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The Ubyssey Nov 8, 1923

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Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., NOVEMBER 8th,    1923
No. 6
UNIVERSITY
LOSES ONE OF
PROFESSORS
Students and Faculty Combine
in Mourning Popular
Lecturer in French
The news ot the death of Professor
G. Grojean came as a great shock to
the student body of the University.
M. Grojean had been ill for some time
and passed away on Friday afternoon
at St. Paul's Hospital.
He was in his forty-eighth year and
a native of France. Twelve years
ago Prof. Grojean came to America
and was for a time professor of
French at the Leland Stanford University in California. He came to
■Vancouver about four years ago and
took over his duties at the University
of British Columbia as a lecturer in
French. Professor Grojean was well
liked, both by the students and -the
faculty, and was also an active member of the Society of French Professors in America.
All lectures at the University were
cancelled on Monday morning when
members of the faculty and a large
number of the student body paid their
final tribute to M. Grojean. The funeral was held at 8.30 a.m. from T.
Edwards' chapel to St. Augustine's
Church, where Father Connolly said
Mass at 9 a.m.
President L. S. Klinck, Dean H. T.
J. Coleman, Dr. A. H. Ashton, and F.
Dallas of the University; E. Chevalier,
French consul, and Charles Duplonich
acted as pallbearers. Wreaths were
sent by the University, the Alma Mater Society, Le Cercle Francais, and
from other friends and societies. Interment took place in Ocean View
Burial Park. The University takes
this opportunity of tendering its
heartfelt sympathy to Madame Grojean and her three little daughters,
Marguerite, Jeanette, and Simonne.
STUDENT  KILLED
AT SURF INLET
Former Member of Arts '25
/Victim of Sudden
Accident
The sad news reached the city on
Sunday of the death of Kenneth
JJtojvn, a former member of Arts '25.
He was instantly killed on Saturday
in an accident at Surf Inlet where he
was assistant engineer in the mine.
During the time he spent at King
Edward High School and at the University, Kenneth made many friends.
To those who knew him best, the
memory of a true comrade, sunny-
hearted, generous, and loyal, will be
forever  precious.
The sympathy of the University
goes out to Kenneth's mother, Mrs. J.
D. Tompkins of this city, and to his
brother Don, who is ill in the hospital
in New York.
^Prnfwanr (§>. dim jean
Mr. Grojean came to us after wide
experience. K-e took his degree of
Baccalaureat en lettres and en sciences
at Lille in 1892-'93. At Toulouse, in
1S98, he became Licencie en droit, and
in 1900 reached the advanced standard of Licencie en lettres at that university. He then became a lecturer
and student in Germany, at Thorn-
Konigsberg and at Berlin. Leaving
Germany, he continued his studies in
Italy, and, on returning to France, became a teacher of classics in French
lycees. In 1913, Mr. Grojean came to
the United States and was appointed
Instructor in Romance Languages at
the University of Pennsylvania.
Musical Society
y Plans Concert
Orchestral and Other Numbers
Promise Entertaining
Evening
The U. B. C. Musical Society with
Mr. Wilbur G. Grant as conductor, will
hold their annual Christmas Concert
on Saturday, November 17, at 8:00
p.m. in the University Auditorium. A
splendid programme of solos, duets,
choruses and orchestral numbers is
being arranged which will assure an
evening well spent.
The orchestra, which is without
doubt the finest ever assembled in
the University, will be heard to advantage in several superior selections,
and the chorus of about one hundred
voices will give two interesting numbers.
Tickets will be on sale by members
of the chorus and orchestra in the
entrance-hall Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday noon of next week, and
also at the door on the night of the
concert. .
VARSITY TEAM
DEFEATED BY
DOCKERS
Varsity Goal Declared Offside
Final Score—One, Nothing
'he Varsily First Division soccer
eleven were defeated by a lono tally,
when Adam Kerr, star outside left
for the Longshoremen bulged the net
five minutes from time. The game
was billed as a feature soccer match
and it certainly was an appropriate
title. Last year the Blue and Gold
squad were called an exceptionally
lucky eleven, this year the team
hardly deserves that cognomen. For
instance, the I. L. A. only had about
one quarter of the play, yet aided
and abetted by Referee Murphy, were
awarded two valuable points. The
three sporting editors of Vancouver's
papers are unanimous in awarding
the game to Varsity, which in itself
is valuable advertising for the team,
but which cannot increase our percentage.
The first half was filled with spectacular plays, time after time the ball
being worked up into the Docker's
goal-mouth, the opportunity only to
be wasted by pitiable shooting. The
ground was slippery, this fact alone
helping considerably to spoil the
style of play favored by the former
Vets. Wilkinson, playing in his nevs
position at centre showed up exceptionally well, his rushing tactics causing the opposing backs considerable
worry. Four goals should have been
registered for (Varsity in the first
twenty minutes of play, but a combination of unfortunate circumstances
made the counters impossible. Huestis
and Kilkinson had opportunities that
(Continued on Page 6    jt.-
EVERYONE OUT
TO MASS MEETING TOMORROW
To-morrow'-th^e first Mass Meeting of
the year.will be-held in the auditorium.
The fatfuftv,0T Science will parade into RoonrXT and Agriculture into Room
Y. Yells will be given by the various
faculties and Yell King Bishop will be
on hand to lead the University yells.
Other features are promised to liven
up proceedings.
This is a chance for the students
to show the team what support they
are going to get at the game on Saturday and Monday. The McKechnie
Cup men are playing two of the biggest games of the year with only one
day's rest between. A good turnout
to-morrow will show the team that the
students are behind them, and will
be a guarantee that the "gang" will
be at the Point to help them fight it
out.
U.B.C. TEAMS
FOURTH AT
\y
PORTLAND
Harold Steves Wins Second
Place in the General
Team
Wrires from Portland state that both
the dairy and general livestock judging teams were fourth in their respective competitions. The dairy team
was made up of Art Alyard, Ken Hay,
and Bob Blair and was coached by
Prof. W. N. Jones. Art Alyard was
the high man of the U. B. C. team and
was sixth in the whole competition.
The team was second in the Holstein
classes.
This is the first time that B. C. has
been anywhere but last in the general competition and the coaches are
pleased that our team pulled in ahead
of Montana and Washington this year.
Harold Steves, who was second in the
dairy competition last year, was second in the general team, loosing by
three points to one of the members
of the California team. Bon Ogilvie
was tenth in the contest. The members of the team were: Harold Steves,
Bon Ogilvie, Vie Eby, Ernie Hope and
Charlie Barton. Prof. R. L. Davis was
their coach.
Miller Cup Men
y    Score Victory
Barwis and Ternan Make
Spectacular Scores
Varsity won the re-play of the first
Miller Cup game when they defeated
•Rowtng^CTub last Saturday afternoon
by a score of 10-4. Despite the drizzling rain it was the best game of the
season.
For the first fifteen minutes, play
was very even. The threes were unable to handle the ball, while the
forwards dribbled from end to end.
Then Barwis, the Rowing Club fullback dropped the ball from 45 yds. out.
With this score against them Varr
sity battled hard but were unable to
rrake much headway until Gee got
the ball and dropped it between the
poles from 40 yards out. Varsity
forced the play for the remainder of
the period, half time finding them on
the Rowing Club 25 yard line with
the score four all.
At the beginning of the second half
Rowing Club forced the ball over our
line but failed to touch it down. Varsity now worked hard and took the
play back to centre. Here Domoney
tried for a drop kick. His ball went
high enough but a little wide. Play
now swayed back and forth between
centre and their 25 yard line, until
their threes broke away, taking the
ball to our 25 before being brought
down. Rowing Club now forced, Giles
(Continued  on  Page 6)    j
»^i^^
■•'&&.;.
iiLii l/
THE     UBYSSEY
Nov. 8th, 1923
Write
Gifts
Something to write
in, on or with, makes
a pleasing and acceptable gift on any
occasion.
Come in and see outline of
Fountain  Pens
Evershnrps
Boxed Stationery
Loose Leaf Memos
Buddies
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS, PRINTERS
569 Seymour Street
What Better Gift?
What Better Time?
Your PHOTOGRAPH
for  Christmas
Hacking Studio
553 Granville Street
Announcement
Beginning 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, we will give
to U.B.C. students and their
friends
Free Instructions in Driving a Ford.
A new two-wheel drive gives
the   instructor  command
the car at any time.
of
Make   Your   Appointment
Personally
Dixon Motors Ltd.
Phone  Sey.  6038
Class Notes
ARTS '24
Class   Party.
Arts '24 Annual Class Party takes
place November 9th in the auditorium,
beginning at 8 p.m. The decoration
committee is preparing to beautify the
interior with Oriental trimmings. Mandarin Eastman will receive the guests.
The party will be restricted to those
in the draw and invited guests.
ART'S  '25  CLASS   PARTY
The best yet.
It happened to be Tubby Shore's
sixteenth birthday. Another sad case
of sweet sixteen and never been kissed.
ARTS '26
Last Wednesday evening Arts '26
held their annual theatre party at
the Capitol. The members of the year
turned out in force and everyone enjoyed himself. Dr. and Mrs. Sedgwick
were present. In the theatre some
yells were rendered and the sign
"Arts '26" was flashed on the screen.
After the theatre, the party broke up,
some members went home immediately while others went around town in
search  of refreshments.
Arts '27 held their first class function on Saturday in the form of a hike
to Capilano Canyon. In spite of tlie
uncertainty of the weather a large
number of freshees were on hand
when the 2 o'clock ferry pulled out.
Miss McGuire and Mr. Lewis acted as
chaperones. The party had to be
divided on the North Shore and even
then the two cars were so crowded
that it is said the conductors were
far from enthusiastic over Arts '27.
Mother Nature seeking to soothe their
wounded feelings .greeted them with
a brisk shower as they alighted from
the car and Arts '27 holds the time
recorded from there to the dance
pavilion.
Then the hikers danced enthusiastically till about 5:30 when supper
was served. It is said one of the
long tables was so weak at the unexpected honor of serving Arts '27
that its fore legs collapsed sending
the dishes down a pleasant toboggan
slide. Dancing was again enjoyed
till 7:30 when it broke up with "Skyrockets" for the chaperones and for
the victorious Rugby teams. They all
arrived safely in Vancouver, enthusiastic about the good time they had.
CHANGE   IN   STAFF
Miss Helen MacGill has been appointed Associate Editor to succeed
Miss Jean Faulkner. Miss MacGill
held the position of Exchange Editor
at the beginning of this session and
last year was assistant on the Annual
Staff.
The Florence
Confectionery
497   BROADWAY   W.
(Corner  Cambie)
Light Lunches Tobaccos
Confectionery
Hot  Meat  Pies a Specialty
A cosy spot on a cold day.
ERNEST  T.  TAYLOR,
Fair. 5697.
Central  Public  Stenographers
Expert   Stenographic   Service.
Reasonable   Rates.
413-414    Dominion   Building
(Cor.   Hastings   and   Cambie)
Sey. 5078
■ATM    ^s«
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Continuous study is known to be a
heavy strain upon the mental faculties,
and careful food selection is essential.
Shelly's 4X Bread will supply the necessary food elements that will keep the
mind clear and body vigorous.
*Efc
At Your
Grocers
SHELLY BROTHERS
okve^liissQnfiQv OllStjQol l-ind&l
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Based on the volume of value embodied above
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dollar.
Above the Frame,—
There's a craftsman-built body, with sturdy steel panels
over a rufe&ed hardwood framework, braced with drop
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With clean lined beauty of appearance, and interior
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With the rufc&ed Reo six-cylinder 50 h. p. esfcine, a 13-
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REO MOTORS LIMITED
"Phone Sey. 861$
1301-1303 Granville St.
V
REO MOTOR CAR COMPANY. OF CANADA. LTD.
WINDSOR. ONTARIO Nov. 8th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
Take a Co-Ed or go on your
lonesome to the
it
ALADDIN"
Delightful  Luncheons
Snappy Afternoon Teas
Epicurean Dinners
Situated  at  Granville  Mansions
Bldg.,   721   Robson   St.
MRS. E. MAY MOODY
Hostess
a
Spalding Sweaters
Are Warm Friends
Become Acquainted !
1 Of Canada. Limited
424 Hastings St., W., Vancouver, B. C.
Real Value in
BLUE  SUITS
For Young Men
One and Two-Button Models
in Single and Double
Breasted
Two-piece Tuxedo Suits
Just In
$42.00
See These
Thomas 8c McBain Limited
Semi-Ready  Service  Shop
655 GRANVILLE STREET
Get a
VARSITY PENNANT
For the
FOOTBALL MATCHES
We have them in stock
SHAW &MCCILL, LTD
SPORTING GOODS
658 Robson St.
Service Bldg., 4 Doors East of
Granville St.
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FOR the student or prot, the
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Write for
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Varsity Squad Lose
v to South Vancouver
U. B. C. has yet to register its first
league victory, as the result of a hard-
fought game at Marpole, when they
again lost by a close margin of 2-0.
The game was played in a constant
drizzle, and Varsity unfortunately had
to play two short, as a result of injuries sustained in inter-class games
last week.
The home team took advantage of
this weakness and from the outset
U. B. C. had to defend their goal, while
the South Vancouver boys forced several corners in succession. Davidson
made a very pretty save of a hard
drive from close in, but the opposing
team ultimately did the inevitable, and
the first tally came from a home forward in a questionable position. The
second goal came quickly after, from
a long shot which Davidson failed to
stop. The Varsity squad were putting
their utmost into the game, and made
several game tries towards the end
of the half.
The Vets got away to a fine start in
the second period, and for some moments our players were hemmed in
their own half, but doggedly came
back at iheir opponents with several
dangerous attacks. Cant struck the
uprights with a fine shot, and Evans'
shot just scraped past. The pace began to tell, however, and the G.W.V.A.
were soon back at 'Varsity's citadel,
although they could not increase their
lead. Butler made a beautiful save
of an almost certain goal, and U.B.C.
got going once more. The play ended
with bold teams tiring, with the Blue
and Gold doing most of the pressing.
U.B.C.  Lineup
Davidson; Disney and Buter; Fanning, Muylaert and Ledingham; Cant,
Martin and Evans. (Cornish, Underwood   and   Newcombe   failing   to   ap-
New Soccer Team
(/    v     Fail to Repeat
Playing in a drizzle on a slippery
surface at Cambie Street, the new
squad failed to duplicate its previous
success, going under to the strong Manchester team by the score of 3-1. The
latter team possesses some wonderful players, their right wing pair being especially clever. Varsity surprised the Manchester squad by beating off their initial attack, and the
Blue and Gold forwards rushed the
play, Smith opening the scoring from
close in. From this period the pace
grew very hot, and there was little
very dangerous, but our defence was
to give or take. Manchester was often
excellent, and by sheer determination
held the clever forwards out till almost the end of the half, when a low
drive from close in gave Sutherland
no chance. The Manchester fellows
opened the second half in whirlwind
style, registering the second counter
of the game within a few minutes,
when a long drive from about forty
yards slipped over Sutherland's hands.
Manchester was doing all the pressing,
and our insides did not help their
halves enough, with the result that
the former found it very exhausting
to break up the clever combination
plays of the wing men and the insides,
and were much overworked. The backs
were playing a fine game, and came
to the rescue on several occasions.
Play was mostly in Varsity territory.
The last goal came from a penalty
from a charge by Davies which happened dangerously near the line. From
this point Varsity tried to fight back,
and strained every effort to even up
matters, the end of the game finding
everyone tired and exhausted from
the heavy going.
The Lineup
Sutherland; Moffat and Heaslip;
Miller, Ledingham and Taylor; Smith,
Dynes,   Partridge,   Black  and   Davies.
FROSH DEFEAT
^ INTERMEDIATES
Varsity Frosh defeated Varsity Intermediates by a score of 5-3. From
this score one would think that uie
play was very even. This was not
the case. The Freshmen out-played
Intermediates in all divisions of the
game. Their forwards were better,
while their three-quarter line was in a
different class altogether. Their only
fault was the tendency of the threes
to play too far apart. In their next
'encounter with Rowing Club they
should make a very good showing.
During the first half the play was
seldom out of the Intermediates territory. The Frosh made several dangerous rushes. After a nice three-
quarter run Gustafson went over near
the corner. He converted from that
very difficult angle.
In the second half the Frosh held
the Intermediates on their side of the
line for the greater part of the time.
The Intermediates broke away twice
and in their first rush were successful
in getting the ball over. They failed
to convert.
Gustafson and Tupper played an excellent game on the three-quarter line.
They were in the play all the time
and made some fine runs by their
good combination work.
Frosh Team-r-Brown, Noble, Sparks,
Hall, Seymore, Rogers, White, Grant,
Phillips, Kelley, Casselman, Gustafson, Tupper, Ingledew, McLean.
Intermediate Team—Hatch, Hardie,
Lugat, Harkness, Bain, Hunter, McPherson, Goodwin, Edgett, Lewis, Mathews, Demidoff, Morgan, Taylor,
Gross.
\M
GRASS HOCKEY fAcL ,'
Burnaby trimmed the new Varsity
grass hockey team by a score of six
goals to nil on Saturday. Three goals
were scored by the opposing squad in
each period, Varsity's back division
being very weak. However new
material is at hand and with a good
practice, the next game should be a
victory for the home squad.
A
nnette says—
Combining the qualities that
make for a perfect glove—fit,
quality and wearability—Trefousse exploits the eight and
twelve-button lengths of beautiful French suede, pique sewn
and embroidered points, in the
popular beaver and grey ones
for   $5.00   and   $5.50.
• *    •
The pendulum of Fashion
swings to white cashable French
suede gloves for evening wear.
Twelve and sixteen-button
lengths are $4.25 and $5.25 respectively.
• m     **
A seasonable topic — warm
and comfy Beacon Cloth Dressing Gowns in all the lovely floral and conventional patterns of
blue, rose, and cream with satin
cords and bindings. There is
some temptation to get up these
nippy mornings when one may
slip into a wooly dressing gown
that defies draughts and the
chill  of winter air.
Drysdale's  Garment Shop
—Third Floor.
TSSci'
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0
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Chocolates
Home-made
Candy
Ice  Cream  and
all   Fountain
Drinks
(Afternoon
Teas)
We will be
pleased to give
special rates for
private parties,
special classes,
etc.
PRINTING
We give the very Best in  Service
and Quality
Dance Programmes, Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also    Personal   Stationery
COADE & DAUBNEY
628 Bboadwjy West
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New
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$ 17.75
'Tour Money's   Worth  or   Your Money
Back"
William DICK Lin"ted
45-47-49 Hastings Street East THE     UBYSSEY
Nov. ,8ts J92&
Sophs!
Did you ever stop to think how
much easier your work would be if
you had a nice Corona Typewriter
to do all your notes, reports,
themes and letters home? Sure,
you can learn to write. We'll
teach you.
$69.00 for the  latest model.
Graham Hirst Company
Sole Agents for B. C.
312   PENDER  ST.  W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C.
The    VARSITY    SHOP
For Correct Styles—
FASHION CRAFT
QUALITY CLOTHES
are away up  to  the minute
Our Prices Are Right
Thos. Foster & Co.
514   Granville St.
One Store Only
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. 377
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications
Board of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per  session.
For advertising rates apply
Business   Manager.     Phone  Fair.
4485
EDITORIAL   STAFF.
Editor-in-Chief    A.   L.   Wheeler
Senior  Editor    Cliff Dowling
Associate   Editors Miss  Grace   Smith
Miss  Helen   MacGill
T.  W.  Brown
Feature   Editor    Ralph   Mathews
Literary Editor  Miss Lucy Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Gwen  Stirling
Sporting Editor  J. Cowx
Chief Reporter  H.  C. MacCallum
BEPOB.TOBIAI,   STAFF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace, Dorothy Arkwright, A. Earle Birney, Florence Williams, Doris McKay, R. O. Norman, Dave Taylor, Sadie Boyles, R. W.
Ball,   Marion   Smith.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager  T. J. Keenan
Assist.   Bus.   Mgrs W.  H.  Sparks
Eric   Dunn
Circulation  Manager  F.  J.  Brand
Business   Assistants H.   C.   Etter
W.   L.   Hardie
D.   P.   Keenan
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
Miss Helen  MacGill
/;v   ^CONCERNING OTHERS
An inmate of one of the hospital
wards adjacent to the University has
written a letter to one of the daily
newspapers complaining that the patients have been bothered by the
shouting of the students during the
day and by the noise of cars and the
clanking of Klaxons during the night.
Familiarity breeds forgetfulness, and
students have become so familiar with
the knowledge that these adjoining
buildings are occupied by invalids that
there is a tendency to overlook the
fact that a very 'slight noise may disturb any of those people who may be
trying to sleep. On Friday nights
when the different social functions
are being held in the auditorium there
is no doubt a great deal of unnecessary disturbance created by automobiles in front of the Arts Building.
Now that the matter has been brought
to the attention of the students, we
believe that everyone will see to it
that the patients will be given less
cause for complaint in the future.
^        INTER-CLASS SPORTS
Once again we have with us the
round of inter-class sports. Perhaps
nothing makes so much for class-spirit
and consolidation as these activities,
but we may ask ourselves if we are
always wise in our methods of conducting them. What about the Miller
Cup team and the McKechnie Cup
men? We can see advantages in debarring them from participation in
inter-class sports, for the following
reasons:
In the first place, since there is less
skilled, more amateur play in interclass games, there is every likelihood
of their being injured, and so prevented from working for us in the civic
and Mainland games. We must be
represented by our best men and we
should keep them in condition for
their tests of strength with outside
teams, rather than allow them to run
the risk of injury at the hands of
those less familiar with the game.
Moreover, we must take into consideration that the class that boasts several Miller or McKechnie men holds
the balance of power.
These players have the advantage
of regular work-outs and are kept in
condition by a vigilant staff of trainers. The trainers cannot be asked to
set to work on two hundred men, to
prepare them for inter-class contests,
and yet that would be the only way
to   equalize   the   conditions   of   play.
Manifestly,-the class without one or
two rugby or soccer men of the Varsity teams labors under a tremendous
disadvantage.
If, then, these men were debarred
from participating in interclass sports
the classes themselves would stand
on a more equal footing, opportunity
would be afforded those who have
otherwise no chance at all to play,
and, most important of all, the men
on representative Varsity teams would
not be, as in the past, needlessly exposed to injury.
STUDENT'S   SUPPORT   OF   GAMES
The representatives of the University best known to the public are the
athletic teams. To do their best,
these teams must have the students
solidly behind them. By their reputation for clean play, their keen fighting spirit, and their self-sacrifice in
keeping strict training rules, the teams
merit the backing of every student.
It :s a matter of reproach to the student body that this support, as manifested by attendance at games, has
not been in evidence this year to the
extent that it should.
Members of the teams have testified that the tide of a hard game has
often been turned in their favor by
the encouragement, and even the
presence of their fellow-students on
the sidelines. It is not overstating
the case to say that the success of
University teams in past years has
been due in a, great measure to the
organized support given by the students.
The athletic history of the University has been exceedingly creditable.
In two years the soccer team rose
from obscurity to be the strongest
and most popular team on the •nam-
land of British Columbia. Twii^ In
succession the senior rugby team has
won the championship of the province. It is the duty of every student
to do his part in maintaining this admirable record by regular attendance
at games.
^ROWDING  IN  THE  CAFETERIA.
Between twelve and half-past the
cafeteria is invariably crowded. A
certain amount of congestion at this
time is unavoidable, but it would be
greatly lessened if those who have
come in early would leave their places
as soon as their meal is finished. Seating accommodation is limited, and it
would be very much appreciated if
the students would, at this rush hour,
remember the needs of others.
BY   THE   WAY
Some rash students started to tell
the Marshall that there would be only
half the students at the Mass Meeting
to-morrow and about a quarter at the
games on Saturday and Monday. The
remains of the above-mentioned student may be viewed in the Publications Office from 9 to 12 Saturday
morning.
We would like to suggest to the
Women's Lit. that while ink may be
the beverage for essays, even co-ed
debaters would probably prefer water.
There is no pity ever displayed towards students who hang around the
Cafeteria (after eating) with a hungry look on their faces.
Reid Prize.
R. L. Reid, Esq., K.C, offers his
annual prize of $25 to any undergraduate student of the University.
The prize will be awarded on the recommendation of the Department of
English, to the student who submits
the best essay on one of the following poets—William Henry Drummond,
Thomas Chandler, Halburton, Bliss
Carmen. The essay must be submitted to Mr. Larsen, on or before March
1st, 1924, and must be at least 1500
words in length.
LIONEL WARD
&   COMPANY., LTD.
Printers
of
Magazines
Papers
Annuals
and
All Business
and Society
Stationery
and Printing
Telephone Sey. 195
316-320  Homer  St.
Vancouver,  B.  C.
THIS   WEEK
It's   Men's    English
WOOL SOCKS
at
95c
pair
This is a wonderful
snap!
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
MEN'S  OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
BOYS!
Patronize Canada's Finest Barber
Shop. 18 Chairs. All First Class
Barbers   and   Manicurists.
The  ROGERS  BUILDING
WM. BRENNAN,  Proprietor
464 Granville St.      Phone  Sey.  785S-0
"Down the Marble Stairs"
University Tutorial
Classes
Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology, Botany, Languages
INDIVIDUAL OR
CLASS TUITION
Junior and Senior Matriculation and Normal
Entrance.
JOHN H. GREENWOOD,
Inter  LL.B.,  B.Sc.   (London)
Carter-Cotton Bldg., 2nd Floor
198 Hastings  St.  W.
Seymour 8976 Nov. 8th 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
THE GREAT-WEST
Life Insurance Co.
Head Office, Winnipeg1, Manitoba
A gentleman connected with
the Bank of Commerce in Vancouver, on Sept. 1st, 1908, had a
20 Payment Life policy issued
to him by The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
The quinquennial dividends
were accumulated to lessen the
number of payments.
On Sept. 1st, 1922, fourteen
years from the date of the policy
it was fully paid up, and he received in cash $20.65.
It was really a fourteen Payment Life.
He will receive dividends on
this paid up policy as long as he
lives.
640 Hastings Street West
Vancouver   Branch   Office
Pitman Shorthand
BUSINESS COLLEGE, Ltd.
422   RICHARDS  STREET
The business of a country is
carried on by the men and women
who have been trained in the
lines of commerce and industry.
We can give you all that is required to make you a successful
business   man  or  woman.
The   PITMAN   COLLEGE,   during    25    years,    has    successfully
trained  young people  to  hold  responsible  positions.
Cor. Hastings St.   Phone Sey. 9135
PHOTOGRAPHY
The kind of Portraits that you
and your friends will appreciate.
We make them at most reasonable prices.
Broadway Studio
BROADWAY  AND   MAIN
Phone Fairmont 3831
N.B.—Save 25% by letting us do
your films.
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and Heather St.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone Fair. 840
KODAKS
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Exercise Books
Looseleaf Covers
and Refills
Waterman's Pens
Eversharp Pencils
Phone:   Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co.
Funeral Directors
Private  Ambulance  Service
802 Broadway W., VANCOUVER
^Ww^&dtmaence
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
All contributions must be written
legibly, in ink, on one side of the paper
only. They must not exceed two hundred words in length, and must reach
this office not later than noon Monday,
in order to appear in the issue of the
following Thursday.
THE    CAFETERIA.
Tlie   Editor.
"The Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:
it is not my habit to make complaints,
but I feel justified in bringing to your
notice the tact that 1 have been "shortchanged' at the Cafeteria three times
since the term opened. I am not the
only sufferer, as I know of another who
lias been  treated in  the same manner.
Thanking you for your valuable space,
1  remain,
Yours sincerely,
—W.F.
AGAIN,   THE   BOOKSTORE.
1       Nov.   5th,   1923.
The   Editor,
"The   Ubyssey,"
Dear Sir:
T would take to draw to the attention
of your readers a practice of which
the book store is guilty. I am taking
a course for which books were bought
several years ago. There were one or
two of the old stock left. These had
been sold at sixty-five cents when they
first came in and I bought one of the
left-overs last week. The old price,
sixty-five cents, was written in the book,
hut the cashier said, "ninety cents
please." it appears that ninety cents
is a new price.
1 understand that the book store exists for our convenience, not to make
money—yet why should they take in
ninety cents for a book which cost them
less than sixty-five cents, for, I presume, we do not get them at quite cost
price.
if the book store is a financial venture,
I suppose it is entitled to make a quarter because of the rising of prices. If
it is, as I have understood, an institution
to serve the University, such practices
defeat its purpose.
llelieve me to remain.
Yours sincerely,
—H.M.G.
NOT   GUILTY!
Vancouver, B. C,
Nov. 5th, 1923
Ye   Editor,
"Ubyssey,"
The  University of British. Columbia
Honored Sir:
There was a notice in the Hall of the
Arts building last Friday, which consisted of a letter to the "Province" by
a Air. Mac Rae. This worthy gentleman
tried to convey the idea that wicked
and wayward Arts men were in the habit
of holding a "gathering of the clans"
around the fences enclosing the Isolation Wards of the General Hospital.
There they would indulge in a nightly
repertoire of choice howls, yells, and
dismal cat-calls. The plutocratic motor
owners helped off the good work by
holding down the horn buttons, as a
basic   accompaniment.
From the accounts of several patients
in the Hospital, the entire row is caused
by the "getting 'ome" of a certain type
of nurses, together with their Bacchanalian male friends, and that the University men as a body cannot be blamed
with the addition of that sign of waywardness to their already sadly attacked reputations.
Yours for blame in the right quarter,
—Merely a Student.
Exchange News
SWIMMING   NOTES
The members of the Women's Swimming Club are making favourable progress under their able coach, Mr. Bob
McKechnie. Swimmers are divided
into sections according to ability. The
classes are held in Chalmers Tank on
Wednesday from 5 to 6 and on Thursday from. 4 to 6.
GYM.  CLUB
The Gym Club is proving very popular this year, the membership now
being between 30 and 40. The class
is held in St. Geqrge's Gym on Monday
from 4:15 to 5:15, and much healthful exercise is enjoyed under the
leadership of Miss K. Duff-Stuart.
THE VARSITY, TORONTO,
Mr. Hoffman of the Student Relief
Movement tells of the difficulties attendant upon attainment of a college
education in Europe since the Great
War. European students are compelled to mine coal to work their way
through college. Some are what is
called "tramp students" who beg accommodation at farms around the cities which are the centre of their
studies. They walk five or six miles
every morning to college and do
chores about the farm in return for
their lodging.
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON.
University of Oregon has a Lost-
and-Found Bureau. Articles t'ouna are
dropped into campus mail containers
with the name of the finder and the
place where the article was picked up
attached. Mail carrier takes collection  to the Lost-and-Found  Bureau.
U. O. is holding a contest for the
best college song.
It seems to us that there would be
room for such a bureau in I .B.C. We
might be able to locate the elusive
fountain pen, etc., with less trouble.
GOOD   ORPHEUM   BILL.
De Lyle Alda, late Follies, favorite
in the Zeigfeld Midnight Frolic, comes
to the Orpheum this week at the head
of a company presenting "Sadie, One
of Those Girls." Miss Alda is now
in the prime of her vocal and physical perfection and is a charming star.
Harry Watson, Jr., in "The Young Kid
Battling Dugan"; the Hegedus Sisters
with Juan Reyes, premiere violiniste
and pianist; Moss & Frye, originators
of "How High Is Up"; Klein Brothers, in "Jest Moments"; Ed. Lambert
and Minnie Fish, in "Youth and Beauty"; the Beatz Equilibristic Wonders
and other features are the attractions
offered on this splendid bill, which offers matinees on Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday.
Learn to Dance
Tango, Fox Trot and Waltz
I<earn   \he   latest     Xew     York
steps   in   two   or three  lessons.
Classes   Friday   Nights.
Beginners may  start any time.
Jean SEARLE'S
PRIVATE   DANCING   SCHOOL
117  Empire  Building phone Sey.  22
603   HASTINGS   STREET   WEST
If you learn here you can dance anywhere.
Men's Suits
$25
' I ''HE true test of value is
in the service you get.
These suits are designed to
give the fullest possible return for the price asked. Materials are specially selected
for their good wearing qualities, and these come in neat
stripes, in shades of black,
brown, and grey. Fashioned
correctly in standard three-
button models, tailored properly, and finished with all
the care that is bestowed on
higher priced garments; all
sizes.     Splendid values.
Hudson's Bay
Company
Personal
Greeting
Cards
Distinctive, Original and
Exclusive Designs.
If you cannot call and select yours, phone Sey. 8000
and our representative will
call with sample book.
D
CLARKE & STUART
Co., Ltd.
..Educational Stationers and Printers..
550   SEYMOUR   ST.
Telephone Seymour 8000
MATINEES  THURS., Fill, and SATUR.
4            DATS 4        ==
Starting ssss
WED. NI»HT H|
Nov.   14 f=.
POPULAR PRICES Is
HARRY STODDARD AND HIS ORCHESTRA
In   "STREETS   OP   NEW   YORK"
HAT.T.,  EEMUTE and BETCE
CABIEB   and   CORHISK                gj
Douglas  Leavitt  and
Ruth Mary Lockwood
"Ourselves"
DEAGON and MACK          |
Smart Comedy  Offering                  53f
RAY   G.   HULING   presents   THE   CMWH  SEAIi	
John and La Petite
The Creative Dancers— 	
GIURAN and MARGUERITE
PICTURE   ATTRACTIONS
BOOK SEATS EARLY
CONCERT   ORCHESTRA
BOX OFFICE, SEY. 852! THE      UBYSSEY
Nov. 8th, 1923
Miss Emslie
Will give free lessons in art
needle work. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2 to 4 p.m., starting Thursday, November  1st.
See our lines in Silk Hose at
$1.25 per pair.
Phone  Fairmont 724
695   BROADWAY  WEST
Cor. Broadway and Heather St.
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature Painters
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cor.  5th  Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   176      -    VANCOUVER
"A Good Photograph speaks a
Language all Its Own
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345 Hastings St. West
All the Newest Models
in College Suits and Overcoats at Prices that are
right.
See us before   Buying
The Last   Word  On
XMAS CARDS
J. W. GEHRKE CO., LTD.
651   SEYMOLR  ST.
Arts  '25 Win* |
Interclass Debate
A well-attended meeting of me
Women's Lit. took place last Wednesday afternoon in the Auditorium when
Arts '24 and '25 held the first debate
of the Interclass series. The subject
under discussion was—"Resolved that
every action of man arises from a
selfish motive." Miss Winnie Cawthorne, president of the Society, took
the chair and introduced the speakers,
who were—Miss Margaret Forward
and Miss Eileen Harmon, Arts '24 ior
the negative, and Miss Elsie Rilance
and Miss Vera Mather, Arts '25 for
the affirmative.
The speakers for the affirmative
maintained that man's actions arise
from instinct, and instinct, being
fundamentally selfish, causes his actions to be the same. The speakers
for the negative upheld the argument
that man is a creature of intellect not
instinct.
After much interesting discussion
on both sides, the decision was finally given to Arts '25, the judges being Miss Ross, Mr. Wood and Mr.
Henderson, the latter in his address
giving some helpful and constructive
criticism.
Literary Corner
SONNET
in vain Time's cruel, beseiging cares
and tears
Against   thy   wondrous   youth   shall
spend their power;
In vain too, shall the ageing touch of
years,
And all the crowded worries of each
hour,
Thy cheeks, thy lips, thy soft caressing eyes
Assail   with   power   (that   comes   not
from above);
And with its hated might implant the
lies
That turn aside false seekers of thy
love;
For  thou  wilt  every  young and  fair
remain,
Within  one's  heart  whose  heart  but
beats for thee;
For   there,   despite   Time's   strength,
thy every stain
And every fault becomes a purity.
Thus  in  my  heart  art  thou  arrayed
for me,
In simple virtues, by Love's alchemy.
—R.O.N.,  Arts  '26.
VARSITY VS. ROWING CLUB
(Continued from Page i)
making a splendid run before being
forced out within 10 yards of the line.
Our men were now fighting on the line
until a free kick awarded against
Rowing Club relieved. Varsity now
pressed hard and after several minutes Gee went over with the ball, from
a scrum in front of the posts. Val
failed to convert.
Soon afterwards Giles broke away
and was only brought down by Domoney within 15 yards of our line. Rowing Club pressed but the Varsity forwards, by a fine display of dribbling
took the ball within their 25 yard line.
Rowing Club now forced the play until the threes broke away, dribbled
the ball to their line, Buchanan going
over. Val was most unfortunate in
his convert, the ball hitting the post
and bouncing back again. Play now
zig-zagged back and forth until just
before the final whistle when Rowing
Club forced the ball to within a few
feet of the line. Domoney saved, the
score remaining 10-4.
Barwis for Rowing Club and Gee
for Varsity were the most outstanding men of the day. Their drop-kicks
were spectacular, while their splendid kicking to touch gained many
yards.
Varsity Line-up—Gwyther, Price,
Brock, Greggor, Ramsell, Carlisle, Hislop; Cameron, Underhill, Ternan, Palmer, Purdy, Buchanan, Warren, Domoney.
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
B. C.ELECTRIC
THE FRENCH CLUB
The first meeting of the newly-formed French Club took place on Tuesday
evening, October 30th, at the home
of Mr. D. Baird, when French songs
and games provided delightfully informal entertainment. The Honorary
President, M. Delavault, expressed his
gratification at the students' keen interest in things French; and promised the club any help or encouragement he might be able to give them
in their proposed programme.
The President, Miss Paradis, announced that a name for the club
would be chosen at the next meeting,
which will be held on Tuesday evening, November 13th, at the home of
Miss Lucy Ingram, 335 Twelfth Avenue West.
FIRST DIVISION SOCCER
Continued from Page 1
would have meant goals at any other
time, while Lundie playing at inside
left had a glorious opportunity for a
sure goal, only to slip and fall.
The second half opened with Varsity still pressing and except for occasional spurts the I. L. A. were seldom in the picture. Wilkinson broke
through repeatedly for what looked
like sure counters, only to miss the
goal by inches. At last, Tommy did
net a pretty shot, but Referee Murphy
ruled offside.
Play now became a little rougher,
both Wilkinson and Buckley were hurt
and forced to retire for a few minutes. Tommy was fouled just as he
was breaking through, a little outside
of the penalty area, but nothing resulted from the kick. With only a
few minutes to go, Forgie, the winner's centre, dribbled the ball down
the field, and drew out both Crute and
Mosher with a shot that was intended
for goal, but went wide. Kerr dashed
in from what appeared to be a decidedly offside position and netted the
pigskin. Mosher had no chance to
save as he was at the other end of
the goal.
It was the hardest game to lose that
the team has met with yet, but it
speaks well for the spirit of the squad
that they finished the game still striving to score, although it was impossible to equalize in so short a time.
Varsity by its exhibition of good
sportmanship on Saturday went far
to establish itself as the most popular
team in first division circles.
The lineup was as follows: —
Mosher, Baker, Crute, Buckley, Phillips, Shields, Huestis, Lundie, Bryn-
dolson, Wilkinson and Emery.
■Dancing-
Get  Your  Next
HAT or     CAP
at
LINFORTH'S
Formerly
RICHARDSON   &  POTTS
417 Granville St.
Mt. Pleasant Methodist
Church
Tenth Ave. and Ontario Street
Minister—Rev.   O.   M.   Sanford
Out   of   Town   Students   Specially
"Welcome
Good Music      Interesting Sermons
Friendly Greeting
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD SPEAKERS
Drop in and ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OF
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814    605 Dunsmuir St.
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
□
2558 Heather St.
Dancing
Private and  Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
Alexander Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Saturday Evenings
Our   new   Augmented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features all the latest dance hits.
804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House Nov. 8th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
MUCK-A-MUCK
The Weather is going to be good and our policy is to see
that  everyone goes to the  "Big Games."
Sra
^~®~v.
Another Opening
He was sent to college to get an
education. After four years this is
what he learned: The latest fox-trot
steps, how to climb the stairs quietly
at three A.M., the words of several
popular songs, how to smoke cigarettes in the manner of the Shiek, that
a good hockey player cuts more ice
than a Rhodes Scholar, that the Lily
of the Field is truly an admirable
flower. He graduated and was a great
success—as a  doorman.
3=
Jubilee    Sale    Value    in
Ladies' Canton Crepe,
Satin and Silk Velvet
Dresses at $25.00.
You are almost assured of
a style to please you, there
being straight line, long-
waisted effects, over-waist effects, draped models and side
pleated dresses in many variations. Materials are all
heavy qualities that ensure
service and satisfactory
wear. Colors, Navy and
Black; also a few in lighter
colorings, Sizes 16 to 44.
Special Jubilee Price, $25.00
David Spencer
Ltd.
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods  and   Bicycle
Dealer
957 Granville Street
A Crookitorial
So many truths were brought to
public light last week in the publication of THE CROOK, that the Post
Office has forced it to cease publication for the present. But one of the
prophets has said somewhere or
other that "You can't keep a good rag
down."
Wifey (from above): "I'll be ready
in a minute."
Hubby  (a little later):    "No hurry
now, dear, I've got to shave again."
—The Gateway.
QUESTIONS
Some  one  asked  me:   "What  makes
the world so bright?"
And nothing did I say,
But gazed into the eyes where shines
the light
That turns night into day.
Some one asked me: "Has music any
soul ?"
And nothing did I say,
But listened to the voice that took its
toll
In hearts bent to its sway.
Some one asked me, "Who is the biggest  Ass?"
And nothing did I say,
But dropped my head, came back to
THE FOOL MUST ALWAYS PAY!
—R.O.N., Arts '26
'25 CLASS PARTY
Who was the Princess in rose?
*       •       •
Who was the tall man who helped
Lee's orchestra along? We wonder if
he could have done as well on the
saxophone.
MUCKLETS
"Bunk," said the sailor as he rolled
in.
Do not yield to temptation. Wait
until something better comes along.
No girl buries her nose so deeply in
books that she can't get at it with a
powder puff.
"That's the Hell of it," said Dante
as he finished the first part of the Inferno.
To find the number of pieces of
spaghetti on your plate, add the ends
and divide by two.
Fresh: I can't go to this dance tonight.   My trunks haven't come yet.
Soph: Good Lord, what kind of a
dance do you think this is?
The Cynic Says
We expect the first club-women
were the wives of cave-men.
Some girls leave home—others are
left home.
The latest love game—tennis courting.
A waving hand gathers many hair
nets.
It seems too bad that fat girls have
such slim chances.
Do   right  and  fear  no   man—don't
write and .    .    .    now guess.
More
His socks were full of holes, but
she didn't give a darn.
The advertisement tells us to "Keep
that school-girl complexion," but we
always brush it off our coat the next
morning.
Who is the Freshette whose modesty received a severe shock when
she perceived an ore dressing in the
Mining  building?
People who blow their own horn
are  becoming too too  common.
To be bracketed with a kittenish
old maid is a catastrophe.
It's a good landlady who knows her
own roomers.
The Bible says the poor shall never
want bread—which is about the truth
nowadays.
A man in a strange town should
grasp the skirts of happy chance.
It seems strange but the boarding-
house steak that is tendered is usually
tough.
Our girl called up the bank today
and found that we were of no account.
Lots of men would rather have their
heads covered with light hair than
have them covered with hair lightly.
All work and no play makes John
a dumb boy.
You can't kiu her Dad—he's just
you, only wiser, and, perched on the
stair-landing, he has the drop on you.
Essay means to try, hence all essays are trials.
|fB*-^r^**v^*^^
IN   THE   CLASSROOM
Now I sit me down to sleep
The lecture's dry, the subject's deep.
If he should quit before I wake
Gimme a punch for goodness' sake.
* *   •
"I see the love light in your face,"
He said as in a dream.
The co-ed seized her vanity case
And cried "Darn that cold cream."
* »   »
Mike: "How do you keep your lips
from getting chapped this cold weather?"
Ike:    "Cold Cream."
Mike:    "Didn't know you had any."
Ike:    "Haven't but my gal has."
DISTURBING
There was a young lady named Astor
Whose clothes fitted her like a plaster,
When she happened to sneeze,
She felt a cold breeze,
And knew she had met with disaster.
See You At The Big Gaines
Naturally
I would like to go out this evening
And stray from the  straight narrow
path
But my clothes are a sight
And it's Saturday night
And besides I must study my math.
But at least I can call up and talk
Postponing the idea of math
I called up all right
But it's Saturday night
And—oh   yes—she   was   taking   her
bath.
IN-VIC-TUS
10% Discount
to all U. B. C. Students on presentation of this add for Footwear purchased at our Stores.
WILSON'S
Twin Shoe Stores
157-159 Hastings Street West
Just  Arrived!
ART SILK
KNITTED TIES
1,000 different patterns to
choose from.    Special at
75c
FLANOLA SHIRT
The sensible shirt.    Wears like
flannel.    Neat stripe effects.
$2.25
Wear  a  Mann's  Shirt
Mann's Men's Wear
Specialty Shops
411-474 Granville St THE     UBYSSEY
Nov. 8th, 1923
CLUBB&STEWART
LIMITED
Just opened up
New Shipment of
Young Men's
Tuxedo Suits
Sale  price
$39.75
Also Complete Stock of
Full Dress Shirts, Ties,
Collars, Gloves, and Silk
Hosiery, all at sale price
during our "Reorganization Sale."
Clubb & Stewart
LIMITED
QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing for all
the Social Fundions
of the School
Term
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
137  PENDER   STREET,  WEST
Wilbur G. Grant
A.  T. C. M.
TEACHER OF PIANO
Organist and Choirmaster
First Baptist Church
Studio:      2213  Granville  Street
PHONE BAYVIEW 3140-R
GUSHES TO GUSSIE
Concerning the Arts
Class Party.
By Leonora.
'25
"Oh, Gussie! Gussie! I had the
most wonderful time at the Arts '25
party Friday night that you ever could
imagine. Come over here and I'll tell
you about it, dear. You know that rose
taffeta dress of mine with the bead
work down the front? Well, I wore
it, and just think, Gussie, four boys
asked especially to be introduced to
me. Oh, it certainly was the wonder-
fulest party, far better than those tame
affairs we used to have over at Victoria College last year. Do you know,
Gussie, I got the cutest, sweetest, love-
able little fellow in the draw you ever
saw; he was just a perfect dear, and
such a wonderful dancer, too. But
the music and floor were so delightful that nobody could help from dancing well. In one medley there, as they
played the jerky strains of Conn's
banana song you could just close your
eyes and imagine you were listening
to Chopin.
"And, oh, Gussie, I must tell you
about the funniest thing that happened at supper time. You know they
served it in that sloping room, Room
'Z' isn't it? Anyway, it doesn't matter; about halfway through, the president of the class got up and told us
that this was Mr. Tubias Shore's birthday (I think it was Tubias), and he
said that he thought we should congratulate him. Everybody clapped and
cheered like everything. Tubias, who
was standing to one side, looked
awfully embarrassed and blushed like
a rose, and put his finger in the corner of his mouth, and looked timidly
down at his dancing pumps. I felt
awfully sorry for the poor boy because
he seemed to be such a deer. You see,
Gussie, it was sort of the Birthday of
the Infanta.
"But I haven't told you about Mr.
Wood, yet, have I, Gussie? You know
he's the Honour'ry President of the
class, and he's just the dearest, nicest
man you could wish to meet. Well,
Gussie, after supper nothing would do
but they'd get Freddie, as they call
him, to play the piano for a dance. You
know most of these profs can't do
anything like that, but he certainly
can, and do you know, Gussie, he played far better than any of those Amur-
rican vaudeville stars we used to hear
over at the Royal Victoria. After he
had finished, the class gave him a
college yell, I think they called it a
Firework or something like that. Gussie! I believe I'm getting a crush on
that man.
"There was just a couple more
dances after that, and then we all
went home with our partners. You
can't imagine what a perfect dear mine
was. But I don't think I'd better tell
you all the lovely things that happened
on the way home, because you see,—
well, you know, you're not quite so
old as I am, Gussie, dear."
S. C.  M.—WOMEN'S  SECTION
So far, two study groups have been
formed, and will be held at the following hours—the first every Tuesday from 9 to 10, in Miss Bollert's Office, led by Miss S. Thrupp; the second on the same day from 10 to 11,
in Dr. Eastman's Office, conducted by
Miss M. Osterhout.
Other groups will be organized
later, for the convenience of those
students who cannot attend those already under way.
LIONEL. WARD * COMPANY. LTD..     e>M
^Vancouver Institute.
"Africa and the Zimbabwe Ruins"
was the title of an interesting lecture
delivered under the auspices of the
Vancouver Institute by Mr. W. Rl/Dun-
lop last Thursday evening. Mr. Dunlop has been a resident of Natal for
over twenty years and was therefore
able to give first hand information
concerning not only these ruins nut
also as regards the life and aims of
the South African natives.
The speaker began by summarizing
the history of the Dark Continent
from the classic times of Hannibal
and the Ptolemies to the modern era.
He also referred to the friendship of
the Boers in the recent war, declaring it a test of British government.
The historic relics at Zimbabwe
were graphically described and the.
two theories regarding their origin
set forward in detail by the lecturer.
One of these hypotheses—which claimed that the ruins were the product of
an advanced native race of medieval
times—Mr. Dunlop declared to be unsatisfactory and proceeded to advance
convincing arguments in favour of
the other.
According to this latter proposal,
the ruins are the remains of scientifically-built structures erected and
used by some unknown tribe of the
ancient Phoenicians for the purpose
Of exporting the immense amount of
gold that was being mined in the
country at the time.
VOCATIONAL  LECTURE.
Following the precedent established last year, the Women's Undergraduate Society will hold a series-of
Vocational Lectures on subjects of
vital interest to the women of the
University. The object of the lectures is to give practical information
concerning training, salaries, and opportunities in the various occupations
open  to women.
This year the lectures, instead of
taking the form of a conference extending over three consecutive days,
will be held at intervals during the
year. The first one will take place in
the Auditorium at noon on Friday,
November 16.
In courtesy to the speakers, who
are putting themselves to the inconvenience of giving noon lectures, the
women can do nothing less than show
their appreciation by attending the
meetings.
The Week's Events
Thursday,   Nov.  8—Science  '27   Class
Party, 9 p.m. Willow Hall.
Vancouver   Institute   Lecture,   8:15
p.m., Physics Building.
Subject:    Shakespeare  as  a  Musician by Mrs. Rees-Thomas.
Friday,    Nov.    9—Mass    Meeting    at
Noon.
Saturday, Nov. 10—Rugby, Varsity vs.
Victoria at Victoria.
2nd SOCCER TEAM VS. MAC AND
MAC,   McBRIDE   PARK.
Sunday, Nov. 11—Outdoors Club meet
at North Van. Ferry at 8:20 a.m.
Monday,  Nov.  12—Rugby, Varsity vs.
Vancouver.
SOCCER,   VARSITY   JUNIORS   VS.
SOUTH   HILL,   WILSON   PARK.
Tuesday, Now. 13—Arts Dance at Lester Court.
Wednesday, Nov. 14—Literary Society
Auditorium  8:15  p.m.
Debate:    The Vote for East Indians.
Dark Brown
Suits
in a nice quality plain cloth,
well cut and tailored, in two
smart models, double breast
and     one - button      straight
front.
$25
Also  in   Plain   Dark   Green.
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.   Homer  arid Hastings
1020 had a
Badminton
built to
drawings
supplied
by one of
the big
men in the
game
It   gives  more
speed with
accuracy
in  placing.
lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
Wholesale   and  Retail
1020   GRANVILLE   ST.
EVANS & HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
IIIW.IS.IIIWIWH.1****^
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines ~
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St.
PHONE SEY. 189
PRINTERS,  318  HOMER ST.,  VANCOUVER,  B. C.

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