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The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1960

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 LOVE
MONEY
and
THE U8YSSSY
FREEDOM
of the
PRESS
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1960
No. 37
THESE  PEOPLE  REFUSED
A FREE STUDENT PRESS
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
By IRENE FRAZER
CUP Editor
; The AMS chose Monday night
to deny the Ubyssey editorial
freedom because of an antiquated stipulation in its constitution.
A motion that the AMS adopt
the charter of the student press
in Canada was defeated on the
grounds that the charter is repugnant to the AMS constitution.
The charter, published in the
Ubyssey, Jan. 8, states that
I'while the student press is a
function of the student government or of the university administration, this should in no
way be allowed to] impair the
freedom of the student press."
This charter, which was
passed by a unanimous vote of
all 24 member papers of the
CUP, is based to a great extent
on the constitutions of both the
student press of the U.S.A. and
-of the World Student Press.
In theory, the AMS is able to
dictate every word whicl^ is
printed in the Ubyssey because
it is the publisher. ' '■'
Hence it cannot recognize the
section of the charter which
calls for complete editorial freedom.
NO
There is no suggestion that
the AMS does in fact dictate
editorial policy—only that it-is
able to. - •
However, since the AMS holds
the purse strings, it does not, of
course, wish to , relinquish control.
The AMS fears a situation in
which the Ubyssey, being solely
responsible for its content, •
should print libellous material.
This would result in the suihg
of the AMS, as publisher.
It is the opinion of the editorial board (with the exception
of one unrealistic dissenter) that
the AMS's refusal of the charter, with no attempt at a reasonable solution, is typical of the
uncompromising nature if this
administrative body,
soul which is, at present,
swaddled  in foam  rubber.   Dr.
Surely a logical solution lies
in this:
1. that the AMS change the
constitution to allow the
Ubyssey editorial freedom,
2. that the AMS and the editorial board accept the
code of ethics drawn up by
the CUP as it applies to
the Ubyssey (which is aV
ready the case), .
3. that tiie AMS approve as
NO
NO
members  of the   editorial
board  only those  individuals  who are; responsible
in AMS opinion.
The result would be a situa^
tion  wherein  the  Ubyssey can
have both revenue and complete
editorial freedom While the AMS
having   exercised  discretion  in-
selecting an editorial board, can
allow these 'individuals freedom
with an easy conscience.
Perhaps, had the CUP charter not been contrary in some
respects to the AMS constitution, some persons on our student council, who have been
influenced by interested persons
outside the Ubyssey and officially unconnected with student
council deliberations, would still
have voted to condemn the charter.
Regrettably, UBC is not the
only Canadian university where
Nesbitt Prophesies
Another Socred Win
By DICK SCHULER
The Social Credit Government
will not fall apart at the next
provincial election, Vancouver
Sun columnist James Nesbitt
said Tuesday at the Progressive
Conservative Club,
"I am not horrified at our government; public welfare has improved," Mr. Nesbitt told an
audience of 65 students. He emphasized that he is not a politician and cannot, as a journalist,
be for one party and against
another.
He told his audiece some of
his reminiscences as a long-time
political observer in the provincial capital. He found, among
others, Mrs. Rolston and Duff
Patullo to be the most colorful
politicians in recent B.C. history.
As for the present govern:
ment: "I find most governments
are adequate to the times in
which they live. I honestly don't
think Premier Bennett has any
ulterior motive in his hydro-
power policy. He is full of life
and color and has a great sense
of drama. But I don't think the
government is corrupt."
"I don't think the Conserva-"
tives and Liberals stand a chance
in the next election," said Mr.
Nesbitt," because there are too
many parties and the CCF. is
still the hard core of the opposition. The Conservatives
can't throw out Mr. Bennett; I
feel quite positive about that."
Mr. Nesbitt continued that
there would be more fun and
color in the Legislature if the
Liberal and Conservative leaders
would at least have a seat there.
But in their present position
they are virtually impotent; no-
See NESBITT
(Continued on Page 8)
HANS-KARL PILTZ
Lecturing   music   professor.
The newly, established U.B.C.
Collegium Musicum will begin
a series of demonstrated lectures
soon.
The lectures, which are open
to the public, will be given by
Hans-Karl Piltz of the university's music department, in the
Music building on University
boulevard near the West Mall.
The three lectures will be
given on January 29, February
19, and March 25. Their respective subjects will be, "The
Violo as a Solo Instrument in
the Baroque," "Chamber Music
in the Early Classic period," and
"Music of the Early Renaissance1."
NO
freedom of the press has been
suppressed.
At the University of Ottawa,
the student council came close
to censuring one of the editors
of its French - language paper,
La Rotonde, who had demanded
tHte drafting of the charter.
-,. Michel Beaubien told delegates to the CUP Conference
thatsSuch a charter was essential
because of "certain influences
that oblige French-language papers to , adopt certain attitudes
for fear of reprisals."
After some argument, the
Council passed a motion stating
that it considered Beaubien's
statement as a personal opinion
and that it did not reflect those
of the Council even after the
intercession Of Jean Carriers,
Editor-in-Chief of La Rotonde in
Beaubien's behalf.
The attempted censure is the
latest in a long series of donny-
brooks between the Council and
La Rotonde, which have resulted in the firing of five student
editors in the past two years.
The Students' Executive Coun
cil of McGill University approve
ed the charter "in principle,"
but balked at incorporating a
guarantee of press freedom into
its constitution.
Editor-in-chief of the McGill
Daily, Roger Phillips, pointed
out that any freedom of the
paper at present is completely ?
nullified since the council is
fhee to change the McGill Daily
constitution when it wishes.
He termed councifs failure te
assert editorial freedom in the
student society constitution
"rather incongruous.'*
In the opinion of th^; Ubyssey's
editorial board, the {matter of
freedom of the press cannot be
under-rated, especially at the
level of the university paper
i which has often been termed
the last out-post of one of the
freedoms so essential to our democratic heritage.
The mlere fact that all the
member universities of the CUP
were in complete agreement in
drawing up the new constitution .
is indicative of its importance to
all students everywhere.
Nominations For AMS
Presidency Now Open
Nominations for next year's
AMS President are now open.
Also included on the first
slate will be the positions of
Secretary, First Member, and
Undergraduate Society Chairman. Nominations for these open
Wednesday next week.
Nominations for the first slate
close Thursday, February 4 at
4:00.
Voting takes place on Wednesday, February 10.
Nominations for the second
slate close Thursday, February
11.
Positions to be filled on this
slate are Treasurer, Second
Member, and the Presidents of
MA1A, WAA, and AWS.
Voting takes place on Wednesday, February 17.
Nominations for the positions
of Co - ordinator of Activities,
Chairman of UCC, Vice President, and Executive Member
close on Thursday, February 1&.
Voting on the third slate is
scheduled for Wednesday, February 24.
Other councillors and student
officials will be appointed at the
joint council meetings in March.
'tween classes
UCC GENERAL MEETING
Election of Vice president and
P.R.O. Eu 205.
* *      * ,
WORLD UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
"Japan's Place in the World
Today" is the topic for panel
discussion today at noon in Buchanan 104. Moderator will be
Prof. R. P. Dore of the Asia*
Studies Department.
* *      * j
DEBATING UNION
General meeting 12:30 Thursday, Bu. 222.
(continued on page 4 i
See TWEEN CLASSES        f PAGE TWO
THE    UpYSSEY
Thursday, January .21, 1960
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
-Published-three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor Elaine Bissett
Managing Editor Del Warren
News Editor   John Russeil
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
Photography Editor _ Roger McAfee
[ Senior Editors:   Irene Frazer and Frank Findenigg
Reporters and Desk:
Derek Allen, Fred Fletcher, Pegi McCaUum,  Allen Graves,
Bob  Hendriokson,   Diane  Greenall,  Pete  McLaurin,. Gary
Keenan,   Jeanie   Dunbar,   Brad  Crawford,   Jerry   pirie,
Hildegarde, Dick Schuler, John Russell, Tallulah, Sir
Vladim r Elias Von Romanchych, Sabrina, our "sine
quo non", Bill Rainer, and other unidentifiable objects.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
On   Breaking  the   Ice
The dunking which three unfortunate individuals received
Wednesday noon indicates on© thing: the little boys with their
plaintive "who are we?" and equally plaintive reply, "we are
the Engineers, etc.", are growing up. The short entertainment
they provided Wednesday was original and executed with
finesse. The usual "heave-ho" dunking was discarded, and
none too soon, for it had reached the point where it was
merely an inconvenience to the victims and a bore to the
spectators.
'     The individuals responsible for capturing the Editor did
not, as they were wont to do in the past, rush down to the
. T^vssey offices, rending destruction in every direction^ but
thjey waited patiently for the Editor to come to them—which
ri6 "unwittingly did.
Jt must fee sai4, however, that these Barnums and Baileys
<VS>uld be a little more original in their choice of victims. Why
njp-t carefully select a few of the more apathetic councillors?
A. good di,p, in ice water just might wake them up.
m£ompe4,©>nce
The complaints which have reached this offifce through
yarious channels in connection with the marking system generally used on this campus bring a few questions to mind. Why
is. it that when a student wishes to ask his instructor why he
received a particularly low marlc on his examination, the in-
st^rjictor is unable to supply the answer? Why does the instructor, in many instances, revise the mark in the student's favor?
Is tjiis an admission that perhaps the highly paid marker might
n,ot know his business? How can a student receive widely different marks for essays which were written with approximately the same amount of ability and care?
Eerhaps a number of the markers don't know their business. Perhaps the jobs are indiscriminately hatnded out to any
aad- aU- who^ can produce a document with B.A. stamped on
it. Perhaps the time has come for an investigation of the entire
marking system.
A  Challenge  to  Duty
A number of faculty membeifs have been approached by
editors of the Ubyssay since September and asked if they would
like to submit articles for the Editorial page. Thus far we
haven't received ope and very, very few for other sections of.
the- paper. I suggest, then, that "lack of time" is just a poor
e«wse. I also suggest that these learned genlemen are more
cjoncefned with keeping their positions at UBC than they are
w-itih creating a little honest discussion.
Much as we would dislike to have a campus newspaper run
by hiembers of the faculty, we fail to see how any harm could
come from a fcmited number of penetrating articles written by
them. May this therefore serve as a warning: those of you who
have not as yet been approached, soon will be. And pletese
accep* the challenge: be bold! state your opinions and sign
your name! If you do, I'll wager that you are rebutted much
more on this page by students, than you are censored in the
offices of the powers that be.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
'ARMS AND THE MAN
By GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
January 21 st, 22nd, 23rd
UJQVERSITY AUDITORIUM - 8:30 P.M.
Reserved Seats - Student's Tickets $1.00 and 50c.
Auditorium Box Office^ 10:0$ aJg. ■ 4:30 p-in.
ft
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Stimulated:
I have been stirred by the
bastard outcrys of two disgruntled art students; this blue manifesto I cannot ignore and 1 hope
you will accept my humble
opinions on the standards of the
Ubyssey. Since this paper was
directed to "a definite minority" of thinkers, permit me as
an Arts student, not on your
staff, to bring up a few pointers.
I take it for granted that you
have read this bulletin and are
disturbed as I, at the trepid
impression it makes on an Arts-
man.
First, I must admit surprise
to the ingrown conflict which
Mr.. Nixon and Mr. Vickery
must have undergone to have
taken all that trouble to publish
their own little bellyaching m
an illegitimate sheet of misguided psychological  growth.
There are some points they
put forth which show ,that the
motive is frustrated social needs.
This attemjpt at a sensational
outburst, a private crusade, displays abnormal thinking; either
this or the unhappy duet have
failed to expand their ideas
through outside arguments.
They seem to have arrived at
their conclusions through bitter
self ■» resolution, in fact their
ideas seem to come from Victoria College fervor; without my
insults, what they consider is
the low quality of UbysSey,
however wrong, is sincere. I
leave off name calling, to discuss some of the thoughts that
Messrs. Nixon and Vickery have
developed in their thumbsuck-
ing; being their fellow Artsman
brings me into this intrique.
In the beginning, these two
have a somewhat conceited attitude that their statements were
not published merely because
they were '.'controversial". Humility is a virtue; maybe the
editors may have decided that
printing the letter would bring
too much shame to its authors.
Fortunately, the authors kept
carbon copies. If this pair felt
so strongly about the Ubyssey
I will be the first to defend/
(as I'm sure editors will) their
rights to contribute or to work
on the paper. They show valid
enthusiasm on the surface, and
they have good writing qualities.
They forget that the Ubssey is
also a public service paper, not
just an organ for the Artsman,
or the Raven. The Ubssey is
put out by unpaid students, who
unlike the duo dissenters, find
themselves enough sincere enthusiasm to SERVE. Responsibility starts where moaning and
groaning ends.
We all respect Vic College,
but the parallel Nixon draws
with it and UBC is inadequate
and prejudiced with pride. Economics differences between the
two are immense, and it doesn't
just stop- at UBC being ten times
the size of Vic College. The circulation problems of representation and finance are such that
the Ubyssey cannot ignore them.
I suggest the pair work for the
paper and meet some of the
problems.
When reading their beefs, one
can't help , noticing that Mr.
Nixon and Mr. Vickery are senior arts students, a quality which
pops up in their arguments, and
their preferences for intellectual
discussion and the Critics' Page.
Can this be snobbery? Critical,
literary and intellecty articles
are fine for Arts students, and
for all the faculties for that
matter, hut let's not be narrow-
minded, there are other things
in life and there are other interests, which may appeal to
more and still be high in quality. Ubyssey is plenty adequate
in critical and literary topics,
though they may be low in
quality. Perhaps Mr. Nixon
means better journalism, which
the Ubyssey could certainly use.
Mr. Nixon does have good reason to dislike the petty "tug-of-
war" articles, perhaps he should
have pointed out the excess of
satirical captions, wisecracks
penny ante puns and witty remarks. I doubt if making the
paper stimulating through more
aesthis articles would be a reasonable basis for  improvement.
Mr. Nixon questions the necessity of advertising in the paper.
If a paper won't be good with
ads in it, it won't foe any better
without the ads. If the staff says
advertising is necessary for the
papers expenses, so what, the
A.M.S. is not aplenty with
money, nor is the University.
Mr. Nixon says Ubyssey must
not cater to the masses; that
". . . you must bring the level
of the students up to the quality of your newspaper . . . you
do not let them degrade the
level of newspaper down to average student, to please everybody ... result . . . you do not
stimulate . . . you stagnate their
minds . . . so that the next time
there is even lower average to
CATER to. . . HENCE ... a
lower quality newspaper." There
is a basis for Mr. Nixons arguments, but his stepping out of
bounds to consider that "catering to the masses" is now the
mere object. Service and journalism are the good qualities in a
paper, it is not meant to be a
literary paper. Ubyssey has
made honest, but unsuccessful
and clumsy attempts to improve its standards.
Evidently Mr. Nixon is anti-
sports. To judge a paper solely
on its ability to stimulate (his)
thinking is unfair. To call fo»
the dropping of sports, Nixon's
"animal activities", and "why
should we be concerned with
sports at all" is as narrow-minded as an liberal educated Arts-
man can get. Other items on
Mr. Nixon's void: ". . . Are we
not past the comic book stage?
(how trite) . . . devote the paper
mainly to critical articles . . ."
I may not be fair to Mr. Nixon's
article by clipping out his big
boners, but the essential bitterness and mistaken grievances
are too persistent to ignore, and
too many to put all down. This
is not the time to argue brain
v.s. brawns, etc., but Nixon
seems to have reduced the issues by as much as I have reduced his article into so many
excerpts.
Going on to Mr. Vicky's article "Oh Universal Education"
It sure is some high and mighty
Artsman's attitude,   though  his
mistakes come mostly from midget thinking. He has taken for
truth basic assumptions which
are unjust to his conclusions.
He first assumes that universal
education (everybody goes to
school) seeks to be "beneficial".
This establishes a nice basis for
a skillful debater; could not education be otherwise in its objectives? survival, achievement,
etc. Is it customary to think of
education as beneficial? Mr.
Vickery also blandly assumes
that New Yorker magazine has
the only literary merit, which
indicates that bourgeois culture
has been badly shaken. So what?
I hope I am not taking advantage in that Mr. Vickery is not
here to retort; but the fact is
when you talk about such topics
as these and arrive at set evaluations, it merely becomes personal hypothesis.
Now get this punch line: "...
Mickey Spillane and Erskine
Caldwell are our leading
authors." Later we get another
line of trite in the form of a
lurid epigram "Beyond a doubt,
Gresham's law is as applicable
to literature as to money."
These truisms don't stimulate,
they are interesting but they
don't stimulate. It does stimulate
interest into the autheor's antisocial psychology.
I see no reason why Messrs.
Nixon and Vickery or any one
else should stab Ubyssey in the
back with a disabled issuances.
Did they mean to stimulate interest or argument? Self glory?
B. LUM, Arts IV.
Editor,
Dear Sir:
HURRAH ! ! ! A revolt over
tbe library muddle.
Any action can only be an
improvement to the present indifference. Let us shoot all the
social    conveners    and    their
courts and  let  us   not forget
the stacks where also many of
these   old   talkative   and   subversive elements hang out.
"SILENTIUM"
'fWHO TALKS SHALL
PAY: ! ! !" ,
A SILENT OBSERVER.
The Editor,
Dear Sir:
Don't you and all the other
students really think that it
would be a wonderful thing
to donate Thunder to the cause
of research?
C. ADDAMS.
Editor,
Nothing in your paper has
nauseated us quite so much as
your recent repulsive articles on
that highly unnecessary item—
Barf. If you can't find anything
more intelligently inspired for
the Ubyssey than your repugnant dissertations on that subject may we suggest you discontinue the paper.
Unanimously, Us,
III ARTS.
Qtismiifin, (Ml £x-JCitAMi\
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND
YOUR 1960
HOMECOMING
• DATE: FRIDAY, JANUARY 22
• TIME: 8:00 -11:00 P.M.
• PRICE: TICKETS AT DOOR (25c)
Come and see your old Alma Mater shine in its
new surrounding.
SEE YOU THERE TOMORROW Thursday, January 21, 1960
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
By FRED FLETCHER
It says in the Brock Hall rules that there shall be no
eating in that building.
It says in the AMS constitution that there shall be no
gambling there.
It is now the middle of January and student officials
have at last proceeded far enough to decide that these
rules should be enforced.
One question remains: HOW?
Last Friday the Brock Management Committee passed
a motion directing the discipline committee to "enforce the
present regulation, that there be no eating in the Lounge,
the Link, and the Common Room".
This decision was brought on by the presence of
silverfish in the building. (For you non-entymologists,
silverfish are small, wingless insects which eat paper and
wood.) Discarded lunches, etc., attract them.
The discipline committee, of course, would like to
see the enforcement of this no eating rule in the hands
of the Brock Management Committee.
At any rate, no one seems to be quite sure who has
what power.
With things in this state, it will not be long before
the Brock denizens return to eating lunches on the premises, if indeed they ever stop. (Ed Note:—No action has
yet been taken.)
The state of food services on this campus leaves them
few other places to go.
Regarding the gambling situation, Pete Haskins has
now produced a report—and that's all.
What else can he do? We have no student.police force
to collect evidence for prosecuting this type of offence, and
one cannot expect councillors to go snooping around like
junior-grade private eyes.
I can just see President Meekison hiding in the card
room disguised as a waste-paper basket trying to cateh
someone in the act.
Also on the subject of discipline, Pete Haskins, discipline committee rep ton council, is trying to solve a somewhat more serious problem: Who put the -chickens in Mary
Bollert Hall?
faskins, who, unfortunately, lacks Scotland Yard train-
„, as the odious and difficult task of trying to identify
the perpetrators of this expensive and irresponsible prank.
If he is unsuccessful, and another such prank ruins
an agriculture experiment, there is every chance that the
matter will be taken from student hands and placed under
some more competent law enforcement body.
It is obvious that Haskins and his committee face an
almost impossible task.
The powers and the responsibilities of the committee
seem vague and uncertain.
Certainly, the enforcement of student laws on this
campus is inconsistent and chaotic.
-The   responsibility   for   solving   this   problem    rests
squarely on the shoulders of this year's council.
I suggest that they do something about it.
There is, however, every chance that the issue will be
handed over to the Haskins Commission for theoretical consideration.
I submit that concrete action is needed now!
#      *      *
COUNCIL QUICKIES
Council refused to approve the "Charter of the Student
Press in Canada". They felt that the wording was open to ■•
too many conflicting interpretations. They did approve the
payment of a fee for the spring term to Canadian University Press and the setting up of a cross-Canada ham radio
network for "fast FM" or whatever.
Dave Edgar's committee on student housing outside
the gates has moved quickly into high gear and expects
to take some action within three weeks.
Congratulations to the new Grad Class Executive:
Dave McGrath, president; John Leesing, vice-president;
Gerry McGavin, treasurer; Ray Smith, social convener;
and especially to secretary Jeri Wilson—because she's the
best looking.
President   MacKenzie   has   turned  thumbs   down   on
games of chance at the proposed spring carnival or fiesta.
Council has  decided to go through with the project
without gambling.
In reference to the question of income tax broached
here last week, a brief on the subject is being prepared by
NFCUS. Bill Miles, who is in charge of preparing the
brief, says that it will be a full treatment of the subject of
student finances.
*      #      #
It is my pleasure to announce that council PRO
Marilyn .Bernard is still hard at work publicizing UBC and
its problems throughout the province.
Well lookee here!—the card room's clean. Everything
has been swept out—even the furniture. The room has
been closed for the remainder of the week" as a result of
the chronically filthy condition. This will happen in other
places if litterbugs aren't stamped out.
UBC has made a bid for, and stands a good chance
of receiving, the host-ship of the largest NFCUS seminar
yet held.
How's  the   water?  Not  many students   would care to join Kerry White as he is lowered
into the murky depths of the much desecrated lily pond. ,—Phot by Earl Olsen.
Gullible Editor Lured
To Ingenious Reprisal
Kudos to the engineers! For
once they have executed a plan
showing organization, ingenuity,
and finesse.
Kerry White, Editor-in-Chief
of the Ubyssey, was abducted
and expertly dunked while following up a "Red Herring','
thrown to him by the now-thinking engineers.
The Ubyseey Editor-in-Chief
was picked up in transit from
his office. White was accused on
the spot of operating a newspaper in a negligent manner
and was sentenced to the pond.
It was noticed that White was
not wearing his inflatible Barf-
Bag as he was slowly lowered
into the jaws of the -cold, murky
water.
Fortunately he did not drown
and was eventually returned,
with his clothing dampened, but
not his spirits.
Following   a   short   meeting,.
Bill RodeBchuek, EUS President
Worker Falls
Not Listed
As Critical
*UBC construction crews today chalked up their second accident inside a week.
At 11:30 yesterday Craig
Blair, a workman on the library
extension construction, fell from
a scaffold and suffered head injuries.
He is now being treated in
Vancouver General Hospital for
head lacerations and possible
internal injury.
Hospital authorities describe
his condition as "satisfactory."
A spokesman for Grimwood
Construction, Blair's employers,
said he fell less than eight feet.
Blair was working on a scaffold inside the uncompleted
building, plastering a wall.
A fellow - worker, who was
with Blair on the scaffold and
saw him fall, is not sure of
what happened, but thinks Blair
stepped back too far.
Construction Superintendent
Conroy refused to allow Ubyssey
reporters and photographers to
see the scene of the accident.
declared the trial of Bernie
Papke, AUS. undercover agent,
would be heard. It is rumoured
that Papke had been detained
by the red-shirted inquisitors.
The charge was laid by persecutor Ray Smith. Papke was
given thirty seconds to defend
his case. Jerry Neilson, Jury
Chairman was then called upon
for the decision and announced
that the defendant was guilty.
Mr. Wayne Wickens, another
Aggie, was declared guilty of
resisting arrest. Both were sentenced to immersion in the Lily
Pond for their notorious crimes.
They were accompanied to
the site where a tripod had been
erected. Wickens was thrown in
immediately, owing to the brief
nature of his offence.
Papke, who had been charged
with high treason for his activities with the Aggies, was then
placed upon the seat of torture;
and subsequently wetted down.
Rodenchuck, it would appear
is striving to get his over-barfed
comrades to adopt a more adult
policy, in that they now carry
out their childish pranks at a
higher level, say infantile rather
than pre-natal. .
Perhaps the "slip-stick'WieM-
ing" kids have set a new criterion in campus humour. Aggies,
how about you? Chickens in
Mary Bollert Hall? Oh, come
now.
Ladies and gentlemen of the
University of British Columbia,
BEWARE. One can only conclude from the above resume
of events that the infamotts
members of the Engineering faculty are once again on the
rampage. Thp Ubyssey hereby
issues a warning to all students
of UBC — ON GUARD! — You
may be next!
Canada: CaM WiMwif
*      By EARLE BIRNEY
This is the case of a high-school land,
deadset in adolescence,
loud treble laughs and sudden fists,
bright cheeks, the gangling presence.
This boy is wonderful at sports
and physically quite healthy;
he's taken to church on Sunday still
and keeps his prurience stealthy.
He doesn't like books except about bears,
collects new coins, models his planes,
and never refuses a dare.
His uncle spoils him with candy, of course,
yet shouts him down when he talks at table.
You will note he's got some of his French mother's looks,
though he's not so witty and no more stable.
He's really much more like his father and yet
if you say so he'll pull a great face.
He wants to be different from everyone else
and daydreams of winning the global race.
Parents unmarried and living abroad,
relatives keen to bag the estate,
schizophrenia not excluded,
will he learn to grow up before it's too late?
Dr. Birney, one of Canada's
most distinguished authorities
on diseases of the soul, has accurately diagnosed the Canadian
malady and prescribed a treatment as well: unrelenting injections of satire and irony sufficient to stagger a horse; administered through needles,
pipes, bellows, tongs, etc.; in an
attempt  to reach the   patient's
soul which is, at present, swad*
died in foam rubber. Dr. Birney will read more of his
diagnosis and prescriptions on
Friday at 12:30 in Buchanan
100. Every one is invited to attend.
P.S. A paraphrase of the
above: The UBC Poetry Centre
will present Earle Birney, one
of Canada's leading poets, reading from his work, etc., etc. f»AGE FOUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 1960
ATTENTION ■ FIRST YEAR...
The Hat is Higher
Than Wide
Are You POSITIVE You
Are Safe From TB ?
Are You POSITIVE?
BE POSITIVE -HAVE YOUR FREE
IB SKIN TEST
UTS STAMP OUT TB
One of the biggest
threats to health in
British Columbia today is tuberculosis.
An average of 50
new, active cases of
the disease are found
every month, and
there are 21 ,500
known cases in the
province.
And since TB is a contagious disease,
every unknown case is a potential danger
to other citizens.
What's more, tuberculosis hits everyone's
pocketbook. It costs $15,000 to treat and
rehabilitate an average TB case and, since
treatment is given free by the government,
everybody helps pay for it through taxes.
The tragic thing about the high cost and
the suffering caused by tuberculosis is that
it is unnecessary.
FEEL SAFE
NOT SORRY
Have Your Free TB Skin Test
Make Your Appointment at the Health
Service Office - NOW!
CHRISTMAS SEALS FIGHT TB
UBC Supports 1960
World Refugee Year
UBC is conducting a fund
raising drive to aid refugee students.
This drive will be held during the week of January 25th
to 28th in conjunction with
World Refugee Year.
Mr. Chris Chataway, member
of   parliament   in   Britain   and
TWEEN CLASSES
(continued  from   page   1)
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Ross, speaking on "Words
and the Man-a study in Christian Communication" today Bu.
106.
* *       *
CHEMICAL  INSTITUTE
OF CANADA, UBC
STUDENT CHAPTER
Meeting Friday, January 22,
12:30 in Chem. 200. Faculty student debate. "Resolved that too
few students take Honours
Chemistry at U.B.C." Drs. McDowell and Hockstrasser of the
Chem. Dept. will participate.
* *      *
AFSU
French Film Friday noon, Bu.
102. Subject: Emile Zola-Vie et
oeuvre de l'ecrivain. (10c admission).
* '   *      * ■
OBNOVA
Important meeting Friday
noon, Bu. 216..All Greek-Catholic students please attend.
* *      *
BIOLOGY CLUB
Presents the famous German
Scientist Valerius Von Geist,
speaking on "The Moose of Wells
Gray Park," Friday 12:30 noon
in Biological Sciences 2321.
* *      .#
NFCUS
Applications forms for Interregional Scholarship Exchange
Plan are available from Registrar or NFCUS office, room 165,
BROCK.
* *       *
VOC
Steven's Pass tickets go on
sale today.
* »      *
DANCE CLUB
Dance Marathon Jan. 23, 12:00
noon to Midnight. Everybody
out, Big After Party for contestants  and club members.
* *      *
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Duplicate bridge tonight at
7:30 in Music Room (north
Brock). All welcome. Please be
on time.
* *      *
SOCIETY OF BACTERIOLOGY
Presents Dr. W. E. Razzell
from the B.C. Research Council
who will speak on the industrial
(continued on page 6)
See   TWEEN   CLASSES
famous B.E.'B. runner, wrote in
support of our proposed campaign. Mr. Chataway is one of
the original proponents of the
idea of holding a World Refugee Year.
Seventy countries are participating in the campaign to
raise funds during World Refugee Year.
In his letter to the Ubyssey
Mr. Chataway stated that the
refugee problem is the "most
outstanding problem to be tackled in 1960."
He also stressed the needs of
"millions of children growing
up in lifeless camps" and that
"we have only ourselves to
blame if these children' become
idlers and enemies of society."
"These people, these children,
should be on the conscience of
the world . . .", Mr. Chataway
wrote. "I hope that the men and
women of the University of
British Columbia will consider
that this is a matter with which
each one of them should be
concerned."
Help this starved and diseased refugee girl and hundreds
of thousands like her by supporting World Refugee Year
Campaigns. —United Nations photo.
TO VISIT CAMPUS
Robert Strachan, official
leader of the Opposition in the
Provincial Legislature, and several CCF MLA's are visiting
the campus tomorrow.
Because he showed an interest
in University affairs Strachan
was invited to view campus
facilities and see the work that
is being done in teaching and
research.
It can be assumed the MLA's
are coming» out here to arm
themselves with information
should the University situation
be debated   after  the   presenta
tion of the budget speech at tho
next sitting of the house.
They plan to get as many
views on campus problems as
is possible in their brief stay.
This will include a meeting
with the senior adminstration
officials, luncheon with members of the Students Council and
the University CCF Club and a
student address at noon hour.
He will also tour all campus
buildings including the gym,
residences and the science laboratories.
STUDENTS
SAVE   50%
DQ WASHING THE EASY WAY
WASH 25c
DRY 10c
University Laundromat
4460 West 10th Aye.
OPEN       24      HOURS Thursday, January 21, 1960
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Happy Home-eds Are Co-eds
Home Ec Stresses
Family Living
By SHEILA FARRINGTON
Ubyssey Features Writer
Most Home Ec students look forward to three weeks jn
the Home Management House.
For the first two weeks, four
on 3>aaitlmL
Sandra Scott, Editor
Enrolment
Increases
Enrolment in UBC's School
of Home Economics has jumped
more than 200 percent since
1943.
The Department of Home
Economics was established at
UBC in 1943. At this time,
money raised during the 1920's
was put in trust for the construction of a Home -Management House.
From 1943, to 1953, Home
Economics at UBC grew from
a department of 60 students to
a School of 170.
Current enrolment is approximately 200.
SECOND YEAR Home Economics students Jean Webster
and Elizabeth Spouse discuss a forthcoming demonstration
lesson in their course. Approximately 200 students are enrolled in the four -year course. —Photo by Diane Whitehead.
Employment Rewarding
For Horne Economis,t
The Home Economist is more than a talented cook and a fine seamstress.
"Through   her  profession,"  says   Miss   McEachern of the Faculty of Home Economics,
is able  to contribute  to  the  enrichment of  family and community living."
'she
„ The girl who takes Home
'Economics is fully prepared for
;$' girl's most likely occupation
-^—that of homemaker. She has
learned the skills that are required for the maintenance of a
happy home. All her courses
can be put to practical use.
There is also the possibility
for an exceedingly rewarding
career. The subjects taken in
Home Economics are by no
means easy as is sometimes
thought by students of other
faculties.
The sciences: chemistry, physics, zoology and bacteriology
are stressed. The social sciences
such as psychology and the humanities are also included in
the curriculum.
During the first two years
the course is quite standardized. After second year the student has the option of taking
a course specializing in food
and nutrition or in clothes, textiles and design. In this smal-
, ler faculty a personalized
, schedule of courses is possible.
For example, the girl who intends to be a buyer will be able
to take additional Commerce
courses.
There is a great shortage of
-   qualified people in the field of
Home Economics. Employment
possibilities    are    very    good.
Teaching  is the  most popular
profession for the Home Economics grad. As a teacher she
has   a  great  responsibility because    girls    between    grades
.. seven and twelve will learn the
- skills of home  making  under
,  -her direction.
Nutrition, meal preparation,
pattern drafting and clothing
construction   are   taught.    The
ujiome Economics teacher also
leels that family relations and
budget planning  are essential
parts of the course. Management of time and energy is
constantly stressed.
Dietetics is another wide
field for the Home Economist.
The armed forces are now employing dietitians. The Air
Force has begun a plan to make
use of the dietitian's knowledge of nutrition and the Army is about to begin such a
program.
Industry, such as the Depart-,
ment of Fisheries, needs Home
Economics graduates.
Home service departments of
utilities companies employ
Home Economists to aid with
their public relations work.
They demonstrate new equipment and lecture on consumer's
problems to schools and women's groups.
Extension work in semi-urban
and rural areas is usually connected with a university or the
Department o f Agriculture.
This branch of Home Economists entails giving lectures
and demonstration classes on
all aspects of home management.
There is a limited field in
retailing for the graduate who
has specialized in clothing, textiles and design. This involves
in-service training in a store.
Buying appears to be one of
the most glamorous jobs open
to the Home Economics graduate but it requires perseverance
to get to the top. Most of the
opportunities, however, are in
Eastern Canada and the United
States.
Interior decoration is a* specialized field for the imaginative girl. Consultations with
clients may involve anything
from the purchase of a lamp
to the selection of furnishings
for an entire home.
Some Home Economists with
a flair for writing find employment on newspapers and
women's magazines. In Vancouver opportunities in this
line are very limited.
There are, at present, no facilities for graduate work in
Home Economics at UBC. However, the Faculty hopes and
expects that graduates will
soon have the opportunity to
do advanced research here.
girls live together in an apartment which simulates family
living. They are expected to
apply the theory which they
have learned in class. Emphasis
is placed on co-operation and
adaptability.
LIVING IN COMFORT
One girl is the "manager".
She plans the menus and shopping lists and prepares and
serves meals. She has an assistant and the two other eirls
act as housekeepers.
During this period, the girls
must plan menus on a "comfort level" income. This allows
for variations in meals. It approximates the income which
most grads can expect to have
when married.
The   "Minimum   Adequacy"
level of income gives the girls
many a headache.
ECONOMY BUDGETING
For one week students live
in two-girl suites: and must prepare meals on 67; cents per person a day. This experience enables the students to understand the problems of persons
living on subsistence level incomes.
The money for the Home.
Management House was first
raised in the 1920's. Many interested ' ''women throughout
British Columbia raised $20,000
for the establishment of a chair
of Home Economics at UBC.
GOVERNMENT FUNDS
Unfortunately, the Depression prevented this expenditure
so the money was set aside. In
1943 the school was set up with
Government funds. It was decided that the money previously raised should be used for a
Home Management House.
The grad class of 1946 had
very  limited   practice   in   the
type of group living that the
house now provides. Miss Charlotte Black, Dean of the Faculty, and her sister allowed -the
girls to prepare dinner for
them in their apartment.
MANUFACTURERS DONATE
In 1947 the school was given
half a duplex on President's
Row in Acadia Camp. This provided accommodation for two
girls and an instructor. A hilt
was renovated and furnished
in 1948 but, despite gay colours
and comfortable furnishings, it
was not adequate for the expanding school.
When the new Home Management House was built in
1956, there was not enough,
money to furnish the house.
Miss Holder of the Faculty arranged to have manufacturers
of ; furniture and household
equipment donate their products, ilhis was good advertising for them because the .house
is shown to many women's
groups.
SILVER BALL TO
GLISTEN IN GARDEN
Silver Mist, the Home Ec
formal, will be held at Canyon
Gardens  Jan.  21. '        ,
John Spark's quartet f}&
perform and there will be a
four piece orchestra. A competition will be held between
the classes for table decora- :
tions. |
Cocktail parties will pre-
ceed the dance and a smorgasbord dinner will be served.
THESE BEAUTEOUS young misses are not members of the School of Home Economics. One
is tempted to call them dummies, but we are informed that they are "forms". The real thing j
uses  them  to  make  dresses on.  Just remember what comes off these "forms" goes on the <
forms of some Home Ec. gals. If interested, the Home Ec. Building is located on the corner of j
the East Mall and  University Boulevard.                                        ' I
—Photo by Roger McAfee. J PAGE SIX
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 196#
This Critic is Not
Inspired By Frosh
By BOB JAENDMCKSON
ft will be a while yet before UBC will win any laurels
in debating.
This is true if the Frosh debate held Wednesday is an
example of the quality of UBC debates.
Although the first debate in
Frosh history, it was highly interesting and some well-worded
points of view were expressed.
The debate, was titled "Resolved That Individualism Has
No Place in the Atomic Age."
Alex Turner and Hugh Large,
taking the negative, were given
the decision by the judges over
Ken-Jensen and Mick Sharazer.
• Turner and Large proved individualism existed today to the
satisfaction of about 100 students who were present.
Any similarly between the
subject of the debate and the
resolution was purely coincidental in my opinion.
Coincidences did happen however.
Affirmative • debators  pointed
out present-day science is so
complex that no one person can
make any great advance.
"It took two men, the Wright
Brothers, to put the first heavier-
than-air machine into the air.
Now it takes hundreds to send
a man into space."
Negative speakers argued that
any progress in the past has
been made by individuals.
"When society becomes an end
in itself, man loses his individuality   and  his incentative."
Frosh debators are still needed. Only six debators answered
the last call.
Interested Frosh are asked to
put their application in the FUS
box located in the AMS club's
office.
TWEEN   CLASSES
(continued from page 4)
Dr. David  M. yers  has  been
problems submitted for research,
Fri., Jan. 22, Wes. 113, at 12:30.
* * *
SPANISH CLUB
To-morrow evening the Spanish Club will present a program
of dancing, singing, and they
will also do a skit. Remember,
Friday, 8:30 p.m.
* *      *
DEBATING UNION-
General Meeting, all members
please attend. Tacoma trip will
be discussed. 12:30, Bu. 104.
PHYSICS SOCIETY
The society will present a
talk by Dr. Russell ■ on "Geophysics Today," on Thursday
noon in P. 301.
MEN'S GRASS  HOCKEY
There will be a practice today. Weather and fields permitting at 12:3,0 p.m. Please be on
time.
* *      * "
CAMERA  CLUB
Meeting Friday noon in Buchanan 203.. A. speaker will be
present.
* *      *
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, Jan. 28, Bu.
Newman Lecture Series
1 .-"Embarrassing Moments in  Church History"-Monday Evenings, 7:00 p.m.-Lecturer, Rev. J. Hanrahan, C.S.B., M.A.
2.-"Carholic Mwals"-Thursday/ 3:30 p.m.-Lecturer, Rev. E. B.
Allen, C.S.B., Ph.D.
Both at St. Mark's College.
1-Apologetics-Mondays, 8:00 p.m.
2~Cnrtsrian Marriage-Tueselays, 4:30 p.m.
3.-Catholic Social Principles-Tuesdays, 3:30 p.m.
4.-Communism-Tuesdays, 12:30 p.m.
ALL WELCOME
OPPORTUNITY
Our Company is a major producer of petrochemicals,
cellulose acetate and synthetic fibres. Our plant is situated on the outskirts of Edmonton. It is one of the newest
and most diversified in Canada. The Edmonton area
offers excellent living and recreational facilities. We
offer outstanding opportunities to learn and grow. We
would like to talk them over with you if you are graduating this year at the bachelor or higher level in any of
the following fields:
• CHEMICAL ENGINEERING -
• MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
• ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
• ENGINEERING PHYSICS
• HONOURS CHEMISTRY
Company representatives will be on your campus
February 4th and 5th.
For appointment see your University Placement Officer.
Canadian Chemical Company
Limited
P.O. Box 99 Edmonton, Alberta
Dr My<
New Science Dean
UBC can still attract top-flight professors.
Dr. David M. Myers, installed here Jan. 1 as Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science, has an outstanding record in the
field of electrical engineering
Dr. Myers, succeeding Dr.
Henry C Gunning who resigned
last year, comes to UBC from
the University of Sydney, Australia, where he was head of
the department of electrical engineering.
He was elected dean of the
faculty of engineering there hi
1955, but resigned recently to
devote more time to his own
department and to plan additional facilities for teaching and
research.
Dr.  Myers'   research   interest
217,  12:30. Elections, films and
amendments to  constitution.
* :|: *
NEWMAN CLUB
Communion Breakfast, Sunday, Jan. 24. Mass at 9:00. Mr.
Lionel Thomas will be guest
speaker.   He   will   be   showing
slides  of some of his work.
* *      *
FROSH UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Frosh Council Meeting tomorrow at noon in Bu. 320.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Fishing Film, Monday noon,
Bu.  203.
* * #
EL CIRCULA AND
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE CLUB
Present a show consisting Of
Spanish Dancing, singing, etc.,
on Friday at 8:30 p.m. in Inter-
natioal House.
* *      *
PLAYERS' CLUB
Auditions for the Workshop
Production of "Medea" by Robinson Jeffers, postponed from
last term, will be held Friday
12:30-2:00 and Saturday 10:30-
1:00 in the Green Room. All are
welcome.
* *      *
SOCCER
Team practices today at 12:30
on Mclnnes Field. All players
out please.
* *      *
FROSH UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Meeting of Frosh interested
in forming a song team to-day
at 12:30 in the Men's Club room,
Brock.
ridge
theatre
Jan. 21 - 22 - 23
Held Over!
"Compulsion"
O. Welles - Dean Stockwell
Bradford Dillman
Plus
'The Horse's Mouth'
Color
Alec Guinness - Kay Walsh
Cartoon
Jan. 25 - 26 - 27
James Jones' Best Seller
"Some Came
Running"
Color
(Adult Ent. Only)
F. Sinatra - Shirl MacLaine
Dean Martin
Color
"Mark of the Hawk"
Sidney Poitier - Eartha Kitt
News — Doors 7:00
One Complete Show 7:30
is in the field of mathematical
computing and its application to
engineering problems.
COMPUTING DEVICES
He has been responsible for
the development of computing
devices for solving differential
equations, and since joining the
University of Sydney has headed a team of scientists developing digital and electronic computers.
This research has culminated
in the development of a transistorized general purpose computer at present undergoing
performance tests in Australia.
Dr. Myers holds a BSc arid a
BEng, both with first class honours.
DOCTOR OF SCIENCE
In 1938 he was awarded the
degree of doctor of science for
contributions to the science of
computing.
In 1939 he underwent the
establishment, and was appointed head, of the electrotechnology
division of the Council for
Scientific and Industrial Research in Australia, one of the
three components of the Australian National Standards laboratory. » .j
During the war this division
developed and designed automatic equipment for control -of
gunfire associated with radter
observations, developed protete-
tive methods against magnetic
mines and torpedoes, and tested
electrical equipment for suitability in tropical areas.
In an interview, Dr. My era
said that UBC had a fine record
of research achievements, especially in engineering, and h«
hoped to have a share in suck
achievements in future.
Freshmen
Fest Fete
For Future
No, those eager-eyed characters racing down the hair aren't
training for the track team.
They're just a couple of frantic
freshman probably rushing 4>f£
to the latest committee meeting.
They are typical of the new
brand of freshman. Instead of
the apathetic, 'I couldn't care
less" Frosh of the past, the
members of this year's Frosh organization are active and interested.
For the first time in years the
Frosh are doing things: those
intrepid warblers, Bill MacDonald and Frank Findenigg, spurring on a song team; experienced
debater Peter Penz conducting
weekly debates (Jan. 20-31); and
bouncy Findenigg (again?) organizing a skating party (Feb.
17). And don't forget Frosh.
Week (Feb. 28-March 5), which
will feature a big dance, open
forums, and numerous surprise
events. Edison Inouye, Special
Events Chairman, is slaving
away to make this a tremendous success.
All loyal frosh will be on the
go attending these activities now
being planned by the Frosh
Council. The more elderly denizens of the campus are invited
too. .Thursday, January 21, 1960
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
h
ARMS AND THE MAN"
Bernard Shaw on Campus
Marlene Dietrich as she appears in the role of 'Lola' in the
original filming of 'The Blue Angel' to be shown today in
BU 108, 12:30.
Original 'Blue Angel'
Shown By Cinema 16
Spectacular film classic "The Blue Angel", the vehicle
which now promises to hurl May Britt to the depths of Hollywood stardom, will be shown in the original version today,
1$:30 in BU 106.
Cinema 16 presents as the
third feature in its spring program of foreign films the fabled
drama storing Marlene Dietrich
and Carl Jennings.
In this, Dietrich's first film,
she plays '^Lola" the unscrupulous cabaret singer who threatens to ensnare Jannings as the
"'schopl master and bring about
his destruction.
.    The film  was made  in  Germany in 1929  and directed by
the great Josef von Sternberg
who followed Dietrich to America and directed most of her
early films there.
This showing will provide
film enthusiasts with an excellent opportunity to contrast the
sensitive handling of the theme
and the brutal realism of the
original with the watered down
'family-style' rendering of the
modern remake.
Animal
Farm
75c — Tickets of- A.M.S. Office
THE RIDGE - 16th & Arbutus - 3, 7 and 9 p.m
It may shock you
It may anger you
It may disgust you
But
You will enjoy it!!
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George Bernard Shaw's classic, "Arms and the Man," will
be presented in the University
Auditorium-on January 21, 22,
and 23, by the Department of
Theatre. ■
In presenting this play, the
University's January production is departing from its established tradition. Since 1947
the plays presented h?ve been
of the calibre which may be
referred to as "non-box-office,"
in that they appealed only to
a select audience. In contrast,
Shaw's play is one which is
studied in the Freshman curriculum and thus should create
considerable interest on the
campus.
Portraying the part of the
ultra-romantic heroine, RAINA-,
will be VALERIE NIELSEN,
formerly of Victoria and now
of Vancouver. Like her, a
rapturous devotee of the "higher love," is her fiance, MAJOR
SERGIUS SARANOFF, who
will be played by JOHN
HOOPER of Fruitvale.
Another ardent romantic, in
this era of intense Bulgarian
patriotism and worship of
Byron, is Raina's mother,
CATHERINE PETKOFF, played by KATHLEEN ROBERTS
of Errington, and Catherine's
husband, MAJOR PAUL PETKOFF, is played by LARRY
JONES of Victoria.
The two servants of the
household play their part in the fl
merry ups- and - down of the
plot: LOUKA, the attractive
and passionately defiant young
peasant girl who wants to rise
in the world, played by SUSAN
BOSTOCK of Ned's Creek
Ranch,  Pritchard;   and  NICO
LA,   the   shrewd   man-servant
who   sees   in  perfect  servility j
the means of advancing to the !
status  of   shop-keeper,   played i
by ANTHONY CHURCHILL of j
Victoria.  The   Russian  officer,
MAJOR     PLECHANOFF,      is
portrayed by ANTHONY LORRAINE, who hails from Ireland.
The role of the Swiss hotel
owner and professional soldier,
CAPTAIN BLUNTSCHLI was
originally intended for JOHN
GILLILAND of Victoria, but
due to illness he has been
forced to withdraw from the
play. At very short notice, the
well-known and accomplished
Vancouver actor, ROBERT
CLOTHIER, has consented to
appear in the rOie as guest
artist. Mr. Clothier is a former
UBC  student, class of 1949.
The designing and painting
of the sets has been placed in
the competent hands of the
University's new Technical
Director, Darwin Payne, and
Jessie    Richardson    has     as
sembled the various costumes
which will be seen, in the play,
while the accomplished professional actress, Moyra JVIulhol-
land has been given the position,
of Mistress of Properties.
DO-NUT DINER
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Try our fresh home made pies.
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HOURS:    -    -   •
SATURDAY:    -
9  a.m. to   5   p.m.
-   9 a.m. to  Noon
LOOSE LE^iF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING J^APER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
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INTERVIEW
ALL FINAL YEAR .UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN PERMANENT
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on the 1st and 2nd
February I960
APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE THJIOUGH
YOUB UMIVHMTY PLACEMENT OFFICE PAGE EIGHT
Haskins Commission Told:
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 1960
2-HOUSE STUDENT GOVERNMENT NEEDED
By DEREK ALLEN
*A two house system of student
government was recommended
for UBC  yesterday.
Artsman Don North, in presenting a brief to the Haskins
Commission called for the formation of a student "Senate" to
act as an upper body to a "slightly altered AMS Council.
North presented the second
brief to be received by the commission investigating the future
of student government on the
campus. Other briefs will come
on Wed. and Thurs. noon hours
every week for the next month.
Audiences are invited.
"The system of government
now in practice is an open invitation to student apathy and
Authentic West
Indian Dancers
Trinidad Primhis
Featured at the number nine
1385 Marine Dr., West Van _
Jan. 23, 24 ■ 10:30 p.m.
Come .early, be assured of a
seat - Doors open at 8:30 p.m.
Minimum charge - 75 cents.
can be rectified oly through a
system embodying wider representation of Campus activity
and interest," said North.
WIDE REFERENCE
His model is based on the
Canadian Federal Government,
with wider reference to the
British system. His senate he
compared to the House of Lords.
Two houses with a different
basis of representation would be
"more likely to reflect general
attitudes and popular will," he
said.
With regard to the present
system of general meetings,
North originally wanted to abolish this institution entirely
However the BC Societies Act
requires the AMS to hold a general meeting once a year, so he
altered his recommendation to
provide for the holding of only
the Spring General Meeting, and
further asked that the Quorum
be lowered to 10 per-cent of the
student body.
In the present AMS Council,
North would make only three
changes:'
THREE CHANGES
- 1,  Add one more representative from the UBC because
this widely diversified
group needs more representation.
2. Adda judge from the Student Court to give legal
advice and represent the
disciplinary arm of council.
3. Let the Speaker of the
Senate sit as an ex-officio,
non-voting member as a
liason between the two
groups.
North also has the AMS Vice
President sitting with the Senate as a liason in the other direction.
It would be up to the Speaker
and the vice-president to decide
what business from the council
would be introduced into the
senate, with the Speaker having,
the final say in case of a dispute.
MEET MONTHLY
The upper House would meet
once per month in the Brock
Lounge, and student attendance
in the gallery would be encour
aged to promote interest and
activity in government by the
student body.
A "vogue" would grow up, it
would be the "right thing"  to
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Come and discuss the many fields open to Graduates
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Hudson's Bay Company !
Make Your Appointment Today
Representatives of  the  company  will  be conducting
interviews on the  campus,  January  27th and   28th.
CaU Your Personnel Office on the Campus
attend    two    or    three    Senate
meetings per year, said North.
North saw the members of
the Senate as falling into three
classifications:
1. Faculties: each faculty having a member who would
.   cast one vote for each 500
people in the faculty.
2. Interest Groups: Clubs
with ten or more members
would fall into one of
seven classes (sports, political, etc. each with one
member, one-half vote per
each 500 members. North
also allowed the Interfra-
ternity Council and the
Pan - Hellenic group one
member each, with one
full vote per 500 members.
3. Special Information
Groups: one member each
with one-half vote per 500
members. This group
would include Radsoc,
Filmsoc, the College Shop,
the Academic Symposium,
the Leadership Conference,
and the Ubyseey
In response to a question from
Commission Chairman Peter
Haskins, North said that his
plan definitely did not try to
subordinate Council, but rather
wanted to stimulate student activity and take some of the ever
increasing load off Council's
shoulders.
The Commission will meet
again at noon today in the Board
Room,    upstairs   in   the   North
Brock.
NESBITT
(Continued from Page 1)
body pays attention to them.
• He also said: "The Premier
has a terrific drive and fierce
political ambition. Victoria is
pretty well a one-man show; but
he is not a dictator because he
could be thrown out any time
by his cabinet or the legislature."
"I can't see the Conservatives
winning the election; our government is very safe. Since there
are never any leaks from the
party caucus I believe that this
is a very happy government."
He expressed also his opinion
that the proposed new C.C.F.-
Labor alliance would help the
opposition, and if Social Credit
really should lose it would h4
the C.C.F. which will form the
new government.
"cinema Iff
northern Electric
wniNifP
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• CMPU8'INTERVIEWS
JANUARY 25th AND 29th
For further information and interview appoint'
ment, please contact your Placement Officer.
Northern Electric
■VJn^O '108Hi}xe«iaa ©oiJJO *so«l £q trem ee-Bjo pnooes ev p»s{ioTOnT

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