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The Daily Ubyssey Nov 7, 1947

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 The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXX
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1947
No. 27
Officials Say
UN Election
MeetVackecr
Sutherland, Cole
Win Office In
Partisan Fight
Charges of a "packed" election meeting flared from members of the United Nation
Society Thursday following ■
balloting squabble which observers termed "the bittere-'
partisan fight yet seen on the
campus."
More than half the society memo.-
present  at  the  election  meeting  had
joined  the  club  only   two  days  pre
viously,    past-president    Dacre    Cole
alleged.
DISCREPANCY
A card count at the AMS offi e
earlier this week revealed 31 paid-up
members of the organization, he said.
Election scrutinizers reported 70 paid-
up members voted at the Thursday
elections.
One member charged .'rom ihe
floor that he had been handed a
"marked slate of officers" by Cole
when he paid his ^N fees in tho
AMS office Wednesday.
A one-time CCF candidate in federal elections, Murray Br.vce, tei'nv !
the meeting "a disgusting cxnmph'
of meeting packing."
Late  arrivals  of  30   members,   who
arrived in a body, broke a tie between
Ray Dewar and Harojd Dean, end;
dates  for  second  vice-presidency.
ELECTION
Following their arrival, Dewar wa
elected   with   a   substantial   majoril.
All  were  paid-up  members  of   th
UN Society.
Elected   to   the   executive   of   'he
society were:  Jim Sutherland,  president; Dacre Cole, first vice-president^
Ray    Dewar,    second    vice-president; j
and Roger Connor, secretary-treasur* I
er. |
RATINGS CF UBC's University Naval Training Detachment
listen intently while Lt. M. L. Richardson explains an important
point in naval construction. UNTD begins a three week drive for
men on Monday, November 10. '
Campus Naval Unit Opens
Drive For Student Tars
UNTD Offices In Armory
To Receive Applications
University of B.C.'s complement to the senior service, the
University Naval Training Detachment, yesterday announced
plans for an intensive campaign beginning Monday, November
10 to recruit student tars to fill its depleted ranks. The drive
will be held in conjunction with*
Dominion-wide    drive    for
Simple Rites To Honor
Fallen At UBC Ceremony
Falsehood
Charged
By Engineers
Delegates Invade
Pub Offices
With Accusation
A delegation of two, claiming to represent approximately 2500 Engineers on the UBC
campus, invaded the Publications Board offices Thursday
to hurl charges of "misrepresentation, libel and bias" at
editors of The Daily Ubyssey.
Ron Grantham, Engineer's president, and Bob Grey, treasurer de-
(Cont'd. on Page 3— See ENGINEERS)
Nominee .
—Ubyssey photo by Tommy tiatcner
WINSOME   Ruth   MacDon>l:i
has been nominated for Queen
of the Fall Ball by UBC Pharmacy students. She is in third
year.
a
naval reservists.
Ji.-Cmd". Frank Turner, officer-
ei.nur'ar.d ng UNTD states that offices
h„ve   ece'i   secured   in    t!,c    Armory
;;pi eit > the present adjutant's offices
f the COTC.
'lUEFTIONS
Tv\o   o.'Ti.er"   aid   senijr   ratings   <>'
'e  navy   group   wilt   be   on   duty   at
lonri   each   clay   and   at   times  posted
nn  the  door   to  answer  queries  and
to   take  applications  from  interested
students.
■ x-:.aval personnel and freshmen
are particularly requested by Turnei
to investigate the opportunities of
the unit. Revision of the syllabus
with possibilities of specialization ha-.
re--.-, introduced for engineering undergo, dilates.
PPE-MEDS
A SaOeial ccurse lies been laid on
for pre-medical students if enough
apply to warrant the institution of
'■pec'.al training. "Pre-meds who continue their training in other Canadian
universities can transfer to Eastern
UNTD divisions without loss of earned rates or seniority," said Turner.
Parades   are   held   every   Monday
'.'rom 7 to 10 p.m. ior which all members  are  paid   on   a  basis   of earned
ate and seniority  in  the unit,
ADVANCEMENT
Oppertunities for advancement are
"irovided within the division. Second
vear members appear before an Officer Selection Board for assessment.
If passed by the board ratings are
'anked Officer Candidates and given
m increase in pay to §135 per month
luring summer sea training.
The unit provides transportation to
HMCS "Discovery" during the winter
n nths and to a naval base for summer training. Uniforms and necessary
netval equipment are provided without charge.
UNTD, COTC To Parade
For Laying Of Wreath
.Remembrance Day ceremonies at UBC will be simple,
impressive rites to honor the dead of two wars.
At Brock Hall, where services begin at 10:30 a.m., wreaths
will be laid before the plaque which honors UBC's dead of
the First World War. ♦	
-Daily Ubyssey photo by Yale Jatfe
"SKYROCKET", MARK II AND TRAINER
Frog Race At Meet Today
Jokers Look For Winner
Confidence that "Skyrocket," the Joker entry in the frog
race at today's pepmeet, will "leap to fame" by beating all comers was expressed by Dick Ellis, chief Joker.
The present, "Skyrocket" is the second to bear the name,
the original "Skyrocket" having been lost earlier this week.
Jokers are unanimous in declaring the present frog to be a
"super-duper substitute."
Dick Ellis told The Daily Ubyssey more than twenty frogs
are expected to compete in today's feature.
Admission to the pepmeet will be by Booster Passes or
advance sale tickets for Saturday's football game with Pacific
University.
Two minutes silence will be
observed before the plaque as
the mournful "Last Post"
sounds at 11 a.m.
Walter Dodman, president of 196th
Battalion Association, UBC veterans
of the last war, and Perry Millar
president of the UBC Canadian' Legion will speak.
PARADE
Shortly before the services, uniformed units of three armed service?
will march to Brock Hall from the
campus armory.
Taking part in the ceremonies will
be University Naval Training Division, UBC contingent of the COTC.
RCAF station, Sea Island, Canadian
Legion pipe band, University brass
band and glee club.
At the site for UBC's half million
dollar war memorial gymnasium,
Hon. E. C. Carson, minister of public
works for B.C., will turn the first
sod for the building.
PIPES LEAD
Uniformed units from the three
fervices will form up in the Armory
under Lt.-Cmdr. Frank J. E. Turner
at 10:30 a.m., to march to Brock Hall
at  10:45.
University pipe band will parade
at the same time to lead marchers
over the campus. Parade Marshall
is T. G. Terry Lunch, sergeant-at-
arms of the UBC legion.
In the event of inclement weather,
ceremonies will be held in the phys-
Speaks Monday .
REV.  ELBERT PAUL, D.D.
, . . Christianity topic
VCF To Sponsor
Lecture Series
ical   education
Hall.
Forum Discusses
Minority Issue
History Is Made
ssey Scores
adio Cover
By Charles Marshall
"First"
0©
Journalistic history has been
made on  I hi- UBC campus.
Al 2:4Ti u.m. W-d-v.-;d:iy Th-
Daily Ubyssey became the first
Canadian   university   pane"   t
another
receive     news     trom
campus by radio,
Through  the   fac.lities o
ly     expand,]
■:■    rnpi-l-
Amateur
wan
New
I llhCl
irunswu
mora  tli..11
ronvcr;
l'ni '.Tsity
I '. illliU I       V.a.       a .  .   a-
ai    Ihe   Unh.'-M'y   ■  '
■:.   in   Fredericton,   and
half nn  hmir  messages
allien   exchanged,
HOT NKWS
A summ.e y of ihe "lead mini's" in
I lie latest issilt ef "The Brunswickan"
was sent over Ihe air waves by the
Fredericton   operators   and   picked   up
here.
As  :i   reply.   Don   Ferguson,   editor-
in-chief   of   The   Daily   Ubyssey   sent
a   personal   message   to  the  editor  of
the UNB paper.
(Cont'd, on Page 3—Sec COVERAGK)
FIRST NEWS STORY ever received by radio for a Canadian
university paper is taken down by Charlie Littlewood, UAR!'
operator.   The story came from the University of New Brum
wick at Fredericton and appears in today's issue of The Daily
Ubyssey.
UN BCouncil Holds
Budget Session
Fredericton, Nov. 7—(CUP
-By Radio)—Seventy-three items were passed after a stormy
session of the University of
New Brunswick student council.
First on tlie agenda was a request
by the Flying Club that it be granted
funds to cover its deficit.
President Bob Pre.scott of tlie club
told tlie meeting that his organization
would be self sufficient next year
and would have been this year had
it not been for unforeseen circumstances.
He explained that the Flying Club
had great possibilities and if allowed
10 progress would become one of the
leading campus organizations, training
students for something that will be
of use to them  in the years to come.
After a great deal of controversy
tlie  budget  was   finally   passed.
Another   matter   discussed  was  tho
Christianity's answer to
great problems is the topic for
a series of lectures sponsored
by the Varsity Christian Fel-
hangar near Brock lowship beginning Monday,
November 10 in Physics 200 at
12:30 p.m. and continuing on
Wednesday, November 12 and
Friday, November 14.
Rev. Elbert Paul will deliver the
series touching on such problems
as Purpose, Principles and Power.
Question periods are to follow each
lecture.
Panel speakers at the Parliamentary Forum decided Tuesday that a
solution to B.C.'s "Doukhobor problem" could be evolved gradually
through   education   and   assimilation.
Bob Dodd contended that the press
had distorted the news of happenings
in the interior saying that this alone
had put solution back 10 years.
Cultural aspects were emphasized
by Mike Lakes who said that their
talent as singers should be brought
out.
Dr. Paul is a graduate of Acadia
University, N.S. and attended Union
College at UBC. He later received
his degree from Western Baptist
Seminary. For the past 17 years he
been pastor of First Baptist Church
in Vancouver,
LIQUOR FOUND IN BROCK
LIVINGSTONE
ACCUSED UNDER
ARTICLE 11
A bottle of beer created a
minor stir in the AMS office
this week when an unidentified
donor left a glistening 12-ounc -
er of Pilsener decked with blue
and gold ribbons and equipped
with six straws on Grant Livingstone's  desk.
A, Daily Ubyssey photographer discovered Ihe plant before the AMS
pres'dent came into the office—result
the news picture of the year.
Hastily dodging the (lash gun,
Livingstone, refused comment other
than "the bottle will be confisealcd
by   tho   Discipline   committee."
Six straws, bearing the names of the
six council members who voted in
.favor of the "prohibition" ruliii",
passed at last week's council meeting
were tucked inside- the how of the
ribbon.
They were: Harwood, Knapp, Macdonald, Sherman. Porteous and Hodgins.
Ralph Huene. president of tho Arts
j Undergraduate Society and member
\ of the Discipline Committee was present at the time of the discovery and
meal   allowance   for   team   members   gleefully   seized   Livingstone   as   tli
playing away from home. It was Anally decided to allow $1 for meals
in the U.S., 85 cents in Canada and
$1.25 on trains.
"first   offender   under   Article   11."
A hasty investigation has not yet
uncovered the identity of the culprit
responsible for the ruse.
-Ubyssey Photo by Jack Law. PAGE 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1947
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University  Pre&s
Authorized as Second Class Mail,, Post Office  Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions — $2.50 p<sr year
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia
• • •
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial   staff   of   The   Daily   Ubyssey   and   not   necessarily
those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone: ALma 1624
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    -     -     -
MANAGING EDITOR   -
GENERAL STAFF: Cop* Editor, Ron Haggart; News Editor,   Tore   Larssen;   Features   Editor,   George   Robertson.
Photography Director,  Bob  Cave:  Sports Editor, Dick Blockberger
For display advertising phone KErrisdale 1811
DONALD FERGUSON
-   LAURIE DYER
CITY EDITOR THIS ISSUE: HAL PINCHIN
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: DON ROBERTSON, MICKEY FYNN
HIGH HANGS THE AXE
We are in a difficult position.
Several times lately we have heard the
opinion expressed that The Daily Ubyssey is
carrying too much material of a political
nature. The charges are levelled sometimes
at the news coverage of political speeches,
sometimes at the columnists, and, more frequently at the letters to the editor column.
In covering addresses in the news columns our policy is simply one of presenting
"that which will interest the most students''
We believe that this method, as we have
applied it, is completely unbiased. If a political group presents a speaker who makes
interesting remarks in an address to a student
gathering we cover it, with the conviction
that his remarks will interest most of the
students.
True, it is up to us to judge the degree of
interest but then that is the newspaper
business.
We may be wrong but we will continue
our present policy until public opinion indicates otherwise.
As far as columnists are concerned our
policy is this: if a by-lined columnist wants to
talk politics he should be free to do so provided that he can make his politics light
enough to be readable. We rule out the
standard "party line" sort of thing, because
after all, if readers want political ideologies
there are lots better places to get them
outside of a newspaper.
Regarding the letters to the editor column
—we have been printing all letters received
that comply with the length regulation imposing a limit of 200 words. We could refuse
political letters, but this action would seem
a little unwise since an interest in the administration of the government is usually considered essential under a democratic system.
If the majority feels that there are too
many political letters to the editor we suggest
that the majority appeal to the majority in an
effort to have the majority stop writing them;
in the meantime we'll print them.
On The Wagon
with DON STAINSBY
ONE NIGHT'S
REVELRY
the Armory, is it?
So the Fall Ball, that
highpoint of the autumnal social calendar,
is going to be held in
Or, as one wag put it,
in the parking lot? Doesn't worry this boy;
no siree, not at all. You see, we've got a plan.
Oh girls, you can go now. You're not
going to like this. Sorry. See you later.
Much later. Now fellas, pull up a wagon
tongue and sit down; Jason, unhitch old
Dobbin and get Baby from behind the couch.
Ah, that's the stuff to make a man talk. Good
old Mr. Kennedy.
Yes, we've got a plan. It's a sure-fire one,
too, for fellas that are broke but don't want
to miss the Big Affair. And they needn't
hold it in the Armory either, to make it a
whole two-fifty cheaper.
Oh sure, we're going, the Wagon and I.
We'll be there. We'll pull up to the parking
lot and toddle into the Armory, but it could
just as well be the Commodore for all that
two-fifty matters. 'Cause when we walk into
the Armory we're going to be carrying a black
little suitcase, and when the Discipline Committee asks us what's in it, we're going lo
say a typewriter.
We won't be lying, either.
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
Corrections
Dear Sir:
Your hair-raising write-up of' the
"Slavonic Circle" O gives me the
impression that Leon Lipson. wh"
did the reporting, is looking for a
quick promotion. He did get one cr
two points right but most of it needs
correcting.
First, the club is not "tentatively
known as the Slavonic Circle," but
is most definitely known as the "Russian Circle".
Secondly, the deadlock did not take
place over the matter of a Russian-
speaking president but over the extent of activities.
The   recordings   were   by   the   Don
Cossacks   and   the   conversation   was
either in fairly decent Russian or in
good English,  mostly the latter.
A. Malysheff.
t
P.S.:   How   could   even   Slavs   get
"violent"  on  tea?
Observation
Sir:
If it looks as though the Fall Ball
is being held in the parking lot, as a
previous correspondent suggests, it
will obviously be just the surplus
crowd from the Armory.
T. F. Harris.
Orchids
Dear Sir:
Once Over Hardly by Hal Tennant talking about Into the Parking
Lot, Out of the Transformation and
Into the Back Seat afforded me the
best laugh since I've been out here
at UBC.
Anon.
SIGNBOARD
• * *
THE PERFECT
SOLUTION
Baby'U   be   there,
but in that deep pocket    in    our    raincoat.
Baby,   and   the   typewriter and I.   That's all.   Oh yes, one other
thing: a pipe and a pouch of tobacco. Nope.
No woman.
We'll—the four of us, typewriter, Baby
pipe and I—we'll just wander over to a table
in a nice dark corner and sit ourselves down.
Sure there'll be nice dark corners—aren't
they going to make a beautiful thing of the
"Ugly Duckling Armory"?
Baby will sit on the floor, myself in a
chair,  the typewriter on the table and the
pipe will recline in its proper position. And
I'll have the best damned time I've ever had.
Cheap, too.
Look: although I've got the Wagon, no
woman would ride on it. But the typewriter
isn't proud—already I've saved six bucks
in cab fares. And flowers—what the hell
would a typewriter want with flowers? Another two-fifty. Tickets? They'd better not
try to charge my little portable for entrance;
or Baby either; another buck-fifty to add to
the original saving.
And then there's Baby to consider—all
beautiful 26 ounces of her. With the typical
date, you'd need two babies—but not with
my portable. I'll just sit there in the corner,
puff on my pipe and drink that Scotch Professor—only one glass at this table, thank you,
No, no cigarettes, thanks. My elate doesn't
smoke, either.  (Another 33 cents).
And it will be the pleasantest, date I've
ever had.
•     *     *
BEAUTIFUL
DREAMER
Just close your envious eyes and sigh
ecstatically, my panting
swains, for here it
comes, Think, think of a fairyland ballroom,
with you the handsome prince and on your
arm a beautiful princess just awakened from
a long, long sleep. You're out on a balcony;
in the distance the band is playing .sweet
music, and your lady is whispering in your
car, words that even sweeter music make.
No, don't deny it. You know the words
you've read about and dreamed of hearing
whispered to you, passionate, palpitating you.
Sound wonderful?
Well, chum, that's me. I'll have my fairy
princess, sitting there on the table in front of
me, and I'll get, all those words of love—with
fingertip control.   I'll just let my hands wan
der, unconcerned about reflex actions, and
my little portable will pour out its heart and
soul to me. And think of it. Only the words
I want to hear and only when I want to hear
them. I won't have to beat the old bat's head
in to make her shut up. Not at all; just quit
making with the fingers, and the little bundle
of joy is quiet. And I. won't have to rack my
brain to think of things to say—sweet nothing ;
or witticisms. I can just sit and smoke, and
watch and listen and reflect, And if I want
her to, she'll, say—this fairy princess of mine
—that she likes my pipe and loves to see
me drink. She'll urge me to reach down
for Baby, again and again.
And she'll agree with me perfectly when
I comment that those fools carousing on the
floor are engaged in a sport much too physical for me. Mush to physhicle.
v.
FOUND
WOULD THE GIRL picked up at
Dunbar and 361 h by a green car
please  phone  BA  8633-L  for a  paivel
left   in   tlie   car.
* * «i
AN UMBRELLA IN my car. Owner
please phone  BA. JH117L.
FOR SALE
MODEL T FORD in good condition.
Ask   for   Ralph   at   Marine   Garage,
529 Burrard, MA, 4836.
* * *
CHEMISTRY TEXT books in Chem.
31)0; Chem. 310. Phone HA 4141R. Ask
for Mun.
MEETINGS
VARSITY BARBELL CLUB will
meet Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. in
Arts 201.
STAMP CLUB—Today, HL 2, Discussion to be held. New members
welcome.
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE
by Jack McCauqherty
WANTED
LOST
THREE   SKIERS   to   eehaec   e : e-.s-    i:RCWN SUITCASE containing books
of a cabin on Mt. Baker for season,   left  in  rear seeat  cf  car on Tuesday
Call Warren at AL. 0063 immediately,   afternoon. Phone Dan at FA. 5908Y.
* * * * * *
COPY OF "Art In Everyday Life" by   "ENGLISH   RENAISSANCE  Poetry".
Goldstein. Phone Marg, North 1299M. I Please  phone  BA.  7123.
NOTICES
SPC WILL PRESENT Dr. Roy Hug-
gard speaking on "Socialized Medicine" today at 12:30 in Aggie 100.
* * *
ROOM WITH TWO SINGLE BEDS
for two men students. Near university.   Phone  AL.  1470L.
» » *
FIRST CANADIAN Inter-university
salon of photography will be held
in Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall,
November 10-15.
t * «
WOULD THE MAN in whose car I
left my black purse yesterday afternoon   (Thursday)   please leave   it  at
the AMS office?
♦ * *
ROOM AND RIDE: Free ride to
lectures Monday to Saturday for
male student sharing large room.
Breakfast if desired. Very reasonable.
Leave note, A. Edwards, Arts Box'
off Quad.
Adjacent To University
Distinctive 8 room family home
with the very best of materials.
Will be completed within 60 days.
Comprising of 4 bedrooms; double
plumbing; extra large living room,
25'xl5'; automatic heating. Situated
on a 100'x260' lot. Owner is forced
to sell due to ill health and wil'i
consider a resonable offer. Cci
Mr. Hay-C'iii'iic, Eves. TA 2191 oi
days
MARTIN  CORPORATION  LTD.
601  Howe Street MA 4311
LEGION    CANTEEN
E£-OPENING
NEXT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1947
Enlarged — Redecorated — Refurnished
Open Till 10 P.M. Every Night
Everybody Welcome
HUT M 12,  WEST MALL
Operated by UBC Branch No. 72, Canadian Legion
  i   =3?-  -aifcfe   \—^
_| prishmin
only!
&>
i^J  wiuome/
FRESHMAN WEEK/
DANCH
"And last year I said
'Nobody loves a
Freshman'."
.Egbert has missed the Freshman dance,
but now he's setting his sights on the Junior
Prom, He knows even a second year man
can make it, if he salts away the money from
his baby-sitting in a "Prom Account" at
"MY BANK".
If you want to see the earnings from your
part-time job grow ... or if you want to stop
your allowance from trickling through your
fingers ... follow Egbert's example and open
a savings account at the BofM
today.
You'll soon be shouting
"money-in-the-bank" haUllujahs
instead of moaning those
"leaky-pocket" blues.
U2-S
Bank, of Montrea£
workmq  with  Canadians  in every  ■valk  of life  s»inee   (817 /riday, November 7, 1917
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
—Daily Ubyssey Photo by Bill Wallace
"HERCULES," pet Peales falcon of Dr. J. Cowan of the
Zoology Department viewed Daily Ubyssey reporter Leon
Lipson with sullen defiance when approached for an interview
Tuesday.
Lipson leered right back but to no avail, as he eventually,
had to get the story from the bird's master, Dr. Cowan.
Totem Asks For
Greek Lists
Fraternities and sororities
desiring space in Totem '48
are requested to contact the
yearbook editor, Don Stainsby.
Stainsby asks that greeks compile
a list of their active members and
pledges. Lists must be in the Totem
office by November 20. Final names
will be called for immediately following  Christmas  rushing.
Fraternity lists must bc submitted
including he following points: alphabetical list of members, list of executive, year and faculty of each member,   international   affiliation,   if  any.
Noon Talk
Falcon Tamer
by Leon Lipson
Hercules' Eyes, Claws
Awe Ubyssey Reporter
Dr. J. Cowan of the Zoological Department introduced me
to "Hercules" his "tame" Peales falcon, last Tuesday.
I took one look at the hostile, jet-black eyes, the sharply-
curved beak and the wide, powerfully-clawed legs and refused
to shake hands, "Hercules" jumped up on Dr. Cowan's arm and
screamed defiance.
According to Dr. Cowan, "Hercules"
is a quiet bird and does not bother
anyone. He was discovered by a zoological field study party which visited
the Queen Charlotte Islands this summer. "Hercules" put up no resistence.
An imperfectly-developed wing tendon made flight impossible. Quite
taken with the bird, which insisted
on staying near the camp, they brought
him back with them to UBC.
BIRD ISN'T FUSSY
"Hercules" had just finished off a
muskrat when I interrupted him.
When muskrats are not available, he
is quite satisfied with any form of
wild meat, and does not turn up his
nose at butcher meat. Zoology students, careless in leaving their specimens lying around, have returned to
find nothing but scattered feathers
and "Hercules" looking smug and
satisfied.
Dr. Cowan keeps the bird in the
room next to his office in the Applied
Science building. "He sits in there
and has a good time watching people
going by," he says. "He seems to be
greatly amused by the UBC students
who stop to look in on him."
SNAKE MORE HOSTILE
Rebuffed by "Hercules'" cool re-
reception, I examined a live, still-
poisonous rattlesnake in a glass case
in Dr. Cowan's room. The reception
was even more hostile—an ominous,
metallic vibration of his tail, a head
drawn and poised to strike, and a
flickering,    forked   tongue    pointing
my way. Mr. Rattlesnake was brought
in by another field party from Oso-
yoos in the Okanagan Valley. He
moulted recently, leaving his cast-
off skin in a corner of the case. His
chief delicacy is a good fat mouse.
"Goodbye Hercules," I said, going
back again where he stood. It was his
turn to ignore me, We parted company, quite pleased at the cordiality
of our relationship.
ENGINEERS
(Continued   from   Page   1)
clared that a report in the October
29 Daily Ubyssey to the effect that
"red shirts" would have to pay for
damage done to the Capitol Theatre
the night of a Science banquet was
"untrue."
Engineers had not been asked to
make good for damage caused, they
maintained.
COUNCIL MINUTES
AMS President Grant Livingstone
told The Daily Ubyssey later that
the following order had been pasabd
by Students Council October 27:
"... that a letter be sent to
M. S. Joiner, of Famous Players,
offering to make restitution for the
damage done to the Capitol Theatre
by a snake parade of students, and
further, that the individuals responsible be asked to make good this
sum through the offices of the Engineers' Undergraduate Executive."
Livingstone explained that the
damage costs had not been assumed
by the AMS since councillors were
reluctant to establish such a precedent.
PAGE 3
—Vancouver Sun photo
JAMES   SINCLAIR,   M.P.
Campus Liberals
Hear Sinclair
James Sinclair, B.Sc, M.A.,
and Member of Parliament for
Vancouver North, speaks to
the Student Liberal Club Monday, November 10, at 12:30
p.m. in Arts 100, on the general
abject "Labor".
The Scottish-born Liberal is a
graduate oi' the University of B. C.
He was a member of both the Students
Council and the editorial staff of
The Ubyssey.
One of the few young MPs, Sinclair has represented Vancouver
North since 1941, when he captured
a traditionally CCF seat. During his
term in the house, he gave much
support to the veteran's housing
scheme, and tried to get the ban
on  oleo-margarine  in  Canada lifted.
Student Group To Fight
Race Bars At Toronto
Toronto, Nov. 7—(CUP)—A special committee on racial discrimination will fight race and religious bars at the
University of Toronto.
The bigotry-fighting committee alleged when it was
formed last year that Greek-letter fraternities on the Toronto campus were "among the worst offending groups."
One organization, the Toronto Ski Club, admitted to
the committee that Jewish persoos were barred from
membershin
COVERAGE
(Continued   from   Page   1)
The UBC "hams" had previously
"worked" the station at Frederick-
ton as part of its program to contact
"hams" nt all Canadian universities
in order to connect all campuses by
an amateur radio network.
EXPERIMENT
Tlie idea of exchanging news and
feature stories by radio was discussed
at the recent convention of Western
University Radio Societies. When the
station at the University of New
Brunswick was contacted on Monday, officials of UARS and Tlie DaiU
Ubyssey decided to try an experiment.
The Fredericton operators hat
promised to be on the air again on
Wednesday and they were easi .
picked up by the station here. After
preliminary conversation to make
sure that reception was clear at both
ends the University of New Brunswick was asked for a story from their
paper.
SH-H-H-H
As everyone in the radio hut listened intently the voice from the
Atlantic coast said "Seventy-three
items were passed ..." and so on
through  the entire article.
Now that the story has been successfully received by radio, the idea
of a daily ov semi-weokly news exchange between various Canadian
universities seems to be almost a
reality.
Such a scheme has long been
dreamed of by officials of the Canadian University Press from coast to
coast.
A   radio   network   would   provide
Canadian   universities   with   a   news
service   to   rival   Canadian  Press   in|
and efficiency,
SUFFERING?
FROM CHAFITIS?
SKIVVY-GRABITIS?
Why bother with old«f ashioatd
shorts with t sandpaper center seam
that gives you too much close sup-
port when you crave freedom?
If your skivvies have that discour*
aging habit of creeping relentlessly
back and sabotaging you every time
you bend over, switch quickly to
a pair of super*comfortable Arrow
•bom.
Tbe seamless crotch is a feature
of tmtj pair of Arrow shorts—
can't grab, can't chafe.
P.S.— Dnfi m and set yourfmvorite Arrow dealer today
•ARROW SHORTS
'ce&L
Fashion favorite
of the week. . .
by MAXINE
There are two viewpoints in the air
That forced us all to be aware:
To follow (hitch-hiking) faithfully
The hosts of gay activity,
The other one is quite opposed —
To study all the work imposed.
GRETCHEN MATHERS here displays
A plaid of blues and wines and grays
That just combines conflicting views,
As every co-ed longs to do.
m
Sportswear . . . 10.95
DAY1D SPENCER
LIMITED PAGE 4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1947
LAURIE DYER, Acting Sports Editor
Reporters: Fred Moonen, Gil Gray, Jack Melville
EDITOR THIS ISSUE: Hal Murphy
"'" n'l
Nanaimo Hockeyists Host
For Thunderbird Invasion
Thunderbirds invade Nanaimo tomorrow night for their
away game of the infant hockey season. Supplying the opposition will be Nanaimo Clippers, last year's third place club,
over whom the Varsity squad held a 3-1 advantage in games
despite their own fourth place standing.
A thumbnail sketch of the players will help fans with
an appreciation of the squad.
~$ GOAL: Murray Higgins; fourth year
Aggie, one of the few local boys on
the team. 21 years of age, 'Wiggie''
learned his goaling in lacrosse with
various local teams, and decided to
try out for the same position in
hockey.
DEFENSE: Terry Nelford; 24 years
of age and a student in third year
PE. Terry played for the Airforce
team at Calgary wireless school, and
previous to that, for Prince Albert
Junior Black Hawks. This 170 pound
defenseman starred for the '46-'47
edition of the 'Birds. Bob Saunders;
teamed with Nedford on last year's
outfit, to form a solid defense which,
according to rumour, intends to repeat this year. An army veteran,
170 pound Bob hails from Vernon,
FORWARDS: Harrison "Hass" Young;
a 23 year old, 180 pound centre whu
has played a lot of hockey. Los
Angeles Ramblers and Kansas City
Pla-Mors know him well. He played
with the latter team when they won
the U.S. Amateur title. An RCAF
veteran, Young is touted as the best
prospect in the league.
William "Wag" Wagner; oldest player
on the team, he totes 27 years on his
155 pound frame. He calls Mt. Albert
his home town, but has played for
Calgary, Nanaimo, and New Westminster.
Lloyd Torfason; 24 years old, 160
pounds, "Torf" is a Prairie boy,
having played for Winnipeg Falcons.
Fills out tho line with Young and
Wagner.
Johnston, Berry, and Andrew form
the second string, but it is a second
string in name only. This line was
well when the latter left Vancouver chosen intact for last year's all-star
in August, 1946. During a year and team. Johnston played with Copper-
cliff, Berry with Moose Jaw Canucks,
and Andrew with Regina Abbots.
ROY HAINES
. . . loss regretted by fans
Popular Rugger
Coach Retires
Roy Haines, popular head English
rugby coach, has resigned this position acording to a report from the
Men's Athletic Directorate.
Haines stated that he has been
forced to give up his rugger coaching duties mainly because of lack of
time and  assistance.
A lecturer in the English Department, Haines took over the head
rugger mentor's job from Dan  Dos-
this year.
Athletic officials have been unable
to find a replacement as yet and fear
that unless immediate help is forthcoming, English ruggers on the UBC
campus may suffer greatly as a re-
a half of service, Haines has produced
more rugger stars than any other
UBC coach and with an unbeaten
record for his Thunderbird team.
Under his guidance, the Blue and
Gold fifteen collected every available
piece of silverware in their rugb>
campaign last season and have won
the first half of the Miller Cup series   suit of this grave loss.
Varsity And UBC
In Weekend Rugby
English Rugger goes into its second round Saturday as two
University teams tilt with downtown squads. In spite of being
slightly unsettled because of losing their head coach the undefeated, untied Varsity wondermen will tackle Ex-South
Burnaby at Brockton Oval.
The Blue and Gold's other 1st Divi- -
sion squad, UBC, will moot Meralomas
in a crucial contest.   Tire 'Loma-UBC
tilt will be featured at Douglas Park.
The Varsity ruggermen will bo
minus one of their stars for the afternoon battle versus Burnaby as Harvey
Allen is still recuperating from injuries suffered in last, weeks north
shore game.
Having taken the first five .amies
without a loss tho Varsity squad is
current favorite with sports scribes
to  win  the Miller  Cup.
UBC is currently dwelling in third
place in the six team league,are given
even   oclds  for   their   weekend   tilt.
Soccermen Ready
For Powell River
Varsity roundball k i n g s
leading the loop at present, will
definitely make the trip to
Powell River this week-end
even if they have to play in
diving suits. Their previous
game with Papertown men was
cancelled because the water
was deeper than usual on tho
field.
STARTING LINEUPS
PACIFIC UNIVERSITY
THUNDERBIRDS
No.
Player
Position
Player
No.
36
Thogerson
LE
Sainas
23
54
Knight
LT
Capozzi
.J.)
45
Wilcox
LG
Hogarth
18
40
Jubb
C
Nixon
20
44
Dahlgren
RG
Pearson
17
55
Rollins
RT
Miller
15
37
Brusco
RE
Chisholm
58
26
Hutton
Q
Mitchell
35
21
Klauman
RH
Brewer
13
25
Russell
LH
Reid
38
22
Olson
F
Murphy
31
MERALOMAS EDGE CHIEFS
IN SENIOR A OPENER
A crowd of approximately 200 people witnessed a 49-46
Meraloma win over the Varsity Chiefs in the UBC gym
Wednesday night. This was the first game for the Chiefs in the
present Senior A Basketball schedule.
«~
HOW TO STOP the 'Birds famous passing plays is what chief
coach of the Pacific Badgers must be telling one of his backfield
in this pre-game pose.
Final Home Grid Tilt
Tough One For "Birds
Varsity stadium will be the scene of UBC's last home performance of this season when the Blue and Gold-clad gridmen
meet a powerful Pacific University eleven at 2:00 P.M. Saturday.
BADGERS RATED HIGH
Meralomas got off to a rather slow
start with the Chiefs shooting and
scoring before the 'Lomas even made
one attempt oh the bucket. In the first
quarter the UBC team outscorod
Bardsley's boys by 14-12. In the
second quarter the Lomas came back
to outscore the Chiefs 12-9. Entering
the second half, the Lomas led by
24-23.
Up to this time the Chiefs were
putting up a fair show for their
followers, most of whom really expected a whitewash after seeing the
close game between the Birds and
'Grads  on   Saturday  night.
But in the third quarter the Chief
mellonmen hit a bad slump and were
outpointed 17-9. However, a last quarter drive by Doug Whittle's charges
brought them within three points
of the Meralomas but they were not
quite able to close the gap.
WHITTLE COMMENTS
"It was a pretty good game con- i losers with 11, followed by Gil Gray
sidering it was their first night out. ! with 8, and Denny Wotherspoon with
We'll get  them next time,"  was  ihe   7, and Walker with 6.
comment of Coach Doug Whittle
when interviewed after the game.
Whittle feels that the team has good
prospects and will develop nicely
after a few games if they keep working out . He went on to point out
that the Chiefs were playing last
years Dominion Championship winners and it was to be expected that
they would have "first night jitters"
"After all,'' he said "some of these
boys are right out of high-school.
We can't expect miracles. It will
take time."
In a preliminary game, Teams 1
and 2 of the Varsity Minor League
fought to a 41-38 win for Team 2—
their second win in three days. This
was a close game, being all tied up
until just a few minutes before the
final horn. High man for the winners
was Keenleyside with 8, followed by
Mathews, Marshall, and McLucqie
with 6 apiece.  Bert Watson  led  the
The Pacific Badgers arc entering
this contest as slight favorites, but
the game will be far from a pushover
for them. Although Greg Kabat's
Thunderbirds have taken almost a
whole season to get rolling, they have
finally raised some steam and are
going to be extremely hard to stop.
The 'Birds are still without the
services of starry Don Lord who is
still on the bench with injuries.
UBC's starting lineup however, will
be much the same as last week's winning  combination.
Half-time entertainment will be
provided by the Varsity Band led
by Arthur Delamont, and the Ma-
rnook's   curvacious   cheer-leaders.
Students   are   reminded   that   their
Ruggermen To Meet
Van. All-Stars
Tiuiudirbird i.iijvgi'iincii will open
with their first game of the year
Tuesday when they tackle Vancouver
All-Stars at Brockton Point. In keeping with the policy of playing a major
lUrKcihnSc Cup tilt on cadi and
every public holiday the Engli:|ii
Ru.erby tilt will bc the open in the
inter-city battle for the McKechnie
tic phy—symbol of pacific ccust winners. Winners last year of the coveted
silver, the 'Birds will be up against
a nowerlul Vancouver team.
advance sales tickets will admit them
free to the monster pep meet which is
Ik in;; held  in the Gym today.
0**/
right now you're breaking records
...but the "breaks"don't always last
Vv HEN success seems to crown your every
effort, and the way ahead looks smooth and
inviting, it's easy to forget that the only
thing certain about life is its uncertainty.
But the wise man remembers ... and through
a soundly charted life insurance program,
prepares himself to meet the unexpected-
whatever it may be. Protected by insurance,
he looks forward to a future free from want
and worry, well-defended against dangers
and difficulties.
In the -planning of such a life insurance
program, you will find the Mutual Life
representative a friendly and experienced
counsellor. He has received thorough training in adapting life insurance to the varied
needs, desires and responsibilities of people
ol all ages and incomes.
Consult him at your earliest convenience.
He will study your special problems and
requirements and recommend the insurance
plan best suited to your circumstances. Ask
him why Mutual Life insurance is low cost
life insurance.
48 HOUR
SERVICE
ON
SHIRTS
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C-3
THE
MUTUAL IIFE
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HEAD OFFICE
WATERIOO, ONTARIO
BRANCH OFFICES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
402 WEST PENDER STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
201-4 TIMES BUILDING VICTORIA, B. C.
SKI CENTRE
Early Arrivals in Equipment
JANTZEN TOTEM SWEATER
$9.50
WO.AIENS RUBBER  HIKING
BOOTS
$2.49
MENS  HIKING  BOOTS
$2.95   and   $4.50
U.S.   ARMY   SKI   GOGGLES
950
Ski Boots at  1946 Prices
will be $16.00 later
ladies & mens sizes $12.50
Steel Edges attached  to skis $6.50
Season Guarantee

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