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The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1950

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 'Dido, And Aeneas'
Auditorium, 7:30 P.M.
MondayfAnd Tuesday
Tne
'Dido And Aeneas'
Auditorium, 7:30 P.M.
Monday And Tuesday
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1950
NO. 0
LSE  SPECIAL   EVENTS
PRESENTS  BALLET
Special Events committee of the Literary and Scientific Executive will present a ballet group under the direction of Mara McBirney Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. in the
auditorium.
Two numbers will be presented and a feature of the
production will be costumes,and sets designed by Mario
Prizek, English department instructor.
Legs, Potts, Burke,
Feature Pep Meet
Kickapoos sponsor their first pep meet of the year today
at 12:30 p.m. in the Armories, to rouse enthusiasm for Varsity's
third grid feature against Western Washington College Vikings
* .Saturday.
Students Pass McKinnon
Budget At AMS Meeting
Nonie Donaldson Receives
Resounding Vote of Confidence
Get Us Up
At Lost
This gin-soaked column, basking
happily in its aura of metaphysical rumination, could probably win
even on undertaker's cup for the
best all-round show of lethargy.
But, frankly, even we are worried by the hippopoamus-llke spirit currently prevalent on the campus.
A tew days ago, a man driving
past a football game, is reported
to have asked "when did the WCTU
ladies sewing circles start holding
meetings in the stadium?"
The situation Is - becoming des-
parate. Downtown business men
who a while ago promised* support
for campus athletics are now nearly ready to toss in the towel.
"Why," they ask, "should we
pass   out  injections   for  a  dead
horse? What's the use If we don't
get  any  co-operation  out  of  the
student/"
DISASTER HO!
Right now such an attitude
would be worse than disastrous.
In a short time the new gym will
be opened and if we dont fill it
this year the efrect of thousands
of empty seats will probably keep
the place empty for the next 10
years.
Right now with downtown business and the faculty behind us
we have an unprecedented opportunity to make good—if we a,ct
now and act fast.
So much for the situation Now
for some solutions.
The first need is for some three-
alarm  razzle-dazzle  and  ballyhoo.
Brass-hands,   leg  shows,   bonfores
In Baton's parking lot If need be.
SPIRIT IN BUSHELS
A little action will bring a lot
of spirit and a lot of spirit will sell
a bushel of tickets and show the
boys downtown that we've got
what tt takes.
We have the talont. What it has
lacked is organization.
And the organization is forthcoming. A new committee headed
by Peter de Vooght and Oeorge
Cumming will go into action next
week.
The effects won't be confined to
athletics. The spirit Is bound to
permeate  through  the campus.
Maybe the days when an AMS
president had to fight to keep order at mass meetings, when organizations fought bitter battles for
the biggest meeting halls and pack-
d them to the rafters will come
back.
> Doug Franklin will emcee the
noon-hour show which features Mllo
Carter and his three piece orchestral group. Carter and his band
playod at the Frosh Reception and
last year's Bonus Ball.
Negro tenor, Arthur Lee Simp-
kins, will not be able to appear
but in his place, Kickapoos have
arranged to have Barney Potts,
well-known local performer give a
few of his clever imitations.
Fresh from an appearance at
their annual cabaret, the Kappa
Kappa Oamma — Oamma Phi Beta
chorus line will demonstrate their
skills for the benefit of those who
missed the cabaret.
Thunderbird grid coach, Orville
Burke plans a personal appearance
at the pep meet and will have
something to say about UBC stu
dents and their campus spirit.
Alix Gordon, Lambda Chi Alpha
Freshette Queen will add her
charms to the occasion. •
Admission to the pep meet will
be 10 cents to cover cost of erecting stage for dancers and tees
charged by performers.
Bill at. John, Kickapoo's president, said "the charge is necessary
bacauae our cjUih was oijlj-:, granted
$200 in McKinnon's budget this
year. <
"We cannot .sponsor pep meets
and arrange for downtown performers to appear unless we supplement our budget grant with admission charges," he added.
All profits from the meet will be
turned over to the War Memorial
Oym Fund,
UN Forces Should
Stop in Korea
Dr. Savery Argues
United Nations forces should
cease hostilities at the 38th parallel In the present Korean conflict
in the best Interests ot world
peace, argued Dr. Savery at the
Parliamentary Forum's opening
debate, Thursday.
Prof. Geoffrey Davies of the de-
parment of history speaking ln
favor of the resolution "that international troops must cross the parallel to obtain world peace
maintained that educating Koreans In western democrasy Is the
only key to unity. This can be accomplished only under the supervision of the United Nations, he
said.
In reply to Davies' statement,
Savery contended that It Is essential to the orilntal to "save face,'
and forcing western democracy
upon them would make them even
more suspicious of iorelgn imperialism. Furthermore, lie added,
conflict across the parallel would
drive Communist forces into Manchuria or underground, where they
would regroup for further attacks.
MAKING ENGINEER PREXY live up tc the boast of his
faculty, nurses from blood clinic in the Armory usher Don
Duguid over to the blood-letting queue in hopes of more
engineers coming to his rescue. Nurses were ready to grab any
other engineer who came to help out his boss.
Arts Blood Donors
gineers
s Volunteer
ing Appeal
In one of the shortest AMS genernl meetings on record,
students unanimously approved AMS treasurer John McKinnon's 1950-51 budget and resoundingly approved a motion of
confidence in president Nonie Donaldson.
Less than 1000 students attended f ■	
the meeting in the Armory and only
one challenged its legality on the
basis that there was not a quorum
present.'
Flood Of St
After AMS
Artsmen are still turn
donors In th^ curr«nt R*d <ir*a^blo«d wm».
An appeal made to students! atf^
the AMS meeting in th? Armory
Thursday   resulted   in   the   blbod
clinic being swamped with donors
during the noon horn.
At press time Thursday, IK) students had glvdn blood. Tho clinic
hoped that by closing time they
would break the previous day's
record of 201 donors.
ARTSMEN  LEAD
Artsmen still topped all other
faculties with 115 donors. Engineers came second with 85.
Mrs. J. N. Mawer, blood clinic
supervisor for the day, expressed
the clinic's appreciation to the
council for allowing a public appeal.
She asked that students keep up
the good work until the drive
closed. The clinic promised that in
the future, rush hour volunteers
would not be kept waiting.  -
Nurses attending the donors
pointed out that UBC students
were in excellent health. There had
not been one hemoglobin reject
during the day. Students resting
after their donation Insisted "there
was nothing to It."
eers by a safe margin of 30
Faculty, Students
Aid Cal Professors
BERKELEY. Cal—University of
California's Jobless professors —
those who have refused to sign the
Regents' loyality oath—may be assailed of livelihood from at least
two sources.
Daily Caltfornlan Editor ■ Frank
Finney p/oposod a "prolonged
d'ivo" aimed at soliciting a cortaiu
imount each month.
FROSH. REDSHIRTS TANGLE
Ball Game Matches Rivals
Those perennial enemies, freshmen and engineering students, will
clash in another campus classic
Monday.
The occasion will be a basketball
game to be staged in the gym at
Iii: 110 p.m. Challenge was issued
today by Cordon Elliot, vice-president of the Freshman Undergradu-
a'e Society.
GOOD THING
The gauntlet was quickly snatch-
eu up by the president of the Eng-lhe will have to "travel from one
Ineers Undergraduate Society, Don end of the main mall to the other
Duguid, who termed the challenge, on his hands and knees," according
,-a healthy sign of inter-faculty , to Elliot, who isuesd the challenge,
i i'airy.  I think it's the best  thing
CIRCUS THEME
FOR HI-JINX
A circus costume party will
highlight Hl-Jinx, annual hen
party for UBC co-«ds In Brock
Hall Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
Executive of the Women's
Undergraduate Society urge all
freshettes to come dressed appropriately. Committee members
hope that as large a orowd as
attended the Big and Little Sister banquet will be In attendance.
that's happened around here for a
long time," he commented.
The vice-president of the losing
undergraduate society will have to
bear the brunt of the punishment,
however.
PUNISHMENT
Under Hie terms of the challenge
Denny Williamson, vice-president
of the EUS, was not available for
comment on his possible loss.
Engineers began whipping up
interest, in the affair today when
lliey plastered the campus with
c.lgns advertising the noon-hour
spectacle.
Twtw Clones
Chief Forester
Speaks Under
Lectureship
Clyde S. Martin, chief forester
for Weherhaeuser Timber Company
in Tacoma will address students
Monday at 12:30 p.m.
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
of students wishing to join the
Slavonic Circle will be held m, Applied .Science 202 at 12:30 p.m.
Friday.
"COMEBACK," a film sponsored by the Pie-Med Society will be
presented Friday at 12:30 in Physics 202. The film, picturing the
rehabilitation of paraplegics, will
be commented on by Mr. A. Clark
of the Kinsmen Club.
ARTS PUBLIC SPEAKING CLUB
will hold a general meeting today
in Arts 100 at 12:30 p.m. James
Peter Ferguson, a professional instructor in public speaking, will
address the group.
UBC CHESS CLUB meets today
at 12:30 p.m. All players are requested to bring their own men and
boards.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN Movement invites all students to a
University Chapel Service at Union
College Chapel in Monday, October
lti, at 12:30 noon. Speaker will he
•■he Reverend Robert, pitt of Jack-
sou Avenue Baptist Church. Meet
in  front of Brock.
NEWMAN CLUB will hold its
ori'-campus Communion Hreakfast
at Convent or the Sacred Heart,
2»th Ave. and Highbury on Sunday, October 15, at !':00 a.m. All
Ncwinanltes are expected to attend.
The challenge came soon after
the beginning Of the meeting as
Cy McGuire, president of the
Undergraduate Societies Committee
was asking for a vote of confidence
in Miss Donaldson.
MEETING  CONSTITUTIONAL
'I'm sorry," he told the students,
"the quorum must be challenged at
the beginning of the meeting. If it
la not challenged, the meeting must
be regarded as constitutional."
A few minutes later, Don Duguid,
president of the Engineers Undergraduate Society, moved a vote
of confidence in Miss Donaldson
which wag seconded by Hugh Cameron, third year arts student.
"I am very pleased and happy,"
Miss Donaldson said at the end of
the meeting. "I hope to prove that
student confidence in me ls justified."
Students also gave thumping approval to treasurer John McKinnon's $96,000 budget designed to
increase student activity this year.
BIGGER GRANT TO HAMS
McKinnon explained that a larger grant, $133 as opposed to $319
this year, was being made to campus ham operators to pay for new
equipment destroyed in a disastrous fire ln 1948 .
He also reassured two other
campus groups, the Agricultural
Undergraduate Society, and the
Pre Med Undergraduate Society,
the additional funds would be made
available to them if it was found
that their enrolment was higher.
Grad Fee
Increases
Mooted
Marshall Gives
Increase Notice
At AMS Matting
Motion to increase AMS fees
three dollars to graduates only
will be introduced at the Spring
general meeting of the Society,
Charles Marshall, student council public relations officer said
Thursday.
Marshall gave notice of motion
to approximately 400 students in
UBC Armory tor the fall general
meeting which approved treasurer
John McKinnon's budget ahd gave
a vote of confidence to AMS president Nonie Donaldson.
LESS CONTUSION
The fee, Marshall said, would be
used to cover the cost of the graduating class gift to the university, a
cruise to Bowen Island and a 15-
month membership ln the UBC
Alumni Association.
"The new system," he said, "will
result in more- payments and less
confusion."
TURNER APROVES
Motion haa the approval of Frank
J. K. Turner, permanent secretary
manager of the UBC Alumni Association.
"It will benefit tho graduating
class executive, the Alumni As'io
elation, and the grad class Itself,"
he said.
NfCUS-ISS Merger
Discussed This Month
Possible merger of the National Federation of Canadian
University Students and the International Student Service will
be discussed at the annual ISS conference October 20-22 in
Kingston, Ontario.
Marie Rodker
Sings in Brock
Madame Marie Rodker, outstanding European contralto, will present a recital in Brock Hall at 8
p.m. Sunday.
Her program will consist of
Laider groups by Schubert, Beethoven, Brahms, Wolf, and Strauss.
Contrast will be given by a group
of folk songs of Finland, Croatia.
Czechoslovakia, and America, all
sung in English.
This evening concert is the first
in a series of eight planned by tho
special   events   committee   of   the
laSR.
Mme. Rodker has gained recognition in London, New York, ami
Europe for her work as an oratorio and concert singer. Her first
public appearance for nt'arly four
years was made in Vancouver last
July. ,
UBC's delegate to the meeting
will be Peter de Vooght, who received Student Council sanction
Monday to fly to the conference.
De Vooght ls chairman of the 18S
Committee at. UBC.
As well as deciding on policy for
the coming year, delegates Will
mull over the possibility of ISS
affiliating with NFCUS, which this
year will establish a central office,
probably in Ottawa.
"The suggestion has met with a
favorable reception across Canada,"
Ide Vooght said Thursday, "chiefly
j because it will mean an economy
!of spending."
The meeting will also discuss
the possibility of bringing German
and Asiatic students to Canada and
UBC on scholarships. ISH at UBC
has already brought two displaced
persons and two -German student?
here.
Toronto to Adopt
Asian College
John
pianist,
Rodker,
Avison,   noted    Vancouver
will     accompany     Mine.
TORONTO, Ont.—(CUIM — The
University of Toronto niay adopt a
.nuth-east A^ian university if a
motion passed at a recent meeting
or the Students' Administrative
( ouucil is acted upon.
.Motion asks that books, student
ni.pplles and other aids lie sent.
Council president Bill Tumor's
report of the International Union
General Meeting of the Radio!"!' Students' World Congress . in
Society will be held 12:1*0 p.m. to-1 I'i ague last summer prompted the
day in Radsoc studies. Any stu-1 ui<''l'>u. Turner said the IUS seemed
dents interested !u taking comnier-' "•> use the congress to solidify the
clal or dramatic radio courses are hold of I Ik- cistern student unions
urged to he ou hand. -'ii south-east Asia.
Special Radsoc Meet
Held In Brock Today Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
,   mmmm*mmiim"
Friday, October 13, 1950
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Offlce Dept., Ottawa. Mall Subscrlptlons-*2.00 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the .Vlma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein arc those of tho editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of thc sAlma Mater Society nor of the University.
Ofllces In Brock Hall, Phone A«Lma 1024 For display advertising phone ALma 8253
KIMTOfl 1N( IIIEF   BAY TOOST
MANAGING EDITOR      HUGH   CAMERON
GINERAL 8TAFP: Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill! Women's Editor,
Joan Fraser; Sports Editor, Ron Pinchin; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington.
City   Editor—DANNY   QOLDiMITH
Associate   Editor—A L   QOLDiMITH
Sox dud
Artsmen, bless their anaemic little hides,
are showing the campus that they have their
regular portion of plasma after all.
In a drive that Engineers boasted they
would lead, the Artsmen have forged far
ahead. At the last blood count, with men who
who knew their plasma best, it was Artsmen
2 tol.
The. Redshirts, for all their barbaric
blood-letting elsewhere, have but a few
meagre drops to offer for practical use.
But everyone from every faculty knows
that the Red Cross system of blood-banking
is an economical system that spells plain, common sense. It doesn't even take much common sense to see that thc nation should have
a sound "bank account" of blood. It's up to all
of us to see that there is a "deposit" for every
"withdrawal" needed.
The Red Cross isn't asking for a slice of
your annual income, It's not asking for anything that anyone, no matter how wealthy,
can go out and buy la unlimited quantities.
It's asking for something thit you and
you alone can give.
The Red Cross is appealing to YOU for
n donation of YOUR blood.
We hated to trick you with a title like
"Sex and Promiscuity," but it was the only
way we could be' sure that everyone would
read this editorial.
We'd like to be just «o sure thnt everyone will give one pint of preeioua blood to
the Red Cross.
The wheels of student government ground
swiftly and smoothly toward's a foregone
conclusion at Thursday's AMS meeting.
Trouble is they ground much too swiftly and
smoothly—because almost nobody bothered
to turn out.
Why this should be, unless it is yet another symbol of general campus lethargy, is
a moot question.
But at least some of the blame must be
placed squarely on the shoulders of co-ordinator Jim Midwinter who unthinkingly
allowed four other mowings to be scheduled*
for- the same time. Another chunk of blame
otn be tossed at thc feet of sororities who
chose Thursday to announce their bids.
Both Mr. Midwinter air* the Greek Letter
girls deserve the wholehearted condemnation
of the society for their unheeding action. It
is time they realised their obligation! to the
group as a whole.
Several serious issues had to be decided
and they were decided by a minority. Gov*
eminent by permitted minority is one of the
surest ways to stifle democracy.
We cannot maintain a working democracy unless students are willing to take per*
sonal responsibility fer their obligations.
While the issues involved were undoubtedly settled in such a way as "to benefit the
students as a whole, exception must be taken
to the lack of interest in the meeting.
Those who did go must be criticized for
their failure to bring out the pros and cons
of the issues. Sitting half asleep like rows of
dead fish in a cannery can hardly be construed as active democracy.
GobbUdtygook
By Hoi Ttnnoi>t
Why Artsmen Must Get By
On A Lousy
"Arts undergraduates will again attempt to organise as a society. The group
has not yet budgeted its $300 grant, but it
expects to have trouble making that sum
cover all the proposed activities."
—News Item
While Engineers spill freshmen's blood
And Commercemen count dollars,
The Artsmen struggle to unite
As gentlemen and scholars.
The Foresters will blaze new trails,
Let chips fall where they may,
While Artsmen scorn such lowly life;
And righteously they say:
"Our work is of such magnitude
Wfe cannot hope to nudge it
Unless the AMS will grant
An increase in our budget."
But common paths they will not tread;
Such thoughts make Artsmen tremble.
(In fact they do but little else
Whenever they assemble.)
They cannot hold a Legal Ball
Or help the Farmers Frolic.
In truth (and such are Artsmen's tastes)
They'd rather catch the colic.
They won't enjoy themselves with WUS
Or sip tea with Phrateres,
Although, their manner does suggest,
They're just a bunch of ...
Fellows.
They shudder at the thought of sports
Or anything athletic,
"Because," they claim, "with body lax,
The mind's more energetic."
Just what they do's a mystery,
For all their hokus pokus.
For this, some think, 300 bucks
Is quite a bit to soak us.
Their dormant state should illustrate
One point they cannot sidle:
We can't afford to spend much more
To keep our Artsmen idle. ,
Wet Paint
By Ralph Blackitead
mmJ—mm—mm—m—mmmmmmmmmmmmm
Art Critic Surprised By Gallery
European Treasures Exhibit
My first reaction on visiting tho
cdrrent "Art treasures" exhibit at
the Vancouver Art da I lory was
surprise. I had no idea that there
was such a number of old and
good paintings in Vancouver. The
first room is the most Interesting;
and the best examples are from
the  Dutch   and  Flemish   schools.
There is one jewol in the pal-
lery that stirs bright in my memory beyound any other work. It. ls
a little picture of the Virgin and
child by Quentin Massys. In size,
surface, and mood, It is like a
Russian ikon. The expression in
the Virrtn's lace is Intensely quiet,
set lu a fullest spare. Most or the
picture Is in dark rod and black
tho colour of ashes; and through a
window casement  is a  lovely em
erald green landscape.
The little Pruegel paintings are
charming, as mood expressions and
as historical grocery lists. I found
myself going over the pictures
inch by Inch, examining the spoons
and "bowls on the tables and the
refuse on the floors. It is Interesting to note how much more
vital are the personages in Breu-
gel's paintings than In the more
pretentious portrayals of human
beings which spot the gallery,
nreugel's pictures have a "lived-
in" quality; they aro little boxes,
set out of our space and time;
; their walls are lit with human
I laughter, and spattered with human dung.
There Is a  very fine picture  In
the    show    designated    as    "16th
Century Venetian; after Tintoretto." It is the head of a bearded
man with hollow cheeks and hollow eyes; lt is spacious*and sombre, and carries a nobility of
weight and dearth wHhtrt Its frame.
Of similar impact are the medieval wooden statues. I was much
impressed by the deet> glowing
textures of the ancient wood, and
found the "do not touch" signs a
real torture. The qualities that Impressed me in. the Massys and Iri
the Venetian painting were present together in the sculptures.
However, this is probably the
best exhibition of old paintings
ever hold ln the Vancouver Art
Gallery, and no one who has any
Interest In painting should miss
it.
From Prague
v By MIKI HINO-tMlTH
, One morning last August two
Canadian students boarded a plane
ia> Parts'for Prague. They were
Bill Turner and Dennis Lazure,
student presidents of the Universities of Toronto and Montreal.
They were flying into Chechoslovakia to attend as Canadian observers tae 2nd World Congress ot
th* International Union of Students.
.4* tbsy tl»w otot waittora Bur-
op* an* into tbe forbidden region
£&tMMt t»* "Iron Curtate" the
«hot* background of their mission
spread in panorama. #
Tie idealism of 1945 that saw
the birth of IUS as a world student
organisation passed through successive disappointments for the
students ot the West until the coup
d'etat of Csechoslotakla in 1848.
From 1MI, students all over the
world saw IBi become a political
instrument in the strugfle of Bast-
era communism.
•UM ur tXMItHWCtt
When" Turner'ant Lasuro return*
•d to Canada they sumawd up their
experience of 1UB in a repert, It
was a revealing analysts in world
student affairs, but a snd commentary on the stagnation of student
aottvity in the Western democracies.
From Prague, where 1206 student representatives from 73 nation* had met, came the story of
highly-organized student administration, of government finance to
student activity and stimulation to
student Ufe. Canada, they toM
NFCUS, was not only backward ht
comparison to the east, but to the
west also where Australian dele*
gates can point to 8,000 annual
government scholarships.
From Prague they heard of the
efforts of students'in Communist
countries to *rtrt» food, relief, boots
and communism te the students of
backward countries, to colonial
areas aad to south-east Asia. They
saw Malayan, Nigerian, Korean,
Chinese students feted and showered with gifts in hysterical demonstrations of solidarity. They saw
promises of education linked with
national independence- offered like
straws to young people floundering
in the baekwashes of regressive
colonialism and eagerly seized by
them.
From Prague they saw the dynamic power of progressive student
action, the grinding of the news
cameras and radios of the eastern
world focnsseeV on the huge assembly hall, ne these students mobilized; youth who woafc) in a few
short years- become leaders of half
the world. Yet the western world
at Prague" was too weak to show
even token resietaeace to this display.
MUST coiwptri
And as these two observers front
Canada, and others from the west-
era worW, returned to their own
countries they came to think in
te'rnw of their own student unions.
They realised tho seeming impoMt-
bility of competition on the scale
of tho ISS display and withdrew
their affiliations with IUS. But they
realized bitterly, too, that compete
they must, or lose cowpteiely the
dwindling respect of the half-world
that is yet free.
To our own National Union came
the report of the Canadians. It
argued for a permanent secretariat
tor NFCUS, for governmental aid
to education and for the recognition
of the position of the student as a
vital element in progress.
They realised thnt till these
thing* come to be, the student cannot become significant in Canada,
as he has become in the eastern
world, nor can Canada progress
in this one world as the other
world has progressed within the
last 30 years.
CONCLUSIONS OP REPORT
Tho most important, practical,
feasible conclusions of the 2nd
world congress of the International
Union of Students held at Prague
ln August, 1950, as they pertain to
the NFCUS, are as follows:
3) NFCUS must strengthen Its own
structure.
2) NFCUS must actively seek to
bring university education within the reach of all those capable
arid deserving of it.
3) NFCUS must expand its activities in the international field
by direct participation in the
Scandinavian Conference, and
its' conclusions.
4) NFCUS must stay out of the
rrinks of the IUS till these 13
points   are   observed.   Hdwovor
we do recommend that the
NFCUS send observers to all
IUS Council and Congress meetings and that we co-operate with
them when their action, divorced
from the dogmata of any one
political creed, furthers true in*
ternational understanding among students of the world.
Respectfully submitted to the National Federation of Canadian University Students at Laval University
Sept.,  1950.   „
DENIS LAZURB
WILLIAM TURNER
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FILTER
THE   PERFECT  %AN*TARV   j'!<*r
»»
§\\j0pp iM J9dJUjl*
Yes, I really enjoyed my
shopping trip—I bought aU
the things I saved for!
That's the way I plan my bigger
purchases. They seem to come easier,
and more quickly, when I put something1
into the bank regularly. I like the
comforting feeling of watching my
account grow.
I hate keeping too much cash around
the house. It's so convenient to have
the bank take care of it. And my bank
book tells me where I stand.
I guess most women are much like me—
housewives with modest savings who
find their neighborhood bank handy,
useful... always obliging.
SPONSOR FD   BY   YOUR   BANK FHday, Octdber 13, 1950
THE~UB¥SSf5¥-
Page 3
LETS SEE NOW
Tension Over As
Bids Given Out
By JOAN FRASER
Did you hear the sigh of relief that four hundred girls
breathed* yesterday as sorority bids were finally given out?
These invitations climax a hectic rushing period and the start
of a new year for sorority members.
All these gals seem to think that sis-
even studying will be nice after this isg-fA^**!    _m '__
past twe weeks, but remember that  Ip'BC    CQftflS'
remark was overheard in the heat                       ^-miv^-mw
of tho moment. Anyway, it will
bO nice to know that the indecision
is all over. Everyone can relax a
while until the start of next year.
* *       *
Bight girls last week received
bids to Delta Sigma Pi, UBC wont-
en's honorary' sorority. After looking at the group's requirements, I
was amazed that there were that
many girls on the campus who
oonM live up to its fabulous standards, Felicity Pope, president of
Delta Sigma Pi, explained that
admission to the group was based
on a point system that revolves
around' three things; leadership,
scholarship and service.
Oreat stress is laid on the first
twb of the three standards—sixteen
ot th* necessary twenty points
come under these headings. Executive positions in campus clubs count
on the former, and Felicity informed me that most of the girls have
a scholarship average of over
seventy per cent. Yipe!
•■ Girls asked to loin this year were
Nonie Donaldson, for her work on
executive of the campus; Mimi
Wright, president of the Women's
Athletic Association; Elisabeth
Money, tor her work with the Film
Society and Aggie undergraduate;
ond Carolyn Harvie, WUS representative for burses on campus.
Irene Carlson's work with the Slavonics department earned her a bid;
while Connie Holmes' academic
standing, Ann Wooten's Player's
Club work, aad Dorothy Chave's
pre-med activities were outstanding enough to rate Delta Sigma Pi.
One change has been made to the
point system this year—credits may
be obtained for Victoria College
work previous toUJBCI. This appeals
to be a very good idea, since UBC
gets many outstanding graduates
from Vic College. Congratulations
to these hard-working lassies!
* * *
Carol McKinnon, last year's president of WAA, (and, by the way,
a Delta Sigma Pi) is on the campus
again this year. Her Interests are
still with the Women's Athletic
Association, but this year she is
anxious to pep up inter-faculty
sports for girls. It seems that any
group of girls from the same faculty
may team together and compete in
lnter-faculty contests.
Carol pointed out that spovta are
fun, and that inter-faculty sports
provide a good way to meet people.
It a few girls got together ahd
started the ball really rolling,
women's sports could prove to be
a lot of fun. Carol's really enthjised.
"I've never been so busy lu my
life," she said.
* * *
Two more dates for campus-conscious gals—Arts Undergraduate
(third and fourth years) girls are
meeting in Arts 204 Tuesday at
noon. Mary Lett, WUS Arta Representative, mentioned that there
will be quite a few topics under
discussion at this meeting, and they
pertain to YOU, so try to attend.
Note also that Hi-Jinx, WUS'
annual hen party, will be held
Wednesday in Brock Hall. More
details will be available later,
One more date to think about—
WUS fashion show on November 9,
I mentioned tbe wrong date earlier.
Well, I think that's about all for
now—or If I used newspaper terms,
it's thirty for this article.
Classics Professor
Speaks Today
The Royal So;.:»ty of Can-.cia bas
announced tbe appointment of lecturers who will tour Canada Riving
public addresses nt each regional
centre of the sooiety.
First lecture of the 1950-51 session will be giver, by Dr. W. H.
Alexander, professor emeritus of
c'assics, University of California,
lie will speak on tbe subject "The
Religion Of C'ln: sirlsm." on Friday at 8:15 p.m. in Arts lim.
The lecture will deal with what
riasslolsm believed fundamentally,
and how In Its literature it ox-
presses that bfil"f. The lecture
will be un'ecUnle,,l in charneler a«
far as the subject, permits and is
planned to uttriui. general iutoresl.
CLASS! F FED
- Sorority bids were accepted
by 140 UBC co*eds Thursday
when girls made their finfii
choices after three hectic weeks
of rushing.
Following is the list of rushees and their sororities:
Alpha Gamma Dolta:
Doreen Albrecht, Mavis Bain,
Margaret Bell, Daphne Cummins,
Ann-Louise Dick, Ruth Done, Gertrude Storey, Beverley Tamboline,
Joan Wolstenoroft, Dona Leather-
dale, Joan Brown, Denyse Pierce,
Donalda Sparling, Patricia Spring,
Barbara Squire, Dree Stewart,
Mary-Louise Grant, Patricia Grind-
ley, Fat Johnson, Margaret James,
Betty Lawrence, Selveig Lervold,
Gustine Lletze, Doreen Montgomery,
Mary McKitrick, Marilyn McRae,
Sheila Moore, Lois Naylor, Doreen
Nettleton.
Alpha D«lto Pi:
Betty Anderson, Ruth Bromley,
Anne Dill, Beth Heslip, Betty Kerry,
Louanne Kramer, Diane Lancaster,
Barbara Reifel, Eleanor Riches,
Irene Slmmonson, Lora Stowell,
Sheila Wilson.
Alpha Omlcron Pt:
Muriel  McMillan.
Alpha Phi:
Maureen Beck, Audrey Butler,
Shirley Campbell, Elizabeth Derry,
Marguerite Fortier, 'Lorraine Gilmour, Patricia Grady, Julie Hack,
Margaret Hughes, Lauree Larsen,
Esther Leir, Freda Morel, Daryl
Muir, Fay Richardson, Mary Ross,
Marion Smith, Peggy Smith, Shirley Sutherland.
Delta Gamma:
Pat Taylor, Connie Armstrong,
Fat I'eek, Barbara l.inns, Sheila
Clarke, Peggy Colquhoun. Nonie
Donaldson, Beth Estey, Pat Furniss,
Louise Fletcher, Mary Elizabeth
Grant, Adelma Grlmston, Julia Horsey, Janet Jabour, Mary Left, Jean
McKee, Charlotte MacKenzie, Cor-
inne Moore, Trudy Nofhian, Fran
Smith, Joan Welch, MarJOrie Wilson.
Delta Phi Epsilon:
Nita Aqua, Esther Cameron, Sally
Dodek, Myra Oreen, Leyla Margo-
lus, Sarah Srolovltz, Florence
Rosenbaum, Sheila Toban.      •
Gamma Phi Bata:
Nancy Boultbee, Diane Dixon,
Betsy Forbes, Margaret Forrester,
Joan Gilchrist, Joy Gordon, Sheila
Graham, Anne Henderson, Mary-
Frances Munro, Diane McColl, Mary
MacCorkindale, Susan MacKenzie,
Arden Murray, Patricia Pearson,
Helen dePfyffer, Nan Plewman,
Pat Shanahan, Mary Taylor, Elizabeth Tupper, Evelyne "Usher, Ann
Willis, Barbara Corbitt.
Kappa Alpha Theta:
Carolyn Bagshaw, Eulalie Bloedel,
Betty Browne, Janet Caple, Mary
Chadwiclc, Barbara Flaten, Dolores
Ford, Jane Graham, Sheila McGlv-
ern, Audrey Moore, Joyce Morrison.
Kappa Kappa Gamma:
Delrdre Anderson, Shirley Bow-
ell, Vlvi Buseh, Brenda Cooper,
Rosalie O'lanvllle, Helen Harwood,
Daphne Harris, Elizabeth McCall,
Nancy MacDonald, Helen MacKenzie, Nancy Moscrop, Beverley Nelson, Carol Nordman, Janet Partridge, Carol Potter, Edith Scott,
Lois Strntton.
Specializing	
SKIRTS
MADWO MEASURE
Your Own Material or Select
From Our Samples
Also Dressmaking,
Alterations and Repairs
ALMOND
Dressmakers
2(21» Alma Rd. -AL.3741L
(Between 10th and 11th Ave.)
L08T
REWARD for BLACK ZIPPER
LOOSE LEAF note book. Finder
please turn Into Lost & Found.
REWARD for text book "Integral
Equations" by Lovittj please see
Mr. Douthwalte, Room 428, Eng.
SPANISH BOOK, "Repaso" in
Arts 100, Wed., Oct. 11. I can't
read it, but I really need it. Carol
Evans in care of Lost & Found.
RUSSIAN 300 SCRIBBLER, lest
last Friday. Return to publications.
CALCULUS, Sherwood Taylor, lost
last Friday. Return to publications,
HORNED RIMMED GLASSES,
with broken arm, bound with tape.
Will finder please return to libary
desk in Law Library.
NAVY BLUE RAINCOAT. Will the
girl who toolt my navy blue raincoat by mistake from the library
washroom last Friday, Oct. 6,
please return It. IT IS MY ONE
AND ONLY COAT. Phone KE 8338
Y or turn it to laost & Found.
LIGHT BROWN leather zipper
looseleaf with name carved on
outside, important notes within.
Left In Stadium after football
game Saturday. Return to Lost ft
Found, or contact Ray Frost GL
2051-R.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDER WANTED for 8:30s Mon.
to Fri. from vicinity of McDonald
&9th. BA 2507; Evenings.
ROOM A BOARD ETC.
ACCOMODATION FOR 3 BOYS,
single beds with breakfast optional. Phone AL 1595-M.
ACCOMODATION FOR 1 or 2 WOMEN STUDENTS. Bedroom, kitchenette & bath. For interview,
phone after 6 AL 3527-M.
TWO CONNECTING ROOMS, One
furnished as bedroom (twin beds)
the other as study-sitting room. In
quiet home, 2 blocks from the university gates. One or two students
at $4.50 each. Breakfast additional.
Rent can be reduced, if desired,
by occasional baby-sitting. Phone
AL 0993-R.
TWO BRIGHT ATTRACTIVE
ROOMS for students sharing. 3
blocks from UBC gates. 4424 W.
12th. Phone AL 0519-M.
ROOM & BOARD, sharing or single, close to UBC. AL 0380-R.
HOUSEKEEPING SUITE suitable
for two. Fully furnished.  Outside
YOUR    CAMPUS
BARBER SHOP
PETER  DYKE
SOUTH BROCK
BASEMENT
It's a Pleasure to
See You Satisfied
SUPPORT
THE GYM DRIVE
entrance. $35 per month. 4477 W.
lBtti AL 0719-R.
WARM ROOM available for 2
girls, board optional or use of kitchen. 10 min. walk to UBC. AL
0833-L.
SINGLE ROOM with breakfast or
full board, Ride available for 8:30s
Mon. to Sat. CB 4421.
ROOMS FOR MALE STUDENTS.
$20. Board self; cooking .facilities
provided. Transportation for 8.30s
Mon. to Sat. CE 4421.
ROOM FDR MALE STUDENTS.
$20. Board self; cooking facilities
provided. Transportation for 8:30s
Mon. to Sat. Particulars at CE
2389 or Peter Dyke, Brock Hall
Barber, Shop.
COMFORTABLE BASEMENT
ROOM CLOSE TO UBC GATES.
$15 for room, breakfast and lunch
optional. For non-drinking boy. AL
0358-L.
ATTENTION STAVONIC STU-
DENTS. Room & Breakfast for 1
student,, preferably man, in Rus-
Dunbar car line. Phone BA 1684
sian speaking household right on
after 0 p.m. •
WANTED
ECONOMICS  200  TEXTS.  Lagon
ft Inman; John Ise; Burns, Neal ft
Watson. Any condition ft cheap.
CH 7623.
FOR IALI
ANSCO 2 1|4 x 21'4 CAMERA to
1|400   sec.   Coated   F ; 4.5   lense
flash synchronized for $49.76. Also
Weston University Exposure Meter for $25. Both like brand new.
4538 W. 10th Ave.
CHEAP TRANSPORTATION. 1938
Flying Standard for $360. Phone
MA 1855 or CE 8769.
BAKER   MICROSCOPE  with   accessories. Latest model in perfect
condition. AL 1842-L,
ATTENTION MEDS. Spencor mi-
croscope at reasonabl price. Phone
CO-EDS ... for your
SPEC rAL DATES
N#w Shrpm-tirt
VELVET
GLOVES
4 and 6 BUTTON LENGTHS
2.50 2.95
'1 vm
575 GRANVILLE ST.
Mar 6942
--•'■•
Choose from a large
selection of authentic
tartan including the
Cameron, Lindsay,
King George, Black
Watch and Royal
Stuart.
Birrs
JEWELLERS,
VANCOUVER
West 1328.
TUXEDO WITH BLACK WAISTCOAT AND EXTRA TAILCOAT
with white waistcoat; six foot, medium build. $25 complete. KE
0905-L,
KODAK DUAFLEX CAMERA
WITH PHOTOFLASH. Value
$19.50. What offers? Apply to A.
Beach, in care of Classified.
1937 Ford TUDAR. '60. New Motor,
good' condition. Phone AL 0654-Y
or call at 4626 W. 9th.
1927 ESSEX. $25, Full price. Take
lt away. Phone DE 1543-Y after
6 P.M.
GE PORTABLE RADIO. Personal
camera size, 'excellent condition.
AC-DC & "Battery. Any reasonable
offer considered. Phone Gerry at
CH 6719.
MEETINGS ft NOTICES
ARTS PUBLIC SPEAKING CLUB
organizational meeting will be held
in Arts 100, Friday at 12:30. Professional' speaker will be engaged,
for instructional purposes. All Welcome,
WILL THE ENGINEER WHO
MARRIED MY FRIEND PAT
WASTELL TELL HIS WIFE TO
PHONE ME? Joan, AL 3688-L,
SHIRTS and CLIANIMC
1-DAY SERVICE
"./jnifff
mm. loth Ave.
PAYS $10 PER STORY -.Sill
Hughes, News Editor of "NW"
pays $2 for the best news story
of the day and $10 for the belt
news story of the week. Phone
him at CKNW News Room,
NW. 8012, (Toll Free).
TYPING....
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUSCRIPTS, NOTES, ETC
MODERATE RATES — PROMPT SERVICE -
MRS. A. O. ROBINSON
4180 W. 11th Ave. „ ALma 0915R
RECORDED COURSES
In French, German, Russian, Spanish and other Languages
Linguophon* InstiMitt) of Canada
B. C. REPRESENTATIVE
1394 West 59th Ave. KErrisdale 2103-R
PIPES#PIPES€»PIPES
A Fine Selection ef Imported French and English Brlara
Calvert • $5.00 Old Pal • $2.00
Dr. Plumb's • $3.50 MacKenzie • $1.50
Yello-Bole - $2.50 Old Owl • $1.00
ALL PIPES GUARANTEED OR REPLACED
Point Grey Pharmacy
4406 WEST 10th AVE.
ALma 0130
ERIC V. CHOWN, LLB., Branch Manager
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
"Hold on, folks! Handsome Harry is saying
something to his opponent. Let's listen!"
(On the air.)—"Say, you lug! If you'd lick
Dry Scalp with "Vaseline' Hair Tonic you'd
have nice looking hair and get across with
the crowd, too."
Vaseline HAIRTONK
'VASELINE' IO THE REQISTEREO TRADE MARK OF TNE CMkBEBROUQH MfQ. QO. RQNS'O. Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, October 13, 1950
Thunderbirds After First
Win in Washington Game
Vikings Boast Top Conference
Passer, 22 Returning leltemwn
■y RAV FROST
UBC's win-hungry Thunderbirds will try again tomorrow
ln the Stadium to e\\e out'their first points of the season, this
time  against  their  Bellingham  rivals,  Western  Washington
Vikings.
 e|   with twenty-two returning letter-
INTRAMURALS
SOCCER
Monday, Oct. 16 Reft-
1. Architecture  vs.  Mechs
Waqslck
2. Alpha Delt vs. Lambda Chi
Gilbert
Tuesday, Oet. 17
1. Fiji vs Forestry — Larsen
2. Zebes vs Zetes McTaggart
VOLLEYBALL
Monday, Ootober 16 — Field House
1. Pharmacy vb Phi Kappa Sigma
Popowich
2. VOC vs. Commerce — Turlk
8.   New West, vb Anglican College
Colman
Tuesday, October 17 — Oym
1. Dekes vs. Mechs 'A' • Hodgert
2. Kappa Sig 'A' vs. Staff • Lindsay
Field Houoo
1. Sigma Chi vs. Ex Byng 'A'
Stangrom
2. Phi Kappa Pi vs. Law • Drake
8.   Beta 'B' vs. ATO 'B' • Shields
NOTICE
Intramural manager's meeting
will be held Monday, October 16 in
Hut L-l at 12:80 p.m. All managers are required to attend.
Agenda Includes election of offerers, and the drawing-up ot new
schedules.
* *       *
Golf draw will be posted on gym
notice   boards   today.   Golf   team
members are asked to check the
list and contact opponents,
w*       *
Thunderbird hockey team will
hold a practice session tonight at
Kerrisdale Arena from 6 to 7 p.m.
Players Intending to try out for
the group are urged to attend this
important gathering.
Second practice ls scheduled for
Monday at 6 p.m. in the Arena.
First game of the season will be
played Tuesday ln Nanaimo.
* *       *
Men's Big Block Club meeting
will be held Monday at 12:30
p.m. ln the Men's Club room ln
Brock Hall.
men coming up to Vancouver today, Viking coach C. F. Lappenbusch should feel quite confident
of a win.
The little school from Bellingham
(with only 1669 students enrolled,
666 of them women, only a 50-plece
band and a stadium ot only 6000
capacity) turned out the second
best passer In the Evergreen Conference last year, and coach Lappenbusch has him back again this
season. •'
MANY STARS
The passing genius is Tom Taylor, a lefthanded gent, who gained
469 yards out of a team season
total of 974 to help win four games
for Western Washington last year.
UBC fans will remember Viking
fullback Norm Hash, 200 pound
two-vear letterman, for his line
smashing performances ot last season ,too.
Defensive stars in the baekfleld
are Half backs Jack Roberts and
Larry Lowery. Roberts is a pass
interception specialist and Lowery
doubles  as  passer.
PLENTY OF TALENT
Man to watch will be University
of Idaho tranter Al Schireman in
the left half spot on offense. Teamed up with veteran fullback Hash,
the backfield carries plenty of.talent.
Line anchors around Art Larson,
226 pound tackle or guard. UBC
will need a strong centre to hold
htm back.
Block  against  Larson   may   be
UBC's   Phil   Nixon,   whom   coach
Orville Burke will probably put in
as centre this game.
KNEE TROUBLE
The rest of UBC's team will be
pretty well the same as last week's
eleven. Burke still has not definitely decided the  starting positions.
Big Dave MacFarlane .who had
a touch of knee trouble during the
week seems to be all right again
and should start at the fullback
slot.
Doug. Swall will be in at halt'
with George Pull, quartered by
freshman Gordle Flemons.
DEFENSIVE BACKS from visiting Western Washington College will be two of the main threats to UBC's Thunderbird footballers on Saturday at 2:15 in the Stadium Jack Roberts at left
and Larry Lowery shine on the defensive line, and specialize at
pass interception.
JACKIE ROBIHSOH STORY
wllti RUBY DEC MINOR WATSON. LOUISE BEAVtAS
RICHARD LANE • An ibgie Hon film* Nltote
Rowing Clubbers
Issue Formal  Invite
Successful Spring Tour Initiates
Southern R-tvisitation Program
UBC's Rowing Club bosses have issued a formal cry for
new members.
Call has ben sent out for freshmen and sophomores to
report to the Vancouver Rowing Club crew house in Coal Harbor Saturday at 2 p.m.
"Experience In shell rowing is
unnecessary,'' said Bruce Garvie,
assistant-coach of the group and
stroke oar of last year's team,
"but we do want big men, of six
feet or over."
Interested persons unable to turn
out Saturday are asked' to  phone
Fraser K076 tonight.
SUCCESSFUL TOUR
As a result of last springs tour
of the Washington, Oregon and
California coasts, the local oarsmen have acquired a good deal of
experience, and a number of feathers in their collective cap .
Wins In the 4-man class at the
I'uiversity of Washington arid the
University of California have so
enthused UHC aspirants, as well
as their southern hosts, trips are
again planned this season.
Team ls tentatively planning
regattas with UC'I.A, I'SC, Stanford, U oi California. Oregon State
and Washington. Latter two groups
will visit lhe local rating pits to
compete with university .squads.
ENTHUSIASM
California universities, particularly, are looking to UBC for continuous competition. Enthusiasm
of that state's colleges was reflected
last spring, when a crowd of .15000
witnessed the I'Rt'-l'SC race at the
Memorial Day aquatic display ut
the Olympic course in hong Beach.
"The I'uiversity of California and
"Stanford were also extremelv anx-
Blementary training program
consists of rowing in 16-man training barges for a two to three-week
By   Nob  Steiner
. . . rowers in action
period,   to   learn   the   principle*   of
rhythm, timing und coordination.
"TIiIn universlly is very fortunate in having some of the he.-q.
oarsmen in the country in a now
lull-lime coaching stuff." continued
ADDED HIT
RED HOT and BLUE
(In Technicolor)
Betty Hutton
and
Victor Mature
VARSITY THEATRE
SPORT
Sports Editor—RON PINCHIN
Refreshment and Movies f
Go Hand-in-Hand
COC^COLXITD; VANCOUVER
310X
ions to continue the competitive M'arvie. "and only Washington and
spirit which developed last spring," I California can boast a more elfi-
sitid (inrvie , cient. organization program."
EATON'S Campus Favourite ol the Week
... by Joan . . . Modelled by Connie Bissett
With its jaunty collar, huge patch pockets,
deep cuffs, comes the cluster—one of the
newest coats in EATON'S rainwear department.  In cravenetted corduroy (part rayon,
»
part cotton) rts colours are designed to
brighten a cloudy horizon. Wear it on
campus or on a rainy day date, for the
duster is one of the season's most adaptable
buys.
Lady Biltmore black felt cloche
with tiny red trim around the
crown 5.93
Milllnary—Second floor
(libson (ilrl umbrella lu merry-go-
round-stripes   of   black   and   whi,te
6.95
Umbrellas—Main floor
Uiiin repellanl duster in clnnaniou,
red,   royal   blue,   green aud   navy
corduroy. Siz.cs 10-18. 27.50
Raincoats -Second floor
Black   leather   shoes   with one   hi';
gold-coloured     huclile     in centre
front 6.85
Shoes—Second  floor
T. EATON C°
• •»«itism coiuuma >*umh

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