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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1961

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 UBYSSEY
i- Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1961
No. 10
Last frat opens doors
No discrimination
for local ATO's
By KEN WARREN
The University is now without racially or religiously jdis^
criminating" fraternities. ' '     "    : .   ^:       '   ♦,
Alpha Tau Omega secretary Larry Page saM "Fimj?@$as£->
the fraternity is now opeK for laemljeriship to all mate uttderi
graduates meeting'university and inter-fraternity council requirements. The stipulations are the same for all campus
fraternities.
pfege acknowledged that the
chapter is taking a chance on
having its charter revoked.
WAIVER CLAUSE
. However, ATO president Eric
Rutledge said a waiver clause
was inserted in the fraternity's
constitution at its congress this
summer which may allow a nondiscriminatory chapter to retain;
membership in the international..'
He said he expects a ruling
from the international office inj
about a week.
Page said the fraternity's db-j
cision to act on its own was
arrived at early in September
at a regular meeting.
Wednesday, Sigma chi fraternity made;known it had removed
its discriminatory  clause at an
Blood! drive
neors total j
Following are blood drive re-j
suits to 4 p.m. Thursday:
I'hijtn h\  <i'i? Kiel b r
BEATING WEATHER AND TRAFFIC problems Thursday,  Werner True,  Arts  2,  has companion*
Judy Ames, Arts l,:"trained to keep him dry while he wheels his easily parked motor scooter
around the campus. Motor scooters will soon have to  leave  the  sanctuary  pf <>the BUchariarr
building and parkin their own lots. *      >-*?,:" ■'.'"!;''■'.'   * jH
UBC  will  send  20  graduates
Lands Minister Williston
defines* Columbia policy
By MIKE BLAIR
B.C. is not holding up fulfillment of the Columbia River
treaty, Lands and Forest minister Ray Williston told a noon
hour meeting in Brock Lounge Thursday. '
. TJie , B.C. stand when the
treaty was being negotiated, Williston said, allowd for future
planning into the scheme of development and licencing by the
water rights department of B.C.
"This was agreed to by United
States and Canadian representatives," he said.
». Williston said negotiations
were hurried so.the Jreaty could
be signed by the (outgoing Eisenhower administration in order
that three years of planning
wouldn't be shelved. "Final details were to be ironed out later,"
he said.
^'Since then to fulfill B.C.
laws, the province has been
spending $400,000 a month on
hydraulic engineering in order
to proceed to the water licencing
of the project which was completed Wednesday.
Causes of  War is
topic of conference
Students wishing to attend
a conference on the "Causes
of War" at Sir George Williams University, Montreal,
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 should apply
in writing at the AMS office
by Wednesday.
Arts.
86%
Engineering
198%
Agriculture
220%
Pharmacy
105%
Forestry
215%
Architecture
6%
(one person)
Home Ec.
102%
Commerce
94%
Law
46%
Nursing
85%
Education
84%
Science
135%
P E
82%
Medicine
80%
Grad. Studies
23%
The drive ends today.
international meeting last summer.
Page stressed ATO's decision
was separate from any outside
influence and had nothing to do
with the Sigma Chi announcement.
He said the alumni chapter of
Alpha Tau Omega is hacking the
motion 100 per cent. The fraternity had planned the move'
since •tlaist spring iand polled
alumni <jluring the summer.
RESOLUTIONS
ThentOtion reads: "Resolved
that Epsilon Pi chapter of Alpha
Tau Omega fraternity exist, initiate, rush and pledge as a com-
p 1 e t e 1 y non - discriminatory
fraternity," Page said.
A ,two-man faculty committee,
set up last year as a result of a
Ipetition circulated by fourth
jyear arts student Ken Hodkinson
■demanding removal of the discrimination clauses, is at present investigating practices of
| campus fraternities.
Oops! their mistake^
The UBC calendar says: "Ad-;
dress to Faculty and .Student
Body by the President of the
University, 11:30 ajn., Thursday;-
Oct. 5, Armory; all 11:30 a.m.
and noon-hour lectures and laboratories cancelled."
And it goes on to say: "Date
and hour subject to change."
And surely enough, they were
Changed. Dr. MacKenzie gave his
address at the Cairn Ceremony
in September.
So lecture and labs were not
cancelled. And you thought they
were? Ha!
100  Canadians  to  go  overseas
^    The .Tegular Tuesday edition
. of lhe Ubyssey   will  appear
Wednesday next week, because
Monday is a holiday.
By MIKE HORSEY
Two UBC graduates now in
Ghana are the forerunners of
a plan that will see 100 Canadian university graduates sent
to under - developed countries
under the auspices of Canadian University Service Overseas.
Dr. Cyril Belshaw, Vice-
Chairman of the national executive of CUSO, announced
Thursday that UBC will send
20 more graduates.
To provide funds for the
UBC students, a fund raising
committee has been established, headed by Dean Neil
Perry, of the Faculty of Commerce. Student interest is being developed "through(Student
Overseas Service, a campus
organization headed -.by Brian
Marson. .? .' . '
Lewis Perinbani; acting executive secretary of CUSO,
who just retucned. from an extensive tour of India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Singapore,
Malaya, Cambodia and Borneo, said he found an interested
response to the idea that Canadian graduates serve in those
countries.
The governments particularly appreciated that CUSO,
is politically independent, he
said. There was also some relief that CUSO was seeking
the advice of those countries
before embarking upon
•schemes. ,
UBC's contribution to the
CUSO pljin, Judy Foote and
Jocelyn 'King, are at a training center in West Africa.
They are* working with Ghan-
ians iri an extensive training
program to prepare'them for
their assignments to the Volta
River Region and the settlement of Kumasi.
Art Sager, administrative
officer of the Campus U.N.
Training Center said, "We are
pleased that they are having
this training. It is probably
the type of work that they
will encounter later."
Dr.-Belshaw also announced
Commonwealth Scholarships
are available to students wish
ing to, work overseas. Next
deadline for applications for
scholarships is Oct. 30th. Applications should be sent
through Dean Walter Gage's
office, to the Canadian Universities Foundation before
this o*ate, he said.
UBC has provided two students to CUF. K. D. Page, a
lawyer is studying at the University of Bombay and Alice
Miller, a psychology student,
is studying in New Delhi.
Students interested in the
CUSO plan should address
inquiries to John Haar, Secretary President's Committee on
Student Service Overseas, or
to Dean Gage's Office, Dr.
Belshaw said. Page 2 	
THE  UBYSSEY
Authorized as second elass mail by the Post Off ice Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
Jn Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma  Mater  Society  of  the  University  of  B.C.
! ■ • TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk),
14 (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15 (business offices).
Editor4nrChief: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor Denis  Stanley
I        Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
!        News Editor Fred Fletcher
■        City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor      .    .    ; Bob  Hendrickson
Photography Editor George Fielder
1        Senior  Editor               Sharon   Rodney
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
1        Photography   Manager                Byron   Hender
Critics Editor     David Bromige
STAFF THIS  ISSUE;
Layout: Sharon Rodney
NEWS: Mike Grenby, Ken Warren, Mike Blair, Joy Holding,. Ei;ic.  Wilson.   Mike   Horsey,   Ruth   Robertson,
George'-RaHton, J. Patrick Kennelly, Ian Cameron,
Pat," Hopkins,     Judy     Richardson,    Nicky    Phillips,
Krishna i&ahay.
-; -SPORTS: Bill Willson, Ron Kydd; Bert MacKinnon,
TECHNICAL: Donna Morris, Pauline Fisher, Kitty Watt,
Fred Jones.
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6,  1961
Guest  editorial
NFCUS and Sir George
The following is an editorial from The Georgian,
student newspaper  of  Sir  George  Williams   University.
• Sir George recently withdrew from NFCUS and The
Georgian here examines the stand taken by the Sir George
". William's council.—Editor.
To withdraw from an organization that has much potential demands much study and evaluation.
When the Students Undergraduate Society did decide to
leave the National Federation of Canadian University Students,
it was bound to investigate the past, present and future of
NFCUS, it should have interviewed past presidents of the
SUS and other interested, students. It also should have investigated this problem fully aware that the Students of the University realized the severity of a possible withdrawal from the
federation; that is, the NFCUS problem should have been publicized.
First rumblings of the SUS' discontent with NFCUS was
heard at the former's summer conference in May. The financial situation as a whole was very unfavorable and delegates
Studied ways of reducing expenditure.
The $1,500 paid annually to NFCUS was a large amount
and naturally came under strong attack by several delegates.
Later a committee was appointed to investigate the whole
question of NFCUS and its relationship to Sir George Williams,
and what began as a financial problem soon culminated in an
evaluation of NFCUS politically and socially with the financial
problem in the background.
It was indeed unfortunate that the committee held meetings
at such a time when the whole university population because
of summer vacation was wholly unaware -of the committee's
existence and the problem it was investigating.
But the SUS executive claims that this was a very pressing
problem and could not be postponed until autumn. The executive is elected by the students to act on their behalf not only
during the academic year but for the whole calendar year.
Thus, while the decision that was made was arrived at almost
in secret j the SUS executive was acting perfectly within its
limits, and is to be respected for making such an important
decision, and not waiting until later.
' The time of announcing the- withdrawal was inopportune.
Students were unaware of the impending move as no publicity was given concerning it. Also, University newspapers
are only commencing publication now and because of lack of
copy, much undue and undeserved emphasis may be put on
Sir  George's move.
While the "Georgian" believes that the move was financially necessary, it also believes that the withdrawal did not
have to be so bitter—bitter by both parties.
Perhaps the student government should have asked for
a year's leave of absence, or something to that effect. For
NFCUS, while not too successful in the past, could very feasibly become a very active and energetic organization.
Letters To
The Editor
No booze
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
As delegates of the Frosh Retreat we deeply resent the implication of the caption under
one of the photos in Tuesday's
issue of The Ubyssey. You yourself as a leader at the Conference know that none of the
delegates had any liquor. This
is a blot on the reputation of
a worthwhile and well-run conference -and we think an apology to the Frosh Retreat Committee is in order.
Your truly, ..j
KATHY McCUTCHEOn
MARGARET BRUCE
PAT PORTEOUS.
P.S.: The food' wasn't "slop"—
it was good. Arid, if you
recall, we never had toast
for breakfast! ! !
Constructivism
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I have just seen a recent issue of The Ubyssey with an
article headed "Let's legalize
whores." As a parent and former graduate of UBC I feel
deeply concerned ahout this. I
believe that our freedom rests
on responsible thinking and
action, otherwise it can degenerate into anarchy and it seems
to me that the attitude indicated by publishing this kind of
article is cruelly irresponsible.
One of the values of university was that there we could
practise at democracy, trying
our wings before we had to fly.
But at 18-20, even 25, one can
still be inexperienced and immature and need higher standards and guidance to grow towards mature and sound
thought and behaviour.
A newspaper has a great responsibility because of the power of the written word. I won.
der about the present aim of
The Ubyssey—is it to pander
to the weaknesses and selfishness in human nature or to encourage and1 give voice to the
positive and constructive elements?
For most students, this is
their last formal education, in
what should be the most mature environment possible, before they assume permanent
responsibility as our country's
leaders, teachers* parents.
Two members of our family
are possibly going to UBC in
the near future, and have been
hoping that the standards held
up to them would be even finer
than that of my day. What kind
of help and guidance for their
future life does this kind of
article give?
Sincerely,
(Mrs.) Kathleen E. Eogan.
The Ubyssey is accepting
ippliccttions from students
with some knowledge of photography who are interested
in learning newspaper photography. There will be a general meeting in the office at
noon.
Persons interested in doing
layout and other technical
newspaper work should also
apply at The Ubyssey offices
in the north basement of the
jij brock.
Serendipity
Tuum  Est
Sy JACK ORNSTEIN
Not long ago I wrote a column on legalizing prostitution.
Soon after, I wrote one on legalizing abortions. I expected
people to read what I had written and to agree or disagree
as they were so inclined. I never for a moment entertained
the idea that anyone would object to my writing on topics
concrning our sexual habits, our morals or our laws. Surely,
I reasoned, we are past the stage where we try to cloak vital
issues which have been kept in darkness for so long.
Tuum est means "It is yours." What does this" mean?
Surely the university is addressing itself to minds no longer
infantile, no longer closed, no longer controlled by others*
Freedom of investigation and of discussion is a university's
most fundamental principle—it is, in fact, its "raison d'etre."
Homosexuality, prostitution, abortions, birth control, ir-
religion—all of these have, at one time or another, been taboo.
What makes our western civilization different from some
societies of the past is that we have guaranteed freedom ol
discussion on subjects of this nature.
When we are not-free to discuss unpopular or immoral
issues, when we are not ettcouraged to do so, at that time we
become a people enslaved. A people in ignorance.
What is worse than a people voluntarily closing its eyes
and ears to arguments which strike them as being "immoral?"
What is worse? I'll tell you. It is worse to try to stop these.
arguments from being expressed. When freedom of discussion of relevant issues is curtailed, then tyranny has replaced
democracy. I'm not appealing to your emotions. I appeal to
the fundamental principle upon which our society, and more*
particularly our seat of learning, is based. That principle is
simply the right of all of us to examine all side of any issue.
When pressure is brought to bear upon me to stop advocating "immoral" positions or to stop discussing these issues, then at the same time, pressure is being brought to
bear upon you, the reader, not to be exposed to "dangerous"
or "immoral" opinions. Your freedom is at stake here: Not
mine alone. You. must be free to examine all sides of these
questions just as I must be free to write about them.
When, your right to examine and my right to discuss or
■r-iiyocate is curtailed:—on that day we might as well knock
down the Cairn and seli the university to the city as a park..
For on that day we cease to be a university.
We become another place in which to memorize lists of
facts and to get a degree for a better job. If you insist on my
. rigjht not to speak, and yours to listen, let me hear from you.
Tuum est. ' ■ ~
WACky rowed the barge
(to the tune of Michael Row the Boat Ashore)
Chorus:—WACky rowed th ebarge ashore.
Hahlerhi-jah!
WACky rode the barge ashore.
Hal-le-lu-jah!
I   The straits are deep, and the straits are wide;
Hal-le-lu-iah!
Funny money on the other side.
Halle-lu-jah!
(chorus)
11   Bennett bought the B.C.E.,
Hal-le-lu-jah!
Got no money tor US.C,
Hal-le-lu-jah!
(chorus)
III Flying Phil, he has this creed.
Hal-le-lu-jah!
Where there's road there's Hying speed!
Hal-le-lu-jah!
(chorus)
IV Columbia power ior dammed B.C..
Hahle-lu-jah!
To help the Yank economy!
Hal-le-lu-jah!
(chorus)
V   Bennett shot an arrow ashore,
Hal-le-lu-jah!
Burned bonds but sent out more,
Hal-le-lu-jah!
(chorus)
Finale:     1 owe my soul.
To the liquor control!! rishy, October 6, 1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
DRIFT
words
By MIKE GRENBY
Busters' trucks are now working a 13-hour day on campus.
'* Looks like B & G must really
be going all out to make sure
they don't run up another parking fines deficit this year.
¥  ¥  3t*
Hey Agnes, and you too,
■Charlie. If you must spit your
gum into the drinking fountain,
at least take it out and dispose
ef it properly when you've finished your drink. Please.
-   Sign of the times: Fail now—
"avoid the Christmas rush.
•!t*   •**   v
* Don't complain to each other
about how bad the campus coffee
is.
If you drink the insipid fluid
and disapprove of its flavor
(strangely enough, most people
do), jot down your esteemed impression on a piece of paper.
*.- Make it constructive criticism.
Suggest they use more coffee
and less water in the preparation
of this necessity.
Then deposit your missile in
the suggestion box hidden in the
southwest (cigarette machine)
corner of the auditorium caJEe-
teria.
* Who knows,;we might end up
getting more beans to the brew.
v v  'p
Why don't these eager-beaver
early-birds leave home 10 minutes later these mornings? It
looks as if 8:3*G lectures aren't
early enough for them.
_ You hit the parking lots much
after 8 a.m. and you park down
by them thar barns. And then
you walk.
So let's all sleep a few miniates longer and get up at a sane
time, like 6:40 a.m.
V     V     Tr
Sick of sandwiches for supper? Dinners are again available
at the main Cafeteria, 4:45 p.m.
to 6:15 p.m. And the bus stop
cafe stays open until 10 p.m
rf.      ^f.      ?£.
The pressure must really be
on this year.
Night studying on campus
started during the first week of
classes and it looks like the study
halls will stay filled until the
end of April.
Seems like only last year that
staying out until 10 p.m. was reserved for the week, before
exams.
rfr      ^f.      rf.
Fact: Local student population
has reached 13,049.
V    3t*     v
Speaking of study halls, why
does the sight of book-covered
But vacant study desks and
spaces make so many students
shrug their shoulders and walk
away?
If you really want to study,
push those books and papers
aside and sit down.
Give the owner 15 minutes to
finish his coffee or whatever. If
he or she isn't back by then,
stay put until you're ready to
leave.
But don't get annoyed at those
who "freeze" a desk to their use
for a whole day even if they
plan to use it for only a couple
of widely separated hours.
Rather pity them. They probably had an unhappy childhood
Jaadly need the security they get
fcpom "owning" a study space.
Therapy school
looks to future
A converted army hut is now housing a School of Rehabilitation Medicine needed at UBC for 15 years.
Jane  Hudson,  physio-training
NEW EQUIPMENT DISPLAYED at UBC's newest faculty currency, residing in converted army hut. Student above is demonstrating new weaving equipment used for physio-therapy.
supervisor, said B.C. has long
needed facilities for training
physical and occupational therapists.
She said therapists are needed all across Canada. "Only five
I other Canadian universities offer
' the course."
"The school offers a combined
I course in both occupational therapy and physical therapy," she
added.
Margaret Hood, occupational
therapy training supervisor, anticipated a rapid growth of the
school. "But," she explained,"
next year we will have room for
only 30 students."
When asked if the School expects a riew building she said
that it has hopes for space in
the new Medical Hospital building to be built in 5 years.
"Progress to date has been
slow but we are now managing
adequately,"  said Miss  Hood.
The School, located at the
north-east corner of "C" parking
lot has 19 students and 4 faculty
members. Students wishing to
become physical medicine therapists- must have completed first-
year university or Senior Matric
before entering the School. A
three-year course graduates students with expert practical training and a full understanding of
surgery and the nature of all
diseases.
Commented the School Director, Dr. Fahrni," Physical medicine therapy is oriented to produce a well-qualified therapist
who, along with the nurse and
doctor can fill an increasingly
important role as the third: member of the medicine treatment
team."
ja^z?
Elizabethan
Students or faculty members,
interested in playing in a noon
hour recorder (ancient musical
instrument) ensemble contact
Dr. Gamble, Hut G-l, Thursdays7
between 12:30 and 1:30 o.m.
ARTSMEN PLEASE;
Nominations for posiiions on
the Arts Undergraduate Society Council are now open.
Nominations must be signed
by five members of the Faculty of Arts and turned into the
Arts office, Bu. 115.
There are fifty positions
open.
Nominations close Oct. 13.
IH presents Spain
International House Club will
present a program of Spanish
songs and dances today at 8.30
p.m. They will feature students
from U.B.C. and Spanish clubs
in town.
THIS  AD is  very
serious, so please take it that
way.
We are in need of a top-
notch banjo player and a
honky-tonk piano picker. We
are seriously looking for two
really good musicians to
work together as a team in
our fabulous new pizzeria.
If we find the right two men,
there wilt be a 2 or 3 nite a
week steady job for them.
We also could use a well
organized 5 piece dixieland
band (if anyone happens to
have one kicking around).
There could be a steady job
for them too.
We will be auditioning at our
new restaurant at 2676 W.
Broadway. Please phone RE
3-9916 or RE 6-0525 for an
appointment.
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.
MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Special Student Rates
INCORPORATED   2V°   MAY   1670. :
Georgia at Granville . . . Shop daily 9^5:30; Fridays 9-9
Phone MU 1-6211
; Ms.
Career and
Campus
Shop
■  in i\
Head - of - the - class  honors  go  to  this
traditional cut suit of all wool worsted
It's the natural choice of undergraduates and' alumni. See it
today at The Bay's CAREER AND CAMPUS SHOP. This one in
new lovat mix, many others in heathers, black, blue. The jacket
features authentic natural shoulders and high 3-button, slim
look. Trim, pleatless slacks with.narrow legs and Vi top pockets.
Shorts, regulars and tails in 36 to 44.
each
69-50
%e
Use your PBA CARD .... . Remember, you can shop 'till 9 tonight,
and all day Saturday at The Bay CAREER AND CAMPUS SHOP. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6,  1961-^
New NFCUS prexy
is old UBC grad
KINGSTON (CUP)—An Arts graduate of the University of
B.C. has been elected thirty-fifth president of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students.
Walter MacLean, 25, drew sup
pOrt primarily from Western region delegates, to defeat Peter
Dembski, formerly of University
of Toronto and Peter Green a
1961 Dalhousie graduate now at
Queen's.
MacLean, a divinity student,
nominated by McGill, won the
election on the second ballot after Green's elimination on the
first vote.
He called for a practical approach to the problems facing
the federation, "Let's be practical. Lets start using the opportunities we already have."
To create greater solidarity
amongst Canadian- university stu
dents he called for increased use
of the provincial exchange program and the establishment of
a national student publication in
the near future.
MacLean' after graduating
from Victoria College and the
University of B.C. went on to
divinity studies at University of
Toronto and University of Alberta at Edmonton.
He brings to the post considerable administrative experience
both in student government at
University of Toronto and with
NFCUS in Canada and as overseas commissioner for the federation.
PROVINCIAL Communist Party
leader, Nigel Morgan, will
speak on "Colombia Power
Policy/' at noon Friday in
Brock Lounge.
WRITER'S SERVICE
Let us sell your story, article,
book, TV, songs and poems.
Violet Sacchwell,
6125 Ewait St..
South Burnaby
HE  3-3176
Open Evenings
YOUNG MEN
will recognize this as the shape of the next few years
.. The Continental Urban II
in hopsacking, tweeds, flannels
Th<* Lions Den
771  GRANVILLE STREET
"EXCLUSIVELY DESIGNED SHOPi FQR YOUNG,MEfcK'
-sHpp:
H—tiiti
P'-y-      :■::■:■... .+';:>:ti.::^;. sSkM*
GYMNASTICS
Organizational meeting for all
women interested in trying out
for" Gymnastics team in apparatus gym, 12:30 today.    _
E:I.C.
Meeting   Friday   noon,   E201.
Film   "Bending   and   Curving."
Use   of   aluminum   in    aircraft-
production.
PtesCmfotioti Optical
We  use  genuine  CORECTAL  lenses
— clear from-edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Corttact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special discounts to undergraduates
Est. 1924.
SAVE YOURSELF MONEY
Order Your Magazines at the Low Student Rates!
TIME
(reg. $7.00 a year)
27 weeks $ 1.97
1 year 1'     3.87
2 years __.    7.00
LIFE
(reg. $5.95 a year)
21 weeks $ 1.91
1 year     4.00
2 years  _    7.00
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
(reg. $6.75 a year)
1 year $ 4.00
2 years     7.50
FORTUNE
(reg. $10.00 a year)
1 year $ 7.50
NEWSWEEK
1 year $ 3.00
2 years       6.00
34 weeks     2.50
17 weeks     1.50
PLAYBOY
(reg. $7.20 a year)
8 months $ 3.50
1 year     5.00
2 years     9.00
3 years   13.00
Show Business Illustrated
(reg.  $12.50 a year)
1 year $ 7.00
SATURDAY NIGHT
(reg. $4.00 a year)
1 year $ 2.00
MACLEANS
(reg. $3.00 a year)
1 year     $ 1.50
READER'S DIGEST
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□  Renewal Friday, October 6, 1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
movie   review   of:
the magician
"One sees what one sees; one knows what one knows;
I am what I am, but it's no use telling them."
Bergman has not done himself justice with "The Magician". If we view this film in
the light of its billing, "Full
of extraordinary thrills", it
does hot come off. In this capacity it is a third rate, class
'C   "Psycho".   Viewed   as   a
;* plausible situation it is weak,
smacking of an "action packed"
script. Reviewed by the New
York Times as a "melodrama
touched with humour" and by
somebody else's Tribune-as a
"terrifyinghenror shoeker;".it
has been mis;«ategorized. As a
rhorror movie if s a dud, for the
audience laughs in the "shock-
■>. ; frig", parts. As aswnelodrama it.
comes close in that it is agon-'
dzingly overacted. However,
our melodramatic villain, slick
Old Oilcan,.Harry, does not materialize; for our Magnetic Mr.
" Voegler looks, like Abe Lincoln,
our police chief like a swinish
Captain Bligh, and our doctor
like a serious David Niven. The
characters do not come alive.
They are as wooden puppets
and the ineffective dubbing
does not aid this situation one
~~      iota.
■j Possibly   the   most   obvious
criticism of the casting is the
, Multiplicity j of characters.
Aside from a few police constables, there were only fifteen
characters, each with a dramatic scene in which he or she
stars. This results in an inco-
hesive, disjointed series of
crises which do not build to, or
support, a climax. The laconic
Mrs. Voegler was the one bright
spot of the cast as she lived
and was human in her own resigned way. However, on the
whole, the acting and the directing were generally poor
throughout.
In the favour of this film
were its lighting effects and
background music. Although
not comparable to the consistently high standard of Hitchcock's lighting, (take for example the hotel and tower
scenes in "Vertigo"), we have
here some very effective half-
light schemes, which came off
exceptionally well in black and
white.
The most effective and skillfully employed device of the
film was the background music.
Throughout, it was excellent in
your plays
are wanted
WHY?
Redo: This was caused by
George Bowering's "placebo"
and his the disturbing 'wake-
up' column about 'Art is dead'.
EFFECT
The Player's Club will produce two student one-act plays,
one in the fall term (tentative
date, last week in November),
"-* and one in the spring term . . .
QUESTION
The P.C. is looking for student-written one-act plays, and
students interested in directing
one or other of the plays . . .
ACTION
Contact Bryan Belfont or
Phil Brown—or drop in anytime to the 'Green Room' (upstairs at the rear of the Audi-j
torium.)
its subtle use. It was not the
crescendoing blare of violins,
brass and timpani which build
to a climax in both British and
American films. Rather, it was
conspicuous by its absense until as almost an anticlimax
there appeared a plaintive,
muted theme, sometimes by a
solitary woodwind, sometimes
by a guitar. The full brass band
of the last three to five minutes was unorthodox and in its
novelty lent an atmosphere,
without wh i ch the ending
would have fallen flat. The film
then, in a composite review,
was not up to the standards of
many foreign films, but watching it ■"' was better than1 suffering through some of Hollywood's ground - out footage,
such as "All fri a night's work."
—bob mcdonald.
only one page!!
It's either ads or copy, and
the ads have the day. Thus,
due to lack of space, the columns "placebo" and "the
soon-seeii sdane" and other
items have been held over
till next week.
• The TISH group will give
a poetry reading Thursday,
October 12, at noon. Watch notice boards for the location.
rj*     »ji      ifi
• The extension department
is giving a course in the technique of film making which is
offered at 8:00 every Thursday
evening in Bu. 202. The lectures are two hours long with
various speakers of interest.
letter:
loin mussoc
mr. bowering?
Dear Bowering:
Undoubtedly, your article
"Placebo", which appeared in
September 22nd's Ubyssey, was
intended to invite controversy.
This, we are certain, it will
do.
It is unfortunate, however,
that from time to time sensationalists sweepingly castigate
theatre organizations which,
while they may well be considered reactionary, are DOING
SOMETHING on this campus.
We understand, sir, that you
have never been a member of
any bona fide campus organization in which case we sincerely invite you to join "Mussoc", purely to enhance your
own experience.
Perhaps, once unprotected
by the sanctity of a desk, your
criticism may be worth recognition.
Yours truly,
Pete  Hermont,
Per Joan Hansen
(secretary Mussoc).
Lessons in non - conformity,
Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
11.30 sharp.
P A G £
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
a delta casa
A review of the first Sunday Concert of
the Vancouver Orchestra, featuring the
soprano, Lisa Delia Casa.
SUNDAY'S QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Concert by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra inaugurated that organization's 32nd season. Judging by the concert's success and the
-friqasessive schedule of coming performances,
196W52 should be a season well worth attending.
Occupying Sunday's centre of attention of
course was the Swiss-born Lisa Delia Casa.
one of those rare creatures — a beautiful
soprano who sings beautifully; '$fiss PeHi$j Casa's
rendition of an aria fron*Handel's Julius Caesar
revealed a clear, carefully projected voice able
to produce a very smooth vocal line. Interpret-
ively, her approach featured restrainst and a
suitably suppliant manner which was complemented by intelligent use of her finely controlled pianissimo.
SIMILARLY WELL SUNG WAS MOZART'S
aria Dove Sono from the Marriage of Figaro,
wherein Delia Casa's especially warm middle
range showed up impressively. One could observe however that her ringing top notes were
slightly forced even though hit securely. While
otherwise satisfactory, Mr. Hoffman's accompaniment failed to reinforce the anger expressed
in the first part of the aria.
STRAUSS?*'JFOUR LAST SONGS" PROVED
to be the most enjoyable offering of the afternoon. The songs themselves represent the composer's full maturity as a master^ of orchestration and deeply moving melodic writing. Miss
Delia Casa's performance communicated easily
their various hues and emotional moods. Only
in the lower notes did' her tone lose color. It
is unfortunate that the orchestral texture sometimes overwhelmed the soloist but otherwise
the accompaniment matched her interpretation.
The concert opened with Berlioz' Roman
Carnival Overture, a richly scored composition   dominated   by   a  frenzied  Italian   dance
theme — the saltarello. Conductor Hoffman's
pacing and rhythm moved briskly here and' although the various orchestral choirs tended to
imbalance the dominant vigor and excitement
of the music, they were well presented.
LESS FELICITOUS WAS THE ORCHES-
tra's reading of Bizet's Symphony in C. An early
work, this symphony is notable for a lightness
and buoyancy which give it great charm. But
although Mr. Hoffman delineated many individual passages imaginatively, he seemed to possess no unifying" approach to the work as a
whole. The Andante fared best, with a combination of skilful woodwind playing and a generally light touch on the conductor's part*. But
otherwise the performance often seemed, a B^ere ;
alternation of fast moving and pedestrian tempi,
inhibited further by a hard quality in viOliEi
tone and a general lack of finesse.
IN MARKED CONTRAST TO THE SUBTLE
tints of Bizet were the -gaudy splashes of color
which characterized the final item on the program, Respighi's Pines of Rome. The Pines
provide the composer's background for a series
of highly evocative tone pjctures recalling memories and events in Roman life. Mr. Hoffman
obviously relished tlie! work's sonorous climaxes
and elaborate orchestration and as a result
drove his forces to heights of enthusiasm. This
was not accomplished however without some
loss of discipline. As in the Berlioz, sectional
imbalances resulted. So too did' on unevenness
in performance between individual members of
the different sections of the orchestra. Still, the
languorous mood of the Pines of Janiculum
section was well captured and the performance
as a whole proved exciting.
THE GOOD POTENTIAL THE ORCHESTRA
demonstrated on Sunday will doubtless mature
as the season progresses. Then perhaps we shall
be able to speak of the improved discipline
which seems to be its paramount need now.
—william littler.
U.B.C.
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"The Home of The
Lea n—Mea n—Jea ns" Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 6,   1961
Look ma!
C-C-G-Corn-
Cornirsittees
What should a council do
when it has a committee?
Answer. Form a committee.
What should a council do when
it has too many committees?
Answer: rorm a committee to
look into the number and functions of committees already
struck.
Or so agriculture president
Tom Nisbet thought.
Monday Nisbet put forward
the motion resolving the Undergraduate Societies Committee
form a committee to investigate
all committees at present constituted to determine which, if any,
are active.
He said there seems to be a
predominance of sub-committees
or presidential sub - committees
and charged many of the committees constituted under the society are an anachronism of
■former student governments-
Nisbet's motion wasn't seconded and never reached the floor.
Teams make show
of athletes fete
Campus athletic teams and
clubs will make iheir annual
play for new members Thursday in ihe Armoury.
The etfenl, the second annual Athletics Day, is a miniature Clubs Day, with the
various sports putting on displays.
Special events planned for
this year include performances
by the judo, gymnastics, fencing, and badminton teams.
NFCUS effectiveness
gauged by survey
TORONTO (CUP)—The withdrawal of Sir George Williams University from the National Federation of Canadian
University Students on the grounds of student apathy has
sparked a survey at the University of Toronto on student
knowledge and reaction to the organization.
The  student newspaper Var-
Coffee house managerl
heads special events
Student council has appointed
first - year Commerce student
Tom Hauki Special Events
Chairman.
He has had experience in
coffee house booking and has
studied fine arts in Europe. The
position became vacant when
Doug Higgins appointed last
spring didn't return to University in September.
WANTED
Girl   to   share   furnished   2-
bdrm suite in Dunbar district.
$45 each
"Phone Joy at AM 6-2736
FRIDAY
FOLKSONGS
ROD   CAMERON
•
CALYPSO
KELL  WINZEY
•
JAZZ
DON THOMPSON
SATURDAY
'A Modest Proposal'
by  JONATHAN   SWIFT
As Read by MICHAEL MAGEE
FOLKSONGS
KELL WINZEY
JAZZ
DON THOMPSON
SUNDAY
JAZZ   CONCERT
PAUL PERRY Jr. QUARTET
Coffee Bouse
726 Seymour Sfc
Open for Lunches
726 Seymour
MU 2-9135 Van., B.C.
York, Ryerson
join NFCUS
KINGSTON (CUP)—York and
Ryerson Universities were admitted to the National Federation of Canadian University students by unanimous votes at the
twenty-fifth annual NFCUS Congress.
York University, which opened last year in Toronto became
the 36th member of the Congress.
Ryerson was admitted on a
conditional basis since it is not
a degree granting institution.
Said an NFCUS official, "We
are co-operating with each other
until the report of the committee
investigating the implications of
Ryersons joining makes its report. Until then Ryerson will not
be a full member.
sity, is circulating a questionnaire which will attempt to
"gauge NFCUS' effectiveness on
campus." The results of the survey will be published next Monday in the Varsity.
3r» H1 %*
KINGSTON (CUP) — Sir
George Williams University was
the topic of only one resolution
and scarcely any debate at the
25th Congress of the National
Federation of Canadian University Students.
The federation moved to recognize the request for withdrawal of Sir George from the
federation. The motion,  propos-
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Edmonton,  also  states,  "At the J
same time,  the  congress  would ■
refer the withdrawal to the commission set up to investigate the
admission  of universities to the
federation."
It was made clear that S i r
George would not be automatically denied re-admission to the
federation, and that it was likely it would be invited to attend
next  year's   r.ongress-
(See editorial page 2)
FOR SALE
1949 Ford coupe, best offer.
J. C. Nixon, Dept. Bio-
*cljenii?try, JjBC,vor YU 8-
3602.  • .:""*■"
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Ask, lovely enchantress, and your
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Cutex brings you Aladdin's Fire.
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regular polish. And all these
polishes have the wizardry of
Cutex plasticizers to help you
strengthen brittle nails.
bv Friday, October 6, 1961
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
Whitman is
team with
a mission
Whitman College Missionaries i
have a dangerous mission Saturday.
The Walla Walla, Wash., team,
young and inexperienced, faces
the high-powered aerial attack
of the UBC Thunderbirds at 1 t
p.m. in UBC Stadium. I
WICKLAND OUT
Bird?, though without defen-,
sive end Ray Wickland, tackle '
Jim Beck, and end Tom Andrews
are favored over the Whits, who
have lost their first two games.
Wickland has a separated
shoulder, suffered in the Birds'
14-14 tie in Alberta, last week.
Eoth Beck and Andrews are still
sidelined with knee injuries.
Whitman has a fine running
game, with halfback»iJilL iJilger
and fullback Mel Litzenberger
the top ball carriers.
Freshman John Hawkins, who
has been outstanding in the past
two games, will quarterback the
team.
Bird coach Frank Gnup has
called up speedy halfback Jim
Stevens from the Intermediate
team.
CHIEFS PLAY
Chiefs, meanwhile, travel to
Victoria Saturday to play the
Drakes. Chiefs are winless in
three games, while Drakes, only
victory was a 35-6 decision over
UBC last week.
It is the last league game for
Chiefs. They have three exhibition games left, two against
Western Washington, Jayvees,
and one with Seattle Cavaliers".
UBC Braves close out their
Fraser Valley Junior Football
League reason -with two games
this weekend. T
They meet Richmond Colts
Sunday in Richmond, and Renfrew Trojans at UBC Monday
at 2 p.m.
UBC CYCLlNGi CLUB
Members and others interested please meet in room 211
memorial gym at noon today.
JOHN HAWKINS
freshman  quarterback
Hoop star goes
to Damn Yankees
SPORT
EELS DIDN1 TALK
THE SAME LANGUAGE
KINGSTON (CUP) — David
MacLean, of the University of
Alberta at Edmonton, led the
Western Weasels to a smug 7-1
victory over the Eastern Eels in
>he NFCUS "Little Grey Cup"
last week.
The touch football game was
the result of a challenge made
by Dennis MacDonald, lanky
president of the U of A, Calgary,
Students' Council. Bob Carswell,
McGiU's dapper president, accepted for the East. The game
was played during a noon recess.
The East's Carswell later explained to the Congress that the
East had difficulty because it
was so nationalistic.
"We had a bilingual team," he
alibied, "and the policies for
each play had to be translated
iin the'huddles. This took so long
we couldn't get moving."
To date, the women at the
Congress have not engaged in
any athletic encounters, other
than parties.
SHORTS
Did you know the Soviet Union
publishes a wealth of scientific
anJ technical information, available through subscriptions to
Canadians? Publications are in the
Russian  language.
They include:
Astronomical Journal
$13.00
(6  issues)
Atomic  Energy
(12   issues)    14.00
Biophysics
(6  issues)    10.00
Biochemistry
(6    issues)        14.50
Experimental   Biology   and
Medicine   (12   issues).-   11.00
A   full   catalogue   is   available    on
request.
Subscriptions can be obtained
through:
TROYKA
BOOK SHOP
799-A College Street,
Toronto, Ontario
IHS2 subscriptions must be received
before November 1,  1S61.
SWIMMING
Trials for the intramural
swimming meet will be held at
gmpire Pool Oct. 6-10. Finals
will be held at noon Thursday,
Oct. 12.
All women wishing to try out
.'or the synchronized swim team
rnust attend the first practices
at the Memorial Pool (16th and
Burrard) on Tuesday from 9-10
p.m. and Thursday from 1-2 p.m.
CURLING
An organizational meeting for
all women curlers will be held
at 12:30 today in Bu 205. All
interested are invited to attend-
•jr  *f"  3t*
CROSS  COUNTRY
UBC cross country team challenges Vancouver Olympic Club
Saturday in hopes of revenging
last week's defeat by the same
VOC team.
Dixon  shuns   Birds
for  pro  ball  job
Ian Dixon, pro baseball player, won't be playing basketball
for UBC this winter.
Dixon, who was at the University for the first two weeks
of classes, has withdrawn because school overlaps baseball
spring training for two or three
weeks in April.
Dixon had planned to play
basketball here this winter.
But baseball spring training
starts early in April. So do final
exams. And for Dixon, baseball
has to take priority.
Last summer, Dixon sighed a
bonus contract with the New
York Yankees for something in
excess of $10,000.
The terms of agreement are
that he' report to the Yankee
spring training camp in Florida
in April.
CAN'T MAIL EXAMS
Dixon tried to arrange with
the University to mail him his
final exams so he could write
them in Florida, but the University squelched the idea.
Dixon is now taking grade 13
at North Vancouver High School,
where he has starred at basketball and baseball for the past
three years.
Senior matriculation exams
can be mailed to the-student.
Head basketball coach Jack
Pomfret,   meanwhile,   held   his
first practice of the year Thursday at noon. More than 80 men
turned out for positions on the
three teams
Pomfret's biggest worry is filling the guard positions on the
Birds, vacated by the graduation of Ken Winslade and Ed
Pedersen.
Likeliest replacement, Earl
Farenholtz, is ineligible this
year. Jack Lusk is the only other
guard back from last year's
team.
Pomfret also has two new
coaching assistants, both high
school coaches last year. They
are Alan Yarr, who coached
Dixon last year at North Van,
and Graeme MacKay, from Abbotsford High.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
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Open 'till 11:30
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Spontaneous enthusiasms are touched off at the sight
of this long-slseved knitted shirt, which comes in a
variety of subtle shades. Its glove-fit creates a masculine silhouette that accents physical prowess with
finesse.
Lucky   Registration   No.
7641612
the shirt n tie bar
658 Seymour MU 4-5749
"come in and tie one on"
What a
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of Coca-Cofa Ltd.—the world's best-loved sparkling drink. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October 6,  1961   <+-
TMEN CLASSES
"What labor wa nts'^noon
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Pat O'Neal, secretary of the
B.C. federation of labor will
speak on "What labour wants"
and will comment on bills 42
and 43. Tuesday noon in Bu 104.
•X*     *P     V
VCF
"How Social is the Gospel?"
A lecture in Bu. 106 today noon.
*t*     rf*     *t*
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PEUS football dance cancelled due to the Thanksgiving
weekend.
*  *  *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
^General meeting  in -Bu.  202
noon today.
EAST ASIAN  SOCIETY
General meeting Bu. 203 noon
today. All new members please
attend.
V    ^E"    v
GERMAN CLUB
Organisational meeting, Friday noon, Bu. 204. Everyone
welcome.
*fr v  v
SOCIETY OF BACTERIOLOGY
Film "The Rat Problem",
Wesbrook 200, Friday, Oct. 6,
12:30. All students interested
welcome.
if.  if.   if.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting, Friday noon,
Bu. 204. All welcome.
tear race
or lie f# democracy
GYMNASTICS
Organizational meeting for all
women interested in trying out
for Gymnastics team in apparatus gym, 12:30 today.
# *  #
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Regular Christian Science
testimony meetings have begun
in Hut L4, Fridays at 12:40.
# *  #
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting, Friday noon,
Bu. 204. All welcome.
CLASSIFIED
ROOM & BOARD: Boarding
house, lots of food. - $70. per
month. 4609 W. 11th. CA 4-
3155. '■
„-... FSodtacfKHi and,distribution of
nuclear weapons systems must
foe frozen within the next 10
months or disarmament will become impossible.
Ross Flanagan, a Quaker from
Berkeley,   Calif,   who   is  on   a
. speaking tour on the dangers of
nuclear weapons told a noon
hour audience that in 10 months
the world's power's will have
amassed so many nuclear wea-
: pons that! an inspection system
' will be impossible.
Doufcjle Breasted Syifs
Converted 'into   '
Single Breasted
Alterations —, Repairs
United Tailors
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville
Flanagan said that soon, if not
now, two men on a Polaris submarine will have authority to
fire nuclear missiles if they
should feel it necessary without
permission from a higher authority.
Flanagan said: "We are left
with the choice of abandoning
our nuclear arms or eventually
dying for democracy."
LOST: Lady's small silver watch,
probably with bracelet. Not
resalable, but a"keepsake. Lost
Wednesday mmt'Pliease call
Mary, evenings at YTT 8-5704.
FOR SALE
'53 Plymouth sedan. A good
ear, $350. For viewing,
please phone MU 3-8876 after 6.
Comfortable rm. plus breakfast and dinner for girl student in exchange for light
duties. Phone Mrs. McLennan
AM 6-5173.
FOR SALE
1960 TR-3, under 2000 miles.
Real cheap or swap! HE 3-
3743.
TUXEDO
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Train if 61'
a Career
With a Future
Here are four interesting and rewarding plans
for young men interested in a career as a
commissioned officer in the Canadian Army:
SUftSIDIZUION  FOR  PROFESSIONAL TRAINING-There
are tri-S»rvice plans wherein university students in
medicine or dentistry can'be subsidized during their
course aid became commissioned Doctors or Dentists in
tbe Can,*iian Aimed Forces.
THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
- This is a tri Service Plan wherein
high school graduates receive
advanced education and leadership
training at one of the Canadian Service
Colleges or a university to become
officers in the Royal Canadian Navy,
the Canadian Army or the Royal Cana*
dian Air Force.
Vil CMHBMtt-OFFICERS' TRAININC CORPS-tlnwersity undergraduates may obtain a commission
tty training 4vi«g the* spare time and summer holidays. The student who trains under this plan
Jt.pa&fw toactuat trimiit tune and is net obligated for full-time service after graduation.
You May obtain full information «n any «f these
plans from your Unrmsity Afmy
Resident StiHftttw.
THE OFFICER CANDIDATE PR06RAWK-
Selected high school graduates, not
wishing to undergo academic training
for a degree, may qualify as a short
, service officer, after a brief-intensive
perrod of mititani training antttater may.
. applj t«. become a repls officer.
man
Ooti
LTD.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted        ■■; r-f': -.7^
Contact Leases;.[ ■.■/.. ;_X'".
24-Hour ^^iceO^TFITAIiBfegairs
Y^ICOI^IR BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-294S
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate AppoiiTtTTTent
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
se
J.C
,«, Fashion Tips
for Fall.
The long, lean
tapered look, in
slacks
(circa 61)
In our shop for young men you'll -find -tbe most extensive
selection of young men's slacks in the city: ftigtrt' from our
Lowboy cords to the finest wool worsteds, -the tnetne'*is authentic with that long, lean look. Self belt and belt loop style.
$8.95 to $22.50
P.S. No extra charge for all J.E. alterations
and credit
Jack CUch M.
545 GKAHVIUE
MU 1-9831
SHOP  DOWNTOWN TILL 9 ON  FRJDAY

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