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The Ubyssey Nov 27, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the  Publications Board of the University of. British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, NOVEMBER 27, 1919
Number 8
'Varsity Wins
Opening Game
UNIVERSITY   DEFEATS    ROWING
CLUB IN CLOSE GAME BY
SCORE OF 32-30
The senior basketball team of the
University won the opening game of
the City League last Wednesday night,
when they defeated the Rowing Club by
a 32-30 score. The game was extremely
close and exciting from start to finish,
and at no time did either team have a
commanding lead. The Rowing Club
finished the first half one point up on
the 'Varsity, the score being 13-12.
Towards the end of the game the
Rowers were seven points to the good,
but 'Varsity tied the score and took the
lead through good combination work.
Following this, each team took the lead
in turn. Gross scored three nice baskets for 'Varsity. Two minutes from
time Dixon put his team one point up,
but the Rowing Club evened the score
on a free shot. To Capt. "Sid" Anderson fell the honor of scoring the winning basket just before the final whistle
sounded.
"Sid" Anderson, George Gross and
Art Lord ■each secured eight points for
the winners. Lord put in six free shots
during the game.
Following is the 'Varsity line-up, with
the number of points scored by each
plaver: Guards, Gross (8) and Lord
(8); centre, Buchanan (2); forwards,
Dixon  (6)  and S. Anderson  (8).
In the afternoon the 'Varsity Intermediates scored a 34-21 victory over the
Normal team. The score at half time
was 18-14. H. Arkley was the star of
the afternoon, securing 20 points for the
winners. The U. B. C. team showed a
vast improvement over their game of
the previous week. The team: Guards,
Hunter (4) and McLennan; centre, R.
Anderson (8); forwards, McLean (2)
and Arkley  (20).
The University girls, who had little
difficulty in defeating Normal in the first
game of the season, were defeated by
the same young ladies in the second encounter, the score being 12-4. Miss
Stuart and Miss Weld scored for 'Varsity. The line-up was as follows: Guards,
M. Gordon and L. Cope; centre, G.
Weld (2); forwards, K. Stuart (2) and
E. Eveleigh.
STUDENTS, ATTENTION!
A special plea is made by those in
charge of arrangements for the Victoria
trip that all students intending to join
the 'Varsity party hand in their names
on or before  Friday, November 28th.
Student's Court
Clause Defeated
REST     OF     AMENDMENTS     SUBMITTED TO ALMA MATER
SOCIETY ADOPTED
A meeting of the Alma Mater Society
was held on Tuesday to vote upon the
amendments to the constitution proposed by the Students' Council. In pursuance of a precedent established three
years ago, Freshmen were not allowed
to vote, and, although admitted to take
part in the discussion, were relegated to
the rear of'the Auditorium, and, as the
meeting proceeded, the members of first
year melted away to more engrossing
pursuits.
The early amendments were passed
with little or no discussion, as much
needed clauses, the most interest being
shown in that adopting the name of the
"Literary and Scientific Department" to
meet the requirements of new subsidiary
societies. The amendments with regard
to the election of the secretary and
treasurer of the Students' Co'uncil direct
from the Alma Mater Society were
passed without comment.
On the consideration of Clause 5, Section (e) 3, however, the pent-up energy
of the meeting was freed, and a hot discussion of the proposed Students' Court
ensued. The matter of "closed session"
and the calling of witnesses at the trial
of any student for misdemeanor were
criticized, as was also the last clause of
the amendment, holding "moral conviction"  of  the  truth  of  the   charges   suffi-
'VARSITY LOSES
Though leading at half time by
10-9, the University basketball
team lost their second league game
to ex-Normals, 31-19, on Tuesday
night. U. B. C. line-up and points
scored: Gross, Lord (5), Buchanan (3), S. Anderson (2), and Dixon
(9).
cient proof for the members of the
court. A two-thirds majority in its favor being lacking, this amendment was
defeated.
One other change was made in the
amendments as submitted by the Council, namely, the introduction of a clause
to prevent members of the Council on
the Joint Committee voting contrary to
the wishes of the students as expressed
by the Council at a previous meeting,
without reporting to that body their
change of views.
Men's Lit. Celebrate Ladies' Night
SOAP-BOX ORATORY ENTHRALLS
AUDIENCE—ORIGIN OF THE
"CHESHIRE CAT SMILE"
The second annual Ladies' Night of
the Men's Literary Society, which was
held in the Auditorium last Wednesday
evening, was undoubtedly the most enjoyable affair that has taken place here
this term.
The programme opened with the
famous international soap-box oratory
contest. Mr. Bloomfield, a Freshman
with an imagination delightful to Professors of English Composition, was the
first speaker. Miss Janet Gilley next
took the soap-box and enthralled the
audience with a very instructive dissertation on "The Conceit of Man."
Messrs. A. Swencisky and B. Lipson
followed. Then came Miss Helen Ma-
theson, on "Smiles." Following her, Mr.
F. H. Buck told the old story of Jack
and Jill in a new way.
The last speaker was Dr. Sedgewick,
who told of his life-long search into the
mystery of the "Cheshire Cat Smile."
On coming to U. B. C, said the speaker,
his search ended, for he found smiles of
every variety in his Freshman classes.
Dr. Sedgewick was given a special prize
—a gorgeously colored tie.
Prof. J. K. Henry, the honorary
president, judged the contest and presented the prizes, voicing the appreciation of the meeting for the entertainment the speeches had afforded. Miss
Matheson was awarded first prize, a
magnificent tin medal, and Miss Gilley
received a beautiful aluminum loving
cup  as  second prize.
The party then split up into groups
according to the ribbon each had received at the door. Each group had to
choose itself a name and stage a "stunt."
"Sedgewick's Simps" gave a representation of a Rugby scrum as it appears to
■the uninitiated. Another group showed
our "Aggies" at work and rendered an
impromptu Agriculture yell. A third
section demonstrated an ideal initiation,
the ladies feeding cake on a spoon to
their male victims.
There was also a representation of the
Victory Loan parade, with Dr. R. H.
Clark starring as marshal and Beecher
Weld as standard-bearer; while the
noisiest group portrayed a practice of
our Glee Club, with Mr. G. V. Scott as
conductor. The appropriate prize of an
all-day sucker each went to "The Candy
(Continued On Page 6) THE   UBYSSEY
November 27, 1919
BOYS!
WE'VE SOME DANDY. Overcoats
and Raincoats, specially designed
for young, men;, snappy models, with
belt and waist seams. Give them the
once-over:
$30, $35 to $50
CLASSY  NECKWEAR.    All   that  is
new will be found here: $1.00 to $4.50
Fancy   Silk  Hose.     Almost  any   color
you could wish for:   $1.75 to $2.00.
Your trade  is appreciated.
RICKSON'S
Apparel for Men
820  GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SJaalfum - (Eraft
QUALITY CLOTHES
QUALITY   should   be   the   first
thing to look for, especially in
young men's clothes.
QUALITY   dominates   in   all
Fashion-Craft Clothes.
Prices moderate.
Value positive.
SHOP OF
FASHI0NCRAFT
(UllOB. $oz\tx $c do.
Sjtmttrn
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NEW TALENT MAKES ITS DEBUT
THIS EVENING
The long-anticipated "Christmas playlets" will be presented for the first time
this evening. Following their usual custom, the members of the Players' Club
are affording an opportunity for those
who have recently joined their ranks to
prove their merit before the caste is
chosen for the spring production. It is
understood that some excellent material
has been discovered among those participating in these little plays, and an
evening of real enjoyment is assured all
in attendance.
Of unusual interest to students of literature and the drama will be the production of the old miracle play, "The
Sacrifice of Isaac," as presented by
priests and choir-boys in the 11th and
12th centuries. This unusual piece will
be followed by a rollicking French farce
of the 15th century, "Pierre Patelin," in
which the clever scheming of a rascally
lawyer is amusingly depicted. The two
modern plays, with which the programme concludes, are from the pens of
the poet, John Masefield, and the expert
dramatist, Sir Arthur Pinero. In "The
Locked Chest," the work of the former,
there is presented a tense play with
some excellent situations, terminating in
a very effective climax. In Pinero's
"Playgoers," the audience will find an
example of bright farce replete with
clever lines and sparkling wit.
Tickets of admission have been distributed to the student body, those for
Thursday being of a pink color, and
those for Saturday of a greenish hue.
On Friday evening the official guests,
including the Governors, Senate and
staff, will be present, together with specially invited guests of the student body.
No one is admitted to any of the three
performances unless able to present a
card of initiation or a ticket. The doors
open at five minutes to eight, and the
curtain will be rung up at eight-fifteen.
JUNIOR   ECONOMICS   CLUB
On Thursday, November 20th, the
Junior Economics Club held their regular meeting at Chalmers' Church. Mr.
Stevenson took the chair. Papers were
read by Messrs. Limpus and Black on
"Ideal Commonwealths." Mr. Black,
who took up the particular commonwealth of "Utopia," pointed out that we
have many Utopian benefits in Canada,
such as modern, sanitary conditions and
shorter hours of labor. Mr. Limpus
touched on Plato's "Republic," Cam-
panella's "City of the Sun," Harrington's
"Oceana," and, particularly, Bacon's
"New Atlantis." Bacon believed that
scientific advancement and labor-saving
devices would bring happiness to the
masses. Mr. Limpus demonstrated that
we had all, and more, of Bacon's suggested improvements, but that the lot of
the worker was not the happy one as
anticipated in "The New Atlantis." He
asserted that this was due to the fact
that our moral and social advancement
was far behind that of science. Professor Angus, the honorary president, defended the political scientist, and suggested the blame might rather be laid at
the door of the moral educator. The
next discussion will be in the form of a
debate: "Resolved that trusts are detrimental  to  society."
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers  and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments  and   Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to-morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Evans & Hastings
 Are the	
Proud  Printers
of
U
The Ubyssey "
For 1919-1920
We make a Specialty of
COLLEGE ANNUALS
MAGAZINES
BALL PROGRAMMES
Etc., etc.
BOYS!   Give us a call before you
go elsewhere
578  Seymour  Street
VANCOUVER, B. C November 27, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
GIFTS!  GIFTS!!
31 Box of
McDonald's Chocolates
Is Always Acceptable
THEY ARE   MADE  EVERY   DAY
MCDONALD'S CHOCOLATES
793 GRANVILLE STREET, near Robson
%. 3Ut d @e.
©^elusive 3^\
urners
800 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
E. C. KILBY
'Good Goods''
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
10%  off to Returned Men
DO  YOU  MENTION  YOU  SAW  IT
IN THE "UBYSSEY"?
CIGARETTE CASES
Are among the first of favorite Christmas Gifts.
In fine  Silverplate,   from $3.00
In Sterling Silver, from $9.75
"Do    your    Christmas    Shopping    In
November."
Birks
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published.
ARTS '19 SCHOLARSHIP
The following information has been
received with regard to the scholarship
established by the class of Arts '19:
The scholarship shall be known as
"The Arts '19 Scholarship." It shall be
awarded, on recommendation of the
Faculty Committee on Scholarships, to
a third year student in Arts on entering
the fourth year.
The amount of the scholarship shall
be one hundred and fifty dollars, which
sum shall be handed over to the University at the commencement of the Fall
term; the same to be awarded in one
payment to the winner during the first
part of that term.
The conditions governing the award
shall be based on:
(l) Literary and scholastic attainments;
(3) Exhibition during undergraduate
days of moral force of character,
and instincts to lead and to take
an active interest in fellow-students  and  in University activities.
The attention of the students is drawn
particularly to the fact that this scholarship is open for competition this year.
I. S. S.
The following report has been submitted by the newly-organized branch
of the Inter-Collegiate Socialist Society
in this University:
"Socialism in some form or another,"
said Arnold Bennett, in a letter to the
Inter-Collegiate Socialist Society, "is
almost certain to be the chief politics of
the future"; and this prophecy is not far
from being realized. The swift revolutionary changes of the past few years,
the prevailing industrial unrest and the
universal social discontent show that
Socialism is now a vital movement that
can no longer be ignored.
This movement demands—not only
from its supporters, but especially from
its opponents—a clearer conception than
that of the average educated person who
confuses anarchism, syndicalism and
Socialism with one another, and vaguely
associates all three with bomb-throwing
and disloyalty. For this reason there
has been organized here a chapter of the
I. S. S., which was formed in 1905 "for
the promotion of an intelligent interest
in Socialism among college men and
women."
The society has no creed, exacts no
pledges, and admits to membership any
student, regardless of political views.
The meetings of the society, for the
present, are being held on Wednesdays,
at noon, and will be announced on the
bulletin boards. Any criticisms of Socialist theory or practice, either delivered personally at our meetings or addressed in writing to the secretary,
would be much appreciated.
When the Universities of Toronto and
Queens meet in intercollegiate Rugby
games, reserved seats are sold at $1.10
and bleachers at 55 cents. And it would
be a great inspiration for Western students to see the crowds that turn out to
the games.    Carry on, U. B. C.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
c o a c h i n g, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
.    DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,    bears   that
well-known
Sprott Shatv Stamp**QuaIitp
R. J. SPiiOTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
LITERARY CLUB
Yet another infant society has made
its appearance in the University A
gathering of literature enthusiasts was
summoned on Thursday by Mr. Larsen
tor the purpose of organizing lor the
study of English Literature. The following officers were elected: Honorary
president, Mr. Larsen; president, Miss
K. Grant; secretary, Miss A. Ure'
archivist, Miss E. Marwick. The initial
meeting will be held on the second
ruesday of the spring session, when
Miss Marwick will give a paper on "The
Poetry of John Masefield." Any desirous of joining the society should send
in  their  applications  to  the  executive.
(With Apologies to Rudyard Kipling)
If you can  talk with  Sophs,  and  keep your
virtue,
Or walk with Profs, nor lose the common
touch;
If   Fred's   remarks   on   essays   cannot   hurt
you,
If   Co-eds   count   with   you,   but   not   too
much;
If you can lead the Lit., edit these pages,
Play  Rugger,   dance,' yet  get your  class-
work done—
You're   what   the   world's   been   looking  for
for ages—
You're the Nietschean superman, my son!
J. W.
ARTS DANCE
The Arts Men's Executive wishes to
remind the students yet again of the
date set for the Arts dance—December
4th. Dancing will start «at 9 and continue till 1. THE   UBYSSEY
November 27, 1919
CLUBB   &
STEWART
LIMITED
Headquarters for Young Men
for the past 30 years
at*
Our stock of Young Men's Suits
and Overcoats this season is
better than ever
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS   for
New Models
309    to    3 J 5
Hastings Street W.
Exclusive Designs in
CHRISTMAS   GREETING   CARDS
(Business  and Personal)
CHRISTMAS PAPETERIES
GIFT   BOXES   OF   STATIONERY
LEATHER GOODS
IVORY  MANICURE  SETS
VOLLAND'S   CHILDREN'S   GIFT
BOOKS
FRAMED MOTTOES
HALLOWE'EN   SPECIALTIES
BIRTHDAY
AND   FRIENDSHIP   CARDS
WEDDINGS
AND   CONGRATULATIONS
BIRTH    ANNOUNCEMENTS
MEMORIAL  CARDS
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and Printers
572 Granville St.,   Vancouver
_     British Columbia
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Issued every Thursday by the Publications  Board
of  the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
f Lillian  Cowdell
Associate  Editors <  H.   L.   Keenleyside
(c D. Taylor
Chief   Reporter A.   II.   Imlah
Exchange Editor T.  P.  Peardon
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager J.   N.   Weld
Advertising  Manager L.   Fournier
a     • .     . (D.  A.   Wallace        D.  Mclntyre
Assistants ' ,,,   ,, „ T   „
^ W.  McKee J. Berto
Circulation   Manager A.   Crawford
Editor for the Week Miss L.  Cowdell
THAT VICTORIA TRIP
"Of course, you're going to Victoria
with the teams," we said the other day
to some friends in the hall. "Victoria?
When — what teams?" was the unsatisfactory answer. Realizing the fact, sad,
but true, that all too little is known as
yet of the second annual trip at Christmas, the "Ubyssey" wishes to draw the
attention of the students to the arrangements now being concluded for a repetition of last year's visit.
According to the latest reports, the
'Varsity group will invade the Island on
the night of December 19th, a considerable reduction being made in the fare if
a sufficiently large number cross. The
long-awaited opportunity for the Rugby
team to decide the drawn game of last
Christmas will be given on the afternoon
of the 20th, while attempts are being
made to stage games with the ice
hockey and basketball teams, both men
and women. The U.B.C. soccerites also
plan to play a Capital City team.
Last winter's trip was an unqualified
success—and it was only the first experiment. The games were well worth
seeing, and the holiday spirit reigned
supreme. This year an even better turnout of students is looked for. Begin now
to think the matter over, and give your
support to the wearers of the blue and
gold in the inter-city games. Come on,
'Varsity!
•*• *& V
LEADERSHIP AND  LABOR
We have heard many times the old
story of the importance of the University in moulding the leaders of the future. So often, indeed, have we heard
it, that we have become careless in listening. Nevertheless, sometimes we find
it expressed in some new manner—some
hitherto unnoticed phase or turn of the
subject brought forward in a way to
strike even the sophisticated minds of
"the rising generation." In the editorial
column of "The 'Varsity" we find such
a view taken of the matter, commenting
on the realization of the importance of
universities by labor. We take the liberty of quoting from the article:
"One of the leaders of British labor
recently demanded in the name of labor
an immediate increase in Government
grants to universities and colleges
throughout Great Britain. These statements taken separately are unusual
enough to excite comment; together
they afford a solution to the riddle of
modern time. The university is the
spring from which our civilization
draws its life.
"Students go from its halls into the
greater world outside with both the
teaching of the classroom and the influence of their associates indelibly stamped on their character. By reason of the
fact that university life teaches the student to think, to judge, and to discriminate, he is placed on a higher mental
plane than most of hjs less fortunate
fellow-men. He is trained to be both a
thinker and a doer, a philosopher and a
man of action. Thus he inherits, as it
were, from his Alma Mater the fundamental qualities of leadership. The university is the diamond point of civilization.
"Labor is slowly but surely realizing
this fact. It is beginning to understand
that its one chance of attaining its object is through the university, by education and not by force. But a battle won
is not always a victory. The Goth
surged over the Roman world and conquered it; yet that same Roman civilization bound the wild barbarian mind and
subdued his soul. So now a great world
wave of masses—call it Labor if you
like—is sweeping into channels hitherto
barred to its force. It is hammering at
the gates of that Aristocracy of Education, and those gates are yielding gradually, year by year. Labor will win—it
must win by reason of its very momentum. But in that victory, it will be conquered, it will be chained, and broadened, it will be moulded into a new and
nobler thing.
"It has been said that we are living at
a critical time in the world's history.
Indeed we are. There are titanic forces
at work around us. The world is in
labor and great are its pains. This century will see a new civilization wrought
from the ruins of the old.
"But few of us realize the magnitude
of these movements or appreciate their
significance. We, who are supposed to
lead, should have eyes that see, that we
may read the writing on the wall, and
prepare ourselves to be true leaders in
this  great  struggle that  lies ahead."
EX CATHEDRA
By the Editor for the Week
Within three hours of the distribution
of the "Ubyssey" last week the office
notice boards had been rearranged. We
appreciate the compliment. Dreams are
coming true. The Student Council
board alone shows no improvement.
Mr. Ridington has recently published
a tract, entitled "Footmarks I Have
Met," or "Keep Your Pedal Extremities
Attached to the Mosaic."
If the male members of the Students'
Council would set the example, there is
a possibility of the ordinary students
obeying the regulations re smoking in
the halls.
Dr. Eastman (starting to read the
roll)—If any of you are not here, please
call out. November 27, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
Dr. Sedgewick, when interviewed in
regard to the Professors' football team,
refused "to be butchered to provide a
Roman holiday." The Doctor was very
wise.
As mere students, we wonder if Kipling himself could write on the "Spirit
of Kipling's  Fairy Books"?
Far be it from us to criticize, but
those essay subjects from the Literary
Department are at least worthy of "honorable mention."
The    Historical   and    Economic   subjects are both interesting and timely.
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name, but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer.
Personally, I don't care—for I forget what
a two-dollar bill looks like. I have one
framed, but can't find it. But, being a noble
philanthropist and enthusiastic Socialist, I
love putting forth the cause of others, less
intelligent and  less fortunate.
TORSERPBR.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Since some enterprising student of Arts '22 has deigned to bestow the
epithet "Freshmores" on the ex-male members of that class, I should like to make a
little suggestion of my own for the distinction of 'the young ladies who are also ex-
members of that year, and, with that object in view, I put before you the epithet,
"Freshyette."
CONFUCIUS.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir;—Permit me, through your popular column, to ask the executive of the Arts
Men's Undergraduate Society one question
—one only, and that a simple one: Have
they ever had any college spirit? If so,
what prompted them, then, to cast aside
that reckless spirit and send out invitations
to their dance, to outsiders, when there are
two hundred 'Varsity students weeping and
gnashing their teeth because they can't secure tickets? Why fill up the hall with
outsiders, and call it a college dance? It
was rumored that the dance was to be exclusive. Apparently so! Exclusively outsiders.
And who ever heard of tickets being sold
three weeks before a dance? Oh! reckless
executive, where did your business policy
originate? In some budding financier? I
suppose you never thought that many fellows had given their money to another, more
worthy, cause, and would have to wait a
week for another remittance. What's the
difference, after all? The cold cash of outsiders is as good as the hoarded pennies of
the  students.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—Of late there has been a growing tendency to put up notices in the Arts
building and forget to duplicate them in the
Science building. For this reason, if Science men do not make occasional pilgrimages to the Arts building, they are left out
of some things. One example of this is the
midnight performance at the Empress on
the 11th.
"A word  to  the wise "
CALCULUS.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—One of the functions which we
miss very much this year is the noon-hour
practice of college songs. Although feV
activities foster college spirit as these practices do, no efforts seem to have been made
to revive them. Could not the Alma Mater,
or whatever society is in possession of the
supply of song-books, take active steps to
place these in the hands of the students
who have not got 'them now, so that the
whole body could join in these enjoyable
affairs, at the first meeting, which I trust
will soon be called.
J.
SENTIMENTAL  FRESH!
Our days are slowly, surely flitting by;
And, as we move along this long, long lane
That knows no turning and but little gain,
We scarcely realize how soon may die
Each one of us;  not any earthly tie
Will hold us back when we are called to go;
Death brings vain sympathies and worthless
woe.
We look to Thee, our Guide, and then defy
Unknown   beyonds;     O   Thou   who   comfort
brought
To Hiawatha's songster o'er the bar,
Be with us, as through life we eke our lot,
For from the straight and narrow we go far,
And when the feeble candle flickers not
Heads high, we bridge the gap to Heaven's
bright star.
F.   J.   GUGGENHIME,
Arts '23.
COUNCIL NOTES
Complaints have been received from
the hospital authorities regarding the
noise made by University students on
evenings when entertainments are held
in the Auditorium. The Students' Council ask that as little noise as possible be
made when students are entering and
leaving  University  buildings.
The Students' Council request that in
the future students remain standing until speakers have left the Assembly Hall.
This courtesy is shown in other universities, and it is not asking too much from
U.B.C.  students to do likewise.
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New  and   Second-Hand
Book  Shop
Specialists  in University Books
DANCING  CLASSES
Adult Beginner Class,  starting
Monday, Dec. 1st
High   School   Beginner   Class,   starting
Saturday,  Nov.  29th
Private  Lessons  by Appointment
Saturday   Evening   Social   Dance
(by invitation)
M.  Lester Academy Sey. 1689
The New Styles Are Smart
5
OR THE WINTER SEASON we can suppty the Footwear wants
of the young man and young woman with jus! the sort of Footwear
they will enjoy wearing.    An expert Fitting Service at your command
n* INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666 GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBYSSEY
November 27, 1919
Art and Style Clothes Shop
Students!
Ifl Watch for our Dollar
Day Specials, Friday
and Saturday, November
21 si and 22nd.
Genuine
Bargains!
Ben Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Opposite Orpheum Theatre)
Trail Cut Tlowm.     funeral Work a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN  STORE:
673   Granville   Street
BRANCH STORES:
57  Hastings St., W.
932 Granville   St.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government   St.
Phone, Sey. 6410
Phone, Sey. 2313
Phone, Sey. 8723
Phone 4742
SIGMA DELTA KAPPA
The last meeting of the Sigma Delta
Kappa for this year was held on Tuesday evening. The programme took the
form of a debate: "Resolved that the
Panama Canal should be internationalized." Miss Matheson and Mr. Lipson
argued in favor of the change, from
economic, political and legal viewpoints,
while Miss Swencisky and Mr. Imlah
spoke for the negative. The decision of
the judges was given in favor of the
affirmative.
MEN'S LIT.
(Continued from Page 1)
Kids,"    who    represented   the   Arts'    20
masquerade.
Each group then selected two of its
number as their entries in the better
babies' contest. Prof. Angus and last
year's winners, Miss McCabe and Mr.
D. A. Wallace, acted as judges and
awarded the prizes to Miss K. Knowl-
ton and Mr. F. H. Buck.
Dancing commenced after supper,
the music being furnished by Messrs.
Woodside and Goodwin. The president, Mr. Alfred Rive, is to be congratulated on the successful arrangement of
the entertainment.
SOLVED   AT   LAST
One day
I went
Into  the  Library,
And there
Was
The  College  Cat.
So I stroked
Its silken fur
And asked it where
It lived.
And  it
Said:
"Down in the basement
Under  the floor,
Where the mice grow fat,
There I love to snore.
But reporters  come
And disturb my rest,
So  the  Stack-Room  shelves
I now like best."
"The Call for Leadership" was sounded by Mr. Jack Storey at the meeting of
the University Y. M. C. A. on Thursday.
The speaker dealt with opportunities of
real service which were everywhere apparent in boys' work in the city. He
told of many classes which needed
mentors, and declared that the churches
had the boys, the programme and the
equipment, but lacked the leaders.
Mr. Storey congratulated the University on their decision to attend the Des-
Moines convention, and declared that it
should furnish an inspiration. The
speaker himself attended a conference
many years ago, and was influenced to
enter the Christian leadership. He is the
paid secretary of the Y.M.C.A., and is
stationed in Vancouver to encourage
boys' work. His address was very helpful and encouraging, and many 'Varsity
boys have made inquiries concerning
this field of work.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
The Art of Speaking
Debates,   Speeches,   Play-parts,
Recitations   Coached
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
TJ. B. C.    Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite  23,  709   Dunsmuir  Street
Phone,   Sey.  6535Y
ENLARGEMENTS
Vancouver Photo Co.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
MAKE   OUR   STORE   YOUR
HEADQUARTERS FOR
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancviwr Stationers £td.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
Insist on your Dealer supplying
you with
KEYSTONE
Loose Leaf
COVERS and SHEETS
No. 2736 Open End size 5% x 8%
No. 3768 Open Side size 9% x 7%
No. 3769  Open  Side  size  10% x 8
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  & Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,    -    B. C. November 27, 1919
THE   UBYSSEY
THE COLLEGE CAT
I was left in a puddle, uncoffined, forlorn, with no one to wail or to weep;
till a single, compassionate student did
mourn to see me lie there fast asleep.
He carried me o'er to the chemistry lab.,
he gave me molasses to drink, he roused
me with muffins and nice scrambled
crab, and ice cream from Cusick's, I
think. But still not a word was I able
to speak, and the student endeavored,
in vain, to induce from me even so much
as a shriek, but my voice had been
drowned in the rain. Then he brought
stern professors, who gazed in dismay
when they saw me lie prostrated there;
they excitedly viewed me, and then went
away, all hopelessly tearing their hair.
Then came Mr. Tansley, who looked
very sad, and offered me afternoon tea,
and said: "I shall certainly say you are
mad, should you cast any blame on to
me." So at length I arose and began to
orate: "This existence supine is immense. I'd fain linger longer in this
pleasant state, but exams, are just three
weeks  hence."
PUSSY.
DEER MERTEL—JOE
Deer Mertel:
This is ritten to explain my letter in
this paper last wk. I gess you were sup-
prised to see it, but no more than me
since the name at the top was not yours
but one which someone else who was
jelus of my letter and whose name was
Joe and who had a girl named Jane had
put there. You no I dont rite to Janes,
Mertel. I was mad and went to see Mr.
Webster, who owns the paper in this
University but he was very nice, so I
didnt hirt him. He is big to but that is
nothing. You no what I am Mertel. He
said his cub reporter, which is a bear,
found my letter with the name changed
and gave it to him. He said he new I
did not no where you lived so he put my
letter in his paper, which is red by
everybody, and that you was sure to see
it. Anyhow they is no names mentioned
before or after and nobody will no who
is riteing this or who it is to. They is
lots of Joes in this Universty and maybe they think Joe Denham or Joe Schell
is riteing this. Anyhow Mr. Webster
asked me would I rite more letters for
his paper and I told him yes if he would
print the rite names. I never thot I
would ever rite for a newspaper, Mertel.
I went down to the hockey practice
on Monday. They was about 40 on the
ice and I showed them all up. I nearly
scored a goal once. They was pretty
rough, but you no what I am, Mertel.
They is a fellow hear named "Pinky"
Morrison who thay say is the best hockey player in this University but I will
let him have six goals and beat him. I
have never seen him play, but I no he is
not as good as me who has played with
the  Coquitlam  Cyclones.
They was a fine basketball game last
Wed. night which I went to and which
our team won against some fellows who
row boats. After the game I went to
the University auditorium, where they
was a dance and then I went to the
Agricultural "cowhop."    I am haveing a
M. PERRIN, Manager — 20 years with the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT   PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,   it  may  be  the   dance  floor—or  the   atmosphere   that   pervades—or   the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it  is   all   three—for   the   BARRON   is   different,   and   that   is   why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day,  including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
PHONE, SEYMOUR   7853
C. HERMANN, Proprietor
hi
l^t^lf^^fl1:1
y
-4. ■-*<jU,*r'
U.B.C.   Students  Should  Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER   SHOP
ROGERS  BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
swell time hear, Mertel, and am very
popular. They is lots of fellows jelus
of me, but you no what I am, Mertel.
This is ritten on Tuesday and tomorrow afternoon they is a game of football
between the U. B. C. team and eleven of
the professors of this University. Somebody asked me was I going. Am I?
They is a bunch of the "profs," as I call
them, who have balled me out this year
and I will be there tomorrow to return
there words with interest at 200 per
cent. I will rite again soon and tell you
about the game.
JOE.
U. B. C. TALENT IN PORTLAND,
OREGON
One of the more fortunate of our
number, who was privileged to attend
the Pacific International Live Stock Exposition in Portland last wek, called on
two former members of Arts '20, Russell Hunter and H. McMurray. We are
informed that these "dentists-to-be"
burn regularly the midnight oil and
practise the weird art of manipulating
dental instruments. And, too, Ree, urged
on by the enthusiastic "Doc," is even
now endeavoring to establish a field for
future practice by vacating their hermitage occasionally to take part in the
lighter activities of life where only those
fair ones of super-excellence and superficial charms are met with. But we must
not give the boys away. However, "Doc"
has got one redeeming feature. He says:
"Personally,  Mac,  Canada  has   got   the
real  ones;  remember  me  to  Miss   ,
and the other ladies of Arts '20.
"Say, when we get back for Christmas, won't we step out?    Oh, boys!"
That's Ree all over.
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
R. C. Purdy, DO.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675 GRANVILLE STREET THE   UBYSSEY
November 27, 1919
.. The ..
Western Life
Assurance Co.
Offers  in  its   Guaranteed  Security
Policies   one   of   the   best
investments for to-day
Every Student Should
Carry One
See  the  Manager,  or  one  of  their
many agents, for particulars
Head Office for B. C:
701 LONDON BLDG.
626  Pender  Street,  West
VANCOUVER, B.C.
C.  E.  MAHON,  Manager
J. W. FOSTER
LIMITED
TWO STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, W.
We sell clothes for young men and
men  who  stay  young
GIRLS'  GRASS  HOCKEY TEAM
SUFFERS DEFEAT
On Wednesday last the girls' hockey
team suffered its first defeat at the hands
of the South Vancouver High School.
The two teams seemed to be about evenly matched, but, as a result of superior
combination and good coaching, with
almost daily practice, the High School
girls managed to get two goals. 'Varsity players, on the other hand, still suffer from being unable to get out even
one team for practice.
Individually, the 'Varsity "ten" were a
match for their opponents; but in team
work they showed a marked inferiority.
Although the South Vancouver girls
were lighter than their opponents, they
more than made up for this deficiency in
quickness on the ball, and scored their
first goal by a good stroke of luck.
In the second half the game was
eagerly contested by both sides, and for
some time the 'Varsity squad showed
prospects of evening up the score. But
their ambitions were never realized, and
towards the end of the game the 'Varsity's opponents secured their second
goal during a scrimmage. On the whole,
our defense played a much better game
than our forwards. There was no clear
shooting on either side. Owing to the
lack of a right half, our right forwards
were compelled to fall behind to aid in
the defense, and thus did not have the
usual opportunities for scoring. Why
is it that, with hundreds of giris in U.
B. C, the grass hockey team can only
secure ten girls for a line-up in one of
the most important games of the season?
Varsity line-up: Goal, V. Herman;
Fullbacks, M. Copping and M. Wilcox;
halfbacks, B. Garlick and R. Gross; forwards, Z. Smith, H. Draper, D. Hopper,
P. Mackay and S. Shorsteinson.
Mrs. Boving has consented to act as
coach, and is appealing for co-operation
from the girls. "There is no reason,"
she says, "that, with more enthusiasm,
the 'Varsity ought not to be strongly
represented' on the annual trip to Victoria."
DES MOINES CONFERENCE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Thursday: Women's Undergraduate
Society. Address by Mrs. Boving,
"Physical Training as a Vocation for
Women."    Room 33, 4 p.m.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday—Players' Club, Auditorium, 8.15 p.m.
The canvass for funds amongst the
students to send delegates to the Des
Moines Conference has been very successful. Up to noon of Tuesday, Nov.
25th, $414.35 had been collected: but this
is not nearly all. First year Science and
first year Arts have still much to contribute. When all returns come in from
the students it is expected that the fund
will swell above the $000 mark. In a
few days the Faculty members will be
interviewed, and a large contribution is
expected  from this  quarter.
J&TBell.
Dame  Fashion's   latest  dictates  in
Fine Footwear
in  endless variety at
CLUFF'S
 S£5	
You will always find just the shoe
you are looking for at the right
price here.
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS    STREET,    WEST
Opposite   Bank   of   Commerce
Men's Tweed
Rubber-Lined
Raincoats
$27.50 and $30.00
A dual purpose coat. It looks like a
smart overcoat, but it is a raincoat—
and a very satisfactory one, too, as
the lining is pure rubber, and will
convince you at a glance that it is
capable of keeping a man warm and
dry. One of the most useful coats we
know for this climate. Here is a
range of smart plaid and fancy patterns in browns and greys. Two styles
—Balmacaan, a short-length coat with
raglan shoulders, and a full-length
style,    also    with     raglan    shoulders:
$27.50 and  $30.00
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED

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