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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1937

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Published Twice Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Vol. XX
VANCOUVER, B, C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1,  1937
No. 3
S. C. M. BREAK
STUDENT CODE
SAYS COUNCIL
Investigation Is
Under Way
Statua of the S.C.M. in the Alma
Mater Society is now under inveati-
gatlon by a apecial committee of
Council, appointed two weeks ago
to probe charges made againat the
religious organisation.
The matter may bring to the
light   a   conatitutional   problem
that   threatens   to   plunge   the
Council Into the midst of a good
deal of trouble.
Two  points   againat  the   S.C.M.
have been mentioned in Council. In
both cases, the charge ia that the
organisation   has   violated   A.M.S.
code previaiona, aa aet out In the
constitution.   They are;
1—That the S.C.M. haa a paid
aeeretary to run Its affairs.
2—That    the    S.C.M. • aoliclta
money from persona off the camp*
ua to pay for the secretary.
BREAKING AWAY
Council arguea that in doing the
above thinga, the S.C.M. ia tending
to break away from the student
society.
Paid aaalatanta of the Players'
Club and Musical Society are reimbursed through the A.M.S. treaaurer. Receipta of theae organisationa
are alao handed to Council.
Action of the S.C.M., It Is stated, takes this large group out
from under the thumb of the A.
M.S., and In addition seta a dangerous precedent.
CLUBS MIGHT FOLLOW
If the S.C.M. was allowed to proceed as it has done for the past
two years, with a paid secretary, it
would soon be divorced from the
student society, and would point
the way to similar action by other
large clubs.
The S.C.M. at present receives a
Council grant, but pays the secretary   out   of  funds   collected   aside
from this.
CONSTITUTIONAL  ISSUE
The S.C.M., it is stressed, is not
itself under question, nor are its
activities doubted. The issue ia a
constitutional one, and may be
solved if both Council and the S.C.
M. give way on certain points.
A compromise would only be acceptable to Council if the S.C.M.
gave the A.M.S. president complete
control of its finances, including the
privilege of paying any hired help
required.
Teazle Ghosts
Aroused For
Player9s Trials
BROWN FEARS
RED MENACE
If an all-Canadian university
students' conference ln Winnipeg
this Christmas, now being mooted
by S. C. M. leaders, should deal
In any way with radical political
thought, Malcolm Brown will wear
a broad smile.
Tha   L.  8.   E.  praxy took  pain-
to   warn   Counoil    Monday   night
that suoh eonfarenoaa, and in fact
all youth movementa, uaually fell
into  the   hands  of "radleal   lead-
era,"   and  that   In   approving  the
meet,   U.   B.   C.  might  be   getting
Into  deep  water.
Although  the local  S. C.  M.  paid
secretary,     Bob     Tillman,     assured
council that the conference committee was taking great pains  to keep
the gathering from assuming a red
tinge, Brown  was not satisfied.
"I'm   afraid   of   It."  he   said.
COUNCIL   APPROVES
Dealing with the proposed conference, council approved the idea,
with no dissenting vote. It is suggested that about a score of U. B.
C. students, representing a variety
of campus life, would attend the
gathering to discuss problems facing the Canadian university student.
Six Super-Salesmen
Wanted for Saturday
Wanted—six boys with lusty
voices, super-salesmanship and
colnless pockets, to help sell pop,
candy, etc., at the opening of the
Stadium Saturday, October 2nd.
Applications should be made
Immediately to Mr. McLean of
the Bus Stand Candy Store.
The ghoat of Lady Teazle rolled
over, gave a delicate ghoatly yawn.
"Sir Peter, Sir Peter!" she exclaimed, playfully rumpling his
lordship's hair, or what was left of
it after two hundred yeara of pro-
feaaional quarrels with his wife.
"Sir Peter, do hurry up or else we
ahall be fearfully late."
TRYOUTS
Sir Peter grumbled about Lady
Sneerwell and aaaerting haa authority.
"Oh, Sir Peter, that waan't your
cue," hia wife shrugged, sighing.
"Don't you remember ? The Players'
Club try-outs are on! Hurry up,
won't you?"
"Oh, hah! By all means! Good old
try-outa! Do let us hurry—and we
mustn't forget to pick up old Sheridan, either!"
Whether the Teasles' enthuaiaam
really aprang from the deptha of
their ghoatly hearts ia highly doubtful. More likely it was largely
forced.
At any rate the quarrel scene
from     Sheridan's     "School    for
Scandal" haa long been a favorite
try-out   part.   Years   after   year
candidates for the Players' Club
have sunk their aspiring thesplan
teeth  Into It,  tearing   the   two
characters to pieces until It Is a
question  whether   Sir  Pete  and
his wife would be able to attend,
let alone want to.
Questioned as to length of time
this selection has been used, a member of the advisory board said its
roots lay in the "mists of antiquity." The part, however,  is  considered an excellent one to test candidates' ability as with a minimum of
memorizing it provides  ample  opportunity   for   characterization.
—M.F.
Late Applicants
Refuted Refunds
On Their Passes
Twenty-five Students
Returned Their Three
Dollars, Monday
. .Twenty-five students, all ot whom
applied for a refund on their student pass before Saturday last, will
be given three dollars ln cash, and
deprived of the privilege of attending $16 worth of varsity functions
free of charge.
This much was decided by Council in short order Monday evening.
Saturday noon was the deadline set
for return of passes, and those
brought ln by that time were declared In good order.
Te S3 late applicants, Counoil
turned a deaf ear. They would
make no exceptions, and newly-
elaoted Lyall Vina, preaent at hla
first meeting, advocated "stern
treatment" ef any latecomers.
MISLEADING SION
It mattered not, Council declared,
that many of the tardy applicants
had been Influenced by a misleading sign, posted In the quad Monday.
According to treasurer Bob
Smith, who tore up the sign, and
promptly forgot the actual wording
of It, students were advised by the
poster to turn ln their passes, that
they had till Monday afternoon to
do so.
NURSES  GIVEN   REFUND
The sign also noted, according
to Smith's memory, that the passes
were of no advantage tor debates,
and Christmas plays, that students
always  got In  free,  regardless.
"Misleading" was the mild term
applied by Council to the sign, and
regret was expressed that the author of It had remained anonymous.
Thirty nurses ln residence at
Vancouver General Hospital will
also receive the three dollar refund,
their passes being useless to them.
Dr. Weir To Declare Stadium Open
On Saturday At Colorful Ceremony
Women's Award System
Is Bitterly Discussed
In order to provide a suitable award for the intra-mural sports
which have increased in Importance since the institution of an elaborate physical education program two years ago, the Women's Athletic
Association worked out a new system whereby the big block will be
awarded for intra-mural sports. Many women athletes thought that
the award was too high and demonstrating a divided stand on the
situation, in the executive itself, was the resignation last week of
Myrne Nevison.
On Monday night )the system will be considered by Situdent
Council, and it lies within their power to decide whether sufficient
number of the women students are behind the system to make It
operate satisfactorily.    (Editor.)
To produce all around athletes
instead of specialised curiosities is
the object of the new award system
passed this week by the Women's
Athletic Association.
Participation in sports is encouraged as points are given for every
game played and every practise attended so that ambitious co-eds in
three years can pile up their 200
points to win the coveted Big Block.
Little ones will be awarded for 125
points.
As it appears, the division of
points is so arranged that stars will
have difficulty In gaining their Big
Block in one year, while continued
application for a longer time will
be   awarded.
Carefully discussed by the executive, the following point division   was   diceded   upon:    Senior
players will get about 120 points
annually.  Varsity hockey, 60; Intermediate basketball, 40; Grade
A intra-mural competitors about
25 and 10 extra for the winning
team:     archery,     outdoor   ..club,
swimming, badminton will all be
alloted  so  many   points  for  service   participation   in    meets   or
league games.
Strenuous   discussion   has   raged
over the campus since the meeting
last Monday with the Big Blockers
and hockey and basketball players
ranged against the members of the
other sports.
POINTS IN FAVOR
Advocates for the new sysytetn
have four main points in their
platform: Encouragement of women to become all-around athletes, abolishment of the "*,tar"
system in which players may gain
the Big Block by participating
for one year only in one sport,
building up of intra-murals and
all so-called minor sports as the
players will amass enough points
in three years to get the Big
Block, raising of the standard of
the highest award as the girls
must work for a longer period to
win it.
BIG BLOCK CLUB OBJECTS
However, the present Big Blockers
differ, while they go around moaning, "They can't do this to us."
They claim that the membership in
their select club will be too easily
obtained. It is generally expected
that Council will have to buy 25
sweaters this year for the people
that have piled up 200 points. It
is not such a difficult achievement
as it sounds. Last year three Freshettes amassed 160 points without
even coming near a senior team.
There is strenuous objection to anyone getting the highest award in
women's sports without being outstanding in any field.
It Is feared that there will be a
lowering of scholastic standing of
players, who will spend more time
than they really can afford in their
effort to pile up pointa.
The   Big   Block   Club  suggests
that  to build  up  the sports, the
point   system   would   work   very
well, but should be awarded with
a little block, the big block being
saved for the person who is outstanding in her own field, whether
It be baskteball, hockey or archery.    Save   the  intra-murals   for
Co-eds  who  for  some reason  or
other are unable to play in other
teams.
On being interviewed, concerning
the system, varying opinions were
cited by prominent campus athletes.
Beth Evans stated, "It will bring a
great many more girls  into active
sports   and   competition,   which   is
the prime object of any organized
women's    system."    According    to
Lee   Straight,   "it   will   be   easy   to
BUS SERVICE WILL
BE SUPPLIED BY
COUNCIL
The new U.B.C. stadium, pictured
as it neared completion on the
campus last week. Inset is Hon.
Dr. G. M. Weir, Provincial Minister of Education, who will open
the new stadium Saturday afternoon.
MINOR RIOT
AT MIXER
From a rather doubtful beginning, Wednesday's "mixer" developed into a riotous mob scene
faintly reminiscent of the Frosh
Reception.
First to start shuffling were a
half-dozen of Pepsters and their
girl friends, who tried to look nonchalant and fill the floor, while the
google-eyed but sceptical freshmen
peered across the gym for a likely
freshette.
The go-getting W.U.S. members
were diligently sifting through the
crowds, mixing them up to the tune
of "grab a freshie, a man, then a
push, and they're off." By this low
method the floor was soon swarming with hastily mated couples, evidently enjoying themselves.
LOTS OF MEN
The biggest surprise was the
abundance of males. From superior
Science to the greenest freshman
they were all there, the majority
resplendent in glistening white running shoes. Several of the freshettes sported zippers, b,ut the prize
for the most ingenious foot-gear
present goes to an upperclassman
who blossomed forth in ski-sox
over shoes over tartan sox.
The biggest hand went to the
young Lochinvar who twice dropped
on bended knee to tie the coy shoelace of his blushing partner.
ROUND AND ROUND
Music was provided by the radio-
gramophone extension lent for the
occasion by Bob Brooks, a former
student. Difficult to hear at flrst,
the music improved with age, and
at last "The Music Goes Round
and Round" was plainly discerned.
Contrary to the ruling, several
scheming upperclass women, remembering their own youth, perhaps, borrowed pill-boxes for the
occasion and got away with it, too!
President of the W.U.S. Peggy
Fox was head of the committee in
charge, and was assisted by the
other members.
Juniors, Sophs Elect
Executives Next Week
Juniors will elect their new executive Tuesday, October 5, according
to dates released by junior member
John Brynelsen Thursday. The
meeting will be held in Arts 100 at
12:15.
Arts '40 will meet on the day following for the same purpose, also
in Arts 100. All nominations should
be handed in to the Alma Mater
Society office by the day before the
meeting.
every girl in the University to obtain a big block, regardless of ability. The pre-requisites for winning
the award will be spare time, not
energy nor athletic ability."
U. of Alfa. Sfudenfs
Pay Five Dollars
For Their Passes
By FRED PRITCHARD
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Oct. 1. (WIPU) — "Insure against being broke" was the
advice given to students of the
University of Alberta this week as
the Student Union offered for sale
their  new  Campus  A  Card.
Saturday, the success of the venture was assured as hundreds of
students used them to pass through
the gates of the grid for the first
rugby   game  of  the   season.
Initiated last year as an athletic
ticket, the idea proved popular and
this year the popularity has already
Increased. Archie McEwan and
his Council were not satisfied with
the financial benefits given the
holders of cards last year and decided to enlarge Its field of usefulness.
As a raault, tha Campua A Card
glvea admittance to the holder to
all home athletlo games snd also
te   sll   performanoea   under   the
Literary   Soolaty.    Thla   Inoludee
tha  Inter-Vear Play Competition,
tha    Operetta,   tha   Spring    Play
and dabataa.
Posters advertising the cards on
the   campus   show   that   their   real
value   is   almost   twice   the   small
purchase price of five dollars.
THE   LAST  NOTICE   REQUESTING SUBMISSION OF BUDGETS
Campus olubs expecting any
financial aupport from the Society muat hand In their budgeta at
the Studenta' Counoil offloe, no
later than Monday, October 4th.
Daily curtailment* in granta will
be levied on budgeta aubmlted
after  thle  date.
ROBERT C.   R.  SMITH,
Treaaurer.
By   DORWIN    BAIRD
In the presence of a crowd
estimated to exceed 4,000
persons, the new U.B.C. stadium will be officially opened
Saturday afternoon.
It will be an actual as well
as official opening, for Saturday will be the flrst time that
a game will be played in front
of the new stands, $40,000
investment of the Alma Mater
Society.
DR. WEIR OFFICIATING
Hon. Dr. Oeorge M. Weir, minister of education, and U. B. C. professor on leave of absence, will declare the stadium open in a ceremony scheduled for 3.16 p.m.
The opening will be proceeded
by a monster pep rally In the auditorium at noon.
Music, yells and speeches are being planned for thia gathering, expected by atudent officials to be the
most enthusiastic in the history of
the university.
CHANCELLOR   KICKS   OFF
At 2 p.m.. Varsity and Rowing
Club will meet in an English Rugby
match.
Chancellor Dr. R. E. McKechnie will kick off te start the
game, opening match In the preaent aenlor league aarlaa.
At 3.10, when the game is finished, ceremonies will commence
with   the   singing   of  "O,   Canada."
COUNCIL    IN
SESSION ?
Students' Council may not be
worrying about the fact, but their
meeting of Monday evening is still
in session.
Strict observance of rules of order point out to this fact, as the
adjournment motion was moved by
Vine and seconded by Walker, one
or the other of whom is not a member of council.
As Vine was declared earlier in
the meeting the legitimate men's
athletic representative, Walker's
position on council automatically
terminated with the passing of the
acclamation motion.
IS   HE  A   MEMBER?
However, at the start of the
meeting, Walker was a member of
council, and may have technically
had the right to finish out the session. There can never be, however,
two on council In the same office,
and above all, two such men should
never move and second the same
motion.
Confusing perhaps, and no doubt
quibbling, the fact remains that
council members have in theory
been in session three and half
days by today noon.
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
TO CONFER IN WINNIPEG
Probably tho outstanding event of
Canadian University life this year
will be the National Conference of
Canadian University Students, to
be held this winter in Winnipeg
from December 27 to January 1.
Original plans for the conference
were made last Christmas by student executives from McGiil and
Toronto, with representatives from
th© West participating. Since that
time planning committees have been
set up in all universities, and student councils have almost unanimously given their endorsement to
the scheme.
Last year the S.C.M. at U.B.C.
introduced  the conference to the
campus. Representatives from all
campus clubs were Invited to
form the organizing committee,
which was headed by David
Carey, tbls year's A.M.S. president.
PROBLEMS  DISCUSSED
Purpose of the conference is to
discuss and endeavor to find a solution to some of the problems confronting the Canadian student today. Campus problems and student
government, new trends in education and the increasing influence of
the University in the community,
political and racial differences barring the way to Canadian unity
will be among those topics under
discussion. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society
ot  the University of British Columbia.
Phona  Point Gray 206
Mail  Subscriptions, $2.00
Office: 206 Auditorium  Building
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Kemp Edmonds
NIWS MANAGER
Dorwin Baird
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Frank Perry FRIDAY: Dorothy Cummings
FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR
James Beveridge Frank Turner
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Monty Fotheringham Bill Sibley
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR EXCHANGE EDITOR
Jack Mair James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Rosemary Collins Irene Eedy Beverley McCorkell
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Norman Depoe
REPORTERS
Joan Haslam, Eiko Henmi, Ann Jeremy, Lester Pronger, Ed McGougan, Ozzie Durkin,
R.   H.   Ker,  Virginia  Galloway,   Barbara  McDougal,   Katherine  McKay,   Nancy  Speirs,
Jack Bingham, Jack Mercer, J  C. Penney, Doug Bastin,  Joyce Cooper, Victor Freeman,
Molly Davis, John Garrett, Keith Allen, Helen  Hand.
Random Ramblings
BY
THE  8TUDENT  PRINCE
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 303-A Pender Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephone: TRINITY 3002
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited	
THE S. C. M.
Most important feature of the present differences between
the S. C. M. and Students' Council is the fact that the religious organization has been soliciting funds to carry on its
work, and has been approaching Vancouver business leaders
for these funds.
Such action is diametrically in opposition to the established policy of the A. M. S. No single group on the campus
should have the right to launch out on its own in a campaign
for monetary donations. Infraction of this principle calls for
stern action on the part of officials.
ss:
CORRESPONDENCE
AWARDS  SYSTEM
There aeema to be a great deal
of discussion on both systems of
Awards for Women's Athletics with
Insufficient information on either.
The executive of W. A. A. would
like to take this opportunity to
Bupply a few of the missing facta.
There were two main reasons
why there was a step made to present a new awards system on the
campus:
1. Dissatisfaction In the old system as far back as three years ago
and increasing slnco.
2. An endeavor to interest more
women in athletics, the main object
of   the   W.   A.   A.   on   the   campus.
Instead of that there has been
a veritable monopoly of awards
which ls definitely not in the interest of  the  association.
There has also been a direct challenge made—that the new system
was railroaded through. How was
this so successfully done?
1. A pre-term executive meeting
was called, in which the new
awards system, after discussion,
was approved unanimously.
2. The awards system was presented at the first athletic meeting, mimeographed copies being
handed to the women so that they
might follow the explanation, and,
until the next meeting, have their
copy to study. Voting was deliberately postponed for several days,
so that the women could acquaint
themselves with the pros and cons
of both systems, and know what
they   were   voting   for.
3. On Monday, September 27th,
the Women's Athletic Association
again met, discussed back and
forth the merits and deficiencies of
both systems, and finally voted for
the new awards system. There
was not one dissenting vote — a
count  did   not  have   to   be   taken!
We would very much like to have
the support of the Ubyssey ln our
activities, Instead of Its antagonism
which we have had to buck for the
last  two  years.
Yours truly,
W. A. A.  Kxecutlve.
Player's Club Fills
Vacancies
Three offices on the executive of
the Players' Club, left vacant when
the holders elected last spring were
forced to resign this term, were
filled at an election held by members of the Club in Arts 208, Tuesday noon.
New vice-president will be Anne
Carter, who was returned by acclamation to the position formerly
held  by  Hazel  Merten.
Treasurer for the coming year
will be Les Sugarman, taking the
place of Eleanor Qreen, whilst a
position on the committee, left
open with the election of Anne Carter to the vice-presidency, will be
filled   by   Lorraine  Johnston.
Varied Classes
At the
Associated Arts
Again in brilliant form, press
and public hail diva on spring
tour.
Galli-Curci
AUDITORIUM
NEXT FRIDAY
Octob . 8th
Seat Sale Now
M. A.  KELLY
659 Granville  Street
Trinity 2418
Hilker Attractions
The Canadian Institute of Associated Arts, tn the Dominion Bank
Building, are offering University
students some very interesting
classes this winter,—ln the evenings, on week-days and on Saturday mornings.
One of their most popular Courses last session was In Fencing—as
taught by an Olympic ranking
champion. It Includes a thorough
training in the use ot the foil, the
epee or the sabre. Cartooning by
ERM (McTaggart), ls proving to
be a well-attended class as well,
with its absolutely professional
instruction. Fashion Drawing, entirely from the reproductive angle,
for departmental and specialty shop
advertising, is one of the largest
classes at the Canadian Institute of
Associated Arts. The Instructress
ls acknowledged to be one of the
best Fashion Illustrators ln Vancouver. Wood-Carving was quite
successful last winter, several University students attending. Advertising Layout and Copywritlng are
attracting considerable attention
for the thoroughness aud practicality of the Instruction offered1.
Mechanical Drawing, by a well-
known European Diesel Engineer
practising ln Vancouver, ls proving
ot real worth to those enrolled.
Still others are finding the Life
Class and the Elementary Drawing
moat profitable.
Altogether, the Canadian Institute of Associated Arts are providing a distinctly varied and popular
series ot professional Courses ln
various subjects by successfully
practising Instructors. •**
CLASSIFIED
WANTED—Four U.B.C. boys. Two
double rooms and board. $25
month. Oarage. 4394 West 14th
Avenue.
FURNISHED APARTMENT —
Through the Illness of a tenant
who is unable to attend the University we have a vacancy. Three-
room furnished apartment, suitable for three people. Very quiet
and comfortable. Call Mrs. Black.
Pt.  Grey   833.
SEPTEMBER IN THE RAIN
rp'HIS ls being ground out to the
■*■ tune of "Blue Hawaii' on the
radio and rain on the window pane,
and we are feeling a bit wistful,
remembering the faded summer
and afternoons In a sailboat with
Jean West and Esther Qalpln and
a gramaphone full of Blng Crosby
records. And now only the rain
and fog and letters from the Dean.
IT HAPPENED ONE NIQHT
AND who was the Junior responsible for a telegram that read:
"AFTER LAST DRINK EVERYTHING BLANK STOP SEND $2!_0
AT ONCE STOP WILL, HOCK
WATCH AND PAY YOU ON ARRIVAL STOP DON'T TELL TAMIL    STOP    I    AM    IN    VICTORIA
STOP." It seems that he drained
Into Frenchy's one evening not long
ago, rather blurred around the
edges, and Informed the house that
he simply had to catch the midnight boat to Victoria. So they took
up a collection, hailed a taxi, and
he did. He awoke in Victoria with
SO cents and no Idea why or how
he had arrived. He still insists he
was  kidnapped.
MUCH MORE SERIOUSLY
rpHE decision of the C. B. C. to
■* eliminate Mr. Earl ("Good
Evening") Kelly as CRCV news
broadcaster ls Just another of those
things that makes us wonder If the
Fathers of Confederation were really so bright. Because we have met
a number ot people ln the remoter
part of this "brutally grand" province (quote Dr. Sage) where CRCV
ls the only audible Vanoouver station, who snap their radios on at
8.45 sharp and off again at 9.00,
simply because Mr. Kelly has quite
a lot on the ball where they are
concerned.
Mr. "Good Evening's" popularity
with the rural population of B. C.
must be seen to be believed. Literally thousands of men In bunk
houses, tug boat foc'sles, farm kitchens and tank town station offices
throughout the wilderness stop
playing Black Jack or reading
"Ranch Romances" or "True Story"
every evening to gather round the
nearest available radio.
Cigarettes glow ln the gloom and
the only sound ls the occasional
smack as another mosquito pays
the price, while Mr. Kelly's slow
blurry voice tells of foreign wars
or of the death of some pioneer ln
B.  C.'s  history.
".. . . the 'Princess Maqulnna' at
four o'clock this afternoon was at
Pt.  Estevan,  southobund  .  .  ."
And then the all-Important weather forecast for the North Coast, the
West Coast, Vancouver Island and
the lower mainland, with a few record temperatures from the Interior.
Like a patient congregation waiting for the benediction the silent
listeners sit through the Old Country soccer results and the Stock
Market reports until the final, solemn  conclusion:
Galli-Curci To
Be P resented
In   Auditorium
Galli-Curci, famous prima donna
of the Metropolitan Opera and idol
of the concert stage, is being presented in the Vancouver Auditorium
Friday, October 8th, under the management of Hilker Attractions.
The return of this great colora-
turo soprano to the musical world
after an entirely successful operation for the removal of a throat
impediment, has been hailed everywhere with the greatest enthusiasm
by both audiences and critics alike.
FIRST OF A SERIES
This is the flrst concert in the
series of greater artists. Others to
appear later on in the season are
Gladys Swarthout, John Charles
Thomas, Mischa Elman and Igor
Qorin, the sensational young Russian baritone.
In keeping with the policy employed by all great concert series
on this continent and in Europe,
these five stellar artists are being
offered to Vancouver patrons under a series ticket plan.
Tickets may be secured at M. A.
Kelly,    Granville    Street,    Trinity
2418. A limited number of season
tickets are still available.
Friday, October 1, 1937
"We wish all our listeners on
land ... on the water ... in the
air . . . ln the mines ... In lighthouses . . . and especially those
. . ." (and here a thousand exiles
wait like eager children for a word
ot praise and remembrance) "fruit
ranchers In the Interior whose
crops have been destroyed by hungry bears ... a restful evening. Good
night."
It Is Mr. Kelly, rather than
CRCV, who has been "the voice of
British   Columbia."
• RIGHT PEOPLE DEPT.
rjOUO HARKNESS carried home
a thirty-pound iron casting in
his bag when he left a logging
camp last month. Some rat had
hidden lt there and we know who.
Dave Crawley wrote for and received an autographed picture of
Sltnone Simon. Now he is corresponding with a Southern miss, who
advertised for "dashing and distant
pen pals" ln the back of a Street
& Smith magazine. The winner of
a French scholarship remarked that
hts parents don't think he drinks.
Now we know where he got that
stupid look.
Norah Gibson (discussing a
Players' Club applicant): "But she
has  such  a  tiny  voice  .  .  ."
Ex-presldent Pat Larsen: "But
such  a  reasonably  big  house."
NI8HT GLASSES
Alto Day and Saturday Morning Courts! in:
FENCING, CARTOONING FASHION
DRAWING, ADVERTISING   LAYOUT,
COPYWRITING WOOD-CARVING,
MECHANICAL DRAWING, LIFE CLASS,
ELEMENTARY DRAWING,        PHOTOGRAPHY.
CANADIAN INSTITUTE
OF ASSOCIATED ARTS
New Quarters    —    5 Large Rooms Magnificent View
Total Enrollment of 54 Latt Sen Ion
1209-10 Dominion Bank Bldg. Phona Seymour 9697 Victory Square
Rax C. Mill*, B.A., Managing Director
S
CORRECT JEWELLERY
AND STATIONERY FOR
EVERY FRATERNITY
ON THE CAMPUS.
There ia none Better than the "Betttt
IBtttiitu KS±
and
&hoppe e«n»ni. *^ *>
THE VANCOUVER
SYMPHONY
SOCIETY
announces
THE   FIRST  CONCERT  OF
THE   1937-38  SEASON
at  the
STRAND
THEATRE
Sunday
October 10,
at 3.00 p.m.
Conductor  .   .   .
ALLARD DE RIDDER
Soloist  .  .   .
JAN CHERNIAVSKI
Mozart Piano Concerto in A Major
What! No
Heat?
DR. G. G. SEDGEWICK hat tpent
years cultivating the myth that
tha light he tcatteri It unaccompanied by any heat, but all who have
gona through hit courtot know vary
wall that ha radiatat from all partt
of the tpectrum when he really
gatt Interetted. In hit regular column in the Vancouvar Sun, of
courta, ha runt true to form and
the light that Itsuet forth it usually In company with enough heat
to make it vary good reading.
read
Dr. Sedgewick's
column in
VANCOUVER
SUN
Phone Trinity 4111 for felivery
Coats . . .
STYLED
RIGHT!
Suits . . . Dresses
Hosiery
Smart misses' draises in new Fall
materials, shades and ttylat. A good
telection, (utt arrived. £_ Q_
Priced at   !>3.V_>
. . Lingerie
PRICED
RIGHT!
"Wa cover tha low and medium price field.'
CHERRY'S DRESS SHOP
1519 BROADWAY WEST (AT GRANVILLE)
■■"**«——*■ "■■■ - —*
I. R. C.
Mr. Jamea Gibson, U. B. C. 1031
Rhodes scholar, will be the guest
speaker at the opening meeting of
the International Relations Club, to
be held at the home of Prof. Soward, 1476 Tolmie St., October 12,
at 8 p.m.
For the past year, Mr. Gibson
was secretary for the Montreal
branch of the League of Nations
Society in Canada, and is now lecturer here in the Department of
Economics.
LETTERS CLUB
There are a few vacancies for
third-year students in the Letters
Club. Apply at once to the secretary, Eleanor Oibaon, through the
Arts letter rack.
VARSITY
SERVICE STATION
"AT THE GATES"
"Our Service Meant Happy Motoring"
smf
NOW, WHILE YOU
ARE AT COLLEGE . . .
and in future years when you enter business or
professional life, you will And a connection with
Canada's   oldest   bank   of   very   real   value   to   you.
BANK OF MONTREAL
B>*-_ll«h-d 1817
WEST POINT GREY BRANCH
Sasamat and Tenth Avenue Weat
A. B. MOORE, Mgr.
UNIVERSITY
BOOK   STORE
HOURS, 9 am. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to I p.m.
LOOSE - LEAF     NOTE     BOOKS,     EXERCISE     BOOKS     AND     SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES all your
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper,   Loose-leaf BOOK SUPPLIES
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink, and Drawing Instruments. SOLD HERE
sma_________i____ifl
•Sty* Hnitij?r0itjj
nf Brtitel? (Colitmbta
LAST   DAY   FOR   PAYMENT   OF
FIRST   TERM    FEES
OCTOB ER 4th, 1 937
All cheques must be certified and made payable
to
The University of British Columbia
Mailing certified cheques to the Bursar is
recommended.
For Regulations governing fees see Calendar,
pages 32 to 36 inclusive.
BURSAR, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
[Athj[WL^^irn Friday, October 1, 1937
THE     UBYSSEY
Three
More Mile* Per $
B EGG'S
CERTIFIED    CARS
Are you prepared for fall and winter
driving?
PREPAREDNESS
USED CAR SALE
Starrs Saturday Morning!
4 NEW TIRES     / On All
NEW BATTERY \   Certified Cars
See the daily papers for list of cars and
prices.
BEGG'S
1057 West Georgia
HOME OF
CERTIFIED
CARS
Seymour 3161
Attention! "^BUYERS
■34 BUICK De Luxe Be.
dan, two aide mounts,
trunk, heater t low mileage i ftnlahed In dark maroon.
•54 TERRAPLANE Sedan, splendid shape, air
wheels, de luxe equipped.
A buy.
•a» HUDSON 6 Sport
Cabriolet, low racy lines,
smartest In Vancouver i
exoellent condition.
•35 CHEVROLET Master
Coupe, sport model, beautiful finish, perfeot condition.
     EXTRA SPECIAL!   	
One 1S3T TERRAPLANE SEDAN, just
broken in. Electric Hand, Hill Hold, many
speolal features.   Substantial savlna.	
•»• Dodae Sedan IIS
■la Essex Coaeh MS
'ST Chevrolet Sedan . $JS
'SO Ford Town Sedan $216
'31 Ford Sport Rdatr $216
'ST Stude. Diot. Sedan Itl
•It Chev. Sedan	
•Jt Essex Coupe	
'It Hupmobile Sedan
'30 Ford Sport Cab...
'It Hudson Sedan	
'31 Harley Davidson
Motorcycle   	
1SS
ISO
STS
STS
SSS
SIM
Speolal Terms and Liberal Trades.
A. W. CARTER LTD.
B. C. Distributors for Hudson and Terraplane
S4S BUBUARD STREET SEYMOUR 43SS
■■ H^ ■■ M ■ Nothln.   la   frea   theta
^LZ~ MM MlZ ^y W diyi, but  we  glvo  you
^P* Wm ^P ^P ■ the mott $ valua pottible
|     H ■■ _■■ | for your money.
'29 Essex Sedan   $195.00
'29 Ford Coupe  165.00
'29 Whippet Sedan  165.00
'28 Ford Touring    125.00
'27 Pontiae Sedan     95.00
'27 Whippet Coach    85.00
'27 Essex Sedan    65.00
'26 Dodge Sedan    50.00
Many Others From $30.00
ROY OWENS LTD.
2202 Main Street Corner 6th Avenue
CURTIS  MOTORS
'36 Chevrolet Sedan .... $825.00
'35 Terraplane Sedan   ... 650.00
'33 Chevrolet Coupe, R.S.. 525.00
'32 Chevrolet Coaeh  .... 425.00
'28 Buick Coach  150.00
'27 Buick Sedan  95.00
'29 De Soto Roadster .... 225.00
TERMS — OPEN EVENINGS — TRADES
CURTIS MOTORS ltd.
Dodge Dealers
1396 GRANVILLE TRINITY 1071
***•,*•    _.*   "*     **■»     '______-»^
KLA-HOW-YA VARSITY!
• The data partlat will toon ba ttartlne and tha rugby taaton will ba In full swing. It It alwaya mora convenient
to attend theta affalrt In your own car.
• Than again there will ba many lata nlghtt at tha library whan a car will be very handy.
• Our telectlon of utad cart It tha flnett wa have had thlt yaar.    Prices range from $50.00 up and our term*
can ba made to suit.
DISTRIBUTORS    USED    CAR    BRANCH'
A safa placa to buy a utad car. Owned and oparatad by—
DAN McLEAN MOTOR CO. LTD.       CONSOLIDATED MOTOR CO., LTD.
1015 West Georgia Seymour 9085
CAMPBELL MOTORS LTD
PLYMOUTH and CHRYSLER DEALERS
Kingsway and Main
'28 Ford Roadster    $ 95.00
'29 Chevrolet Coupe    225.00
'28 Chevrolet Coach   175.00
'31  Ford Coach     295.00
'27 Pontiae Coach    75.00
'34 Chevrolet Coach     495.00
'29 Oakland Cabriolet   295.00
'32
'36
'32
'29
'29
'28
'36
Plymouth Sedan
Wil
 $495.00
'illys 77 Sedan  625.00
Pontiae Sedan     495.00
Nash Sedan     150.00
Buick Sedan    275.00
Chrysler 4 Sedan  165.00
Ford Coach     675.00
80 CARS TO CHOOSE FROM!
Inspect Our Complete Stock
at KINGSWAY and MAIN
Open Till 10 p.m.
FAIRMONT 6604
Take
Advantage
of the
Used Car
Values
on Thlt
Page!
Jim Macdonald Is
Chosen President of
Parliamentary Forum
After a brief period of dlaor-
ganlzatlon, the Parliamentary
Forum atarted thla year'a work
on Tueaday, when a bualneaa
meeting eleoted Jim Maodonald
aa prealdent. Othera on the executive are: Maurice Belkln, flrat
vloe-preaident; Don McTaggart,
aecond vlce-prealdent; Alex Maodonald, treaaurer, and BUI Sibley,
aeeretary.
The Forum's apeaklng actlvl-
tlaa for the year will oommenoe
within a week, with a noon-hour
debate on the merlte and demer-
Ita of the C. O. T. C. Norman
DePoe will defend the Army
againat an aa yet undecided opponent. The debate will be
thrown open to anyone who
wlahae to apaak, following the
two leading apaakera.
Date for thla debate will be announced In Tuoaday'a Ubyaaey.
V.C.U. Start Activities
With Party Tonight
Fall actlvltloa of the V. C. U. will
be started by a squash party at 7.46
p.m. tonight, to be held at 4188 W.
14th avenue. A varied program of
gamea, singing and two short talks
haa been arranged by the executive.
This term Mr. Judd, of the China
Inland Mission, will lead a series of
study groups on the Chinese mission field, commencing the aecond
week of November. Besides the
daily noon-hour meetings which are
taken by membera of the group in
Arts 206, a number or outside speakers will be brought to the campus.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
The Musical Society is holding a
reception banquet in the Caf. on
Friday evening, October 1st, at 6
p.m. A social gathering will be
held after the banquet to enable
old and new niernbers to become
acquainted with one another. A
musical evening has been planned
and a good turnout Is expected. All
old and new members are expected
to  attend.
QUARTET GO
TO   PRAIRIES
McPhee, Lucas, McComber,
Pendray Selected
Four of Varsity's outstanding
trackmen are all primed for the
intercollegiate trip to the Prairies,
where they will compete against
the stars of Alberta and Saskatchewan varsities.
Howie MoPhee, Alex Luoaa,
Wllf Pendray and Vanoe Mo-
Comber were thoae aaleoted
through the medium of a trial
whioh waa not run. Tha other
2194 atudenta either didn't have
the ability or the dealre to enter
the  ellmlnatlona.
OUT FOR  RECORDS
McPhee will endeavor to break
records in the sprints and low
hurdles; "Luke," the high Jump and
broad; McComber, the half-mile
and mile; and Pendray, the mile
and two-mile.
Varsity's chances are exceptionally good. All four have shattered
local high school and Ama Mammy
times In their stride, and the way
Howie (the captain) and Bud Burden (the senior manager) have
been poring over the Canadian college record book, things are looking on  the up and up.
— RENWICK.
Varsity Ruggers
In Default Win
Senior Manager Ron Andrews,
of the English Rugby Club, an-
announces a Varsity victory in a
second division tilt.
U.B.C. 2"B" ruggers win, via
default, over Nippons in their match
slated for tomorrow. Alao, the 2
"A" ruggers are asked to look at
the Caf bulletin board tomorrow
morning for the game announcement.
NOTICE
Strip Curator Dave "Soccer"
Kato asks Orme Dier and Harry
Campbell—second year Arts students—to call the strip room as
soon as possible.
CABLEGRAM CORRESPONDENCE
Mr. Kd.:
Listen, Mr. Ed., you are going on
the   proverbial  carpet.
First, I don't like your attitude
of  "Oh   the  Futility  of  it  All.'
Second, if you want something
done why not tell ua, the students,
beforehand, not after things have
taken place. The reason is without
a doubt that you couldn't get over
the shock of an election going the
wrong  way.
Thirdly, puns and excuses have
no place in an  editorial column.
Fourthly, I like your paper, so
let the other 2,000 take a jump in
the   LILY   POND.
So long,
J. A.
All
the
Advertisers
Appearing
Here Are
Dependable
Dealers
U. B. Careful
Where you spend your car money.     Real
buys in  low priced transportation.
'27 Pontiae Coach   $145      La Salle Sedan,
'28 Whippet Coaeh.   165 * p»» 395
'30 Ettax Coaeh ... 345      "& Chrysler Sedan,
'28 Emox Coaeh ...    99 4-wheel brakai.   155
'28 Pontiae Coach..   195
'35 Pontiae Coach. .  745
'30 Durant Coupe. .  325
'24 Studebaker
Sedan, Good ...    90
6 cyl. Star Sedan. $ 89
We have late model Willys, Chev., Fords
and Plymouth cars.
Meredith Motors
LIMITED
WILLYS DISTRIBUTORS
Trin. 4402    701-744 Burrard     Trin. 6412
'27 Chrysler Sedan,
4-wheel brakai.
Enkina Sedan,
4-wheel brakai. 135
'28 Whippet 4 Sedan 225
'28 Chevrolet Sedan 195
Dodge D.A. Sedan. 375
'28 Buick Sedan ... 225
YOU    CAN'T   GO   WRONG
WITH ONE OF THESE:
'29 Chevrolet Coupe   $265.00
'34 Austin 10 Sedan      595.00
'30 Ford Sport Touring    165.00
4 Cyl. Chrysler Sedan     95.00
'28 Chrysler 4 Cyl. Coach,
4-wheel hydraulic brake* 165.00
'27 Essex Sedan         75.00
'27 Peerless Sedan,
Hydraulic trakos     145.00
'28 Whippet 4 Cyl. Sedan...  145.00
Fordyce Motors
1937 LIMITED
British Hillman Distributors
Used   Car   Dept.: TRINITY
1345 GRANVILLE 1851
Have you seen the British Hillman?
look, looki LOOK! LOOK!
The Home of First-grade Used Cars.
Agents for the British Hillman.
One only NEW HILLMAN Sedan IIIO
•86   PLYMOUTH   Tourlnjr   Coach 18(0
'34   PLYMOUTH   Sedan SSSS
'33   PLYMOUTH   Sedan $646
•31   DODGE  Sedan,  trunk $728
'30 CHRYSLER Small 6 Sedan $219
'31   PONTIAC   Coach   $410
'31   CHEVROLET   Sport   Coach $3IS
'20   CHEVROLET   Coach $245
•29   CHEVROLET   Coach    $176
•30   PONTIAC  Coupe   $329
'80  WHIPPET Roadster   $11$
•28    CHEVROLET   Roadster $129
•27  CHRYSLER 60  Sedan $125
WE TRADE AND GIVE TERMS
CARLSON'S AUTO SALES
2325 Cambie Street Near 7th Avenue
A JOHNSTON
SEPTEMBER CLEAN UP
1036   CHEVROLET   St.   Sedan SITS
1D87   CHEVROLET  Master   Coach Ills
ieae Chevrolet m.d. sedan itaa
1036 CHEVROLET Bus. Coupe $778
1034  CHEVROLET M.D.  Sedan SITS
1038  TERRAPLANE   D.   Sedan $176
1082 CHEVROLET 6 w.w. Sedan $S|S
1081  PONTIAC 6  Sedan $426
10S1   FORD  Victoria Coupe $326
1031   NA8H 8  Del.   Sedan Ma
1031   FORD   Roadster.   R.S $216
1920  CHEVROLET Sedan   $325
1028 CHEVROLET Sedan $176
1027 CHEVROLET Sedan  $160
Each car thoroughly reconditioned,
suaranteed and ready for winter.
JOHNSTON MOTOR
CO.  LTD.
SEVENTH and MAIN NINTH and ORANVILLE
Fair.   424—425 Bayvlew   9107
Freshette Supper
Disturbs Tin Gods
At Council Meeting
Council waa ln a light mood Monday evening, accentuated perhaps
by the presence In the cat of some
500 big and little sisters, noisily
enjoying their annual "been  feed."
President Dave Carey started It
when he asked, ln all Innocence, "Is
there really a Dean of Agriculture ?"
Men's athletic representatives
Vine and Walker, finding their Job
too small for two persona, both
turned their attention from sports
and demonstrated their personal
accomplishments by ripping a calendar ln two.
Other Insane Incidents, Including
a tirade by Malcolm Brown on the
red menace, marked an unusually
dull session of the nine A. M. S.
directors.
SOCCER CLUBS
One Junior and assooiate
manager wanted. Apply
N. S. Free, Arte Letter
Raok.
Important meeting Monday noon — all eoocer men
muat be there. Watoh notloe board, Arts' common
room.
NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the
M.A.A. on Tuesday, October 6th, at
12.16, in Applied Science 100, the
purpose of which is to elect on
exeutive  for   1937-38.
HISTORICAL   80CIETV
There are a few vacancies for
third year people in the society.
Applications will be received by the
Secretary, Prances Matheson, up to
October  7. Four
THE      UBY S S E Y
Friday, October 1, 1937
$40,000 Monument To Student Effort
SECTION OF 430 YEAR OLD
TREE   IS   ON   DISPLAY   HERE
By BOB KINO
When Columbus ln 1492 sighted
the tropical shores of the WeBt
Indies, he was neither cognizant of
nor Interested ln the fact that on
the far western limits of the great
continent he was discovering stood
an insignificant little Cedar sapling,
proud ln its flrst year of victory in
the struggle for existence.
But one of myriads, this young
tree survived for centuries the ravages of Are and flood, eventually
emerging as a fine example of the
majestic Western Red Cedars which
typify the natural beauty ot British
Columbia.
A section of this 430-year-old forest giant, cut In the University area
ln 1927, has been preserved, and la
at present on display in Room 203
of the Applied Science building at
U. B. C.
The gently undulating fronds of
that stately sentinel silently greeted Captain Vancouver, anchoring
off   Point   Qrey   In   1796,   and   it
seemed but a fraction of time Bince
the Spanish ships had come, marvelling at the silhouetted boughs
against the sky,
Simon Fraser was doubtless too
pre-occupled to note the murmuring branches above him as he saw
the estuary which bears his name
broaden into the sweeping Quit of
Oeorgla. Countless Indian skirmishes, and perhaps more peaceful
scenes must have been witnessed
as the Cedars shadow slowly grew
with the years. Had it eyes, think
of the sunsets it might have seen!
Time does not exist for such a
giant, and yet this Cedar Is but a
child 'among trees. In Capllano
Canyon, until six years ago, stood
another of the same species which
ln 1931 had lived 1885 years as we
measure time, while ln California
hundreds of Redwoods still stand
Arm against the windy sky, as they
have for three and often four thousand years. Mow they must scoff
at this eulogy of a tree which was
born  when  they  were old!,
I
Are you taking a shy lirtle freshette to the rugby game and tea dance
tomorrowP Or are you going with the co-ed who has been the best girl for a
long time. Whichever it is, she'll appreciate your company ever so much more
if you send her a chrysanthemum to show off her new sports coat and tea
dress.
MOWN IKOS., AT 665 GRANVILLI ST., make up special chrysanthemum corsages in all the autumn shades for only 50 cents. Ask her what
shade will suit her ensemble then phone Brown Bros.—Sey. 1414. They'll send
a corsage to her before she leaves for Varsity on Saturday morning.
•*        *        *H
We want to know why the Phi Delts have a gas mask at their fraternity
house.
+        •*        *
THI  RUSSIAN   DUCHISS  LABORATORIES are having   the entrance   to
their salon AT 761 GRANVILLI ST. remodelled and have had to temporarily
remove their neon sign. But they're still there, and what is more important,
they're still giving their permanents to university students af a special
reduction of 50%.
It's hard to believe, but they use their regular French Oil solution which
leaves your hair just as soft and natural looking as if it had never been
permanented.
You'll not only be pleased with your permanent, but you will be really
thrilled with the clever way the Russian Duchess operators set your wave so
that it can be combed into so many different styles. You can forgi one
continuous roll around your head if you're in a hurry for lectures and yet
break  it up into romantic groups of curls for an important date.
-X        -*        -X
It seems that the big sister of one of the freshettes who attended the
Frosh Smoker is quite worried about her little sister's reputation Pep Club
members are dangerous people.
-X -fc *X
DIL RAIN!, AT 718 ROISON ST., is carrying those sporty little suede
hats you've been admiring on the passers-by for the last two weeks. And better
still, they have not only the calottes, but a most interesting variety of shapes
in shades matching their soft wool sports suits. Just the thing for Saturday's
rugby game.
-X        *        *
There's one extra student  in the teacher's training course  this year and
all  because he met "the girl"   this summer.   And  .  .  .  well he wants to be
self-supporting just as soon as he possibly can.
•X -X -X
Have you nothing in the way of footwear to show off on Saturday afternoon? Then dash downtown this afternoon to RAE-SONS ■UDGIT SHO* on
the mezzanine floor of Rae-sons regular store at 6AA GRANVILLI ST. and
look over their sport styles. Rae-sons have the largest selection of sport
oxfords on  the Pacific Coast.
Just arrived from California are several models of reverse calf in all the
neutral shades as well as the new hunter's green and Scotch rust. They come
in several styles, with and without the new shawl tongue.
■***■¥
We are wondering who the freshman was who phoned Miss Moore and
asked her the price of dancing lessons to prepare him for the Frosh Reception.
He's taking two lessons at one dollar per.
-X        *        *
You'll be going to twenty rugby games throughout the term and some
of them will be mighty cold affairs, so why don't you get a pair of heavy
gloves and be sure of having warm fingers all year. WILSON'S GLOVI AND
HOSIIRY SHOP AT 575 GRANVILLI ST. are carrying Pigskin and Goatskin
gloves with stitched seams at the lowest possible prices.
-X * -X
Have you seen the Sc. '39 man with a university crest in bead work on
a white buckskin jacket?
-X   .    *X        -X
Tomorrow's rugby game will be a literal fashion show, ,so you simply
won't be able to get away with wearing your old hat. THI B. UTLEY ARMSTRONG HAT SHOP ON SOUTH GRANVILLI are carrying all sorts of sporty
models and each is individually designed in the shop.
-X        *        -X
Some people think the near riot at the Mixer was entirely to do with the
competition for a certain petite freshette. The Zets almost fought among
each other.
-X «X -X
You can find just the thing to brighten up your sports suit at THR
LINGIRII SHOP ON SOUTH GRANVILLI. The store has the larrjest stock
of blouses you can find anywhere and each one of them cleverly different.
If you want to transform a tailored suit into something dressy to wear on
the dance floor a long-sleeved sanr> or the new |ersey silks are just the thing.
On stock at present are clever little sheers in white, navy and one in
scarlet, as well as sporty silks with a zipper down the back. And best of all
the prices are as low as $2 98.
*X        -X        -X
For the special benefit of the students THE DOLPHIN is opening at
eight o'clock in the morning now. A couple of the campus literary lights
dropped over early the other morning for coffee after a late party the night
before, and although they found the waitresses unprepared, they were served
m front of an open fire and returned  to  the campus  in much better spirits.
When you come in to the lounge ring the little service bell on the table
in case  the waitress hasn't beard you coming  in,
|   SPONSORED PLAN   |
Jay Gould, ex-president of the
Alma /yAater Society, who led
last year's council in the effort
to have a varsity stadium built.
Through his efforts, government assistance with the project
was given to the student body,
and the $40,000 bond issue approved by the society.
Freshman Registration
At Alberta Lower
Than Previous Year
UNIVERSITY OP ALBERTA,
Edmonton, Oct. 1 (WIPU) — Another session began at the University ot Alberta with Freshmen
registration early this week. While
the number of newcomers was
down over last year, the opinion ot
officials was that the 1937 Freshman was older, more experienced
and better academically equipped
than his predecessors.
The reason for this Is the new
entrance    regulations    requiring
senior   matriculation   before   entrance.    Thla   stiffening   of   requirements  reduced the  number
of   Fresh lee  to  382,   almost  one
hundred   leaa  than   the   total   of
last   year.
Instead   of   being   greeted    with
kicks  and  blows,  the  Frosh  found
themselves     almost     overwhelmed
with kindness, in a round of gaiety
including    dances,    pep    rallies,    a
smoker for the men, and a tea for
the  women.
Since the abolition of hazing ln
initiation during 1933, the Student
Union haB built up a Freshman
Week program that has been gradually improved until every moment
of the week is made use of. Known
by a green and gold badge, designated Freshie, only Freshmen
could  attend   these  functions.
LB CBRCLB FRANCAI8
The flrst meeting of t,e Cercle
Francals will be held at the home
of Dr. W. Tipping, 5416 Cypress St.,
on Tuesday, October 5, at 8 p.m.
An invitation is open to all Interested. Take No. 6 or 7 cars and get
off at 41st and Cypress.
Gould Praises
Building Work
Done At Varsity
Government's Generosity
Pays the Interest On
Student Loan
"The new stadium is a monument
in concrete and "teel to the foresight and courage of the undergraduates of the university," stated Jay
Gould, last year's A.M.S. President,
tn a radio address over CJOR on
Tuesday evening.
"It Is a monument .to them personally,"   he said,   "because  the
stadium was not donated as a gift
nor erected by the Board of Governors,    but   was    planned   and
payed for by the concerted efforts
of the studenta themselves."
Mr.   Gould   paid   tribute   to   the
generosity  of the  Provincial  Government in endorsing   the   $40,000
bond  issue  voted  by  the  students
last spring and in offering to pay
the interest on the loan if the students saw flt to borrow the money.
"A recital of the facilities of the
stadium   reveal   it   in   its   function
other  than   as  a   grandstand,"   he
pointed out.   "Underneath the spectators decks is what amounts to a
complete    athletic    centre—offices,
coaches' rooms, locker and dressing
rooma, an assembly hall for athletic
instruction, and special storage accommodation for equipment."
ACCOMMODATION INCREASED
"The athletic equipment and accommodation at our B. C. university
has   been,   until   now,    somewhat
meagre," he stated.   "For at least
Ave years past the student body at
Point Grey has been steadily planning and working towards the goal
of an adequate stadium and athletic
centre. #
"By a courageous willingness to
undertake a large financial obligation, namely, the bond issue, the
students have now achieved that
goal."
Carey and Dr. Pringle
to Speak at Church
Services for Frosh
Following the precedent established last year, a special aervice
for freshmen and other newcom-
ere to the University will be held
next Sunday night, October 3, in
Canadian  Memorial Church.
Dave Carey, president, will preside over the service, which Is
under the sponsorship of Students' Counoil. Rev. Dr. Oeorge
Pringle, who spoke to the freshmen last year, will again deliver
the  address.
Informal firesides, to be held
for the frosh before the church
servloe, have again been ar-
ranged by oampus exeeutivee. A
number of Faoulty members and
undergraduatea have lent their
homes for the occasion, and will
Invite their guests personally. All
men and women new to Varaity
wilt be Included In the Invitations.
Best Wishes to
the U.B.C.
from
and
THOMPSON
Architects
B. BOE LTD
PLUMBING
STEAM and HOT WATER
HEATING
Office and Showroom
652 SEYMOUR ST.
SEYMOUR  1568
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Established 1905
Campbell & Grill Ltd.
SHEET METAL WORK
TAR AND GRAVEL ROOFING
WARM AIR SYSTEMS
VENTILATING
1236 SEYMOUR ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
**
TRUE MIX"
CONCRETE
WAS USED
THROUGHOUT THE CONSTRUCTION
OF THE STADIUM.
supplied by
DIETHERS LTD.
PLANT ANO OFFICES
GRANVILLE ISLAND
VANCOUVER, B.C.
*
AKIlSfS  I'HOrOt N<,K<VVf K\ IIKIHOIH'IKS   SFIKIOrVI'IRS
CLELANDKENT
ENGRAVING   COMPANY   LI-MITED
r,14   CAAAIVII    SI - VANC OUVhR- l»-C- Friday, October 1, 1937
THE      UBYSSEY
Five
Stadium  Opening  Long Anticipated
CHANCELLOR, PRESIDENT
KICK-OFF TO START GAMES
One minute of silence will follow,
as the crowd stands ln silent tribute to university students who
lost their lives during the past summer.
Part played by these students ln
the building of the stadium will
thus be signalized with this impressive tribute.
PRESENTATION
Dave   Carey,   prealdent   of  the
Alma   Mater   Sooiety,   will   then
hand   over   the   atadlum   to   tha
Chancellor, a gift of the student
body   to   the   university,   a   gift
worth 140,000, and paid for entirely by the atudenta.
In a brief speech of thanks, Dr.
McKechnie   will   acknowledge   the
gift, and then introduce Dr. Weir.
The   minister  of   education   will
formally open the stands.
BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Presentation of the Canadian
Basketball Championship Trophy
will follow. Walter Hardwick, president of the B. C. Basketball Association, will speak, and Dr. Weir
will preaent the cup to Jimmy Bardsley, captain of the team who led
Varsltys team to the Canada championship.
Varsity and Knights ot Columbus
will 'meet in the second game of the
afternoon, a Canadian football
match starring Varsity's much-
talked-ot  new  squad.
President L,. S. Kllnck will officiate at the kick-off of the second
game.
The new stands wtll be decorated
in university colors for the gala affair, and everything possible ls being planned for the success of the
afternoon's games and ceremonies.
The Alma Mater Society will provide free bus service trom Sasamat
Street direct to the stadium.
Tickets for the opening are already on sale at Oeorge Sparling's
sporting goods store down town,
and are priced within the reach of
all.
(Continued From Page' Ono)
Student passes will be aeeepted
at the game, with apecial atanda
for the atudenta being oreoted for
the day.
Small eanea with U. B. O. pen-
nants  on  them  will   bo  aold  on
the oampua Saturday and today,
and It la hoped that all students
going  to  the  game  will   provide
themselves with these.
Opening of the stadium will end
a   long   period   of   preparation   tor
the    moment    when    the    campus
would   be  provided   with  adequate
sport facilities.
EVERY FEATURE PLANNED
For years, money has been spent
ln grading the site, and laying the
groundwork for the majestic stadium that now stands on the campus.
This year, Students' Council has
spent most of Its time and energies
on the stadium opening program.
Every "oature of Saturday's affair has been thrashed out and prepared in order that there be no
hitch ln the proceedings.
Hardest working individual has
been the A. M. 8. office manager,
Mr. Horn, who has been kept busy
day and night in connection with
stadium matters.
When tho games on Saturday
are over, and tha erowd  loaves
the grounda, student officials will
settle  down  to the  long Job  df
making the new stadium pay.
Frequent   major   gamea   will   be
played   on   the .campus   this   year,
and during the years to follow.   As
much as Is  possible, varsity  sport
will stick to the campus from now
on.
This policy will have the two-fold
result of arousing more student interest ln sport, and providing paying crowds who can assist in raising the funds to make actual ownership of the stadium by the university an accomplished fact, for
the $40,000 bond Issue ot last year
Is expected to be paid off ln less
than  a  decade.
COAL
for every purpose.
BUILDING MATERIALS
Of   every   description, including
Cement,    Lime,     Brick, GYPROC,
INSULITE   Wall   Board, Insulation
Materials, etc.
EVANS, COLEMAN & EVANS, LIMITED
Foot Columbia Avenue Telephone: Seymour 2988
'•iiii'iriiiiiiiiiii
IIIIIHIIHIHIIIIKtllllllllllltlMtMtl'lttllllHHIIIIIIIIIIIIItMlllllll
Buckerfields, Ltd.
offers its
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
ALMA    MATER    SOCIETY
on their
WORTHY ACHIEVEMENT
GRASS SEED AND FERTILIZER
FOR YOUR  BEAUTIFUL  FIELD
was supplied by
BUCKERFIELDS, LTD.
iHiiMiHimmimiiHimii
No Ubysseys to Be
Given at Pub Office
Starting with thla iasue, no
Ubysseys will be given out from
the publication offloe between
11.30 m.m, and 1 p.m. on Tueedaya
and Prldaya.
Student circulation atarta at
11.46 on theae daye, and papere
mmy be found In the following
plaoea:
1. Auditorium lobby.
2. Foot of oaf atepa.
3. Foot of atalra at eaoh end
of Arta Building and at eaoh end
of  Applied   Sclenoe   Building.
4. In Meehanloal and Eleotrleal
buildings.
6. At eaoh end of the ground
floor and on tha third floor of tho
Selenee Building.
The number of Ubyaseys Is Hm*
Ited; do not waste your oopy, aa
the offloe aupply frequently le ex-
hauated on tho day of publication.
TRANSPORTATION WANTED
Transportation wanted for woman student from New Westminster.    Apply  Dean of  Women.
$130,000 Spent
By Students On
U. B. C   Buildings
Dave Carey Outlines
Growth of Campus
In the Last Decade
The genial voice of A.M.S. Prexy
Carey wafted over the air waves
Tuesday evening from station CJOR
in tribute to the efforts of the U.
B.C. students in contributing to the
building program of the university
more than 9130,000,
Reviewing the history of student 'achievement   slnoe   tho   re*
moval of U.B.O. from "the squal-
or and filth of Fairview," Oarey
told of the beginning of ths on*
ward   maroh   In   1926   when   tho
Alma Mater fee was raised from
97.00 to S10.00 to make possible a
940,000  bond   Issue  for the  construction of tho gymnaalum.
"This bond Issue was due ln 1933
bu twas amortised In 1935 — nine
years earlier," he stated.
"At the same time playing fields
were Inadequate for the teams be-
Compliments
of
CANADIAN
WESTERN
LUMBER CO
LIMITED
FRASER MILLS,
B. C.
Ing produced, and in 1929 a site
was selected and the preliminary
work was done, Anally being completed, together with cinder track
and other facilities at a cost of
•19,000."
FEE  RAISED AGAIN
The raising of the A. M. S. fee
ln 1933 by one more dollar was accomplished for the purpose of perfecting the drainage system, he told
his radio audience, and since then
the students have turned  their at
tention to the wider aspects of the
building program.
"It has long been our desire to
have a student Union Building, and
lt seemed a fitting tribute to Dean
Brock that such a building be erected to his memory." By actual cash
the students have contributed 921,-
000, while a motion was passed at
an A. M. S. meeting authorising a
bond issue of 910,000 when tbe
building began."
Congratulations
to
The University of
British Columbia
on its
Splendid Stadium
and hearty congratulations to the Alma Mater
Society, whose efforts have made it possible.
Since its inception twenty-two years ago, its
Athletic Associations have been conspicuously
successful in fostering Sport and keenly sensible
of the place which Sport should occupy in relation to the basic purpose. We are warmly proud
of our University and of its eminence among the
seats of learning, and join very sincerely in its
pleasure in this notable addition to its equipment.
THE  BUREAU  OF   PROVINCIAL   INFORMATION
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS VICTORIA, B.C.
CONGRATULATIONS - UB.C
Upon the completion of the Stadium project another milestone has been passed in the development of the University
of British Columbia, Canada's youngest University.
The students of the University are to be commended on
the initiative and energy which they displayed in conceiving and carrying forward a plan of this magnitude.
MONCRIEFF AND VISTAUNET join others in commending
students upon their achievement and in wishing them an
equal measjire of success jln whatever future endeavor they
may undertake.
MONCRIEFF & VISTAUNET
CONTRACTORS
119 West Pender Street
Seymour 1253 STADIUM   OPENING   TILTS
Eng. Rugby—Varsity vs. Rowing Club.
Can.   Football —Varsity  vs.  K.  of  C.
ALL.   STUDENT   PASSES   WILL  BH
HONORED.
Six
STADIUM   OPENING   TILTS
Eng. Rugby—Varsity vs. Rowing Club.
Can.   Football — Varsity   vs.   K.   ot   C.
ALL STUDENT PASSES WILL BE
HONORED.
Friday, October 1, 1937
Samples of Our
RUQBY
and
FOOTBALL
SHOES
Are On Display at tha
ALMA MATER OFFICE
Lisle Fraser
Two Stores
1020 Granville Street
719 Pender Street West
VANCOUVIR, I. C.
Dancing Evary Wednesday
and Saturday
Special Coll.gl.ts Danes* l*sry Friday
PALOMAR
DK SANTIS MS hli IS.pliu ershwtra
— Canada's QrtalMt Daiui Band —
featuring tsnsatlMal |TH_L LAND,
CHUCK GALS and riOYO SIMPSON
•n ««llt.
■nqulr* now rasarrllni rinUI af ballraam tor
your dub danio. SatltfMtory arranaomanU
mad*, no maltor how imall your ar$inliatlon.
UNIVERSITY-
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
NORMAL and SCHOOL
BOOKS BOUGHT and
SOLD.
BUSY "B"
Book Store
508 RICHARDS ST.
Wilton To Coach
U. Oarsmen
Two Major Regattas
For Next Term
Varsity oarsmen who In March
gave the Washington 150-pounders
one of Its closest races by shooting
across the finish line a mere boat-
length behind the Huskies, look
forward to turning the tables as
they start a new year with the
added  services  of  a  new  coach.
Professor Wilson, tralnsr of
Kelowna rowing stars In the past
few years, oomes to U. B. C. with
a wealth of rowing and ooaohlng
experience. Besides turning out
first-rate oarsmen In the Interior,
he rowed at Durham Unlveralty
while a oollege  undergraduate.
Plans of the club call for at least
two major regattas next term while
arrangements are under way for a
Thunderbird crew to meet a junior
V. R. C. crew this term. All men
interested in rowing are urged to
turn out to a meeting to be announced for next week. Organization and time for practices on the
Coal Harbour course, will be the
business.
USHERS   WANTED
The Pep Club requires the assistance or about eight students as
ushers for Saturday's game. Will
those interested please get lu
touch with Van Perry or Orant
Cameron.
Students are asked to park west
ot a line drawn from the Auditorium ntttldlng doors on Saturday, to
allow room for the outside cars
coming  to  the  game.
Pigskin Parade about3:30
Footballers To
Play Columbus
By ORMI DIER.
Maury Van Vliet's thundering
berd of Thunderbirds are rapidly
rounding Into form to be ready for
the gala opening of the imposing
new Stadium on this eventful next
Saturday.
The Varaity fields a young, In-
experienced squad against tha
seasoned veterans of tha K. of C.
Club, and tha Indications ars now
that tho young follows will
bring home tha baoon, or at least
a good slice of It. If oampus con*
fldenea of tha students la eon*
veyed to tha grunting grlddars by
game-time, they will be ready to
taokle any four teama this aids of
Slam, and than aak for more.
Even the freshest freshie says
"Wa   oan't   loss."
BITTER  BATTLE
From the reports of both camps,
the signs Indicate a battle to the
bitter end, with youthful enthusiasm on one side, opposed by experienced ardor on the other. The
Blue and Qold boys will be ready
to do or die for Alma Mater, while
the K.C. fellows claim "they shall
not  pass."
If pre-game Injuries mean anything, both teams are really out for
blood. On the Varsity bench will
be two stalwarts from the regular
line-up, while the K. of C. Club
will miss no less than three. If
the lads play that seriously ln practice, it's a cinch bet that they
won't be laying back when they get
into a real tussle, so it looks like
no quarter on either side, and winner take all.
Neither team haa had a long
practice grind and aignala may
ba a bit haay yet to aome of the
boys, but what they lack In polish
thsy will make up In apirit and
determination. The Thunderbirds
are assured of plenty of vocal,
aa well aa moral aupport when
the eheerlng aeotlon turns on ths
old raule-dazzle and rah-rah to
urge tho padded ohapa of U. B. C.
onto viotory.
STARTERS TOPS
Lineups are Just about as changeable as the proverbial female, but
Varsity will probably start somewhat as follows: Evan ap Roberts
at left half; Freshman Aubrey Qrey
in fullback position; with "Hunk"
Henderson and Dave Lewis filling
out the backfleld. End positions
will be held down by Bert Horwood
and John Pearson, and guard positions will be filled by Chuck Campbell and Jim Harmer. Russ Keillor
and Carson Magulre will start as
tackles, with Oscar Orr snapping
the ball  back.
This array of football talent will
be backed by an equally strong
squad of reserves ready at any moment to spring into the breach and
plug the holes. Ace linemen, who
may even start, depending on the
vagaries of Lady Luck, are Art
Deptford, Moanin' Lowe, and centre-
man Lee Straight. The backfleld is
enhanced by Jack Ross, speedy
Rann Matthison of basketball fame,
Aser Rothsteln, and Tom Williams.
Soccer Hopeful
Juniors Go Up
Although no practice game has
been scheduled for Varsity soccerites this Saturday because of the
Stadium opening, Coach Hitchlns'
boys are steadily rounding into
shape for their opening tussle. October  9th.
Manager Norman Free reports
that the Juniors, who performed so
creditably for the "U." last year in
the O.V.A.A. League, have entered
the Second Division of the V. and
D. Lengue for this year; a big jump
for the boys, but. we feel sure
they'll  justify   their   promotion.
I    "HUNK" ALL SET
Ralph "Hunk" Henderson, shown
here in basketball strip, takes on
a new role tomorrow when he
dons the studs and pads of
Canadian football against the
Knights of Columbus, in the
second game of the Stadium
Opening  double-header.
GIRLS' MURALS
ORGANIZED
Archery, Golf, Even
Dancing on the Books
Badminton, archery, golf, rhythmic exercises, yes, even tap dancing, entices the wise young freshette to the gym these days.
To them the main problem seems
to be lack of time and strenuous
manipulation of timetables ls In
order as up-to-date co-eds try to
squeeze ln the extra hours that
"make" their course.
PERFECT FIGURE
Quaint  folk   dances,   eharaoter
onea and modern tap dancing are
for the  luoky girls who have no
10 o'olooks on Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday     and     Friday,     while
rhythmic exercises, tumbling and
floor work at 11 on the aame days
ars  quite the  vdgue   In  attaining
the  perfeot figure so dear to all
feminine hearts.
Golf,  the   sport  of  ladles  of  leisure   and   a  big   standby   for   the   future,  comes  at  10  o'clock on  Wednesdays with practices any time on
the    University   Golf    Course   at   a
reasonable  fee   per  round.
ATHLETIC   MAJORS
For future leaders in the field of
physical training, the classes ln
"games and how to teach them"
and "recreational leadership" loom
as athletic majors.
Intramurals in volleyball (this
term) and badminton, and basket-
hall (in the spring) will all draw
their quota of followers. These
games are on Monday and TueBday
antl start at 12.15 sharp (please
note).
Inter-class archery will probably
start this fall, while dame rumor
has If that an inter-collegiate tournament relayed by telegraph might
be arranged with other Canadian
universities.
LOST
Parker and Haswell zoology text.
Finder please notify K. S. Weaver,
Arts   Letter   Rack.
Dobbie's Team
Battle Rowers
To the English Rugegrs goes the
historic honor of being the flrst
to wing over tbe velvet green turf
ln front of B. C. Varsity's brand
new stadium.
With banners, flags, even rags
waving the gladiators on to battle,
and wltb a special band blaring
forth increased spine-tingling sensations, .■ e olde ruggers will trot on
to the field at 2 o'clock aharp to
open hostilities.
Varsity's former "Wonder Team"
will glare at, and tear Into the Vancouver Rowing Club Senior fifteen
In this Stadium debut. And 'twill
be "anything goes" right from the
first whistle ln this mammoth tussle.
NO "WONDER TEAM"
Although Coach Dobbte's '37-38
outfit wtll no longer be panned
"Miracle" men, It's a sure thing that
all former stars should be more
than replaced by additional scrap-
piness, and a determined will to
win.
If tho glory of viotory In a historic battle la not enough to mako
all true-blue Varaity lads see
"red," there's an added Incentive
to wreak havoe with the Downtown oaramsn's squad. In fact,
there are two "Incentives."
WILSON, WILLOUGHBY
OUT  WITH  V.  R. C.
Both these "Incentives" were ace
members of last year's Blue and
Gold Miller Cup champs—Art V'il-,
loughby and Lyle Wilson. These
speedsters, going the way of all
graduates, have tossed their lot in
with Alma Mater Rowing, and accepted posts on her flashy three-
quarter  line.
But there's gloom 'midst all this
optimism. Captain Dobble will be
minus two star threes when he
starts his gunning for victory In his
first start tomorrow.
Howie McPhee, one of the fleetest rugby players ln Canada, will
be using those same rapid strides
to burn the Chllllwaek track on the
same day as the tilt. And. sophomore College will confine hlB yaTd-
gaining antics to the second and
third tiers, row four In the Stadium
itself. College may be out for some
time with a bad hoof.
Hoewever,   the   Dobbiemen   still
have plenty of super-charged artillery to train on the Rowers.
FULLBACK BIRD
With the greatest fullback in
Western Canada, Johnny Bird,
backing up all miscues, the Collegians have an Al three line to sweep
through the Rowing defense. Raw-
boned Strat Leggatt and three newcomers: Teagle, Tremblay and Mc-
Crae, will bear the brunt of the attack, while Captain Dave Carey,
and Freshman Ted McPhee will
show in the half and five-eighths
spots.
And for the heaving duties in the
forward line, Robertson, Andrews,
Wallace, Billings, Tupper, Pyle,
Madeley and Robson will heed the
call to arms tomorrow.
—F.  J.  T.
GRID DOUBLE-HEADER IN STADIUM OPENING
Rugby Fifteens To Open
Stadium Hostilities at 2;
AGGIES PLAN
CLEAN-UP IN
MURAL SPORT
Plans for a closely knit organization of Aggie teams for competition ln Intramural sport were outlined by Wilfred Pendray to the
first meeting of the Agriculture
Undergraduate Society, Tuesday.
"We have fewer students," Pendray
stated, "but as a result we can organise better than either Arta or
Science, and there ls no reason why
we should not clean up the Intramurals this year."
Aggie   president   Paul  Trussel,
In   charge   of   tho   mooting,   an.
nounced tha proposed sooial program, whieh Included tho annual
field   day,   banquet,   barn   danoe,
Agassis trip, and weakly dlaeua-
alon olub  meetlnge.
Maurice   Welch,   treasurer,   summed   up  the   present   condition   of
Aggie 'finances  by   saying,   "There
aren't any."
—KING.
INTRAMURAL   BASKETBALL
Ootober 6, Wedneaday—
Education   vs.   Aggies,   12.10.
Arts '38 vs. Science '38, 12.60.
Ootober 8, Friday—
Arts '39 vs. Science '39, 12.10.
Arta '40 vs. Science '40, 12.60.
Ootober 13, Wednesday-—
Arts '40 vs. Science '40, 12.10.
Science '41 vs. Arts '41, 12.60.
BASKETBALL. MEETING
There will bo a meting of all
thoso Intoreated In baaketball at
12.16 today In tho gym. Through
*n unfortunate error It was published that thla meeting would
be held Wednesday noon. We
apologise for any Inconvenience
that may have been caused. Thla
Is an Important meeting and all
thoso Interested are urged to
attend.
Grass Hockey Facing
Scarcity of Forwards
A large number of defense players, and too few forwards turned
out to tbe first Women's Grass Hockey meeting to discuss plans for
the coming year. It was found that
seven of last years players will not
be here this season, so that newcomers have a fine chance of making the Senior team. Freshettes
this year seem unusually good, and
ought to provide material for a tiptop squad. The first game will be
played October 9, and practices
are scheduled for next week.
Dr. C. M. Whitworth
Dentist
Telephone llliet 17M
Hours: 9 to 5
Saturday: 9 to 1
Cor.  10th and Sasamat St.
FRESH ETTES:
RATE wall whan "RUSHED" by tha Graak Lattar Sociatias
_L_^Z.c^_i   Tt>€^_^   Opp^Orpheum
1
887 Granvilla
Straat
Theatre
Aftar   tha   Big   Opaning
Gamas . . . Danca at tha
SPANISH GRILL
HOTEL VANCOUVER
H. Jessie How, B.A.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER
Popular Library
4451 W. 10th AVENUE      P. G. «7   *
*
"THE  U.   B.   C.   OS"   DANCING"—
Freshmen or post-graduates will And our courses easy to learn, with
a quickness that amases. Special rates September and October to
Varsity   students.
BALLET TAP
BALLROOM
LILAS MOORE
Rsco.nlstd Authority on Danclna*
T0»  West  Georsia  Street
Trinity  1710
BADM INTON
Rackets, Prassas, Covers, Shuttles, ate.   Expert Restringing by
Trinity 1639 BEV. RHODES       726 Seymour Street
The Tennis and Badminton Specialist
TROPHY FOR HOOPERS
In between gamee at the Varaity atadlum opening on Saturday the cup denoting Canadian
supremacy In men'e basketball
will be presented to the Senior
team.
Jimmy Bardsley, captain of
last year'a team, will accept the
cup on behalf of his team-mates
and It la planned to have aa
-nany aa poaaible of the vlotorl
oua regulara on the platform
for the  preaentatlon.
"WE ARE YOUR DELIVERY SERVICE
B. C. DISTRICT TEL. and DELIVERY CO. LTD.
Rear,   BIO W_aT Hasting* St. Seymoun 8188
aft-h  a  p.m.,   A_ao   Sundays  and  holidays.   S_v.   8184 K
Head Office:   Marine Building
trucks,   motokcyclei  and  bike miminolrt
available at all. times
VARSITY AND HIGH SCHOOL
BOOKS WANTED
Technical, Scientific, etc.   Texts, Classics and the Languages.
Bring Them to the
VARSITY     BOOKSHOP
4521—10th AVE. WEST (The Bus Stop)
DINE & DANCE EVERY NIGHT!!
TO A FULL PIECE ORCHESTRA ... NO COVER CHARGE!
At One of Vancouver's
3    BEST    RESTAU RANTS
Where   the   Food   Tastes   Better
and   Costs   Mo  More
EMPIRE CAFE
160 W. Hastings — Downtown
NEW GOOD EATS
No.   1
619 W. Pender
Centre
NEW GOOD EATS
No. 2
938 Granville Uptown
_J

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