual
up with fervent appeals from! Alma Mater meting on Wed-
NEW POLICIES
OUTLINED
Stadium Plans Will
Be Presented Soon
With only a score over a
those in sympathy with the
speaker.
WARNED FOUR TIMES
Four times Gould rose from
his seat and spoke to Powlett,
quietly asking him to finish
and let the meeting go on.
Disregarding the president,
Armand kept right on, although few could hear him
above the din.
Once when Gould spoke to him,
Powlett tald, "I think everybody
ia enjoying this." This caused an
uproar that brought a broad smile
to the face of the excited orator.
The general trend of the speech
seemed to be against the Pass System. Armand spoke of the effect
of the measure on Sciencemen, saying that they would be forced to
go to every function that came up.
He claimed that such action would
ruin the scholastic standing of the
students and lower the prestige of
the university.
SUPERHUMAN STRUGGLE
He dwelt for a few moments on
the "glorious heritage that exists
in the University Library." Above
the clamor was heard his accusation that fraternity men were "lotus eaters of the campus."
After nearly a quarter of an
hour of such talk, all of which
was lost in the general commotion, Gould, Vine, Logan and
Carey surrounded the speaker
and started to remove him from
the stage.
But they reckoned without Mr.
Powlett's feelings on the matter.
Putting up a superhuman struggle
Powlett resisted to the extent that
it took the united efforts of the
above mentioned councillors and
John Witbeck to remove him from
the scene—temporarily.
RETURN8 TO STAGE
Running up the aisle to the stage,
Paul Payne took possession of the
microphone and called down the
audience for not giving Powlett a
proper hearing. He called the audience "miserable cowards" and at-
nesday heard reports from
Student Council and an outline of Council policy for the
year to come.
THREE INNOVATIONS
Three new matters are included
in the policy for this year, these
being approved Wednesday shortly
before the meeting got out of hand.
They are:
1. Continuation, in a quiet way,
the upbuilding of the Student
Union Building fund which stands
at about $43,000.
2. Budgeting for an ample surplus at the end of the year in
order to make certain no deficit
will occur.
3. Presentation to the students
early In the new year plant for
several stadium buildings, and
plans for financing these structures.
Treasurer Vine in his lengthy report, stated that last year saw a
deficit of $1,106.01 in accounts of
the A.M.S.
Gould announced that the S.C.M.
had the student co-op boarding
house question in hand and were
developing plans for greater expansion. No other major business was
done,
tacked Gould for not attempting to
keep order in the first place.
Hardly had he started hit attack than  Payne wat rudely interrupted by the triumphant return   of   Powlett,   who   entered
through  a  side  door  and  came
back to the stage    With no reference to hit short absence, Armand took up the thread around
where he left off, but aa before,
nobody heard him.
Then it was that Gould took the
floor, and, as Powlett continued to
speak, put the motion regarding the
Pass System.   With this approved,
a   hasty   adjournment   concluded
what will go down in U. B. C. history as one of the most exciting
student gatherings of all time.
The last words that Powlett uttered were shouted across the footlights as the crowd dispersed from
the hall.
". . . and remember the bravo
Presbyterian woman who hurled a
chair at John Knox!"—D. R. B. ]
Two
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1936
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWNE-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY; Kemp Edmonds FRIDAY: Dorwin Baird
SPORTS EDITOR
Dick Elson
Ken Grant
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Dorothy Cummings
Frank Turner
Dave Smith
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Bill Sibley Peggy Higgs
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Stewart Calvert
Subscription Rates for Ubyssey:
Student rate, $1.00 per year. Rate for non-students, $1.50 per year
Advtrtiting Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 311 Province Building, Victory Square, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff    Charles H. Munro, Howard D. Fletcher
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited.
HMIIIimilHltH1IIIHIUI)mWllttnHtlHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlMlllltltllllll1tHllltlllllliH*IIIHIIItlllll>ltl<liHltll<
CLASHING DATES
It has been brought to our attention that the Arts Ball
is definitely planned for the night of November 19. Arrangements have been made with the Commodore Cabaret for the
affair. At the same time we hear that the Players' Club, who
originally dated their Christmas plays tor November 25 to
November 28, have changed the time to November 18 to
November 21. This clash of dates should be immediately
rectified.
MANNERS
After Wednesday's disgraceful exhibition we are inclined
to doubt the wisdom of student government. The student
body seemed to delight in increasing the general disorder
to a point where it resembled a nightmare pep meeting. No
attempt was made from the floor to assist Students' Council
in curbing the tumult. We elect a Council to represent us
and to carry out our government and then when they are
trying to do their duty, only hinder their attempts.
Alma Mater meetings provide the only opportunities that
the general student body haa of making its wishes known
to council. If we don't take advantage of these opportunities
in a sane and reasonable manner the only way that Council
can get anything done at all is by what is generally known
as railroading.
If students want to have a real share in their government they will have to realize that pep meeting manners are
deflinitely out of place in an Alma Mater meeting.
SOOTHING SYRUP
By THE CAMPUS CRAB
THE LESSER EVIL
The University authorities are afraid of bad publicity
in the British Columbia papers and consequent ill feeling
against the University, and so they ban initiation on the
campus. And what happens? Initiation takes place, not
on the campus, but down town.
The snake parade of Tuesday night caused more ill
will towards the University than all the preceding frosh-
soph fights. Such parades must be stopped if the University is to retain the respect of the citizens of Vancouver.
However, once a mob of 500 students gets down town
determined to have a snake parade it is Impossible to prevent them, even if the combined student's council, faculty,
senate and Board of Governors tried. The only solution is
to prevent such a mob from ever getting down town.
The most feasible solution would be to keep the frosh
and sophs on the campus where student council and the
University rulings have some authority over them. This
plan also has the advantage of keeping the students out of
the direct line of vision of Vancouver citizens.
The traditional frosh bonfire recently banned by the
Senate at least had the advantage of keeping the high-
spirited freshmen occupied on the campus. Wouldn't it be
possible to arrange for some form of organized activity
along the same lines to take place on the campus on the last
four nights before the reception?
Certainly a few clothes might be torn, but it is unlikely
that there would be any serious casualitles.
One thing is certain, if all initiation is banned on the
campus it is bound to take place down town where the university authorities have no jurisdiction.
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Now, will you be good, my dear
freshies ?
You see what happens when you
stray off the home reserve. Senate
investigations, one iad in serious
danger of losing the use of his right
hand forever, and a flock of outraged citizens writing letters to the
press, the chief of police, the president of the University and anyone
else they think they can persuade
to listen to their complaints.
Not that I condemn you so severely for rampaging around in the
manner of brainless Frosh from the
time of Adam (you remember
Cain's playful little ways, of
course) to the present, and probably far into the future.
THf FAULT
No, your chief fault was in your
lamentable lack of discrimination.
Do you call yourselves Varsity
men ? Are you at all proud of your
newly acquired distinction as a
class apart from the common rabble?
Any U. B. C. class that shows
itself so utterly lacking in decent
pride of place, any university men,
even freshies, who would not get
up on their ear and tell the hoodlums that you consorted with last
Tuesday night to get to hell out
of the district, deserves what they
have coming.
Naturally, they were the apes
that brought the anger of the town
upon you, and equally naturally
YOU get the blame. If you have a
sense of shame, I hope it's in good
working order.
Now, in my time as a freshfe
(and I stroke my long grey beard
aa I say it) WE had a proper sense
of pride, and there would have been
a gory massacre if any East Ender
had the temerity to try and horn
in on any of four little demonstrations.
Let this be a lesson to you,
BUCK PASSERS
I hope it is a lesson to our worthy
Senate, Board of Governors, Faculty Committee and what-not, as
well.
By passing pious resolutions telling nil freshies, sophomores and
other campus warriors that they
must not do what they know very
well they will do, they wash their
hands with a ceremonious unction
that must evoke an appreciative
grin from Pontius Pilate as he
toasts comfortably in his subterranean bunk.
They make the prohibitions, we
have to enforce them, and we are
deprived of the only possible means
of enforcing them.
THE  REMEDY
It is all very well for them to
say that the students should not be
fools. Students are fools, or they
would not be here.
If they had sense and wisdom
enough to conduct their own affairs
with the perfect decorum that is
demanded by those in authority
over them, they would not be seeking an education in these academic
halls of ours, but would be in a
position to impart instruction to
some of the Intelligent gentlemen
that sit on the Senate, Board, Committee and so forth, and spend their
time passing haywire regulations
for foolish students.
What the student government
government must have if they are
to govern the campus and its inhabitants properly, is the power to
put on an EFFECTIVE initiation,
and to enforce its regulations.
If the lower-classmen had not
learned through experience that
they could defy the government
with impunity, they would not have
staged Tuesday's little show.
HORSE SENSE
Of course, we SHOULD be able
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to introduce a new class to the
campus without having them blow
off their excess steam in curious
and barbaric riots, but If we all
were as we should be, there would
have been no World War, no Mussolini, no Hitler and no depression.
The authorities of this University
have yet to learn that they are confronted by a condition and not a
theory.
Neither have they learned, as
they must, that they cannot solve
the problem by comfortably sidestepping all responsibility.
Student government is willing to
work WITH them, to produce as
safe an initiation as possible, but
student government cannot be expected to bear the whole burden.
They must have co-operation.
The University must take a share
in the responsibility, and take a
chance that it can avoid serious
trouble.
WHAT  A  HOPE
It means that this institution
must do Its best to create a spirit
of culture, unity, co-operation and
loyalty among the students attending it. To do this, one of the imperatives is that it shall not shirk
its duty in cases when the students
wander away from the paths they
should take.
Under present conditions, the
University (as a corporate entity)
is trying to divorce itself from the
students that attend it. It should
make them part of itself, should
govern, guide and treat with sympathetic consideration the needs
and follies of youth.
Until the University succeeds in
making the students feel that they
are really part of it, until they feel
that any injury to the University is
one to themselves, until those in
authority extend a hand to help, instead of drawing their skirts away
from any exhibition of student
foolishness and heedlessness like
a lot of Brahamins in fear of pollution, this University will be a
University in name only.
We get justice—scrupulous, fair-
minded, legal justice—from our
leaders. What we want is sympathy and co-operation.
DANCING LESSONS —
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to be able to go to the next party with the
poise   that  comes  of  being   a   good  dancer.
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DRESS REFORM
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We have been reading ln the honorable Idaho "Argonaut" for the
last few weeks about "Campus
Cords," which are, evidently ...
well, Campus Cords. In other words,
the "Arg." is advocating dress
reform. We heartily endorse this
action. Every man remembers the
time he had to wear Cords to
school, along with Clodhoppers and
95-cent Day sweaters. Maybe the
memory will prove repugnant at
first thought, but, consider, men,
that outfit was darn comfortable.
You could do anything in it, and
anything was good enough {or it.
Perhaps we can eliminate the boots,
but lets all get behind the idea,
and enter on a new era of comfort
for men. (This lets out the Frosh,
who, in all the pristine dignity of
University Students, will have to
wear their Sunday-go • to • meetin'
duds every day and all day.)
The    ideal    sartorial    turnout
would thus be:
1  pair slightly dirty cords	
everyday wear.
1 pair dirty cords cafeteria.
1  pair very dirty cords	
pep meets, etc
1 pair cords social functions
plus
1 aweater in similar condition as
above.
Shoes are optional, but we advise
against sandals, dancing-pumps or
other blights • on the male escutcheon. Sciencemen will find the red
shirts of tradition both comfortable
and inspiring, unless the date is a
rialroader's girl. Tartan shirts with
ties ditto would also prove warming, albeit a trifle vocal. But appearances must be sacrificed for
comfort, where the men are concerned, and the comfort of the
above outfits can only be proved by
experiment, so we will be glad to
see the scientifically trained minds
of the student body at work on this
problem. Dress reform's the word,
men!-FERRY.
Saskatchewan
Follows U.B.C.
Plan
Frtshmen Receive a
Quiet Welcome
UNIVERSITY OP SASKATCHEWAN, Saskatoon, Oct. 6 (WIPU)—
Freshman Welcome Week was formally opened on Friday, September
26, at the University of Saskatchewan. This arrangement was inaugurated last week to assist the
student to adjust himself to his
new position as a member of the
university, and to make the transition from college to university less
abrupt. The week is designed to
Improve the student's system of
studying and acquaint himself with
the new method of Instruction.
The program Included lectures
on how to study, by Professor S.
R. Laycock, on how to use the library, by Professor A. S. Morton, on
how to choose classes, by Dean W.
P. Thompson and Dean C. J. McKenzie. Less academic items Included an Informal frosh dance In
Convocation Hall, a welner roast,
and conducted tours through the
University buildings.
The freshette were given special
assistance, due to the Big Sister-
Little Sister plan, started in 1910
by the women of the university.
The plan arranges for each freshette to be adopted by a senior girl,
who helps her protege to meet new
students and to feel at home.
Laval Students Get ,
Entangled With Law
During Vice Raids
The snake parade instinct; a
phenomena peculiar to college
boys in the earlier stage* of enlightenment, was turned to a new
use in Quebec last Monday night,
when 200 students of Laval University invaded the old city's dens
of iniquity and did battle with
the forcea of evil. Apparently
the reformation of Quebec's underworld was only halted by the
intervention of the police force
who arrested three student ringleaders and released them on $25
balls.
The peculiar situation in which
the police were placed by having
to decide which faction was in
the wrong has created much
amusement and diseusaion across
Canada, and it waa rumored on
Tuesday night that U.B.C. students intended to turn their snake
parade to a similar use. However,
the local parade demobilized before reaching Vancouver's moat
notorious haunts, and only a few
scattered bands of zealots attempted similar reforms, without
any appreciable success.
New Principal At
Anglican College
By PETER  DISNEY
The appointment of the Rev. H.
R. Trumpour to be the new principal of the Anglican Theological
College is one that has met with
| general satisfaction In both church
! and academic circles. Dr. 1*rum-
pour is one of the most esteemed
of Anglican clergy in the province,
and has a reputation as a scholar
and forceful preacher. He is well
known in university circles, having
at one time lectured in Greek, and
for many years having been on the
lecturing staff of the Anglican College, and also rector of St. Helen's,
Point Grey, a church which has always maintained a close connection
with the university. A man of wide
contacts, his work has gained unusual recognition for an Anglican
clergyman in the conferment upon
him of the Doctor of Divinity degree by the United Church. With
lilm as principal, a happy future
for the Anglican college seems assured.
BOOK LOST
Lost- Harts "Mathematics of Investment." Please return to Council
Office immediately.
THE NEW PROFESSION
The recent Vancouver addresses
of the Lord Mayor of London, Sir
Edward Beatty, and Mr. Towers
were accurately recorded on the
Stenotype machine by George Morrison, age 18, after 6 months' training at the Vancouver Stenotype
Coaching School. Full-time students can graduate in six months;
part-time students in one year at
this school. The speech which the
Hon. C. U. Howe is delivering today at the Vancouver Hotel Is being recorded for the Board of
Trade by Mr.  Morrison.
SHOPPING
WITH
Gomg to one of the Sorority
Cabare'ts this week? Don't you
think it would be a good idea
to'have a new dress for it,
something not too formal and
yet not informal. MADAME
RUNGE on South Granville has
just   what   you  want.
There is a new selection of
evening dresses priced at $16 95
which come m moires and taffetas The little black model
with its flaring skirt, puffed
sleeves, slit back and parade of
brilliant buttons down the front
is very stunning Or there is
the square necked red moire
with the attractive shirring at
the back. More formal is the
grass green satin tunic with its
wide arinholes and  low back.
Want to look dignified-5 Well
there are the velvet dinner
gowns. The wine colored fume model with the beiewelled
shoulders and rhinestone buckle
strikes the luxurious note so
popular this season.
An evening dress from Madame Runge is an mdispensible
part of any college girl's wardrobe.
*     *     *
Sorority Cabarets coming up.
And that means formal evening
gowns which call for corsages
from BROWN BROS.
They can supply corsages to
suit any feminine whim and
which are guaranteed to blend
with any colored gown.
There are roses m all shades
of blush peach, pink and red.
..«ari1l
Or gardenias which go with anything except white, and only cost from
50c to 75c a bloom. For that very special date you may get an orchid
for only $3 00, a special price which won't last very long
The long-wearing carnation which stands up under a lot of hard
usage, makes a very attractive corsage and is exceptionally reasonable
m price.
So now that you've got your date for the cabarets you'd better
phone Brown Bros at Seymour 1484 and get them to deliver a corsage
to the girl of your choice.
* *       *
Only five more days' The special free Pme-A-Rol shampoo offered
with each finger wave or marcel given at the RUSSIAN DUCHESS beauty
salon doesn't last any longer So, co-eds, you'd better make the most of
your opportunities You'll need a wave before you go to that sorority
cabaret so it would be w!se to phone Trinity 4727 and make an appointment nghf away Remember, Pme-A-Rol is a corrective treatment and
e'tra spe' a:!\ good for the hair. Only once m a while can you get a
bargam hke th.s the best operators -n town g . ng a shampoo and wave
at half  tne regular pr.ee Lint I October  15.
Remember, the Rues an Du'he.es -s iust cpros'te the L>rc Theatre
en Granv.i'e Street
*     *     +
Doe* ycur fa!l su f need a touch cf colon Then what you want is
one of the bright imported scarves from PHOEBE'S. There are Cashmere
plaids which would delight.any highland heart or the imported wools from
Austria wh.ch are downily warm and soft on a chilly day
For those who prefer silk there are the nubbly silk boucles in all
shades of the rainbow and the paisley silk scarves which brighten up any
dress when used for a collar. The scarves cost from 98c up, so won't
stram any college girl's budget.
Phoebe is also featuring polka dot Windsor ties Just pop down to
71 j Dunsmuir Street and take a look at them.
+       •       *
A knitted suit that looks like hand-woven tweed wth bright
colored nubs Doesn't that sound attractive3 All you have to do is to
go to the WOOL SHOP at 2207 West 41st Avenue and buy some of their
sirdar tweedex knitting wool and begm your suit. Or if you prefer, there
s the S'rdar crochet wool and the sylcrepe which has a continuous loose
silk  thread and comes in all colors.
You can get skirts tailored to order at the Wool Shop. Imagine a
brown and gold tweed skirt worn with a sweater knitted m the popular
jungle gold crochet wool sold at the Wool Shop.    Hard to resist, isn't it?
* •       *
Personabt>—that   ,s  what  shoes   from   RAE-SONS   BUDGET  SHOP
possess     Each has been given a name of its own.    Let lis introduce
tc a few of these aristocrats.
There ,s "Mingo,' a fascinating strapped suede trimmed wth patent
Ccr calr t p; and heel and having a narrow silk braid running up the
centre cf Me strap     It comes in black and brown
"Royalty" :s also a patent tr,mmed suede distinguished hy a cross
■trap "Boom" has a stitched strap and tip and comes m b'ack or brown
Tnese three shoes are just perfect for tea dates as we'l as for campus
/.ear
Then there are the p.'am kid and suede pumps for those who prefe
more conservative styles
Why not pa, a vis-1 to Rae-sons budget shop, just up the stairs
from Rae-sons mam floor on Granville Street, and make the acquaintance
of these pcrsonahfy shoes which all cost just $G cC
* *       *
First hme you've been away from home for so long, isn't it, out-of-
town student3 Don't you think it would be nice to send the family a
substitute to help fill your place3 And what better subsiture could you
have than a portrait of you pictured by ABER. Why wait till Christmas.
Let your family see you now. All you have to do is to phone Tr.mty
<.:'?, and arrange for an appointment
* *       +
University life is not all play. Unfortunately about half of it seems
to he studying. Mrs Paton of the LINGERIE SHOP must have realized
this when she bought in her new shipment of satin dressing gowns There
are the popular tailored styles and the more fluffy feminine gowns They
may be had m all shades of rose, blue and red and are just perfect for
studying m    The price is $4 98 and $5 50.
For those who find these fall nights chilly there is a wide choice
of attractive flannel dressing gowns.
High marks come to those who study in comfort, so if you want to
pass well at Christmas you'd better go along ro the Lingerie Shop on
South Granville and invest in a comfortable dressing gown.
you
INITIATION IS
NOT DEAD ON
EVERY CAMPUS
Bonfires Popular
At University
Of Alberta
By J. D. MACFARLANE
The faculty and student
heads of this university have,
in the last two weeks, expressed their strong disapproval
of the present system of initiation. It is to be wondered
why, if such be the case, there
is no real attempt made to
provide an organized and
workable substitute for the
old methods.
BONFIRES STILL EXIST
Sister universities, both in Canada and the United States, offer
ideas vhlch might help to solve the
"riddle of the frosh.".. Such things
as bonfires still exist, even ln the
best regulated universities, but
without the violence of the dark
ages. An organized effort Is being
made towards a spirit of co-operation which has as an integral feature the full hearted welcome and
direction Into activities, not the attempted degradation, of new students.
For much time past the passing
of the bonfire has been lamented
greatly around this campus. It
might be Interesting to know that
U. of Alberta got together around
a bonfire last week, and, even with
the presence of almost 350 freshmen, the traditional riot did not
occur. Instead, under the leadership of the rooters' club "the new
arrivals were spurred to loud and
lofty heights in the art of cheering
and community singing." The affair, which featured th? address of
the Dean's representative, was, as
the Alberta Gateway puts it, a roaring success. The new cognomen of
the Students' Handbook at this university, the "frosh bible" offers another note of subtle suggestion.
ADVISORS ASSIGNED
In California where a large
number of students mutt be
looked after, a system of advisors
has been Instituted, with each
student assigned to his own advisor and of whom one may ask
any question on anything from
"why aren't there any frogs in
the lily pond" to what courses
may be taken. Only minor Initiation  regulations are  in force.
Already we have the makings of
a system in the various organizations on the campus of which the
Committee of Faculty and Students
under the direction of Walter
Gage, the Students Handbook and
the Information Bureau are examples.
It is possible that someone might
be inspired to work the idea out.
At any rate this is 1936, Lalssez
Faire was dead and burled long ago
and cat-calling doesn't go down
these days. A gem of truth Is contained in the inspiration that gal-
ATTENTION CO-EDS!
An opportunity to gain confidence
in yourself. The Literary Forum
presents an opportunity for self-
expression in short impromptu
speeches before an audience. Dean
Bollert, the Honorary President
and critic, aids the speakers with
helpful suggestions. Noon hour
meetings are held twice a month.
The first meeting is next Tuesday
in Arts 105. We extend a welcome
to all co-eds, especially the freshettes.
lery sitting sophs coul4 be more
superior by leading than opposing
—especially where this year's frosh
are concerned.
Talking about co-operation and
what not—what happened to the
Salisbury co-operative project of
last   year.    From   Los   Angeles
comet  the echo  of "college  It
darn expensive" with an attend*
ant ttory on the tubjeet. In many
placet ttudentt themtelvet have
got   together   in   amall   groupt,
tharing   rooms,   making   mutual
meal arrangtmtntt.
At Washington a student co-operative group serves 260 men and
women, offering each member board
at $16 per month for three hours'
work a week.    Other universities
quoted  by  the  University of Cal.
"Bruin"  show  similar results but
ln the words of the California student paper, "One fact stands out in
the study of student co-operatives
ln colleges throughout the country.
It is that in practically every case
the initiative has come from the
students themselves and that the
university    administrations    have
been mainly helpful in promoting
the expansion of groups after they
have been organized."   It is whispered ln my ear that there were no
students   willing   to   sacrifice   an
hour or two a week to get along on
less.
For those lightsome Individuals
who like to explore there comes a
scheme, once again from California, whereby students may avail
themselves of vital statistics concerning their classmates. Alphabetized files carrying all necessary
Information about students are
placed ln public on what Is called
the Co-op mezzanine in Kerckhoff
Hall at U.C.L.A.
At Dalhousie In Nova Scotia the
big bad sophisticated seniors are
very particular about their freshettes. It Is reported that here they
stand outside the Library to look
'em over but reserve final judgement until "they have more firsthand dope as to physique, characteristics, mentality and personality
of the additions."
C.O.T.C, go east boys, go east!
At Alberta the girls are going Spanish and trying to get Into the army.
Sergeant-Instructor Evans of that
contingent, felt good, masculine
army tradition rocking to Its very
foundations when a winsome co-ed
who would have been an asset to
any army corps applied for admission to the C.O.T.C. Regulations,
however, could not be denied so the
militaristic female took physical
training.
Which takes me to Manitoba
where a psychologist's statement
"that the average English girls face
shows determination" met with the
reply that "many of their eyebrows
also show signs of pluck."
Hill*'
[You ahould be able to read fine print like thla 1
without effort  nt ordinary reading dlatnnce J
Every student should make this test,
for if you cannot read these lines,
you probably need more light. Eye
strain will affect your progress.
Don't risk it for the sake of a
brighter lamp, costing only a fraction of a cent for current for
a whole evening.
BETTER LIGHT...BETTER SIGHT
BRITISH  COLUMBIA   ELECTRIC   RAILWAY CO.  LTD. Four
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1936
&Ajfo   &4ff>   ^y   ^>
Music
DRAMA AND THE DANCE
|M   ^M^   ^y   ^^>
R EG INALD
 *
Piano
HOPKINS
Theory
"Interestlnn Course for
iegi inters"
CITY STUDIO: 817,GRANVILLE ST.
STUDIO: 435 EAST 63rd
AVENUE
PHONEi FRASER 1423 R
L U
ISABEL CAMPBELL
and
Associate Teachers of Pianoforte
All Grades Taught
Studio: 1490 WEST BROADWAY
Phwii: Bay. 7610      R«. Bay. 6016 X
&
..Society
•  •
<&
l> VOICE PRODUCTION
A Special ratM for beginners.
— Free auditions by appointment,
R 3890 HUDSON AVC. Bay. 6300
l HORTHY
ETHEL FERGUSSON
F.T.CL, M.M.T.
OOLD MBDAIiMBT
VANCOUVER IHOOL OP tXPMMION
Public Spttklni Class—Dramatic Art
CaachlM Play Tru Outs
603 HASTINGS STREET WUT
•tyaiour 438
Siymour 8627
t^nSSSSBBSSB
Edythe Lever Hawes
Dramatic Soprano
3015 WEST SECOND AVE.
BAY. 3954
Member of B. C Music Federation
HELEN CREWfc
School of Dancing
ALL   AOBCi
Studio: ST. JOHN'S HALL. Nanton Avt.
Ballet, Modern, Tap and Ballroom
Bayview 8371 L
"Your Favorite Instrument'
at
Barney's Music Studio
679 Granville St.     Sey. 5338
Freshettes Round
The Fireside
Seniors Entertain
on Friday
Arranged by the Phrateres
executive under the sponsorship of W.U.S. the freshettes
became acquainted with senior and junior students when
about fifteen hostesses entertained before church on Sunday afternoon.
Round the fireplace at the
home of Ardy Beaumont, ex-
president of the Women's Undergraduate Society, a number of newcomers discussed
professors and exchanged
travel experiences. Presiding
at the tea table later in the
afternoon was Marjorie
Brown.
In order to facilitate conversation
Fronia Snyder pinned names on
her fourteen guests. After high tea
in the dining room, the. senior
guests, who had been chosen from
the major organizations on the
campus advised freshettes on their
choice of activities.
Tea-cup reading was the feature
at the home of Joy Cameron, when
the .dozen guests gathered around
Mary Miller. "She was really good,"
they insisted. Pouring at the tea
hour was Joanne Brown, assisted
by 'Use Lorentzen and Lucille Le-
tham as servlteurs.
Enid Williams, president of the
Triangle Club, entertained a few
freshettes on Sunday afternoon, in
charge of the dining room were
Mollle Wilson, Clare Williams and
Carol Menchons.
Other hostesses were Agnes
Sh'ewan, Madge Neill, Katherlne
Scott, Christine O'Loaue, Anna Mc-
Canu.
Original Motifs
At Sorority
Informal*
With informal parties every
night the sorority rushing
season reached its height this
week.
Monday evening at the Point
Orey Oolf Club, Alpha Omlcron PI
held a rose banquet for rushees. A
contest ln artistic ability at the
commencement of the evening led
on to jig-saw puzzling, music and
dancing.
Alpha Gamma Delta entertained
their rushees at dinner at the Georgian Club on Friday. The dinner
was planned ln a deep sea motif,
which was carried out in seaweed
and Ash as room decorations.
The guests were entertained by
a skit featuring "Barnacle Bill."
At the home of a member Delta
Gamma hed a cabaret with a floor
show and music on Tuesday evening.
On Thursday, Oct. 1, Gamma Phi
Beta entertained at a buffet supper
at the Jericho Country Club, later
enjoying motion pictures at the
home of one of the members.
On Wednesday evening Alpha Phi
held a dinner in the Point Grey
Golf Club for prospective members.
After dinner members staged a
fashion show of fifty to twenty
years ago.
Elgar School of Music
Piano, Voici-Production, Singing, Theory
I'uplls pruparwl (or »U Local Examination*,
I'ractlcul and Theoretical.
Sliclit-reiidinK   anil   Bar-training    etoes    for
examination  pupils;  Music  Appreciation
Classes for Theory Students.
C. E. FINDLATER,
L.T.C.I., A.T.C.M., A.T.S.C.
68 Fairfield Building
Seymour 6937 Trinity 1956
FORUM ELECTION
A meeting to elect officers will be
held by the Parliamentary Forum
Tuesday noon ln Arts 100. All Interested are urged to turn out.
ROYAL A8TRONOMICAL
SOCIETY OP CANAOA
Vancouver Centre
On Tuesday, October 13, at 8.15
p.m., in Science 200 the society will
be addressed by Dr. Andrew McKellar ot the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria, on the
subject, "The Architecture of the
Universe."
Dr. McKellar Is a graduate of
UBC. All students are cordially
Invited to attend.
PHYSICS CLUB
The first meeting of the Physics
Club will be held on Tuesday, Oct.
Utth, at 12.20 in Sc. 200. Dr. A.
McKellar of the Dominion Astro-
physical Observatory will give an
address on "The Determination of
Atomic Weights by Physical Methods. " The meeting Is open to everybody, and Freshmen will be welcome.
OUTDOOR CLUB
There will be a meeting of the
Outdoor Club on Friday, Oct. 9th,
at 12.15 in Ap. Sc, 2117. Purpose
of the meeting la a discussion of
the fall trip. Members and others
inttM'OHtod are asked to attend.
Musical Sociery
Extends Activities
—Plan Recitals
The Musical Society is this year
extending its activities widely. Following the lead of last year It Is
sponsoring a number of musical
recitals and lectures on the campus. All programs will be given
on Wednesday afternoons at 3.30
P.m.
On Wednesday, November 4, in
the Auditorium, at 3.30 p.m., Ira
Swartz, one of the first pianists ln
Vancouver, and widely known as a
teacher, will give a piano recital.
He will be assisted by Miss Louise
Stlrk, soprano. Admission will be
15 cents.
Either ou Wednesday, November
18, or on Wednesday, November 25,
depending upon the dates of the
Christmas Plays, the Vancouver
Symphony String Quartet will visit
the University.' This quartet is
composed of Allard de Ridder, distinguished conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Jean
de Rlmanoczy, Concertmaster of
the same organization and renowned violinist, Joy Calvert and
Freda Setter. This quarter attracted a large audience at the University last year, being Introduced by
Dean Buchanan as the "Hart House
Quartet of the West." The admission will be practically nominal.
After Christmas It Is expected
that Allard de Ridder will give a
series of lectures on music, particularly on song forms. In all probability, he will be assisted by Miss
Elsje de Ridder at the piano and
by soloists. Last year Mr. de Ridder's lectures had an average attendance of 900 students. The
series, which will be open without
charge to all students, Is expected
to be given on consecutive Wednesdays at 3.30 p.m., commencing on
January 13..
Students are reminded that they
are allowed to attend the last two
rehearsals for the concerts of the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra ln
the Strand Theatre. Free passes
may be obtained from the Musical
Society office In the Auditorium.—
W. GAGE.
Japanese Welcome
New Students
The Japanese Students' Club welcomed 17 new members Into their
midst at a Frosh Reception held In
the Golden Room of the Melrose
Tuesday night, Oct. 6.
The room, decorated in green,
provided a suitably fresh atmosphere for the initiation of the freshmen. Following the initiation the
committee in charge had arranged
a varied program of games and
dancing to entertain those who
were now official members of the
class of '40.
The committee consisted of KI-
mlyo Kagetsu, Irene Uchlda, Tommy Shayama, Bill Iwasakl, Albert
Taklmoto, George Tamakl and Roger Obata. Roger Obata acted as
master of ceremonies for the evening.
Council Backs
Bigger Totem
Gladdened by an extra supply of
sandwiches which were remains
from the Sunday night firesides,
Student's Council went rapidly and
efficiently through the routine of
their weekly meeting last Monday
night.
The unusual speed was probably
due as much to the president's 8.30
date as to lack of business.
Council decided to back the new
and larger 1937 Totem proposed by
the Publications board on condition
that 800 caution waiver promises
to buy were obtained before the
end of the month.
The first class party of the season
will be the Arts '39 on October 10.
The date of the Science class party
scheduled for October 27 was advanced to November 11.
Alma Mater fees from Nurses In
residence In the hospital were reduced from 110.00 to the $3.00 necessary for the gymnasium bond.
Frosh Received
At Happyland
Usual Crowd at
Informal Party
A bigger and better Frosh
Reception was the object of
Council this year when they
arranged for the Happyland
dance floor complete with
Doug. Raymond and orchestra.
With a little more space to
schottlche and gavotte and a
knowledge that there was
fresh air at least accessible a
large crowd of senior men
and women Were present to
officially review the numerous
frosh.
During the first half of the evening, unique millinery creations ln
paddy green perched over neatly
arranged braids with fingernails en
tone were almost universally chosen by the freshettes. Instead of
flowers in their hair as noticed during the summer season the newcomers wore clothes pegs.
A feature of the evening was the
specially adapted university music,
arranged and played by the orchestra.
The annual ceremony for welcoming the freshmen was held at midnight. First, passing forever out
of high school through an arch decorated in the colors of the local
schools and then entering University under the gold and blue, a
long procession of newcomers were
welcomed as full-fledged members
of the student body by Council dignitaries.
As the accommodation was too
limited to handle a large crowd all
at once, it was arranged that the
dancers should wander out little by
little for supper.
FRESHETTE CHOSE GREEN
Jean Pearson, Arts '40 and ex
Kitsilano High, took advantage of
the insignia decree and made it
part of her ensemble. Her dress
was of seagreeu, cut on Empire
style with a tltted skirt and puffed
sleeves.
Velnia Smyth chose navy blue
triple sheer on fitted lines, the tailored neckline of which was softened
with a white ruffle.
Ethel Eaton wore a tunic model
of blue silk crepe set off by con
trusting white,
Hazel-Jean Bescoby wore a wine
tunic iu silk crepe. The line of the
round yoke was carried out ln a
flared skirt and fitted sleeves.
SENIORS' QOWNS
Margaret Ecker wore a black
crepe, leaf patterned dress with a
flared skirt and leg o' mutton
sleeves.
Audrey Horwood, president of the
Women's Undergraduate Society,
chose an Informal print ln blue and
rust, gathered Into a yoke at the
neck. The sleeves were of Russian
style, wide to the elbow, and the
skirt was flared in front.
PHRATERES
The Annual Meeting of Phrateres
will he held Friday at noon. Freshettes are invited to attend. Seniors,
bring  your   little  sisters.
RETURN STRIP
Is the request Canadian Rugby
Club officials are making to those
members who do not intend to
play. This should be done as soon
as possible. The strip room will be
open every day from 12.15 till 1
P.m.
NOTICE
Soccer Manager Dave Kato announces that one Junior Manager
Is needed for the round ball game.
Freshmen particularly are asked to
apply.
Gym. Display To Be
Repeated
Another performance of the gymnastic display which delighted students Monday noon will be given
ln the auditorium of the Point Grey
Junior High School, Tuesday, Oct.
13, at 8.15 p.m.
Moderate prices of 5 and 10 cents
will be charged for the unusual
show, and university students who
missed the other performance are
urged to take advantage of this second opportunity.
FASHION
MARCHES ON
at Gillardes!
Always a Fashion Leader—Gillardes' come to
the front with distinctively styled COATS
and DRESSES—all moderately priced.
Co-Eds—here's your chance to be dressed in
the forward trend. Gillardes feature College
Inspirations!
GILLARDES
726 GRANVILLE STREET
Opposite the Hotel Vancouver
Ladies*
Wear
Biology Discussion
Club Plans Year
The Biological Discusion Club announces its fall display of books on
biological and related subjects,
which will be on show in the reference desk In the library for the
week commencing Tuesday, Oct. 13.
The collection Includes essays, memoirs and biographies as well as
more technical literature.
The first meeting of the club for
this session will be held on Monday, Oct. 19, at 8 p.m., at the home
of Or. and Mrs. McLean Fraser, at
4585 West Sixth Avenue. All students who have had Biology I or
some equivalent course and who
plan to continue the study of Biology are cordially Invited to attend.
Meetings are held biweekly ln
the evenings and papers on subjects of general interest are read
by both graduates and undergraduates of the third and fourth years.
Papers are also given by outside
speakers.
All students who intend to come
to the meeting are requested to Inform the secretary on or before
Friday, Oct. 16.
For further Information those Interested may apply to the President, Hugh MacKay, or to the Secretary, Janet Balllie, at Applied
Science 217,
PLAYERS' CLUB FORMAL
With the new members chosen
and the work of organization almost
complete, the aristocratic Players'
Club are making arrangements for
their annual formal reception. It
is rumored that the hostess this
year will be Trudean Spencer and
the' date Is Friday the sixteenth.
'39 CLASS PARTY
The new executive of Arts '39
are determined that their class
party will be "the class party of the
year."
The Commodore has been reserved as "the place" and if all
goes well Oct. 29 will be "the date."
MUSICAL SOCIETY FORMAL
Members of the Musical Society
are hoping that plans for new membership will be completed soon, as
they are anxtous to arrange for
their fall formal party. This function will be held ln about two
weeks.
sWftWftftWWWWWWVMflWWtfS^WVWWWW^WW
M
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646 Seymour Street Seymour 4214
COSSACKS
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Phone
Trinity
6304
BEFORE IT IS TOO
LATE-OR BETTER
STILL—COME   TO
570  SEYMOUR  ST.
Famous Artists Series...
Don Cossacks November   3
Kayla Mitstl, Violinist November.23
Nimiira-Kay, Dancers March   1
Myra Hau, Pianist March
There are still a few good seats
left for the series
Prices:  $5.25 and $3.70 for 4 Concerts
New Dean To Speak
Hear Thursday
The new dean of Applied Science,
Dr. Finlayson, will address students
for the first time at the opening
meeting of the University Engineer
ing Society to be held Thursday,
Oct. 15. in Applied Science 100 at
12.25.
The meeting wil be attended by
downtown engineers and members
of the Association of Professional
Engineers. At this meeting, which
has been postponed from Thursday,
Oct. 8 he will meet the sciencemen.
Individual Tickets for each concert:
$2.00, $1.50, $1.00 and 75c—Plus Tax
WESTERN MUSIC CONCERT BUREAU
570 Seymour Street Trinity 6304
ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
$45 — $65
De Luxe New Quiet Model — $75
Typewriters of all makes
for sale or rent.
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Limited
592 SEYMOUR STREET SEYMOUR 6639 Friday, October 9, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
Five
TO THE GRADUATING CLASS
The Totem staff this year Is considering the possibility of
incorporating individual photos of every member In every olaea
in the University.
To allow for thla possible number of piotures being taken on
the campus, It is absolutely imperative that we have the photoa
of the Senior Claaa by the 31st of thla month.
We know the claaa of '37 ia a busting, spirited group who have
consistently ahown Initiative and oo-operatlon. Please give the
Totem the benefit of your co-operation—FILL OUT THE TIMETABLE BELOW: CUT IT OUT AND DROP IT IN THE PUB.
OFFICE MAIL BOX AS QUICKLY A8 POSSIBLE.
Name
Hours Free through the week (write them in spaces provided.)
Monday Tuesday Wedneaday Thursday Friday Saturday
Afternoon
Morning
TOBA STUDENT DODGES
BOMBS IN SPAIN
Carlton Ross Ltivts Lectures For
Job As News Cameraman
■y H. K. WHITE
UNIVERSITY OP MANITOBA,
Oct. 6 (W.I.P.U,)—High above the
machine gun and cannon fire ot
rebel-loyalist clashes on Spain's war
torn fields, a lone aviator piles his
dangerous course between the Pyrenees and the Mediterranean Sea
Coast. He Is W. Carlton Ross, a
youth not yet past 25, the only motion picture cameraman and news
reporter daring to fly in Spain,
whose small fragile Moth plane outwits hostile anti-aircraft guns while
its operator attempts to' record
photographically the history-making events below. Many times death
has marked young Carl for its own.
His engine has aputtered and
stalled over Toledo, while artillery from oppoalng batteries
barked out at him. Confronted
by government planes who mistook him for a rebel, he was
obliged to utilise his entire repertoire of aerial atunta to shake
them off.   That was near Madrid.
At Alcazar he had to make a
forced landing and a few seconds
later found it necessary to hold a
very Impromptu and inspired address to a few persistent Latins
who were attempting to stand him
up against a wall.
Small wonder then that Carl Ross
is rather homesick for his home
town, Winnipeg. How often does he
review in his mind's eye, while
turning the crank of his camera, his
St. John's College days, the prophe-
cy of a college instructor that he
would never really accomplish anything of Importance? Winging his
way over the valleys and hills of
a foreign land does he think back
of those hotly contested rugby tilts
on the St. John's College backyard,
those reckless solo rushes down the
Ice at the North End Olympic Stadium?
Down at Wesley College a newspaper story concerning Ross has
been posted on the third floor bulletin board with the following note
attached: "W. Carleton Ross, Wesley, 1930-31-32." They remember
him well, his former Instructors
and acquaintances. Peering over
this Manitoban correspondent's
shoulder at the write-up, Mr. R.
Nell, the caretaker, allowed a long
drawn "Whewwww" to escape. "Do
you remember him well," the reported asked Mr. Neil. The latter's
pursed Ups stretched Into a wide
smile. "Do I," he replied. "He was
one of the wildest young cahoots
we've had here in many a day."
"Do you mean that he skipped
many lectures while he was here?"
the scribe, fairly astonished, queried. "Many?," was the quick reply. "What that fellow could dodge
periods better than he's dodging
bombs right now."
Wishing to verify this startling
information, the reporter sought
out Prof. A. L. Phelps and asked
him point blank what sort of a chap
Carleton actually was. Prof. Phelps
answered point blank that if it was
for the press the answer was that
W. Carleton Ross was "a good,
strong, fly-away sort of a person." Dean Anderson suggested
that Carl's academic record was
not "a true criterion of his scholastic ability." He was a reckless,
excitement-craving person, whose
main interests didn't happen to be
in school work."
High above the clouds playing
hide and seek with the enemy
planes, Carl Ross may be thinking
hack to his college life at St. John's
and at Wesley. A life that is now
lar away from him.
Anniversary of
I. R. C.
Club Was Founded
Six Years Ago
1936-37 will mark the sixth anniversary of the founding of the International Relations Club at the
University of British Columbia. The
club Is not unique, but merely a
unit of a widespread organization.
There are 751 clubs altogether, of
which 595 are in the United States
and the balance In Alaska, Puerto
Rico, Hawaii, the United Kingdom
and Dominions, the Far East, Iran,
Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and
Central and South America. The
purpose of these societies, which
are sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace,
is well expressed in the. words of
Dr. Butler, President of the Endowment, who says that It la not necessarily "to support any single view
us to how best to treat the conditions which now prevail throughout
the world," but ". . . to fix the attention of students on those underlying principles of international
conduct, of'international law, and
of international organization which
must be agreed upon and applied If
peaceful civilization is to continue."
Whether or not western civilization is entering a period of internationalism may be open to dispute;
but all those who heard Mr. Steward's address at the last meeting of
the club on March 18, and all those
who take even the faintest Interest
in foreign affairs, must realize that,
despised or welcomed, internationalism is the oply salvation for our
present and future difficulties. And
as Dr. Butler states ln the above
quotation, it was for the purpose of
focussing students' minds on that
point that the International Relations Clubs were founded. So far,
the units have had a very favorable
reception from the student bodies
of their respective localities; and
Mr. A. Charters, the vice-president
of the U. B. C. Club, who visited
the annual conference of all northwest clubs at Pullman, Washington,
last spring, found the atmosphere
of the meeting very keen Indeed.
Club membership is limited to
25; but since there are at present
several vacancies through graduation, etc., any students wishing to
join are requested to send in their
applications to the International
Relations Club, Arts Men's Letter
Rack. The taking of several history courses Is not necessarily a
prerequisite for membership. All
students who applied late last term
are requested to do so once more,
as the secretary Is informed that
owing to the confusion attending
the break-up of the Academic Year,
several applications did not reach
him. Cards notifying members of
place and date of meetings will be
sent out soon.
NINE GOOD
FRESHMAN
RULES
A List of Frosh
Rules to End
All Lists
(From the McGill Daily)
Mr. Freshman, you need more
advice. Somebody has to tell you
how to get along in the college
world. It might as well be this
writer, a respectable, dues-paying
Freshman of many years standing.
1. Act "wise," Pretend you know
it all. Never admit your Ignorance.
In the classroom as well as in the
bull session act as if you've always
known it all, you still know It all
and you will always know it all. If
you hear a phrase like "categorial
Imperative" or "lnterpenetration of
opposites" or "marginal utility,"
nod your head wisely, and If you
must speak, say 'to be sure." Not
until you've encountered William
Cornell Casey will you be able to
end all discussions with "it's just a
grindesthetlc sequence." Never say
"I don't know." Only professors
and graduate students say "I don't
know."
2. Learn the language. Now
that you're In college you ean
forget all you learned about subjects and predleates. Bone up en
collage lingo. Don't say "girl,"
say "broad," and If you must be
polite, say "babe." Call Philosophy "Phil," and Gymnasium
"Jim."    That's the way to talk.
3. Develop a pose. Acquire the
Idiosyncratic touch. But not for
much. Dont stand out too much in
a crowd. Develop some harmless
..form of lunacy. Oo nuts about
"swing." Read poetry by candlelight. Learn to twirl a lariat. If
you didn't bring along a battered
hat and a dirty pair of white shoes,
send home for them. If you only
have a clean pair of shoes, get them
dirty quick. Be careful to look sloppy. Acquire some characteristic
which isn't too, too utter, but just
distinctive enough for people to remember you by.
4. Get a good slop on once in a
while. And it you can't take it
(fake it). Let your Imagination
run wild the morning after with
the bigness of the night before. If
you're good at making yourself sallow-faced, so much the better.
5. Know the big-shots. Cultivate the acquaintance of captains, editors and politicians. Off
the campus, if you know the star
strip-teaser at Mlnsky's or the
bartender at Leon and Eddie's,
you're made. It's always good
to be in the know.
6. Be a good sport. Follow the
leader. If the Junior next door suggests a few Innocent pranks like
dropping water bags on the pedestrians below, say "Sure, let's." Or
If he suddenly is inspired to flood
the dormitories with a fire hose,
don't come out against the proposition. As a sophisticated Frosh
you should aid him and abet him,
but remember, it's usually the aiders and abettors who get it in the
neck.    The Junior who prompted
UNIVERSITY
BOOK  STORE
HOURS, 9 am. to 5 p.m
LOOSE - LEAF    NOTE    BOOKS,    EXERCISE
Saturdays, 9 a.m. to I p.m.
BOOKS    AND    SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphi.:   Engineering   Paper,   Biology  Paper,   Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink, and Drawing Instruments
ALL YOUR
BOOK  SUPPLIES
SOLD HERE
S-m-o-o-t-h, mild—
and throat-easy
Buckingham
CIGAR ETTIS
you will probably wind up at Oxford on a scholarship.
7. As a general policy, cut your
classes once a week. It's all In the
books. But don't open them before
Christmas. There's a prevailing
superstition on the Campus that if
you go to class and read your books
you might learn something.
8. Develop the "tohell-with-it"
attitude. The Spaniards can settle
their own problems. The Italians
can settle their own problems. The
Russians can settle their own problems. The Republicans, Democrats,
Socialists, Townsendites, Communists, Coughllnites and Mormons can
settle their own problems. To hell
with them. You've got a C.C. exam
to pass next January and a poker
debt to meet within a fortnight.
9. And If you do all these things,
little man, and do them well—you'll
turn out to be a model 1940 Campus
punk.
NOTICE TO I.R.C. MIMiIRS
The.International Relations Club
will hold Its first meeting of the
season at the home of Mr. F. H.
Soward, 1476 Tolmie Street, on October 14, at 8.00 p.m. The speaker
will be Dr. Angus; his subject,
"Impressions of Europe." Dr. Angus spent last summer travelling
in Europe, and his keen appreciation of social and economic factors
gives his observations a particular
interest.
WRITERS WANTED
Because of the larger also of
the Friday Ubyssey, the polioy
of publishing feature artielea has
been Inaugurated. As ean be
seen, much of this material has
been of necessity reprinted from
other college  papers.
Articles, poems, and Itema of
intereat written by U. B. C. students will be weloomed by the
publications office. Aoeordlng to
the English Department, there
Is plenty of potential writing
talent on the oampus. Why
shouldn't sueh writers contribute to the Ubyssey? We will
weleome any material that is
submitted.
RHODES PAMPHLET
The Rhodes Scholarship Selection
Committee has left with the Registrar two copies ot a pamphlet—
"What the American Rhodes Scholar gets from Oxford." Students
who are interested may borrow
these by applying at the Registrar's
Office.
STANLEY W. MATHEWS,
Registrar.
LOST
In Arts Building, Mother of Pearl
Sheaffer fountain pen. Name John
Stark is on barrel. Please return
to Mr. Home's office.
DRY, LIKE IN DESERT
Condolences to Paddy Colthurst,
who found It so dry In Sooke this
summer that he saw four trees
chasing his dog up a hill.
A    WONDERFUL    DANCE    FLOOR
Iring your party ,and enjoy this
most beautiful spot ... the
grape vinery, which it decorated
with Japanese lanternt, is something unusual in beauty.
A wonderful open fire every
evening . . . available for private parties, social meetings,
and dances . . . phone Point
Grey 39.
JUBILEE PARK
SOUTH   MARINE   ORIVf
Dirtclh t*Hu4
Tin   Vlvtnity
THIS ADVERTISEMENT, WHICH APPEARED IN THE
LAST ISSUE OF THE UBYSSEY, RECEIVED SUCH
FAVORABLE COMMENT THAT IT IS AGAIN PUBLISHED
IN THE INTERESTS OF THE ADVERTISERS REPRESENTED
IN THIS NEWSPAPER
BLIND   FLYING    IS   SAFER
THAN     BLIND     BUYING
WHEN an aviator, soaring high abovt tha clouds, is flying blind, tha radio
baam that seianca has davalopad for him, guidas him lika a talking magnet,
safaly through.
So it is with advertising, particularly tha advertisers in Tha UBYSSEY.
Through its columns ara found Vancouver's most representative advertisers—
those who offer VALUE to the readers of The UBYSSEY. Those readers are
U. B. C. Students, Parents, Grads, Faculty and Friends.
Today, The UBYSSEY is a newspaper which in the attractiveness of its
editorial design and in the excellence of its advertising content is unsurpassed
by any single issue ever previously published. Why? The answer is manifest—
because you have advertisers!   Reciprocate—
PATRONIZE YOUR ADVERTISERS
<
Number 2 in a series of adiertisements released by PACIFIC
PUBLISHERS LIMITED in the interests of their Clients—the
advertisers in The UBYSSEY.
> LINE SHAKEUP FOR VARSITY-RANGER SOCCER BA7TLE
Six
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1936
LIONS FAVORED IN GRID CLASH
Sport Snaps
by
Frank Turner
by
FRANK TURNER
EXCESS ENERGY
Freshmen are queer creatures, at
least   that's   one   man's   opinion.
Aside from being decked out in tas-
Bled green bonnets, and taking a
very active part in inane horseplay,
their   surplus   energy   apparently
vanishes ln the misty ozone.
Opportunities   await   thsm   in
every field of  University extracurricular activities,  but  either
from a deplorable lack of Intereat
In their new Alma  Mammy, or
from   unaccountable   ahy   backwardness—at a suppoaedly mature age too—theee new U. B. C.
undergrade   fall  to   become   enthused over such rosy prospects.
A scant few do decide to take a
fling   at   the   varloua   programa
open to them, but the majority
content themselves with attending lecturea, trouplng to the library, lounging in the oaf, and aim-
leaaly wandering around the campus.
In Campus Sport, there is perhaps more chance for greenies than
in any other line of endeavor—no,
I'm not prejudiced. Right up from
Minor teams to the five Major
teams, positions are waiting to be
filled. Junior managers and players
are crying needs — how about it,
Frosh ?
FITTING TRIBUTE
A great tribute was paid last
Saturday afternoon to one of the
finest men ever to attend the University of British Columbia—the
late Bobby Gaul. Bobby impressed all thoee who knew him—hia
kindly, understanding manner
never failing to make friends
wherever he went. Aa well aa
being a true gentleman, and a
briliant acholar, he waa an outstanding athlete. Making the first
Rugby team In his second year,
he played courageously under the
handicap of almost continuous
Illness, finally being choaen captain In his last year. As a fitting
remembrance to hia sportsmanship which was exemplified In alt
that he undertook, one minute's
silence was kept before the etart
of the U. B. C.-Ocasionals game,
and will be kept in years to come
before the first game between the
University and ex • University
teams.
GOLD TRIUMPHS
Our million-dollar stadium has
finally—or at least partially—repaid the efforts, and the moneys
spent by the student body. Streams
of gold flowed to absorb the pools
of water which formed on the green
moss of the playing field—with no
apparent success—until Saturday.
But Saturday, the Oold triumphed
—the soggy morass of yesteryear is
now no more. In other words, the
costly drainage system which Is
yearly changed, is now performing
Us duty. At the end of the two
games played on Saturday—played
In a steady downpour—mud, muck,
and mire were as scarce on the
stadium field as you'd like your
mother's aunt to be some broad
moonlight night.
TDITBITS
Taking a leajf out of Footballers'
books, our Senior Melon tossers
are rolling out of bed with forced
grins these mornings to practice
the basket-heaving art under the
watchful eye of Doc Montgomery,
Doc Burke's charges are all set to
climb back into the Big Four fight
tomorro wafternoon at Bob Brown's
playground—for once, they claim,
Thunderbirds will eat Lions. . .
Humor — Frank Willams, Meralo-
ma's Fullback, smearing brother
Tom in the second division tilt between 'lomas and Varsity on Saturday. . . . Harry Pearson, and BUI
Len, both members of last year's
UBC. champion ruggers, are finding it tough playing against the
Blue and Gold boys.
BURKE PINS HOPE ON
SPEEDY BACKFIELD
Parkinson Will Be Quarterback-
Season Opens Tomorrow
With two years of unsuccessful experimenting in American football behind him, Doc Burke's 1936 crop of Canadian
gridders return tomorrow to meet the North Shore Lions,
conquerors of 'Lomas, last year's champs, in the season's
opener for Varsity.
Despite the reported strength of
the Lions, the greatly-improved
bunch of pigskinners are primed
for Saturday's tilt. Doc. Burke is
determined to ring up a record for
the mantle, and with plenty of top-
notchers in the line-up, he's a fifty-
fifty bet to clean-up. Bob Twiss,
power-plant of former games, is
backing up the line, and two Frosh,
Evan ap Roberts, and Tom Williams, track stars as well as gridders, are potential backfield stars.
"PARKY" AT QUARTER
Bob Parklnaon calls the signals,
and llne-aeeplng "Osmosis" Orr
will anap the pill. Captain Bar
ney Boe, Bill Hodgson, big
"Hank" Stradlottl, Ken McRae,
Jack Wark, and Lorie McHugh
complete the Hat of blocking
bruisers up front. Marcel Qui-
guet, a tricky greenle, will get a
ahow at Plying Wing.
Most of the boys have had a bit
of trouble getting back into Canadian football form after a year of
American, but, on the other hand,
the tricks they learned from our
cousins' ball-playing should prove
mighty useful. The return to the
Canuck code has necessitated a
large amount of experiment, and
the boys are still a trifle rough in
their grooves, but a bit more oil
will probably eliminate this friction, and put them on a smooth-
running basis.
Playing Noth Shore Lions is going to be a tough proposition, even
with a large number of U. B. C.
supporters on hand to instill that
College fight into the boys. According to the potential "Lion-
bearders," the more spectators, the
more score for Alma Mammy's
entry.
With a heavy line, and a heavy
defense and fast ball-carriers, there
is about an even chance this first
experiment will work.
THE LINEUP
Orr, center; Hodgson, left guard;
Boe, right guard; Stradlottl, left
tackle; McRae (Mclvor), right
tackle; Wark, le*t end; McHugh,
right end; Guiguet, flying wing;
Parkinson, quarter; Twiss, right
half; ap Roberts, left half; Williams, full. Spares, Lowe, Light-
stone, Clark, Burnett, McDowell,
Straight, Runkle, Grey, Lewis.
"Joe" Pringle, captain and player of last year's "Pringle Rookies"-—Senior A melon tossers to
you—is once more trekking
around the campus, this year
pursuing another couple of letters to acid to his name Picked
on the mythical All-Star team
last season, he'll probabK continue his starring antics on the
basketball   floor   this  semester.
Shuttle Artists Set
Once again the badminton fiends
have sallied forth, racquet in hand,
to pursue the wily shuttle. About
forty players turned out on Monday
last, among whom were a goodly
number of promising newcomers.
It Is expected that the club's already excellent standard will be
raised appreciably.
The officers chosen at a meeting
last Thursday are Margot Martin,
president; Helen Westby, vice-
president, and Stan Haden, secretary-treasurer.
The club plans, this year, to enter
a team In the city "B" league, with,
they hope, gratifying results.
Membership fees for the year are
$2.00 a term, or $3.00 for two terms,
payable at Mr. Horn's office. New
members will be gladly accepted.
The meetings have been set for
Mondays and Thursdays at 7.15 p.m.
with refreshments being served
every other Thursday. The members are reminded that the American tournament scheduled for Monday next has been postponed until
the following Monday, October 19,
when all members are asked to
turn out.
Swingsters Start
Soon
Golf Tourney Set
For Friday
Once again the "dlvotees" of the
little, dimpled pill are getting set
for a swing session on the wide,
open spaces of the University Golf
Course. Such oldsters as Ward
Allen and Gordie Livingstone feel
in the mood to hand the newcomers
a lesson, hut the boys may get a
shock, if rumor proves correct.
Some of the freshmen are said to
be great guns on the tees and
greens, so that there may be many
a  rare old battle of the brassies.
Last year's captain, Ted Charlton,
and Pete Sharpe, are not here this
season, and thus Varsity is deprived of its two top men. Commerce
here couldn't hold them any longer,
and now the world of business has
claimed them as its own. From
now on, Ted and Pete will have to
do their swinging when the boss is
away, or when his daughter needs
a partner. (Perhaps Commerce
isn't a bad course.) But it certainly has split up a fine team, and the
whole club regrets the loss.
Still, the golf swingsters will try
to keep up the high standard set
by this renowned pair, and the resultant scores should be something
to hang up in the study.
Rowers Are Busy
According to a statement from
the rowing club, a tall meeting
with the crews of Washington and
Oregon State may take place this
year.
In order to prepare themselves
for this ambitious program practices are being held every Saturday afternoon at Coal Harbour.
In this connection Coach Brand
states that a definite practice crew
will be formed on Saturday.
SOCCER ON
SATURDAY
Varsitv Confident of Win
Over Rangers
With the same players but ln a
brand new lineup the Varsity soccermen go confidently out to meet
the Rangers tomorrow at Kerrisdale park.
This team ahakeup followed the
extra practlee called Tuesday for
the purpoae of finding out why
the 0-0 loss to the Twigg Island
occurred last week.
The new lineup, club officials report, Is designed so as to fit in with
the capabilities of the various players.
CROLL FULLBACK
Croll, formerly at fullback, now
defends the net; the freshmen, Mahood and Foster, who were outside
and inside rights respectively, are
now inside right and center, still
teamed and expected to do a great
deal more damage than previously;
McBurney, ex-right half, now covers Inside left, to complete the
change.
Moodle, right back; Sutherland,
left back; Ruah, right half;
Quayle, center half; "Blah" Thurber, left half; Chapman, outaide
right; and Cheayer, outaide left,
all retain their old slots, the ones
in which they feel most at home.
This lineup has already proved
more manoeuverable and more
smooth-working.
FRRESHMEN GOOD
Mahood   and   Foster,   two   freshmen,   work   ho   well   together   that
Coach Hitchins has decided to keep
them next each other regularly as
a double threat.    These two keep
at it steadily, and can be seen getting in a workout nearly every day,
with   results   that   will   prove   astounding,  to opponents especially.
Moodie, last year'a Juniors captain,  is  showing   up   very  well,
according to Manager Dave Kato,
while Thurber shows better form
than ever.   Alt these boys will be
on display Saturday at 3 o'clock,
ready to wipe out the slight slipup of laat week.   The opposing
team is the Rangera, a strong aggregation    from    the    Inter-City
League of 1935-36.
JUNIORS TO PLAY
The Juniors also have a game
Saturday, unscheduled at the time
of writing. These lads are in the
2nd Division, G.V.A.A., and are doing their best to make a fine showing. We wish them all the best of
luck, especially the freshmen. Cuo-
sin, centre, and Ferguson, as well
as Jack Logan, halfback. These
three are showing promise, and
have good chances of making the
Seniors next year.
Alaska-Varsity Ice
Scries Mooted
The much-mooted series with the
Fairbanks, Alaska hockey team
may be arranged if Varsity's icemen can assure the Northerners of
an appreciable gate.
Although no Information has been
divulged as regards the merits of
the Arctic Circle puckchasers, It is
believed that they are a fast-playing, colorful aggregation.
Varsity, too, will field a hard
fighting skating mob this year, for
most of last year's squad has returned and will be in fine fettle
for future frays, Clarence Taylor,
Big Block winner of last year, will
return, and Jim Usher, Ron Andrews, Framp Price, Paul Trussel,
Maury Lambert, Ralph Cudmore,
Frank Perry and Jack McKenzie,
all of last year's lineup will again
appear on the Ice.
Arrangements have been made
with Guy Patrick for the boys to
practise at an early-morning or
late-evening hour, and a general
meeting will be held soon to decide
on  a definite time  for practice.
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FOOTBALL
Student tickets for tomorrow's
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Varsity vs. North Shore. Price,
25 cents.
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Varaity vs. North Shore, Athletio
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SOCCER:
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Park, 2.30.
RUGBY:
Varaity vs. Rowing Club, Brockton Point, 2.00.
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"WASTE TIME IS LOST TIME"
We pick up and deliver your car
while   you   are   at   your   classes. Friday, October 9, 1936
THE     UBYSSEY
.Seven
Ellis To Play Full-back As Dobbie Switches Line
SAVE AT WALSH'S  $  SAVE AT WALSH'S  $  SAVE
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C.O.T.C Now Uses
New Armories
"Lett . . . left . . . lett . . . left
. . . Ho!" roae the mighty parade-
ground voice ot Quartermaster-Sergeant-Instructor A. A. Smith above
the din ot trampling teet, thumped-
down rifle butts and the plaintive
bleats ot newly joined recruits on
Tuesday night. The U. B. C. contingent of the Canadian Officers'
Training Corps was holding Its first
drill and Instruction parade of the
season In the brand new Seaforth
Armories.
The budding "Second Loots"
greeted with joy their elevation
from the cluttered premises of the
mechanical lab and the dingy halls
of the Beatty Street Drill Hall of
years gone by, to the spic and span
new floor on Cedar Street.
This year an exceptional number
of recruits have Joined the Corps,
and a record enlistment Is in sight.
In addition, the "B" certificate
class, seeking the qualifying papers
for captain's rank, is starting out
with more than a dozen attending.
Lectures for the "A" and "B" classes commenced this week.
At the conclusion of Tuesday's
parade, the members of the Contingent held a meeting to outline a
social program for the unit. With
Lieutenant A. D. Greenwood presiding, they elected a committee to decide on the form the program will
take, which will probably be a series of dinners or Informal dances
of some sort each month.
Shooting on the Blair Rifle Range
for members will commence this
month, and the gentle rookies are
being rapidly instructed whtch end
of their Lee-Enflelds they should
point toward the target — and at
nothing else,
f SportraitS !
\       Frank "Vic" Perry       J
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Lloyd Detwiller
1917 is a memorable date in the
history of the world for that was
the time of the birth of Lloyd "Det"
Detwiller. The Americans first entered the war on that date, too, but
that, ln the sight of posterity is
comparatively unimportant.
Yes, It was in 1917, in a little
hamlet in Saskatchewan that "Det"
first saw the light of day, and it
was on that day that he first decided to become a Scienceman. It
was not until 1936, however, that
he really saw the light, for this
year "Det" — curly-haired, saxophone • tootling, orchestra - leading
hoop star "Det," Scienceman de
luxe, deserts his faculty for a career In Commerce.
Lloyd played on Varsity's Senior
A basketball squad last year—a recruit who made good. He tore 'em
down to pint size In his position as
guard, and was a consistent point-
getter when up-front. Won a Big
Block ln his freshman year and
modestly says he didn't deserve it.
Some ot "Det's" pals klddingly remark that he's probably right at
that.
"Det" recently squad-carred back
from a summertime truck-driving
career at Barkervllle, but he has
now settled back Into the complac*
ency of normal living by rising at
the ungodly hour of 5.30 ln the
morning to do r die for dear ole'
Alma M„   Yea, Detwiller!
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Province Bldg.   Trinity 1945.
Co-Ed Basketball
The Province girls' basketball
team is feeling sad indeed these
days. Last year they lost Isabel
Campbell, a good point-getter to us,
and this year, their prize young
guard, Ruth Wilson, has joined the
Blue and Gold ranks.
To add further to their dejection
the benevolent Province-ites have
unwillingly provided an assistant
for the co-eds—a male from the
Senioar A team. This latter good
deed came about because a doctor
decided that young, good-looking
Ian McLeod, of basketball fame,
should stop strenuous play, but
stated he would be allowed to
coach.
Thus, Mr. McLeod came here to
help Doc Montgomery, and consequently there is a very large turnout of girls for our teams. This
turn-out means more competition,
and playing, hence causes plenty
of moaning by the newspaper
lassies.
But the Province team is not the
only one in broken bits, for the
Spencer, and Blue Ribbon squads
have also found themselves without
many of  last  year's stars,
VARSITY ROWERS CLASH
IN SATURDAY RUGBY TILT
Ellis Will Play in Fullback Spot—
Line-up Released Thursday
By ALAN MORLEY
A three-quarter line with a ripple and a flash, responsive, fast,
sure, daring, perfectly co-ordinated
and furiously determined.
That is what Captain A. G. Dobbie, coach of the Thunderbird English rugby men is looking for (as
what coach Isn't) for Saturday's
game against the Rowing Club at
Brockton Point. The interesting
part is, though, that he may have
found it.
In the line-up released Thursday
by Captain Carey, of the first team,
the backfield has distinct possibilities that way.
Ellis is shifted to fullback on the
strength of his performance against
the Occasionals last week. If he
can hold the anchor position safely,
Varsity's chances are distinctly
good.
In front of him the shock troops
of the three-quarter line will be
Strat Leggatt, Johnny Bird, Lumsden and Wilson, all tried and true
men of many season's Work for the
Blue and Gold, except Lumsden,
who is a find promoted from the
second team. Coach Dobbie thinks
he is a distinct possibility. Bird,
star fullback of last season, performed well in his new position last
Saturday.
More difficult was the choosing
of the forwards, with several good
men offering from the second team.
Hobson won the only spare berth,
and the pack will be J. Andrews,
Madeley, Hobson, Pyle, Harmer,
Maguire, Watson and Swan.
It is hoped that they will be able
to compete on equal terms with the
heavy Rowers.
Carey, of course, is scrum-half,
with Willoughby in the five-eighths
position.
The second team, which meets
New Westminster at Douglas East,
lines up as follows:
Fullback, Whitelaw; three-quarters, Trussel, Andrews, Ellis, College; halves, Mackie, Whittle; forwards, Robertson, Stewart, Housser, McCammon, Billings, Ark-
right, Leckie-Ewing, Tupper. Ellis
will captain the team, with Housser leading the pack.
The thirds, opposing West Vancouver at Douglas West, has Butters as fullback; Smith, Drabble,
Ross and Maitland in the thme-
quarter-llne; Day-Smith and Grlffln
as halves; E. Robertson, Roberta,
J. Campbell, Knox, Bardsley, Gross,
Morrison and J. Pyle for forwards.
Smith is the captain.
Livingstone Is Chosen
Golf Prexy
Succeeeding Ted Charlton, Gor
don Livingstone, well-known city
golfer and quarter finalist ln the
B. C. Amateur, was elected president of the student golfers at a
meeting held Tuesday.
Ward Allan, Shaughneaay Golf
Club'a junior ohamplon, waa chosen to aaalat Livingstone In tha
eapaelty of Secretary.
Further buainaaa of tha meeting waa dlaeuaalon of plana for
tha annual Varaity golf tournay
and an Inter-oolleglate atriea with
unlveraltlea In tha Pacific Northwest.
Despite the tact that the golfers
have only three of last year's men
returning, they were considerably
strengthened by the addition to club
membership of such men as Jack
Stark, Curley McDowell, Doug
dross and Bob Wilson, finalist in
the 1934 Varsity tournament.
Dr. Wilbur S. Watson
DENTIST
RESIDENCE OFFICE:
4494 Wast 9th Avenue
3.00 to 8.00 p.m.
Talaphone:   Point Gray 652
Sask.-Alta. Clash
In Grid Battle
Huskies Win
Close Contest
A perfect movie finish was ruled
out by a conference of officials to
leave the Saskatchewan Huskies
victors by 5 to 3 over the Alberta
Golden Bears, in a wide-open, cleanly played game at the opening of
the University Stadium last Saturday afternoon, before a 2000 strong
crowd. The Albertan passer attempted to pass on a fake end run.
It was blocked by Morrison and hit
Wilson, becoming a "free" ball.
Morrison picked it up and ran it
over the touchllne. Colb McEown,
referee, admitted not seeing the
ball at the time, but head linesman Clarence Cook claimed that it
touched the ground before Morrison got It, making the play an Incomplete pads, and the touch which
had brought the crowd up on the
seats an Invalid play.
ALBIRTAN8  HAVE  EDQI
Prom tha beginning ef tha
game It was obvloua that tha Al-
bartana had ths sdgs ovsr ths
Husklss In )hs kicking department, and wars also their supsr-
lora In running baek kloka. Woy-
wltka and Wllaon never failed to
take ths ball baek tan or twslvs
yarda. Bast fsatura of tha Husky
playing waa their bucking. Tha
line could alwaya find a hols or
make a hole and the ball-carrier
hit hard and oftsn. Few paasss
wars attempted and none completed, though three were intercepted, two by Alberta and one
by Sask. The game waa an exceptionally clean one, penaltiea
being given only for Interfsrence
and offsides.
Tracksters Prepping
Three afternoons a week spike-
footed college undergrads fly over
the cinders of the Varsity oval under trackmaster "Maury" Van Vliet.
These track sessions are held in
preparation for the coming fall
meets, the first one one the books
being the Frosh-Varsity slated for
October 23rd, followed in a week's
time by the annual Varslty-Inter-
High clash, and the Arts '30 Road
Race.
Captained thla year by husky
Jim McCammon, holder of the U.
B.C.  recorda  in  both  8hot  and
Javelin heaving eventa, the cln-
der-pathera   are   figuring   on   a
polnt-aweeping aeaaon.   Not only
have they gathered In a bunch of
promising Froah atara, but thia
year they have aotually Instilled
aome  of that  mythical  College
Spirit into their workouta.
Looking over the tracksters' roll
call we find several names of former High School stars.    Heading
the list are four greenhorns who
hav ebeen showing spiked heels to
High School opponents consistently
for the past few years—Tom Williams,   Evan   Ap   Roberts,   Vance
McComber and Jim Brown.
When not playing the grid game,
Tom can usually be seen prancing
around the track, prepping for his
two favorite distances, the 220 and
440-yard sprints. Jim Brown is the
other speedster in the quartette, his
races including the 100-yard dash.
Ap Roberts is the only hurdler to
appear on the campus for many
moons, but his versatility enables
him to be an expert shot putter,
and javelin-heaver to boot. A
crack half miler completes the Al
prospects in the person of Vance
McComber.
Correspondence
Editor of Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Pursuant to the resolution passed
at Wednesday's A.M.S. meeting,
there will be another meeting, November 4, to discuss and take ac-
tion*on the "Student Pass System."
May I express my personal regret
to the students that their time was
so unfortunately wasted at Wednesday's meeting.
Yours sincerely,
JOHN G. OOULD,
President, A.M.S.
DOES DECIDING where and
what to buy things bother you?
Just glance over THE UBYSSEY
advertisements. Tbe business
firms and merchants represented
firms and merchants represented
tn THE UBYSSEY can easily
and completely satisfy your
every need. You will find it
convenient and profitable to do
so. Each firm represented it
prominent in its particular field.
DINE	
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PATHS AND TRAILS—AWAIT
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Starting at 33rd—down to Marine—Through the frail to Im-
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May We Have You as Our Guests?
POINT GREY RIDING ACADEMY
4100 West 33rd Avenue Kerr. 2074
ft TOTEfll UiORTHV Of OUR KLfflA fflATEft
A new "TOTEM"—year book of our activities—is proposed by your Publications Board. Larger, thicker, more
beautifully bound, full of pictures of our University life,
the new "TOTEM" is truly worthy of our Alma Mater.
All we need is YOUR support —1,000 caution money
Waivers for $1.50. Make this new book possible—come
and sign your Waiver now.
Publications Office     •     -  Auditorium Building Eight
THE    UIYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1936
SPEAKER TELLS
OF INCREASING
FASCIST TREND
Dr. Visser T. Hooft
Addresses Noon
Meeting
"The world of today, wltb Its
science and philosophy, has completely broken apart the mediaeval
University and has left its modern
counterpart no integration or unity
whatsoever. Students in the University have had no Integral philosophy of life. As a result, when
men like Mussolini and Hitler offered them a comprehensive Ideal,
students eagerly joined the ranks
of Fascism."
STANDPOINT OP STUDENT
Such was the relation of Fascism
to the University as seen by Dr.
Vlsser T'Hooft of Holland, when he
addressed an audience that completely filled Arts 100 Tuesday
noon.
Speaking on "The Menace of Fascism" the distinguished visitor, who
from much first-hand observation
knows his subject thoroughly, approached the topic from the standpoint of the etudent. He showed
how,,In the confusion and drifting
that followed the war, students
were not able to find a satisfactory
and integrating philosophy in the
University, and how they turned
to.Fascism, which offered them all
they asked.
"Fascism has integrated etudent life. It haa given atudenta a
totalitarian philosophy—a philosophy which haa the courage to
enter every aapeet of life. It
doea not claim to be merely a
aoolal, or political, or philosophical view of life: It embodies
DENIES INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS
After warning hia audience
against the danger of taking Fascism too superficially, the speaker
turned to attack it, denouncing It
chiefly for taking away the right
of the individual to seek the truth.
"Instead of serving Truth, the Fascist interprets it to suit his own
ends. It is a concept of truth
which strikes at the root of all
that is best ln the University."
Dr, T'Hooft then attacked Fascism from the standpoint of Chris
tianity. He declared that a new
god had been set up—the nation—
to whom complete and final loyalty
must be given, and which defined
"good" only as "that which served
the nation."
"How can we flght Fascism? An-
ti Fascism is not enough, for Fascism is such a positive force that
only something more positive can
combat it. We must find a new integrating or Fascism will win."
"Personally, I believe that only
a totalitarian Christianity is strong
enough to triumph. There is yet a
way out for the world — and the
Universities—from the challenges
of the mass movements, but it Is
at a high cost, It is simply to take
our Christianity seriously,"
Dean Buchanan Introduced the
speaker, and George Nicholson, S.
CM. President, moved the vote ot
thanks at the conclusion of the address.
Aber To Take
Totem Photos
Aber Studios, Totem photographers for the 1937 volume, will begin |
their work on the campus promptly j
at 1.30 Tuesday afternoon.    Tuesday's  Ubyssey  will  announce  the i
whereabouts of the campus studio
where Mr. Aber will be located for
the coming seven weeks.
Sample folders of the type to be
included with the one dollar Totem
photograph are on display at the
foot of the Caf stairs. This attractive folder, for which Mr. Aber has
exclusive rights in the city, will be
given every student whose picture
is taken for the Totem.
The first schedule of photo appointments appear below. Students
are urged fervidly to be prompt and
unfailing in appearing for their appointments.   Please note below:
Tuesday afternoon: 1.20: Paddy
Colthurst, Rosemary Bawden, D. A.
Darling, Margaret Hughes, Kiyoko
Yoshlda, W, N. English.
2.30: Dick Elson, Audrey Hamilton, Kenneth Grant, Shuichl Kusa-
ka, Walter Barss.
3.30: Mabel Pearce, Hugh Ham-
ersley, Lloyd Hobden, H. F. Alexander, M.E.
Announcement of the campus studio will be made in Tuesday's Ubyssey.
Seniors To Revive
Age-Old Gown
Controversy
Arts '37 Executive
Plans to Bring
Up Matter
By KEN GRANT
Dracula and Faust will have
nothing on the Senior Class
In the way of sinister dignity
If the conspiracy to bring
back gowns for upperclassmen succeeds at the Arts '37
class meeting next Tuesday.
The suggestion has been
made before on several occasions' but this time It is rumored that a large minority
of the class are behind the
idea and expect to push it
through without much opposition, since the meeting will
be held in the Applied Science
100, which is considered outside the cruising radius of the
average reactionary Artsman.
WEAR AND TEAR
The motives behind this new
drive for gowns are not known, but
it Is thought likely that the suggestion comes from some of the less
impressive looking Seniors who
suffer from inferiority complexes
in the presence of husky, noisy
Frosh. The old alibi about saving
wear and tear on clothes will probably be mentioned at the meeting,
but that Is as much a part of the
gown tradition as the actual garment and will probably be listened
to with great reverence by all.
The sight of black gowns billowing down gloomy corridors
and acroaa the windy quad will
lend a sombre monastic note to
the Univereity, which ought to
raiae the scholastic standard con-
aiderably, it la felt by those who
worry about auch things.
Meanwhile,  several   Seniors  are
practicing some of the fundamental principles, of gown wearing in
the Council office, such as the state- j
ly descent of staircases, the awesome   entrance   of   lecture   rooms
(done by clutching the folds closely
to the throat with  the  left hand,
elbow leading, and holding the note-1
book close to the body in the right, j
and walking with a noiseless glide), !
and the nonchalant shrug perfected
by Council members at A.M.S. meetings, which means, "I am ready to
listen   now.     Kindly   commence."
The possibilities along these lines
are   unlimited,   the   experimenters
state,   and   arrangements   may   be.
made with the Players' Club to se
cure expert lecturers to help Seniors through the first self-conscious
days.
iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimtm
aurownd
the campus
by darby j
ITiitiniiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiHiuiiwmmtl
CORRESPONDENCE
The Editor, Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
A meeting of the boarders in Salisbury Lodge was held on October
1. A president and committee were
elected as follows:
President, Allan P. Fawley; house
committee, Howard Alexander, Ted
Jackson, George Turner; recreational committee. Maurice Lambert,
Bill Tater, Bernard Neary.
Attention was drawn to some of
the publicity that Salisbury Lodge j
had received In the Sept. 29th Ubyssey and the Sun of September 30. j
The meeting Instructed me to write '
to you and let you know that they
were not pleased with your state- \
merit  that  the   food   at  Salisbury j
was "good and fairly plentiful" and |
to inform you  that the food here ,
is both good and very plentiful.   If
you have any doubts In this respect,
drop in and have a meal with us
to see for yourself.    The house is
full to capacity, almost to overflowing, but everyone Is well looked after and there have been no complaints regarding accommodation.
Salisbury Lodge is still under
private management even though
the boarders draw up their own
regulations regarding discipline,
etc. Mrs. Hassall, the proprietress,
offered to co-operate with the S.C.
M. and agreed to provide good
board at reasonable rates If the S.
CM. would assist her to obtain a
required number of student boarders. She also agreed to permit
these boarders to be self-governing
so far as discipline and conduct
were concerned. She has carried
out her part of the agreement and
it is only fair that we help correct
some of the current rumors regarding the management of Salisbury
Lodge.
I trust that you will assist us in
this effort.
Yours very truly,
G. A. TURNER.
A large paper seems to be bringing back columnists and others who
delight in writing to fill space. The
crab has re-established himself on
Page 2 every Friday, while the
"Student Prince,' whoever he may
be, Is invading the Tuesday issue.
The current crop of frosh has
been the topic of enough patter in
the Ubyssey already, but allow me
a last word. Freshmen must be
getting a grand idea as to the quality of university students. What
with riots in the quad, bad manners
at pep meetings, and tragic happenings at A.M.S. meetings and
snake parades, the Impression that
the children are receiving must be
pretty bad.
Let me point out but one thing;
there was no trouble on the campus
until the brats of 1940 appeared on
the scene. Other classes have been
foolish, but they have used a little
discretion. What we have now
seems to be the pure "depression
youth," careless, carefree, and absolutely devoid of responsibility.
With that done, let us now go to
the snake parade.
SLIME MARCHES ON
While it Is not considered quite
proper for any upperclassman to
lend his stamp of approval to a
freshman activity, one has to admit that the snake parade offered
plenty of excitement.
Our party, when it started out at
7.45 Tuesday night consisted of: 1
editor in-chief, 1 Totem editor, 1
cameraman, 1 ordinary student, 1
girl friend and a columnist.
It didn't take long" to lose most
of the party, although the columnist, as is usual with such, kept
along with the two ladies. The Totem editor and the cameraman, evidently longing for excitement, stopped to take in "Anthony Adverse."
The ordinary student couldn't resist the call of the mob and joined
up with the paraders, becoming vertebrae No. 357 of the snake.
"These Three" continued on our
way. observing much on the route,
No connected memories come back
from that night of speed and noise,
but a general impression that Vancouver had gone insane seems to
tick in the mind.
Odds and ends ... a prominent
pepster on the stage of the Royal,
standing in front of the screen on
which was showing the antics of
Wheeler and Woolsey ... a seasoned old news vendor at Hastings
and Richards who looked at the
parade and remarked with a grin.
"Them's the student gang." ... a
recent, oh so very recent A. M. S.
president and his lady companion
sipping beer in the Georgia as the
gang passed through . . . the detailed instructions given to the parade leaders by certain ex-varsity
students who seemed to be running
the affair . . . the boos that the
Beacon got when the doors were
barred . . . and the surprise when
the boys arrived at the rear stage
door and got in anyway ... the surprisingly few who dropped by the
wayside in the shows . , . and the
ditto for the "refreshment parlors."
The awful few minutes spent in
a drug store while first aid was
rendered to the boy who injured
his hand . . . and the presence of
mind displayed by a pepster who
handled the emergency situation.
Stu Keate looking at the line and
then dashing to the Beacon to warn
his pal, Leon Errol, that the British were coming . . . the little
Japanese girl that insisted on tag
ging one of the press party , . . and
the noticeable absence of any student officials. (Gould was seen
walking north on Granville Street,
at Davie, about 10.50.)
Arts School Fills
Real Need
New Institution Offers a
Varied Course
Filling a long-felt want in Vai
couver for a school that teaches
art of both a practical and saleable
nature, the Canadian Institute of
Associated Arts now offers courses
In Advertising, Story Illustration,
Mural Pair ting, Photography, Cartooning, Wood Carving and Animal
Drawing.
Advertising end Commercial Design, in the form of Layout for advertisements in newspapers and
magazines; Copy writing, or the preparation of the written material for
ads; and Commercial Design including lettering, creation of monograms, letterheads, greeting cards,
book and catalogue covers, freehand perspective, etc., will be
handled by Rex C. Mills, B.A. (Brit.
Col. 1925). Mr. Mills received his
early art training in Minneapolis
and later in London, England, During the^ast five years he has had
publicity experience with Union
Steamships, Ltd., besides having
work accepted by Addison, Lewis
& Associates, of Minneapolis.
Water Colour and Life Class
leading to Mural Painting are under tne direction ot Mrs. Kate
Smith Hoole, instructress for eignt
years at the Vancouver Scnool ot
Decorative and Applied Art ,now
known us the Vancouver school of
Art. Mrs. Hoole has exhibited in
Loudon, England; Tokyo, Japan;
isational Gallery, Ottawa; R. C. A.,
Montreal; Society of Uraphic Artists, Toronto; Institute ot Artists,
Seattle, and the Vancouver Arl
Uullery.
Life Class, leading to Story 111-
lustration and Portrait Painting,
will be conducted by Clark Steven-
sou. Mr. Stevenson studied at the
California Institute ot Fine Arts,
sun Francisco, aud also at the
Urand Central School of Art, New
\ork City. There he was awarded
the bronze medal for Portrait
Painting, while in Vancouver, in
11*35, he received the Beatrice
Stone Hedal for Black and White
ut the local Art Gallery,
The Crafts department will be
supervised by .Miss Maisie Robertson, (Dip. V.S.D.A.A.; scholarship
awards third and fourth years). She
has been most successful in the
wood carving of animals—a remunerative and attractive specialty.
Miss Irene Sanderson, who has
been most successful in children's
work, will be in charge of the
Children's Saturday Morning Section. .Miss Sanderson took postgraduate work at the Vancouver
Art School, and was on the staff
of the Children's Gallery Classes
for three years.
Cartooning is under the able
guidance of Mr. E. R. McTaggart,
"E. R. M." of the Vancouver "Daily
Province,'' where he has successfully free-lanced for the past five
years.
General, Amateur and Photography Classes are being held by Mr.
W. H, Best. F.R.S.A.. A.R.P.S. Mr.
Best is a well-known contributor of
technical articles to photographic
journals In England, Canada and
the United States. The courses
cover the most practical fields of
this art, in landscape, portraiture
and commercial photography.
TOTEM STAFF
Totem organization meeting, Publications office, 3.30 p.m. today.
Staff and parties interested please
attend.
THE ADVERTISERS REPRESENTED IN THE UBYSSEY
make possible tbe size of your
student newspaper. They will
appreciate your patronage.
SOPH  PARTY
The exact plans for the Arts '39
Class Party cannot he disclosed Just
yet as the date and place are to be
approved by council. It is almost
certain, however, that the Campus
headllner will be held about the end
of the month. The arrangements
for the party are practically complete but the major problem of collecting fees remains. It is up to
the Sophs to seek out executive
members and pay their dollar. Help
put the party over. The Fee-Campaign starts Monday, Oct. 12. Men!
phone your queens now!
i—WILLIS PIANOS—
Canada's Best
THE
BOWES MUSIC HOUSE LTD.
951 Granville Straet Douglas 999
FILM SOCIETY ELECTS
On October 22nd, at noon, the
newly-organized U. B. C. Film Society will have a showing in the
Auditorium of a French and German picture for its members. This
will be the first in a series of films
to be presented on the campus
through the co-operation of the National Film Society. These will be
pictures of educational and cultural
interest, previously presented by
the Vancouver branch of the society.
At the organization meeting on
Tuesday, Leslie Allen, the newly-
elected president, explained that
only members of the club may see
the film, because they are only admitted to Canada for private showing. An initial membership will be
charged of 15 cents, which will entitle the holder to at least two
showings.
Supporting Mr. Allen on the executive are: Lloyd Hobden, Vice-
President; Secretary treasurer, Helen Parker, and a committee composed of Don Munro, Allen Walsh,
Mary Moxon, and Graham Darling.
It is hoped to install permanent
sound equipment on the University
stage, and to bring at regular intervals such pictures as otherwise
would be inaccessible.
/^T^T
"\          IMPORTED FRENCH WOOLS
(<K}0tiu
fp\           Also SCOTCH and CANADIAN  YARNS
(^m&
V    r\                                    fret Instruction
\M) I    Fairfield Bldg.    44) Granville St.    Room 51
Mademoiselle Vignal    Telephone Seymour 2008
SPENCER'S
MEN'S SHOP
"The Smartest Clothes in Town"
A SATURDAY CLEARANCE
SALE
FOR UNIVERSITY MEN!
98 High Grade
SUITS and TOPCOATS
Reduced from Regular Stock
for this Event!
48 Worsted Suits. ..
formerly $27.50
22 West of England Topcoats .. . formerly $27.50
28 Hand-woven Tweed Topcoats . . . formerly $35.00
... all at one rockbottom
price
19.75
Suits are single and double-breasted models ... in
full weight English worsted fabrics. Topcoats are
mostly single-breasted raglan models. Sizes range
from 35 to 44 . . . but not every style and pattern in
every size, of course.   First come, first served.
Buy on Budget Plan terms . . . convenient
and easy to pay!
Men's Shop—Spencer's. Main Floor.
SPECIAL!
Just 33 Cravanetted Oilskin
Interlined Trenchcoats
Fawn shade, solid
leather buttons.
9-95
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED

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