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The Ubyssey Nov 23, 1961

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 Council
funny
THE UBYSSEY
ha, ha, ha,
ha, ha, ha,
retch
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23,  1961
No. 28
Arts debate censored
Topic   might be
unwise'—Cornwall
Student council ruled Monday night that the Arts Undergraduate Society couldn't hold a debate until council approved
the topic, after hearing homosexuality was being considered
as a topic
_ .. Jto  by  Les  Pa]
DO-IT-YOURSELF  BOMB SHELTER BUILDERS? No, just workmen taking advantage of the fine
weather   yesterday   to   lay   some   cement.   This  shot,  taken  from  the  roof of the  new  Fine
Arts building, shows one of its surrounding walkways nearing completion. It is expected that
the first  stage  of the   new structure will   be finished this January.
Two papers leave CUP
Sheaf returns to the fold
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
Sheaf, University of Saskatchewan student newspaper forced
to quit the Canadian University
Press last week when the U of
S student council refused to pay
CUP fees, has rejoined the service.
Faced with the resignation of
the entire Sheaf staff, council
rescinded a previous motion
which, in essence, refused to pay
the Sheaf's fees to CUP.
A subsequent motion to pay
the fees and send two delegates
to the December National CUP
Conference in Toronto was
passed with council president
Roy Romanow casting the tie-
breaking ballot.
A group of councillors moved
for reconsideration of the motion paying the CUP fees, but
the   action    was   prevented   by
council secretary - treasurer
Bruce McCulloch and a group
of supporters who left the meeting breaking the quorum. The
meeting was forced to adjourn.
Sheaf editor - in - chief Lionel
Wilson said he disliked using
the threat of resignation to
achieve an end, but felt the
action of the council "was so
completely irresponsible and
wrong" he had no choice.
*     *     *
National office of CUP has
announced the withdrawal of
two member papers from the
organization..
The Manifesto, Lakehead College of Arts, Science and Technology at Port Arthur, Ont.,
went broke after its first issue
last year. The paper indicated
to CUP last year it was in a
sound financial position.
Le Quartier Latin, student
paper at University of Montreal
withdrew from the service because CUP could not provide
news releases in French.
Beer in Brock Hall
Studeni discipline committee is investigating into the
mailer of alcohol in Brock
Hall. Two persons were apprehended in the Mildred
Brock room Wednesday night.
The committee is also investigating a broken door to
fhe men's washroom on ihe
second floor of ihe North
Brock.
Persons desiring to give evidence are directed to the
hearing io be held on Nov.
24, 1961, in ihe Brock common
room at  12:30 p.m.
The Arts council subsequently
decided not to hold a debate on
the subject.
Instead, it decided to sponsor
an "intellectual discussion" on
homosexuality by four professors.
Council president Alan Cornwall said "adverse publicity"
deriving from last year's "chastity debate" had resulted in the
withdrawal of money from the
University Development Fund.
(The statement was later denied by administration officials.)
Student council passed the
motion by a vote of eight to
five, with one abstention.
Arts council members speaking in f«vor of the debate
argued it would bring recognition to the Arts society.
CHEAP METHOD
Other Arts council members,
however, said the topic was
chosen irresponsibly and was a
cheap method to gain publicity.
Student treasurer Malcolm
Scott criticized student council
for attempting to regulate debate topics.
"Council should not sanction
functions which are likely to
result in riots or other such disturbances. But it is not this
council's role to set itself up as
the arbiter of freedom of debate," Scott said.
Speaking for the motion "That
the topic for the proposed Arts
Undergraduate Society debate
be subject to approval of Student Council," Cornwall said:
"It  is   the    responsibility   of
Scott charges NFCUS
with doing nothing
Student treasurer Malcolm
Scott Monday charged.the local
National Federation of Canadian
University Students committee
with doing nothing but receive
correspondence this year.
"I haven't seen any activity
fromi the local committee this
term. It's almost time to shut
down for Christmas and they
haven't done anything," he said.
"I wonder what their purpose
is."
Education Undergraduate Society president Stan Yee said he
had read the NFCUS constitution and "didn't learn a thing."
"I can't see a thing NFCUS
does," Yee said. "They have a
scholarship program, but nobody
knows anything about it. The
committee seems to have a very
poor publicity program."
Commerce president Bob Gayton said he knew "nothing"
about NFCUS.
"The only visible benefit of
NFCUS was the student d i s-
count cards," Gayton said, "and
they seem to have disappeared
this year."
council to protect the good name
of the Uniyersity and if we do
nothing, we are neglecting this
responsibility."
Said second vice-president Pat
Glenn:
"Student council possesses
ultimate constitutional authority over all of its subsidiary
organizations and is ultimately
responsible for the activities of
al] subsidiary organizations.
"Minute 34 (the debate minute) was passed in order to ensure student council the opportunity to exercise this authority
before the activity in question
was likely to take place."
POINT OF OBSCENITY
Vice-president Eric Ricker
said he felt the publicity from
such a debate would be detrimental.
"When considering anything
that gets to the point of obscenity, council has to consider the
implications," he said. "As we
are ultimately responsible, it is :
our duty to consider the question."
Science president Bill Munro
said he felt the students were
becoming "cowards at the expense of a few narrow-minded
citizens.
"I don't think all the publicity this debate would receive
would be unfavorable," he said.
"I heard many favorable comments from the public on the
chastity debate."
TOPIC DOESN'T MATTER
"It shouldn't matter on a university campus what the topic
is in an academic debate,"
Munro commented.
"I think council should know
what's going on in AMS organizations, but I don't think we
should tell them what topics
they can debate," he added.
Bob Gayton, Commerce president, said "If such a debate is
sponsored by an AMS organization, we're responsible. I'm not
willing to sit by if it may damage the University, I'd rather
see no publicity than bad publicity."
Voting against |he motion
were Engineering, president
Terry Guest, Arts president
Mike Sharzer, Forestry president Al Sawby, Munro and
Scott.
Alarm alarms students
The fire alarm system in
Buchanan was set off accidentally Wednesday and
wouldn't stop.
According to Fire Chief
Gerard Foran the bells could
have gone on ringing all year
and ii wouldn't have made
any difference.
"Thousands were in the
building that didn't pay any
aiieniion at all," he said. Page  2
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University, year in
Vancouver by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial
opinions expressed are those ot tire Editor of The Ubyssey and not
necesr-.arily   those   of   the Alma   Mater   Society   or   the   t'nivcrsity   m    i..C.
;        TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk),
14 (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15 (business offices).
tditor-in-Chiei: Roger McAfee
Managing   Editor Denis  Stanley
Associate   Editor        Ann   Pickard
News Editor  Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor       Bob  Hendrickson
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior  Editor             Sharon  Rodney
Sports Editor     Mike Hunter
Photography   Manager              Byron  Hender
Critics Editor David Bromige
STAFF THIS ISSUE:
LAYOUT: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS: Kenneth Warren, Michael Grenby, Patricia
Horrobin, Sharon MacKinnon, Joy Holding, Krishna
' Sahay, Michael Horsey, Richard Simeon, Christopher
Fahrni, Patricia Hopkins and George Railton.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher and Jones.
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23,  1961
mmri-'*-''''*^--*
Letters to the Editor
Over ihe stile
Autonomy?   Here?
Council Monday night decided, once again, to become
a censoring board.
Completely  ignoring  UBC tradition  of  student res-
r ponsibility  and  initiative,  it passed a  motion  which  required the Arts  Council to submit   for  ratification,  the
topic of a proposed debate before the debate is staged.
The council, acting only on rumours that the debate
;■ was to be on homosexuality  (a topic since thrown out
by the Arts Council itself), passed the motion in the light
of some highpowered oratory from several of its "public
.... relation?, officers."
What these people know about public relations can
be written on the back of a five-cent stamp with a shaving brush!
All universities, including this one, have traditionally    !
taken part in  and  sponsored   debates  on "controversial
topics" and no permanent damage has resulted.
A good case might be that publicity resulting from
such debates has been good for the universities involved.
Council was told that money was withdrawn fronj
the university development fund due to the "bad publicity" following last year's chastity debate. A check by The
Ubyssey revealed that the statement is pure fiction!
Council was also  told a prominent  university  staff.
member almost lest her job because of the same debate.
More fiction!
The co-ordinator of activities said he would not have
allowed the Arts Council to book a. room had he known
a debate of such nature was going to take place. Where
did he receive the authority to act as a one-man censor
of student activities?
Within our structure of student government, student
council has always received a large amount of trust and
.   autonomy from the University administration. Why then
is it loathe to pass this along to its subsidiary organizations?
Is council labouring under the mistaken belief it embodies all the intelligence and ability on the campus?
The university has traditionally been the place of unlimited student activity and one of council's main responsibilities should be the protection of this freedom. To
force a group to stop a function on the sheer speculation
that it might not be "properly handled," is a gross mismanagement of that responsibility!
Tihe student body is not in danger of losing their
autonomy to the university administration. Apparently
they are in danger of losing it to student council.
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I am a frequent visitor to
the stacks of the College Library. I maintain .that one's
visitation into the realms of
literature should be encouraged. However, our library
(whether aware of it or not) is
discouraging admittance to any
members of the male, and female, student body who desire
to keep their fertility.
When leaving this section Qf
the library, the student must
pass through a turnstile which
is operated by a usually lazy
librarian. Many a time, after
having secured my reading material, I have begun to take
my leave, and have found myself, in repressed agony,
doubled-over across the rather
taught iron bar of this turnstile. In search of solace I imploringly turned to the stack
librarian (the one in charge of
releasing the iron bar). She
only smugly grinned at my apparent discomfort and pressed
the button. I left the library.
If the machine on the "way
in" functions adequately without   the   assistance   of   human
interference,   why   cannot   the
machine on the "way put" perform in the same manner?
Yours truly,
"A WOULD-BE
PERPETRATOR OF
THE HUMAN RACE."
Hairy horde
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
On mundane Monday, as a
sound-car was adventurously
advertising the political speakers in Buchanan 106 on Tuesday, graciously giving its suitable subtle message to the campus in particular and particularly the campus, a hairy horde
of morbid; mutinous members
of that fine faculty (which will
remain anonymous) engineered
a demonstrably devastating debacle.
The occupants, being Liberally-minded, rabidly refused to
give adamant arguments.
We decidedly didn't want
the cretinous creature to feel
"run-down"; we knew if they
ate lunch outdoors Tuesday the
fall-out would get them. We be-
seeched; they besieged. But we
still have fond, perhaps futilely
fallacious hopes that they will
come and be understandably
uplifted.
Even they are warmly welcome—besides, it's a peaceful
place to have their bananas fed
to them.
Yours  truly,
MIKE COLEMAN,
Arts II.
"Illogic rubbish"
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Again, I read with disgust
the latest telegram sent out by
the members of the Nuclear
Disarmament club. I am getting sick and tired of their line
of illogic rubbish being presented in your paper. For
example, in their telegram,
they relate that the youth of
all nations have lost respect
for the two world leaders. May
I ask, since when does the ND
Club   speak   for   youth   of   all
nations? They speak for themselves only.
This group would very much
like to see the Western Powers
destroy their nuclear weapons
unilaterally, thus peace would
not be long in coming. Very
true, the Russians could obliterate us tomorrow, and there
would be peace. There is also
the problem of those 650 million peace - loving Chinamen,
whose population increases
faster than we could destroy
them in conventional war —
35,000 people a dav. I'm afraid
the peoples of Laos, Nepal,
Manchuria, Northern Vietnam,
South Korea, Tibet, and Formosa would choose to disagree
with these ND groups who
think that the Chinese are a
peace - loving group.. Without
the atom bomb, we would be
helpless against this nation.
Russia has too much to lose in
a nuclear war, whereas one
Chinese leader said, all we
would lose is people, and vye
have lots of people.
I agree most readily with ND
Club's (and everyone else's)
condemnation of nuclear testing. But again this club showed
its childishness by picketing
both American and Russian
embassies protesting the nuclear testing. I sometimes marvel at the patience of Americans who put up with these
falsely directed smears.
The nuclear bonib, I feel, is
the greatest deterrent against
war we have. No one dares
launch major offensives against
another country for fear it will
be destroyed by nuclear bombs.
This Mexican standoff cannot go on forever, and I'm hoping, given enough time, Russia and (China will begin warring agiainst each -other, as
their ideologies no^y have dif-
1 ferent paths.
To the ND group I suggest
they polish their buttons, put
up  their   banners   and   march
down    to    hear   Dr.    Norman
Alcock present a better idea of
bringing peace  to  this world.
Yours   truly,
R. S. HALLISEY,
Eng, III
Blase attitude
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Mike Grenby's column reflects a blase attitude towards
petty theft. Many of the students shrug it oft until they
lose something.
This blase, careless attitude
carries over into other things,
until personal rights tend to
mean nothing, making a farce
out of Diefenbaker's bill.
This causes one to fear his
safety and distrust his fellow
students. Your car, parked in
the university parking lot is
not safe there (despite the vigilant B&G officials), for our
blase comrades are honest only
if they can't get away with
being dishonest. Thus to back
into a car means nothing to
them if they think they won't
be caught.
They don't consider that
some people are not that slipshod, have some pride. That
these people will be compelled
to shell out some hard-earned
dollars for someone else's folly.
Yes, we need a student police
force, a vigilante to protect us
from our folly.
Yours truly,
CLARENCE BURR,
Arts III.
Not a German
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I wish to express my disgust
upon reading the "Let them
stew" letter (November 17,
Ubyssey). Without mentioning
the absurd narrow-mindedness
evident in the ideas expressed
in this letter, it strikes me that
the arguments are biased and
unfounded.
It is an injustice to speak of
Nazis and Germans as synonymous. Because a nation of
people in the midst of a far
worse depression than this
country has ever experienced,
was led astray by someone who
appeared to be a way back to
prosperity is no reason for condemnation. Do you think that
the German people do not
regret this particular segment
of their past? Is this any reason
to abandon them, when they
need our support, especially
moral support, the most?
I don't believe in judging a
person by his past, and in this
case the Germans should not
be constantly reminded of
theirs. What good does this
do? It is not human nature
(and the Germans possess the
same human nature as the rest
of us) to react kindly to animosity and animosity towards
them by English- speaking
peoples has been growing in
recent years to an appalling
level. I wonder whether this
person has ever known any
Germans other than Adolf
Eichmann.
I assume by this letter that
the Germans have no right to
individual thought and action,
and that they should never
have been created. But since
they were, they are. supposed
to keep out of everyone else's
way. The Germans have made
and are still making invaluable contributions in all fields:
chemistry, physics, medicine
and the arts. This is an indisputable statement.
This person has apparently
had some unfortunate experience with a German or has
been brought up in an atmosphere of prejudice against
them. I say this because had
her arguments been sound and
had she actually felt justified
in making them, she would not
have hesitated to sign her
name.
Just remember, please, that
you can't judge a race as a
whole, but you must judge each
person in the world as an individual.
I am not a German-
Yours  truly,
TIM FULLER
Is there a Santa?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I see in The Ubyssey that
Santa Claus is coming to UBC
Dec. 5 and 6.
I thought there was no Santa Claus.
Please tell me—is there a
Santa Claus?
VIRGINIA,
Arts I.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The
Ubyssey reported some years
ago that Santa Claus was
dead. Last year The Ubyssey also reported that Santa
would not visit children of
the University for similar
reasons. The Ubyssey will
keep you well posted on his
present state in plenty of
time to write your letter. Thursday, November 23, 1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at large
__WEE PROBLEM	
By KEN WARREN
Ubyssey  staff  writer
Let's throw the editorial "we"
out of Ideas at Large. These
surely are ideas and random
thoughts of an individual, and,
being so, rate the first person
singular where applicable. Besides, the confusion wee "we"
could spread is unforeseeable.
Take for instance a recent
Fort Camp occurrence that saw
my shorts the recipient of covetous attentions. I had finished
washing them — several pair —
and left them in the laundry
room to dry. On my return,
however, I discovered I was two
shorts short.
Now, consider that, were I to
columnize my sorrows under
present restrictions the resulting
sad soliloquy would go something like this:
"We had our shorts snatched
from beneath our noses the
other day and feel that anyone
who would stoop . . ." .
Like sad man! What are my
shorts anyway? Community enclosures? A reader Would be
justified in assuming tiie Stan-
field Snatcher might well have
been  a  co-owner.
Along the same line of thought
it is presumptuous, yet; righteous, to consider that someone
lifted shorts that a friend and
I share.
Furthermore, the fact that my
nose is a' trifle large (mother's
side of the family) is no reason
to come out and make a group
comparison of the bloody thing.
Now, I have never as yet lent,
rented or sold any pieces of my
underwear. Nor have I ever even
considered doing the opposite
to those belonging to someone
else.
That someone would steal
mine though presents a great
opportunity for a column — an
opportunity I will have to pass
up in view of a wee restriction.
How could 1 delve into such
a person's questionable morals
when the suggestion crops up
that my own are similar? How
can I rouse you to action
against such a being when I am
forced to say "our" shorts
rather than "my" shorts?
Would not in fact your first
move be to check the beltline to
see if your own wore in place?
Still not convinced that "we"
presents a problem?
Okay, consider this:
Last week a colleague of mine
used   this   space   to   relate   her
"craziest nightmare." She wrote:
"Oh we had the craziest nightmare   the   other   night   alright.
The only trouble was, what we
actually did was turn over, flick
off   the   ten   o'clock   news   and
stay  awake  till  four."
Innocently enough intended, I
think, but just who is the we
in her boudoir?
Regardless though, the "we"
won't-be replaced by its singular
counterpart in columns. We
could care less!
What we had planned to
stress is the evidence of changes
taking place in mankind as fallout increases. Shortsy raids indeed! Makes one feel like becoming a bomb-banner.
In Kangaroo Court
Rebel engineer castro-ated
By ERIC WILSON
For conduct entirely becoming a student, Engineering
Second-year President Edvard
Grande Wednesday was
"castro-ated" by an Engineering Undergraa Society  court.
Engineers feelings had earlier been cruelly shattered
when an AMS Student Court
had cleared Grande on a .
charge of attempting to incite
a riot by urging students to
collect eggs to bomb the Brock
after Student Council officials
had refused to allow Homer
Tomlinson to crown himself
King of UBC before students.
Grande was cleared when
he insisted that he was trying
to prevent a riot by leading
the Engineers away from the
Brock. The court decision mortified the Engineers, who were
shocked to find a conformist
in their midst.
At his second trial yesterday noon in the Brock, Councillors Fairy Mason and P. R.
Icker argued the case before
Court Judge I.  M. Fink.
Grande was charged with
failing to incite a riot by
leading the Engineers away
from the Brock during the
Coronation festivities.
First witness for the Prosecution, second - year student
Christopher Tattletale, revealed that the Engineers were
prepared for King Homer with
dynamite and brassknuckles,
but had been led astray by the
actions of Grande.
After his counsel had resigned because the trial was
being conducted honestly,
Grande took the stand in his
own defence and staggered
veteran court reporters with
his deft ability to handle a
Yo-Yo.
Because of the magnificent
defence oratory, which moved
hardened Chemical Engineers
to tears, Judge Fink revealed
to the hushed courtroom that
he found it necessary to declare Grande guilty.
After the confused uproar
which greeted this unexpected
judgment nad subsided,
Judge Fink passed sentence
on the humbled defendant,
who had earlier revealed his
true feelings about the court
decision by breaking his Yo-
Anglican bishop to
speak again today
The Right Reverend R. S.
Dean, Anglican Bishop of the
Cariboo, will speak on "Race
Relationships" at noon today in
Bu. 205.
One of Canada's most distinguished clergymen, he will discuss the problem of race from a
Christian viewpoint.
"PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
. . . Brahadi's smoking
tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
53* for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxes included
Also available in
vacuum packed half pound tin
Yo   string    over   the   Judge's
left ear.
Having found a precedent
for his sentence in modern
Cuba, Judge Fink solemnly
proclaimed that the defendant,
Edvard Grande, be taken by
Engineers Secret Police to a
place of execution and there
be "castro-ated."
The sentence was carried
out immediately by ten neuter
Engineers, there being no
other gender available among
the 300 present. Grande's girl
friend was unavailable for
comment.
COMMERCE HEAD Dean Neil
Perry will speak to the Vancouver Institute, Saturday,
8:15 p.m. in Bu. 106.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
20%
OFF
BOOKS
20%
OFF
Special sale on most of our
paperback stock.
OWL  BOOKS
4560 W.-TOth
Lt. John Kennedy's
desperate swim
for survival
Read the authentic story of
how President Kennedy-
shipwrecked in the South
Pacific—swam thirty hours
through enemy waters. The
story is in this week's Post.
TA« Saturday Evenin/t
IX)NT
TODAY — NOON
BROCK LOUNGE: Hon. Alvin Hamilton, Postmaster General, will speak in Brock
'Lounge at noon today. He wjll speak
on "Conservative Government Policy."
BUCHANAN  217:  Rod and  Gun  Club—Ted
Peck, of Channel 8's "Tides and Trails"
will speak. All welcome.
Top of "C" Lot: Sports Car Club rally.
FRIDAY — NOON
AUDITORIUM: Jazzsoc presents Eleanor Collins, well-known Vancouver vocal stylist.
SATURDAY
Commerce Undergraduate Society's Annual "Cocktails and Rhythm" at the
Lion's Gate Hall. See bulletin board on
second floor of Commerce Extension ior
ctetails.
th. MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday
KINEO *
turkey dim
By PETER MORRIS
-# SHOOT THE PIANIST *
(directed —by Francois Truffaut, France 1960)
The Varsity Theatre is continuing its strong art-theatre policy -
with a film by the director of FOUR HUNDRED BLOWS, that is
a first class piece of stylistic cinema. Francois Truffaut is a new
French directors who, like Alain Resnais and Jean-Luc Godard,
has been generally dubbed by the misnomer "New Wave." Their
general thesis of film-making is that the "means of expression"
are more important than any message, social or otherwise, that
the film conveys. SHOOT THE PIANIST superbly exemplifies
this thesis.
The world of SHOOT THE PIANIST is one dear io the hearts
of the new French directors: the milieu of the American gangster
thriller. (These directors, most of who are former critics for the
French film magazine, "Cahiers du Cinema," have always claimed
that the Hollywood B-thriller is replete with very stylised filmmaking.) The story concerns a timid, withdrawn bistro piano player, Charlie Roller, his involement with two gangsters who have
been double-crossed by his brothers; and his love affair with a
waitress, Lena. Charlie's affair with Lena is interrupted when he
accidentally kills the bar keeper and the lovers' consequent flight
from justice inevitably ends in tragedy.
PERFECT CONTROL
..Not a very profound theme, but pictorially the film is magnificent: from the opening chase through the alleys of Paris to
the final tragedy on the srio'w-covered hillside the imagery is perfectly controlled. Scenes like the one where Charlie, 6n his first
walk with Lena, wonders how to make the first overtures. Here
the use of close-ups coupled with Charlie's thoughts on the sound
track convey his hesitancy, and the cinematic use of framing, enables us to share with Charlie his surprise when Lena suddenly
disappears.-The scene where Charlie and Lena are kidnapped by
the gangsters is also visually exciting as well as being highly
comical.
. There is also a very striking use of sound during this scene
when we hear laughter totally divorced from the visual reality
of the car but coupled with a long shot of the busy street. A remarkable use of camera occurs at the point where Charlie's wife
commits suicide. As the noise of the window opening appears on
the sound track, the camera begins to move with Charlie down the
hallway into the bedroom, flashes over the room to the open window and drops to the sidewalk outside. This makes us emotionally
identify with Charlie.
One could go on listing almost interminably the imaginative
visual effects that Truffaut has employed, but perhaps final mention should be made of the style of the final tragedy on the hillside.
As Lena moves from her hiding place the camera follows her with
such breathtaking speed that we are convinced she will reach the
safety of the house; then there is a cut to the gangster carefully
aiming his revolver and we cut back to the fleeing girl until a shot
rings out and the girl stumbles and falls. Even then the camera
doesn't stop, but continues its frenetic pan across the snow and
finally comes to rest on the aghast face of Charlie. Truly a remarkable evocation of the breathlessness and helplessness of the chase.
CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT
There  is  also   a  careful   development   of   character:   Charlie
(superbly played by Charles Aznavour) is portrayed as a timid,
unwitting victim of tragedy and fate. Though his personality is
never wholly complete he is always very real and engaging. The
supporting characters also come completely alive: some of them
bizarre (the two gangsters, the prostitute Clarisse), some of them
fatalistically bound to tragedy (Charlie's wife and Lena). One is
also entranced by the whimsical nature of some of the scenes: the
two crooks proudly embarking upon an almost surrealistic catalogue of their material possessions; the grotesque procession of
death; the myriad eccentric characters in the bistro and the weird
song which is sung by the band to cover up a fight. There are also
some respectful tributes to the silent cinema — the cameo and
vignette shots, and one superb visual gag that I mustn't disclose.
To all this is added a most imaginative use of sound for emotional and dramatic effect.
If I were to find fault with the film it would be on the grounds
of its sometimes jarring emotional shifts from near-farce to tragedy
that are often dramatically perplexing. But this is scarcely a film
of logical progressions, and Truffaut's ability to delineate his characters, the whimsical and often bizarre humour of some of its
scenes, coupled with a strongly developed sense of cinematic
style, make it a' film that is a notable addition to the French cinema's recent achievements.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Saturday, Dec. 9, 8:30 p.m.
$4.50- 4.00, 3.25, 2^50. 1.75
Incl. Tax
P~motJ« Artists Box Office
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
MU 1-3351
riocetus in aiu ox t.ft.n w   Orphans Fund
c
R
I
T
I
..$■
P AGE
EDITOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
jys^.t-l ■M£*i-"e-"-J. ^ "***■§• J-y^y^
DINNER WITH THE FAMILY isn't
the best of Anouilh's plays. Its denouement is predictable and its third act
flat. The themes—the strength of innocence, the corrupting power of
wealth, the we-are-what-we're-expected-
to-be of human behaviour—have been
laboured before by many writers, not
least among them M.Anouilh himself.
But it does contain one perfect comic
situation, and enough ingenious twists
of plot to make an entertaining evening under  imaginative direction.
DINNER WITH THE FAMILY, in
other words, need not be as dull a play
as the Player's Club made of it last
week. What it missed was imaginative
direction. Cues were thrown to the
carpet, walked around, and sniffed before being picked up; extraneous blocking braked proceedings further; while
two characters who should be played
with a high metabolic rate were turned
into shuffling, snuffling laggards.
Why Anouilh should have been
stretched longer on director Roy Brin-
son's rack I don't know; perhaps Mr.
Brinson hates the playwright. It's hot
easy to see why Mr. Brinson shouldn't
have bullied/cajoled his generally inexperienced cast into a faster rhythm.
It's even harder to see why he should
have allowed Scott Douglas to render
Jacques as a sinister lounge-lizard.
Anouilh is seldom unsubtle, and didn't
write Jacques to fit in with any middle^
brow cliched notions. Jacques is a no-
goodnik, but he appears to be the epitome of.buoyant charm.
The reasons for this are twofold: to
get a tension between the IS and the
APPEARANCE, a p
through this play, ar
third act. Jacques ha
good lines in this ac
that Anouilh, realisir
play was at this po
wanted Jacques to b«
very spirited young
would infuse the lines
elan. Jacques revels ii
His speeches on the t
lyrically. They can't b
a sneer or irritatingly
a bloodless chuckle,
performance was tru<
the limits set by his
the limits that were f;
The other mis-chai
Emile, the fallen but
production had steppe
West End farce. The a
appeared to be the vie
son's jeevishnes. Emilc
DINNER   WITH   A
Players* Club. Nov. :
Wood Theatre.
ler; he needs rakishne
going to seed, not s
the1 tilted chapeau in j
zontal bowler. Anouill
lovers of caricature.
The shame of it alH
Fall Play, DINNER VI
ILY was well cast, an
the club has more tale
many a lean year. M<
showed glimpses of a 1
der a better director, r
more to view! Tony Sil
had poise and some of
in  the  younger meml
ten string triumph
It is performances like this
which give one a great respect
for the guitar. With fingers
running spiderlike across the
strings Ida Presii and Alexandre Lagoya presented a program of classical guitar works
in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
such that the most Doubting
Thomas would become an
ardent disciple of the guitar.
Their program opened with
the Lauffensteiner Sonata in A
major. The trills, of the first
movement Grave, were harpsichord-like in their brilliance.
Rhythmic changes were well
executed and the device of
plucking near the bridge produced a sharp, almost harsh,
sound which was effective in
its employ.
The finger-work, of the second-movement Allegro, was
clean and clear with parts
working well together. The full
melodies, of the Andante, were
well brought out and trills
were dextrously executed.
The fourth and final movement Fugue was a pleasurable
listening experience. Subjects
sounded out clearly and counter subjects were well controlled. The contrapuntal work of
the two guitarists was excellent
in its balance as each presented
clearly his or her part but did
so while lending support to the
other.
The two Scarlatti Sonatas in
D minor and D major were well
presented yet not as inspiring
as the opening number. However, one must deduce that the
lack of inspiration arose from
the works themselves and not
from the performers as their
technique, melodic control and
balanced support was flawless.
The Bach Sarabaijde, two
Bourees and a Gigue displayed
a firm unexaggerated touch
from Lagoya.
IDA PR EST I and ALEXANDRE LAGOYA, Guitar
Duo, Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, November 13,
1961.
The rhythmic structure' was
strong and firm, heavily accented but well controlled.
Sharing the honors for the
best performance of the program was the Beethoven, Andante Variee. The full, rich
sound of the stately Beethoven
melody was captured and transmitted in the theme to give a
firm basis for the variations to
follow.
In the first variation, the
thematic   melody   was  promi-
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nent in the midst of decorations while the rapidly running
second variation displayed a
clean and accomplished handling. The third variation over
a rolling chord pattern produced excellent climaxes and
well-controlled tonal shadings.
The Rodrigo, Menueito Pom-
poso displayed th6 performers^
wide range of tonal capacity,
varying from a crisp bridge
staccato to broad, muted,
damped tones. Melodies sang
out firmly and sonorously.
The Tarantelle of Pierre
Petit opened with the sound of
a snare produced by the flat of
the hand. This work was reminiscent of Debussy in' its
progressions and lyric, nebulous effect of the minor key.
The performance also gave impressions of carefree buoyancy
produced by a light, rhythmically driving staccato.
As anticipated, the program
finished with Spanish works.
Here though was not a flashing,
garish Flamenco sound but a
mature, sensitive finale of more
reserved works with a Flamenco basis.
Included were the Tango
Espangnol of Albeniz, the Vil-
ianescas of Granados, and the
first Dance of "La Vie Breve"
by de Falla.
The driving finish of the
First Dance was well chosen
for a finale. The quiet underlying rippling bass provided a
good support for the theme,
and the clean exactness of the
running passages reinstated the
performers'   ability.
The unannounced encore
with its amorous melodies was
tonally rich but not as sure as
the rest of the performance
and it rather spoiled one's last
impression.
—bob macdonald lfeer 23, 1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
?r fault of cook "".placebo'-
_running        enunciation needs cleaning up, but his     good, and easier for her, if she hadn't m
_ running
:arry that
ly all the
not iikely
' thin his
ould have
ling but a
one who
11 possible
ickedness.
lould soar
rered with
lated with
Douglas's
gh within
or; it was
ation was
to in this
ght out of
at Wright,
Mr. Brin-
lallen but-
Y,   UBC
Frederic
rustication
>omp6sity;
' the hori-
't eater to
for a P.C.
HE FAM-
sated that
'than for
the actors
vhich, un-
iave come
Delmohte
in lacking
ales. HI is
enunciation needs cleaning up, but his
vocal strength is remarkable. Sue Allen, as his opposite number, had the
right idea, and the gap between what
she gave us ~and what was called for
was as narrow as that between a smirk
and a knowing smile. In the final event,
her youth was against her.
This criticism can be made of so
many of the actors that one wonders
why North American twenty-year-olds
persist in attempting sophisticated European comedy. Barney Baker's Georges kept coming and going, without ever
making an exit; no sooner did Mr.
Baker slide into either the possessed
calm of Georges^neurotic or the determined energy of Georges-sane than he
fell out. the other side, and appeared
to be apologising for his momentary
success. But Mr. Baker's confidence
about being on stage—as opposed to
his confidence with the part—was as
heartening as it was unusual in a
Fall show.
PAT DAHLQUIST. a promising new
arrival, was quite the classy tart when
speaking, but in repose became the
sorority girl again. Here, of course,
she suffered from the blocking, which
during the third act made me look
around for her sentry-box; but she isn't
a good| ystenef, and Barbara,, has a lot .
Of listening to do.
GAIL HILL, another comer, was
fortunately cast as Isabelle, and could
have made even more of her natural
innocence by standing straighter and
letting us see her face.
LIZ FRAZER gave an accurate picture of Madame  Delachaume,  though
it probably would have been just as
good, and easier for her, if she hadn't
decided to pitch her voice an octave
higher than usual. M.Delachaume, as
played by Colin Rollins, hadn't the
same quality. He, together with Jane
Hey man, illustrated once again the tendency of the very young to caricature
the very old. Anouilh nowhere suggests
M.Delachaume is arthritic, -and Mr.
Rollins would have been on safer
ground had he not decided to improve
on Anouilh. Not everyone above forty-
five is white-haired and doubled over.
Jane Heyman wasn't all that bad, and
the Proprietress is old, but her shrillness became obtrusive and therefore
distracting. Of Esme, I'll only say I
like long-legged blondes, but prefer
those who look at the person they're
a-talking to.
Looking over this list, I heave another sad sigh, for most of the faults
could have been remedied by a director
who was also prepared—as directors
who work with students must be—to
be a teacher. I don't think Anouilh bred
a turkey, and if turkey came to the
table, I can hardly blame the waiters;
obviously something happened in the
kitchen, and Mr. Brinson as head cook
must answer for it.
To end on a happy note: the set and
the   design   thereof,   for   Which   John
Madill. Denis Howarth, Doug Higgins,
and  a host  of tireless workers  were
responsible,    were   very   satisfactory.
The technical crew is pretty good by
how, and if the acting promise hinted
at  in the this production is fulfilled;,
! the Players' Club will in the next year
■or two enjoy an overdue Renaissance^
—david bromige
by george bowering
RUE KOLLER, alias Ed-
d Saroyan, in a tense
e with his wife. The film:
OT THE PIANIST, which
howing at the Varsity
t're, and which is re-
'ed in KINEO this week.
\ble for frauds
farcical revue, "Fable for
ids,  by Dr. Donald Soule.
1 department of theatre,
be presented in the Fred-
Wood Theatre, November
to   December  9,  excluding
days and Mondays.
he   play,   which   is also
cted by the author, is based
Macchiavelli's     famous
an Renaissance comedy.
Mandragola"    (The   Man-
te).
ickets are available at Uni-
:ity   Theatre    reservations.
msion department and at
theatre   on   performance
lings.
903   ROBSON   STREET,
Vancouver,   B.C.
MU   1-0612
South Seas Gift Shop
Christmas Gifts
HAND CARVED WOODS
from   Africa,    India,    Philippine's
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Exotic   Sea   Shells,   Corals,
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Soapstone   Figures,
Woven   Bamboo
U
i r»rt
WITT'S
LOW PRICED GIFTS
FOR
Men, Ladies, Student and Children
5732 University Blvd. CA 8-8110
THE THEATRE OF THE
absurd (Beckett, Genet, Albee)
is characterized, of course, by
a seeming ignorance of cause
and effect, and by a seeming
comic disregard for detractors
who point out that fact. But an
absurdist, no matter if he be
outrageously bitter Genet or
wildly flippant Ionesco, has as
the origin of his theme an intensely serious statement to
make about the world, and
sometimes an unusual antidote
for the world's sickness. He is
the furthest thing from the
American soap opera.
THE NEAREST THING TO
the American soap opera is the
French soap opera, as perpetrated by many of the neo-
mannerists of the early part
of. this century. They tried
valiantly,: in the face pf mass
indifference, to keep the people
from running awav to the American girlie shows in Paris.
They weren't sure enough of
their own ,messages to stop the,
exodus, so they turned to form,
to character, and found ways
to titilate while all the time
turning out the same turgid
story of the Paris wastrel
searching for a clean, well-
lighted jjlace.
ANOUILH'S DINNER WITH
THE FAMILY is an admixture
in point. The plot, the love
story, is as old as John's other
wife, and a good deal older, as
a look at sprue early nineteenth
century poetry will attest. The
wastrel is there. The clean,
well-lighted place is available.
The situation (for a while) is
absurd, and (for a while) the
plot is saved from Oxydolism.
ANOUILH SUPPORTED
the works of Ionesco and
Beckett, though he qualified
his support by disapproving of
what he called "old-fashioned
avant-gardism." Luckily, in his
play we see a little old-fashioned AG to offset the old-
fashioned suds. The characters
that surround the principals
are irrationally interesting.
Last week's production by the
Players' Club (see Bromige's
review for the only informed
one in town, as usual) gave us
some delightfully irrational
people, and they saved the
piece from an unimaginative
direction and a  rather boring
"I'm no
superman,"
says Chuck Bednarik
Rough.toughChuckBednarik
of the Philadelphia Eagles is
a rare bird. He has played
both offensive and defensive
football. And he says most
pros could do the same—if
they had the guts. Read his
story in this week's Post.
Th* Saturday Evening
POST
love affair. (However, as DB
has said, "I am doing the review", I am not. Onwards.)
THE T H E A T R E OF THE
Absurd rests heavily on a creation of a set that will symbolize
the problems faced by the
characters. Thus Albee's American dreamers are encircled
by a frame of smoke. Speedy
Madill's sets were symbolic:
'one was a plush and stuffy
symbol of the bourgeois French
imagination; the other was a
crooked offset little room that
surrounded some crooked offset people. Plaudits again to
Madill.
SYMBOLIC, TOO, ARE THE
dialogs and reactions of the
characters. Example: the dramatic rapid shift in emotion of
the phony parents as portrayed
by less than successful. actors,
done not as a -parody of actors,
but as a schizoid comment on
what daddyhoodand actorhood
rfeally represent in this our
cloud-framed world. The many
seeming diversions are nothing
of the sort, rather comments
on deception and romance. Feel
lost? Go to the Cambie Theatre.
Do hot pass. Go!
THE   POSITION    OF    THE
protagonist faced with the absurd is, of course, influenced
by his wholesome • love, etc.,
but,the position must be made
clear. Barney Baker did not
realize that he should not balance the absurd with his own
sanity, but that he should
partake of it with shaken
sobriety. Especially as a Frenchman, not as an Anglosaxon
apologist. Not his fault, of
course, rather that of the
director.
ANOUILH'S IS NOT THE
theatre of the absurd; far from
it. Rather he tries to flog something stale by beribboning it
with peculiar wrappings. The
message is straight from Proctor and Gamble; It's hard to be
honestly bourgeois, but it's
worth the inner struggle. The
play bogs because it is so
chicken. Credits to the PC for
attempting it, and for pulling
it off with such a suddenly
bright lot of acting material.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
a 1000  Garments  to
Choose from
• Full   Dress
• Morning- Coats
« Director'?   Coats
m, White and Bine
Coats
• Shirts   &
Accessories
• 10',  UBC Discount
E. A. Lee Ltd.
One   Store  Only!
623 Howe St.     MU 3-2457
Shoot fhe Pianist
Tirez sur le Pianiste
France 1960
A brilliant film with flashes
of bizarre humor and fliahts
of fancy.
A GANGSTER THEME
Directed by
FRANCOIS   TRAUFFAUT
of "400 Blows" fame
VARSITY
KMirt TRIMBLE CA 4-37M Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23,  1961 -
Diefs gift of gab
draws blank space
HALIFAX (CUP) — What
should a newspaper dd when it
covers a speech by the Prime
Minister and he says nothing of
importance.
Report the content of what he
said, the Dalhousie Gazette decided. '
. So, the paper left a three-inch
blank space under the heading:
"Prime Minister John Diefenbaker spoke to Dalhousie students and faculty in room 21 last
Friday."
In ah accompanying editorial,
the paper said the Prime Minister undoubtedly left the opinion among students and faculty
that he:was probably "an awfully
nice fellow."
The Dalhousie Gazette thus
reported the appearance of Canada's Prime Minister on the
front, page of its November 15
issue.' ': -
: -"We think that any of the
several J hundred students and
faculty1 erf this university who
heard - the Prime Minister of
Canada ^aeak last Friday would
agree with us that little else" can
be done.
"Haying agreed that a report
is necessary, the Gazette would
rejoice if •■ any member of the
Prime Minister's audience would
approach us.and inform us just
what we should report.
"How indeed," asked the editorial, "is one to report a speech
in which nothing was said?"
"Although Dalhousie was
proud to welcome Canada's
Prime Minister, we regret the
fact that Mr. Diefenbaker insisted on addressing the students
present at a 'nursery' level. The
jokes and pious platitudes to
which the gathering was subject
was fit more for a tea party of
elderly conservative ladies, than
for what we might hopefully
refer to as the elite of this
generation.
"It is small wonder that
students revolt at being told
continually that they are the
nation's future leaders, if the
nation's present leaders treat
students with such marked intellectual disdain."
Discipline   committee
for Fort Camp rejected
Students   to   meet
for Edmonton trip
Students planning to take
the special Edmonton train
trip, leaving December 21, will
meet at noon Friday in Bu.
317.
1\
ff
THE REEF
POINT  ROBERTS,  WASHINGTON,  U.S.A.
.   •  ■  '     DINING & DANCING
Featuring "the Fabulous Ian Smith Trio"
FRI., SAT. & SUN:
OPEN YEAR ROUND
10 Miles South of Deas Island Tunnel
Large Parties by Reservation Only: Dial 945-2233—945-7579
No minors allowed on premises
Proof of age must be available
The College Shop
Makes these Xmas Gift Suggestions
UIC Lighter _______ ________ 1.25
Cud Links __ 3.95
Tie Tacs  ___ 2.50
Tie Clip __  2.95
Mugs, white, blue, black, 18 oz. 4.25
Charcoal Ashtrays  2.39
8" Desk Ashtray ______ 2.85
Copper Coasters _„ .75
Faculty Sweaters,
Arts, Education, Aggie ____ 15.95
UBC Necklace, gold or silver
with Blue Saphire stone ______ 6.50
Closes December 1st
NEW DIRECTOR of  the   UBC
Alumni Association is Tim-
Hollick-Kenyon, assistant director of the association since
April 1. Hollick-Kenyon is a
UBC  graduate.
Cornette Beauty
Salon
Special Prices for UBC
"Individual Attention" by
Male and Female Stylists
Up to the minute hair styling
OPEN FRI TILL 9
1532 W.  10
CA 4-7440
An attempt to set up a Fort
Camp discipline committee was
defeated Tuesday night by a
six-vote margin.
The intention of the proposed
committee, as described by camp
council, was to handle "minor
and petty" matters now being
looked after by the Housing
Administration.
Councillors told the genera!
meeting a "major crisis" sucb
as panty raids would still be.
dealt with by Housing.
"If the proposed committee is
to handle petty and prunor mat
ters," said one camp resident,
"then I suggest it will be a
minor, petty and useless committee. And I don't think we
want  it."
The   resolution   was   defeated
54-48.
TIAIK :!7  weeks  l.!JT;   1   year 3.ST;
2    years,    7.00
I.IFK SI   weeks, 1.91; 1  year, 4.00;
■>  years,   7.00
Maeleans,     1     year,     1.50
Saturday   Night,   1   year,   2.00
Wijte: Student Pei-iodical A-gency,
P.O.   Box   717,   Adelaide   P.O.,
Toronto   1,   Ontario.
POINT GREY
JEWELLERS
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(Show Student Card)
4435 W.lOthAve. CA 8-8718
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.  10th       CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
Without this label
A<JverH«n$ Monomer:    J©tin Sutbeifond
Coven    Temia MJhoitoH
BIRD CALLS
ON
SALE
NOW
BROCK HALL
75c
ONLY A FEW LEFT ..Thursday, November 23, 1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  7
Confederation   still   an
experiment   says   Congress
By Canadian University Press
QUEBEC — The Canadian
'experiment' has neither succeeded nor failed—it is still
an experiment. This was the
consensus at the end of the
four-day Congress on Canadian Affairs at Laval University last week.
The English-speaking delegates left for home with the
realization that Confederation
is no longer to be taken for
granted. They were impressed
with the depth of French Canadian nationalism and the
extent to which French Canadians in general sympathize
with the separatist movement.
"French Canada forms a nation," as one French speaking
delegate explained Saturday,
and unless she can realize her
legitimate national aspirations
within Confederation, there
seems to be a very real possi-
possibility that she will opt
for independence."
•    •    •
Thirty Canadian universities and clsssical colleges were
represented at the Congress
Whose purpose it was to study
the question: "Canada: A Success or a Failure?"
Perhaps the dominant tone
of the Congress was its frankness—almost a brutal frankness. The guest speakers, some
of the most prominent men in
i Canadian public life, spared
nothing to outline the gravity
of the present relations between English and French
Canada.
Rene Levesque, Quebec
Minister of Natural Resources, told the English-speaking
delegates that "you need us
more than we need you. If
we can't get what we deserve
from Confederation, don't be
too surprised if we decide on
another course."
• • •
Douglas Fisher, CCF member of parliament for Port Alberni, replied that he failed
to see what French Canada
was offering to the country as
a whole. "They talk about
French-Canadian culture, but
it seems to me that its famous products have been Maurice Richard and Lili St. Cyr."
The Congress also heard
Andre Laurendeau, editor of
Le Devoir, Gerard Pelletier,
editor of La Presse, Michael
Oliver, co-president of the
New -Democratic Party, Murray Ballantyne, editor and historian, the Honorable Davie
Fulton, minister of justice,
Eugene Forsey, director of research of the Canadian Labor
Congress, James Mallory, political scientist at McGill University, Marcel Chaput, loader
of Rassemblement pour l'lnde-
pendence Nationale, a separatist group, and author of
"Pourquoi j'ai choise l'inde-
pendence," and the Honorable
Jean Lesage, prime minister
of the Province of Quebec.
• •    •
Murray   Ballantyne,  in  his
speech "What the French Canadians Have Against Us," es-
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 60
Peace River North
ELEMENTARY TEACHER WANTED FOR TOWN SCHOOL
TO TEACH GRADE 7 IN FORT ST. JOHN, B.C.
SALARY SCALE FOR  1962:
EC
3300
to
4100
EB
3650
to
5650
EA
4050
to
6300
PC
4525
to
7000
PB
5000
to
7700
PA
5400
to
8500
Applications and enquiries are to be directed to Mr. E. A.
Vince, Secretary-Treasurer, . School District J\|o. 60, (Peace
River North) Box 849, Fort St. John, B.C.
.i-ii-...-
SCIENCE STUDENTS
Science sweaters will be on sale at
the
COLLEGE SHOP on Thursday, November
30th.
There is a limited initial order of 24
only
so you will have to move fast.
PHIL CLARKE,
Manager,
College  Shop.
tablished a tone which was
to influence the whole congress. He made fiank and
basic remarks on the ignorance on the part of.his English
speaking compatriots toward
all that he had to do with
French Canada.
Said Mr. Ballantyne: "We
will never understand the
'French Canadian until we
accept wholeheartedly that
they are very different, that
they have a perfect right to
be themselves, and therefore
different, and that this difference is a good thing and an
enrichment of our own national life."
*    •    *
A fuller account of ihe congress with excerpts from some
of the key speeches and
articles by graduate students
Ray Noel and Rick Brown,
UBC's delegates to the seminar, will appear in a special
supplement to The Ubyssey in
January. •
Varsity Fabrics
4437 W. 10th Ave CA 4-0842
Yard Goods, McCall Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'fll 9
POSTMASTER - GENERAL William M. Hamilton will speak
on Conservative Government
Policy at noon today in Brock
lounge.
Today final day for
AMS photo retakes
Today is the last day for Alma
Mater Society card photo retakes.
They will be taken in the
Common Room, Brock Hall,
from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Some AMS cards are still
waiting to be picked up at the
Undergrad offices.
'Dig-the-Ditchers'
finally finished
SACKVILLE, N.B. (CUP) —
The Chignecto Canal has been
dug — or at least a miniature
version of it.
The project was undertaken
by students of Mount Allison
University last month. Appropriately christened "Dig the Ditch"
and "Little Chignecto", the
work -was carried out on the
nearby Tantramar Marshes in an
effort to focus public attention,
on the canal, which has been
tossed around as a political foot
ball for more than 100 years.
The students began digging
October 23 and dug through 10
miles of fields, lakes, rivers,
and woods. Jon Everett, chairman of the "Ditch Committee",
said: "I think we have accomplished what we set out to do,
not only digging a symbolic
canal, but also forcing the issue
to a culmination point."
Campus Barber
Shop
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
BROCK EXTENSION
Attention WloJs or Pilots To Be!
For private, commercial, night and instrument flight training at a Government Approved Flying School, contact Abbotsford Ajr Services, Box 345, Abbotsford, B.C., or phone
ULysses 4-7231.
Parish priest
leads teen-age
street gang
When gang war broke »ut in
his parish, Rev. Kenneth
Murphy decided to find out
what made these kids tick.
So he worked his way into
a tough Boston gang. His
story is in this week's Post.
The Saturday Evening
jPONT
Q brilliant ilkd. student erne said,
If a person cuts of Ms oum kad,
Tra we dia^iom
Points to a neurosis
But,I'm positive
he'd be quite dead!"
If bills your finances are wreckin',
Give a thought to Personal Chequin',
The account that says "whoa",
To your vanishing dough—
To the B of M now you'll be trekin'?
TO l MILUOH CAUtlAMS
filfjil
Bank of Montreal"
@cuuid<M "^OtAi S<uc6 fan SiUcdcttt*
The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed
Your Campus Branch in  the Administration  Bldg.
MERLE C. KIRBY. MANAGER Page 8
T H
UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 23, 1961"
'TWEEN CLASSES
Sportsmen hear Ted Peck
UBC CLASSIFIED
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Special meeting today: Ted
Peck of Channel 8 TV "Tides
and Trails" will speak and show
films. Bu. 217 at noon. Everyone welcome.
* *     *
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
W. Hamilton, Postmaster
General, will speak at noon today in Brock Lounge on "Conservative Government Policy."
* *     *
FOLKSONG SOC.
Meeting noon today in Bu. 102.
Special guest, Roli Harris, also
films. Members only.
* *     *
PSYCH CLUB
Noon today in Psych Room 4.
Members only.
* *     *
PHILOSOPHY  CLUB
Mr. Penner, Socrates' Philosophy  of  Philosophy. '
* *     *
NEW DEMOCRATS
Banned World War II propaganda films., "Battle of Russia"
noon today in Bu. 106. Admission 25c.
* *     *
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
Advanced code and theory
classes noon today in Bu. 317.
* *     *
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Noon-hour rally at top of "C"
lot at noon today.
* *     *
SAILING   CLUB
Meeting   noon   today   in   Bu.
.103...Filrn,s will be showri, non-
members  are  welcome.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
French film in Bu. 202 Friday at noon. Members free,
others 10c. "Hugo's Life."
* *     *
COMMUNIST   CLUB
Mr. Maurice Rush, writer for
"Pacific Tribune" will speak
Friday noon in Bu. 205.-'!A, Oom-
munist Views the New Party."
* *     *-
JAZZSOC
Jazzsoc presents the vocal
stylings of Miss Eleanor Collins
on Friday at 12:30 in the Auditorium. Members free. Non-
members 25c.
■k      -k      "k
JR. CHEM CLUB
Dr. Trotter speaks on X-ray
Diffraction at 12:30. Chem 250,
Friday.
* *     *
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
German evening including
folk dancing, singing and several variety acts followed by a
public dance on Friday at 8 p.m.
Everybody welcome.
* *     *
Girls wanted
Tryouts for Mardi Gras chorus
line are being held today for
girls, from 12:30 to 4:30 in the
Stage Room, upstairs Main
Brock Hall. Boys' tryouts were
held Tuesday.
Chorus line dancers are not
limited to Greeks. Those who
make the grade will be featured
entertainment in the Mardi Gras
Charity Ball, Jan. 19 and 20 and
the Pep Meet on Jan. 18.
-u
THE SMACKERY
3 LOCATIONS
3075 Granville - RE 3-5813
4423 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-0833
5075  Kingsway  - HE  1-8818
FREE HOT & FAST PIZZA
DELIVERY!   !
n
GIRLS!
Just what you've been asking for .
THE    I
HIGHLAND
HOUSE
NEW
BERNHARD ALTMANN SWEATERS
NEW! BERNHARD ALTMANN SWEATERS!
$1395,  $15.95,  Cardigans $18.95
MATCHING SKIRT!      • Slim $17.95
• Pleated $19.95
VCF
Rev. R. Birch speaks on the
New Men Friday noon; Bu. 106.
* -k       k
ALBERTA   SPECIAL
Meeting Friday noon Bu. 317.
■k        -k        k
LUTHERAN  STUDENTS
Fireside, Sunday afternoon 3
p.m. at Pastor Pearson's, Dr. K.
Erdman will lead a discussion
on the Christian Attitude to
Nuclear War.
* *     *
BOOSTER CLUB
Meeting of club Monday at
noon in Bu. 2238. Guest speaker
Coach Pomfret of the basketball team.
•k       -k       ~k
CHINESE VARSITY
Three days on this Beautiful
Isle, Formosa, Tuesday, Nov. 28,
noon, Bu. 106.
* *     *
CHINESE VARSITY
Box Social Saturday 8:00-12 in
Brock extension. Girls bring
lunch, boys bid for it.
WANTED: One Arman ski. 2.10
meter. To replace broken one.
Phone YU 8-7908.
HIDE WANTED: To West Vancouver, preferably 21st and
Queens vicinity. Leaving campus at 5:00 p.m. Phone CA.
4-1111,     local     790.       Carol
 George. ^	
HELP WANTED: Reporter required for National U.S. student newspaper. Must be familiar with disarmament and
political activities on campus.
Apply to Mike Audain, CA.
4-9865.
WANTED: Would the gentleman
with whom I hitched a ride
from 41st and Dunbar on Sat.,
Nov. 4, please call CA 4-9049
and ask for Mr. Sangra. I left
some photographs in your car.
LOST: Would the person who
took my lab coat and lab
books from outside the Chem.
205 lab room please return
at least the lab book. No questions asked. Phone Linda
Sharpe. CA 4-9211 or LA.
2-1179.
LOST: Now what are you doing
with my driver's licence or
AMS cards etc., that you so
kindly borrowed at the Sadie
Hawkins dance? There isn't
much, so how about returning
them. Please mail them to me
or put them in the Bus Stop
Lost and Found.
LOST: Tyrol green hat, at the
Tea Cup Game, Thursday,
Nov. 16th. Finder please contact Jim Holloway at CA.
4-5725.  '
FOUND: One pair glasses. Gent
who called, please claim.
jProctor^s Office, _Brock.	
FOUND: Earring. Gent who
called, please claim. Proctor's
ojffice^Brock. ^	
URGENT: Would the persorTTn
the black Austin who saw a
child hit by my car at Arbutus and Fourth Ave., 8:15
a.m. Nov. 9, please phone
Brian. CY 8-1527 at 10:30
p.m. 	
SANTA  GLAUS:   is   coming to
UBC Dec. 5th and 6th.
UPPER
TENTH
BARBERS
4574 W. 10th AVE.
One Block Past the Gates
Featuring European Trained
Barbers
AGGIES!
STUDYING TOO HARD?
]
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT  ALL  TIMES
ASPIRINS!
UNIVERSITY      PHARMACY      LTD.
5754 University  Boulevard CA. 4-3202
What's doing at ALCAN for
UNIVERSITY GRADUATES?
Here are some of the booklets and brochures about
the opportunities at Alcan for graduates. Please
write for the copies in which you are interested!
~k Presenting Alcan to the University Graduate.
ik The Role of the Physical Metallurgist in Alcan
and its Associated Companies.
~k The Role of the Chemical and Extractive
Metallurgist in Aleak and its Associated Companies.
~k The Role of the Mechanical Engineer in Alcan
and its Associated Companies.
•k The Role of the Chemist in Alcan and its
Associated Companies.
ALCAN
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
STAFF PERSONNEL DIVISION, BOX 6090, MONTREAL•• 3. P.O.

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