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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1959

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 .-.ivirP'.iTv
-^
W6 DAYS
Mt
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UB YSSEY
CLUBS
DAY
VOL. LXvn
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,  1959
No. 5
Staff Elects New Editor
"Mall; Factors" To Go
Ubyssey's new editor-in-chief was elected by acclamation
by the'newspaper staff Monday.
Editor-in-chief Kerry White, 22, is a second year student
in the Arts and Science Faculty.
"I was very disappointed that there were no other nominations for the post," White said.
UBYSSEY'S NEW EDiTOR-IN-CHIEF didn't get a chance to settle in his new office yesterday
before staffers were asking for decisions on newspaper problems. From left to right are Brad
Crawford, Bob Hendrickson and chief Kerry White.
B &G Super Claims
Parking Adequate
A recent issue of the Ubyssey headlined student dissatisfaction concerning parking facilities.
In' order to inform the student body as to the actual situation, Building and Grounds Superintendent Tom Hughes
supplied the Ubyssey with the following points of information:
I
Faculty as well as student
cars will be impounded for parking infractions.
2. Car owners who move cars
after receiving tickets will still
have to pay five dollar fines.
Student's marks will be withheld if they neglect to pay these
fines.
3. No one will use lot G unless that person has a lot G sticker. (Lot G will .contain only 260
cars although 300 of the 1000
persons  eligible  have  cars.)
4. 5000 sickers should equal
5000 cars, but the maximum cars
on campus will be 3000 for any
Hey I
n.
Newtditors Wanted
A new Publications Board
is being formed.
The editor-in-chief, Kerry
White,   will   choose  the   new
White will choose the new
board from written applications which may be submitted
by any and all persons qualified and interested.
Applications are to be submitted to the .Editor not later
than 12:30 Friday, October 2.
The positions vacant are
Managing Editor, City Editor,
- News Editor, Sports Editor,
Features Editor," C.U.P. Editor and Clubs Editor.
day. (sic) Many students obtain
stickers for family cars which
they will seldom use on campus.
Hughes assumes that 2000
registered cars will use the lots
only on special occasions. (It
does not seem reasonable that of
the 5000 cars registered nearly
half of them will seldom be
parked on the campus.)
Lot G will vanish if and when
the Fine Arts building is started.
(Which means that available
parking spacce will be depleted
by 260 spaces.)
Part of lot C will pass out of
existence in January because of
new construction.
(This will further increase the
lack   of parking   space.)
According to Hughes there is
ample parking space for every
student car and Buildings and
Grounds will provide more as
it is needed. (The Ubysey will
reserve judgment on the accur-
comprehensive student poll can
be taken.)
acy   of   this   statement   until   a
The bottleneck on University
Boulevard can be. completely
eliminated if students will enter
by another access route.
Stopping on the University
Boulevard is caused mainly by
students stopping their cars to
discharge or take on passengers.
(This may be true of outgoing
traffic in the afternoon but few
cars stop on the way in for
early classes.)
The Pub is getting organized.
As a temporary training
measure, the entire group of
applicants for positions on the
Publications staff has been divided into three staffs, each
of which is allocated to one
paper during the week. After
the Editorial Board members
have had a chance to judge
the calibre of each applicant's
work a permanent staff will
be selected.
For the present, will all
prospective pubsters please remember 10 appear al 12:30 or
as soon after as is reasonably
convenient ON THE DAY TO
WHICH THEY HAVE BEEN
ASSIGNED.
FFor example, those persons who contributed to last
Wednesday's paper will be expected  again tomorrow.
Evening Speech Class
By Janie Stevenson
Miss Janie Stevenson, L.R.-
A.M„ L.G.S.M.A., A.L.A.M., will
instruct courses in speech training and voice production, advanced speech training and pub-
li speaking.
All three courses will be limited to 25 students, and will be
conducted Mondays, Tuesdays
and Wednesdays, respectively,
commencing Sept. 28, 29 and 30.
Time is 8 p.m. in room 104 of
the  College of Education.
Registration for the course is
$18.00.
A fourth course entitled, "The
Fundamentals of Public Speaking", will be instructed by Dr.
Read Campbell. Classes will be
held Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m.
in room 107 of the College of
Education, beginning Oct. 14.
Fee for this course is $10.00.
Immediate effect on the Ubyssey will be the disappearance ol
White's column "Mall Factors".
"With my new duties I won't
have time to do the column," he
said.
DEMANDING DUTIES
An editor-in-chief's duties will
include writing editorials and
securing material for the editorial page, supervising all
stages of the paper's publication,
attending AMS meetings held
once a week, and selecting an
editorial board.
Under the AMS by-laws the
editor-in-chief is also responsible
for anything printed in the
paper.
"Our aims will be to. offer
constructive criticism,- to give
fuller coverage to engineering,
the sciences and professions,
and to have more feature stories
on campus life and institutions,"
the new chief said.
"Because of the fact that we
have very few experiences
people left from last year, our
toughest job will be to train an
efficient staff of good newspaper
men and women."
"I think we have the nucleus
3f a very competent staff,"
White said.
EDITORIAL BOARD
The new editor's most, important job in the near future will
be the picking of an editorial
board.
"We (when  the board  is   appointed) shall do our very bes
to keep within the smaller budget allotted to us this year bj
the AMS," he added.
White said"UBC is the third
largest university in Canada.
The paper should keep pace
with the university and still up
hold the campus traditions, ht
said.
A serious effort will be madi
this year to regain  the reput
tion   the   Ubyssey   held  a   fev
years ago, the new editor said.
White   worked   for   Ubysse:
last year as a feature writer and
general   reporter.  He   has   also
worked on the Vancouver Sun.
His ambition is to enter journalism.
'Tween Classes
Inside
Clubs   Day    8
Coffee   -1 8
Fall   Play    3
Frosh Queen 3
Our College System
is Obsolete .__ 3
Sports 7
UFOs To Be Aired
FLYING SAUCER CLUB
Dr. G. H. Williamson, anthr»«
pologist and explorer, will lecture on "Unidentified Flying Ob- -
jects" at noon today in Bu 108.
IliiKOIilll
ROWING CREW
Come to Room 216, Memorial
Gym, Thursday at noon if you
are interested in playing on one
of UBC's three basketball teams.
IIIIKOIIIII
GAMES ROOM
Pool and table tennis open today, 12:30, in Brock Extension.
IliiKOIilll
JAZZ  SOCIETY
Jazz Society presents Dixieland Jazz with the Lance Harrison Orchestra, Wednesday, 12:38
in the Auditorium. Admission
25 cents.
IIIIKOIIIII
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB
Very important meeting of all
big and small block holders on
Wednesday, 12:30, in the Women's Gym.
IIIIKOIIIII
PLAYERS'  CLUB
General meeting of all members, Tuesday, 12:30, in th«
Green Room.
IIIIKOIIHI
UBC BOOSTER CLUB
Anyone wishing to play in th»
UBC Pep Band please bring instruments to the Booster Club
booth on Clubs' Day in the Aroap
curies,   Thursday,   12:30.
!llli(0lll!l
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
First meeting in Bu. 219, Wednesday, 12:30. All Demolaya
Urged to attend.
IIIIKOIIIII
RAMBLERS
First general meeting in Phys>>
ics 200 Tuesday, 12:30.
IIIIKOIIIII
LPP CLUB
LPP presents Harold Pritch-
ett on Krushchev, his visit, his
peace plan; Tuesday, 12:30, Bu.
100.
IIIIKOIIIII
SAILING  CLUB
All persons interested in sailing meet in Arts 106, Tuesday,
12:30.
IIIIKOIIIII
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First regular weekly testimonial meeting will foe held in
Physics 202, Wednesday,  12:30.
IIIIKOIIIII
UN CLUB
Executive meeting, - Tuesday,
12:30, Room 256, Brock Extension.
IIIIKOIIIII
PREMED SOC
Everyone welcome to free get
acquainted movie "Breakdown".
Wednesday, 12:30, in Wesbrofck
100.
IIIIKOIIIII
VARSITY CHRISTIAN *  !
FELLOWSHIP
All members and those inter*
(Continued on page 3) PAGS^TWO
TH.E      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 2&th,  19§9<
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottaw*
MEMBER CANADIAN  UNIVERSITY PRESS
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15
Editor-in-Chief:   Kerry   White
Senior Editor: Wayne Lamb
Reporters   and   Desk:   Bob   Hendrickson,   Brad   Crawford,   Bob
Sterling, Anne Pickard, Diane Greenall, Stu Morison, Ross Munro,
Derek Allen, Allen Graves, Gary Hofne, Ralph Henderson, Colin
Landie, Jill Harker.
A Statement of Policy
This year the Ubyssey has been forced to rebuild from
the ground  up.
Because the experienced staff of last year, with -few
exceptions, have not returned to work on the paper, the
existing staff has an extremely difficult task.
The staff of the Ubyssey is asking for help from the
-student body as a Whole, from the various faculties, and the
faculty members.
They ask for an understanding of ^ the paper's present
position and problem, for more suggestions as tb what the
student body would like to see in the paper, and for more
articles of a provocative and informative nature.
! The student's council has asked the staff of the Ubys-
. ,sey to present what will be the editorial policy of the paper
for this year.
The staff has therefore decided that the aims of the
paper will be:
i ~        1.   To criticize (a) all the aspects of university life (b)
; -.ithe business of any and all governments;
2. To inform (a) students about their university by
publishing and explaining the budgets of the various organ-
iations (b) the public about university problems (c) the
provincial government about university problems.
3. To have faculty members write guest articles designed to provoke rebuttals from their colleagues;
4. To provide liberal coverage of all faculties. This
will mean that each faculty will have the opportunity to
have its work, history, aims, etc., explained a series of
features. By doing this, the student body as well as the
public will know what, for instance, the sciences are ac-
.coniplishing at the university.
This will also mean a maximum of co-operation between the Ubyssey and all faculties.
"        "5.    To be, as far as humanly possible, non-partisan,
politically.
do their utmost to publish the calibre of paper the third
-ado their ulmost to give this university the paper the third
. largest university in Canada deserves, but they need your
help.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Guest Editorial
The provincial government has a simple rule for dealing with opposition—turn the other cheek.
The effectiveness of this policy cannot be denied by
«ven the most violent anti-Social Crediter. Political scandal
a»d double-dealing that would have eclipsed the government of a more volatile region has left Premier Bennett
and his supporters smilingly unconcerned.
Criticism from almost all points has failed to penetrate
the government's wall of silence.
A recent case in point was the firing of David Barrett
:§S staff training officer at Haney Correctional Institute
because of political activities. Barrett's "crime" was to
actively campaign for the CCF nomination in Dewdney
constituency to run against Labor Minister Lyle Wicks in
the next provincial election.
Attorney-General Robert Bonner's comment on the
firing was brief: "Barrett engaged in obvious, open, partisan activity, in conflict with the tradition of government
service." The A-G omitted reference to the numerous
Social Credit supporters in the government service who
have not been fired after appearing on political platforms.
Barrett spoke at UBC last week. He denounced the
government action as "fascist tactics". The charge is serious and not without justification. It hasn't yet been answered and judging from past records, probably won't be.
The point is this: how far will this "rule of-silence"
extend, and what does it hide?
As election figures show, the policy of "turning the
*»$ier eheek" has been politically successful. But it is a
policy that cannot be tolerated by any responsible newspaper, jp^ticulaxly a uniy.ersity newspaper.
jBarrett's case is tihe Latest in a long line of disturbing
mritTCTTOrtf *ction£. We cannot afford to ignor, or forget
THE REASONS
Editor, The Ubyssey,;
Dear Sir:
The Ubyssey's main story on
Tuesday    about    the    parking
problem was  a  good story  as
far as it went. But it didn't go -
anywhere.
That the "parking problem
is still unsolved" is true, of
course, but it also couldn't be
more obvious. As a university
newspaper, The Ubyssey can
assume higher than average intelligence on the part of its
readers. Obvious journalism is
a glut on the market.
Somewhere behind, perhaps
far behind, of the problem, is
the reason for it. The Ubyssey
should make a serious attempt
to find out.
Too many cars for too little
space. That's the. problem, is
anything being done about it
besides fiddling with a cumbersome system of automobile
stickers? Is any serious attempt
being- made to obtain more
parking space? And what
about the half-empty faculty
parking lots that tempt me
every morning^-is there too
much parking space alloted to
the faculty.-
Answer these questions and
I'll send you some more.
Anonymous.
of every five Ubyssey staffers
become steers.
Trustfully   yours,
Jerry   Pirie,   2nd Ag.
Wayne Wickens, 3rd Ag.
Bob Krieger, 4th Ag.
i Lynn Warner, 3rd Ag.
Lome McRoy, 4th Ag.
Alan Cornwall 3rd Ag.
Art Stafford 3rd Ag.
Harold Steves
Maxine F. Hillary, 2nd Ag.
Sue March, 4th Ag.
(Ed. note: These students are
referred  to today's editorial.)
Infamous Attack
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The rather scurrilous article "The State of the Intellectual in Canada", which 'appeared in last Thursday's edition
of the Ubyssey, is an infamous
attack, obviously dictated by
personal animosity, against
certain members of the department of English of this University.
Rather than that such matter should be taken seriously
by the relative handful of people who have read it, I would
spring to the attack, but unfortunately, considerations of
both space and time prevent
his.
I am ' a three-foot midget,
with a very short life span.
Let me just say that bitterly object to a responsible newspaper printing tripe of this
sort.
James  Turner.
ONE OUT OF FIVE      PREJUDICE
Editor, The Ubbysey,
Dear Sir:
In reference to a note printed in the Sept. 24 edition of
the Ubyssey mentioning that
one out of every five Aggies
is a cow, we the undersigned
serve notice upon the staffers
of the Ubyssey or persons responsible, that if further derogatory remarks of this nature
are printed concerning Aggies
we will see to it that two out
Editor. The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
What do you think of this?
On the Registration Day all
first and second-year students
were given a couple of sheets
with the different courses and
the times of registration for
the necessary en's physical education courses. For the letters "N" to "Q" registration
was on Thursday, from 12:30
to 4:30 p.m. Being in that
group   I   went to  the Gym  at
3:45 and asked to be registered for ballroom dancing. Of
all the sections, not a single
one was left. A few of the
other boys wanted to register
in some other courses also got
the answer "Sorry, there is
none left." or "There is only
this section  left."
And what is going to be left,
for the group "T" to "Z"? Is
it a person's fault that his
name begins with "X", "Y"
or "Z"?
Embittered   Freshman.
COLD, HARD LUMPS
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
One of your reporters inter- '
viewed   me   today   concerning
the food in the university cafeterias. Since he caught me unaware I just stuttered that,
"It was fine, thank you."
But after thinking it over
for quite some time (five minutes) I changed my opinion.
I will not dispute that there
is nothing as bracing as UBC
coffee even though we must
chew it. What I will venture
to question is the huge amount
of gravy that covers all our
food. One begins to wonder
what lies beneath.
Every morning if we get up
at dawn and make it to breakfast we are served grapefruit
or oranges and given no means
to eat it. I will not elaborate
on the stained ties that emerge
,  from Acadia way.
The food is not always bad,
in fact supper is pretty good
if one doesen't have classes until 5:30 and doesn't get a cold
hard lump of food.
Please forgive me for gripping, Sir, but I have just run.,
out of money and I cannot afford another bottle of Bromo-
Seltzer.
Sincerely,
Jay Lester,
Ann  Wesbzrook Hall.
COLLEGE SHOP
OPEN DAILY IN THE BROCK EXTEHSION
11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
COME IN AND HAVE A LOOK AROUND
FEATURING
faculty sweaters and crests
pins for all faculties and clubs
crested UBC jewellery - cufflinks, tieclips, charms
UBC scarves
UBC jackets - for both fall and winter wear
UBC blazers and crests
shorts, faculty and UBC T-shirts
sweat shirts, sweat pants, hooded sweat shirts
school supplies and UBC stationery
and many other items
^0^l^/0UN^
OWNED AND OPERATED BY  THf  A,M,S.
m*m**m*iimmmmfmmmmmimmm Tuesday,  September 29th,   1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
HAPPIEST GIRL at Frosh Reception Saturday, was Fern Owen, pictured above being crowned Frosh Queen by President
Norman MacKenzie.   Barbara McClatchie and Liz McLennan were chosen as princesses.
Attention! You
Who Be Thespians
Any budding Thesbians about
the campus are urged to try out
for the fall play. This year's production will be satirist Peter
Ustinov's "Romanoff and Juliet."
The Player's Club has engaged 'CBC's Ian Thorne to direct. Those who saw "Charlie's
Aunt" last year will remember
that there was hardly a dry seat
in the house. Mr. Thome's very
capable direction was most instrumental in making that play
the hilarious, success that it was;
in fact, a large part of his fame
here rests on Mr. Thome's uncanny ability to get very professional results from comparatively inexperienced troupes. In
short he's an excellent fellow to
work with.
Those people who are interested in taking part in a first-
class production—thereby gaining fame, popularity, and a g-ood
excuse for wearing long hair (no
Peekpeeuuepeakpiqu
piquepikepookpeak
Pick a peck of Pique! Or
rather, for Pique. Razor witted
literati with a propensity for
lecherous, lascivious verse, familiar essays and nubile maidens,
are cordially invited to submit
prose, verse and playlets to the
humor magazine office in the
South Brock Upstairs Committee Room.
Pique (a dirty version of Look
and See), the illegitimate child
of Raven is the campus' oldest
established  humor magazine.
She has a thirst for young
authors' humor and young artists' work and girls to lay out.
In keeping with Pub tradition she will have much beer
and the like consumed at her
soignee soirees.
Copy deadline is October
10th, South Brock Upstairs
Committee Room.
Do come.
money) are hereby enticed to
wander into the Player's Club
Green Room which is situated
on the second floor in the Southwest corner of the Auditorium.
The times to come are:
Between 12:30 and 5:30 on
either Oct. 1st or 2nd; or on Saturday, Oct. 3 between 10:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m.
Drop in at any of the above
times you wish, but please—do
come if you are in the least inclined. Stage hands, prop-men
and lighting crews are needed as
well as actors.
LPP Will Explain
Russian Position
L.P.P. Organizer Harold
Pritchett, speaks today on
"Khrushchev—his visit and his
peace plan" at noon in Buchanan .100.
Pritchett has returned from
the Soviet Union within the last
three weeks and has a fresh
view of the Soviet people's
hopes for Khurshchev's and
Ike's meeting.
He will also have comment to
make on Soviet public reaction
to both the cool reception and
immense impact of Mr. "K's"
visit in America.
The LPP leader is no newcomer to U.B.C.
He spoke many times on campus especially in the years following the war when he was
Canadian head of the I.W.A.
Pritchett was one of the founding organizers and first International president of the I.W.A.
There will be ample time for
questions from the audience at
today's meeting.
UBC  Students
, Excellent
Room & Board Available
Call AL 4275
Right  Away
All musclemen interested in
competitive weight lifting should
attend the organizational meeting Tues. Sept. 29 at noon in
room 216 Memorial Gym.
Those unable to attend should
contact Westley Woo at TR.
9-1919.
Yukon CCFette to
Speak on Mr. K.
Grace Mclnnis, president of
the B.C.-Yukon CCF, will be
speaking in Buchanan 102 at
noon Tuesday, the 29th. Her
topic will be "Has Mr. K. Got
the Answer?" Besides her well
known speaking ability the timeliness of her topic makes this
meeting a must for all students
interested in politics, the international scene, and the nuclea$
threat.
Mrs. Mclnnis, who is the
daughter of . S. Woodsworth, the
first leader of the CCF in Canada, started her education at
UBC. From here she went on
scholarships to the University of
Manitoba, and after getting her
B.A. at that institution, studied
on a French Government scholarship for two years at the Sor-
bonne.
Since coming back to Canada,
Mrs. Mclnnis has continually
been involved in CCF activities.
She was first caucus secretary
of the new party, she married
long-time Vancouver MP Angus
Mclnnis, and she even represented Vancouver-Burrard in the
B.C. legislature from 1941 to
1945.
Her wealth of experience and
knowledge of provincial, national and international issues and
her dynamic personality ensure
that her talk in Bu 102 on Tuesday will be a stimulating one.
For Your Convenience
TWO BARBER SHOPS
Inside   the   Gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
MALE*ONLY
Room  &   Board
1  Single  $50
1 Double  $60
Apply:
2726 West 6th Ave.
at   McDonald
'Tween Classes
(Continued from page 1)
ested invited to Frosh Reception,
Thursday, 1:30 p.m. at 6062 Newton Wynd (one block from Law
Faculty.) *
.11111(011111'
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Perspective '59-'60. Students
speak at opening meeting Tuesday, 12:30, Bu. 104.
iiriKomn
CCF
Grace Mclnnis, president of the
B.C. Yukon section of the CCF,
speaks Tuesday, 12:30, Bui 102,
on "Has Mr. K. Got the Answer?"    All  welcome.
IIIKOIIII
DANCE CLUB
All frosh are invited to drop
in and see the club facilities in
the Brock Extension. Open all
day.
IIIKOIIII
FENCING CLUB
Special general meeting, on
Thursday, 12:30, Bu. 326 or Bu.
327. Persons interested in joining turn  out.     P.E.U.S.
General meeting Tuesday, at
12:30, 211-213 Memorial Gym.
All PE majors pleasee attend.
IIIIOIIII
FOOTBALL DANCE
Saturday 9-12, $1.50 couple,
$1 single ,John Fredrickson's Orchestra.
Do you know what law student Use torts for? I don't know
either.
Historian To Offer
Pathological Twist
vDr. C. "R. Fay, the eminent
economic historian, is scheduled
to deliver two free public lectures on the University campus.
The lectures will be given on
the first two Thursdays in October, Oct. 1 and Oct. 8. Both
lectures will be at noon hour,
and both will be in Buchanan
100.
Dr. Fay Was professor of economic history at the University of
Toronto from 1921 to 1930 and
taught at Cambridge University
from 1930 until his recent retirement.
He is noted for his research
in economic history and has published many books and papers
on the subject. He is also noted
as a colourful and compelling, if
somewhat eccentric, lecturer
and personality. Dr. Fay is over
eighty years old.
The title of the October 1 lecture will be "Pacific Discovery". The second lecture on October 8 will be entitled "Quarantine, scurvy, and smallpox as
factors in imperial history,"
UBC Evening Classes
Going Ultra-Modern
The attention of parents and
teachers is drawn to the U.B.C.
evening class program.
During the fall and winter
months, a series of courses of
special interest to these persons
will be featured.
Titles of the courses available
are: Values in Our Changing
World; Pre-School to School;
Teenagers in Modern Society;
The Development, Psychology
and Education of the Mentally
Retarded Child; Family by
Adoption; and Leadership and
Human Relations in Community
Groups.
The majority of these courses
will begin this week and will
presumably all be under way
by the end of the first week in
October. Those seeking further
information should write to or
phone the University Extension
Department, ALma 4600, local
528.
What You SfcouM Krww
About Y&ir flair
Can hair turn white ovemi;rh<?
Do "hair growing" tonics really
grow hair? And what r.bout the
use of hormonec? October
Reader's Digest telis c: some
false ideas a.".* mireonceptiona
about hair — and prr-scnts some
facts everyone can own. Get
Reader's DiR'.-st to&r.y — &i
articles of lasting interest, plus
a 1-o-n-g book  con-Ic «*!/•.«.,»«.
UNIVERSITY THEATRE DEPARTMENT
January Student Production
Arms and the Man
By George Bernard Shaw
CASTING OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
Introductory Meetings
FRIDAY,  SEPTEMBER  25—AUDITORIUM,   any fine   between 2:30-5:30.
MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 28—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
—12:30 noon.
* Casting Tfy-Ouls
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28. and WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 30—AUDITORIUM,  3:00-6:00. PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September „2 9th,  1959
QUALITY CANADIAN PRODUCTS CONTAINING QUALITY INCO NICKEL
New nickel-chrome
lined oven cooks
more evenly,
cleans more easily
The beautiful new range you see here is a marvel of
modern cooking efficiency. And a brilliant new concept
in design. It can be mounted on kitchen cabinets or
counter tops; or you can hang it on wall brackets at any
desired height. With slide-in burner units, a drop-leaf
cutting board, a rotisserie, automatic timers and heating
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But perhaps the most interesting and time-saving feature
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r i Tuesday, September 29th;  1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVH
UBC CHORAL SOCIETY'S new director, Harold Ball conducts choir rehearsal. Students are
welcomed to rehearsals which will take place in Physics 202 beginning Oct. 7. Rehearsal
time is 5:45 p.m. to 8 p.m. (See story page 8.)
Lectures Cut Quality
©^CoZ/ege £ ducat ion
vThe following is reprinted from The New Republic, Washington, D.C.
r        Thfough the figures given are for American colleges, the
same problem is faced by Canadian universities.
Nearly 3.5 million students will register this month   (in
the U.S.)   for some form of higher education—250,000 more
-than,last year.
To handle the increase, colleges are trying to. expand their
. faculties to about 270,000 teachers—20,000 more than last June.
With some 10,000 professors having retired or left the profession over the summer, a total of 30,000 recruits is needed. But
since   graduate  schools   last   June   granted   only  about 6,000
, Ph.D's to people  entering teaching,  what the  press  calls  a
"shortage of qualified teachers" has developed.
Stop-gap profs
For students in the classroom
. this "shortage"   does not  mean
that there will be 24,000 class-rooms without  teachers.  Somebody will be found to fill the
vacancies.
In most cases, this somebody
will be a man who lacks his
academic union card, and holds
versities, these apprentices will
only a B.A. or M.A. In the uni-
foe graduate students more or
less actively pursuing Ph.D's.
Many will be capable teachers,
closer to the undergraduates in
both age and outlook than their
more distinguished elders.
Expansion out
There  is   no   reason  to  hope
:that   universities   will   expand
their   graduate   schools   in   the
;next decade to  supply  colleges
.with 30,000  Ph.D's a year for
the  next   decade.   In   the   first
place, scholars profit by  keeping themselves in short supply.
.In the second place the academic
profession   has   neither   enough
prestige  nor   high   enough   salaries  to  attract  30,000 capable
graduate students annually.
At best we may  hope for a
third this number, which leaves
some 20,000 vacancies every
year until 1970, and perhaps
beyond, each of which will be
filled by someone whom both
colleges and other professors regard as unqualified.
Middle Ages
The only alternative to such
a future is to discover more
efficient ways to employ wihai
qualified teachers we have.
Most colleges use a lecture pedagogy which was invented in th.
Middle Ages, when there were
no books and students came to
class to hear the professor read
the manuscript.
A first step at reforming the
curriculum would be drastically
to reduce the number of lecture,
a student attends every day. Instead of three or four hours a
day in class, he might spend one
or two.
Read books
In the free time he would be
sent to the library to read
books—books which, if chosen
with a modicum of skill, would
prove far more exciting and instructive than the average college lecturer. Of course the stu-
University Theatre Department
For experience under expert guidancce
in
BACK-STAGE - SCENE CONSTRUCTION
LIGHTING - STAGE MANAGEMENT
Join Technical Apprentice Group
DARWIN PAYNE, UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL
DIRECTOR
invites all interested students to
I INTRODUCTORY MEET! NG
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 30 - 12.30 -SCENE SHOP
I
dents might not read these books
very carefully, but as any examination reader can tell you,
they don't listen to lectures very
attentively either.
And if they did learn to read
books, what an advance over
today's passive assimilation of
predigested ideas!   .
Two students for one
If students spent only 8 or 10
hours in class, instead of 15 or
20, two students would be no
more trouble than one is today.
The six million college students
of 1970 would be taught by the
250,000 teachers of 1959 without increasing the teaching load
an iota.
The only thing that would
have to grow would be the library.
What is more, doubling enrollment would mean doubling
tuition incoe, and if the size i
the faculty was constant, th
would provide handsome salary
increases. Thus by attracting
better men to the academic profession, the colleges could assure that the few classes the
student did attend would be
more competently taught.
Good lectures or bad?
The choice is this: The colleges can send students to 8 or
10 lectures by competent scholars each week, and can supplement this by large doses of
reading. Or else they can send
the students to 15 or 20 lectures (some by teachers who
lack both knowledge and self-
respect) while letting the student continue to do little or no
reading other than textbooks.
Students take part
The colleges can expand
their faculties (and thus keep
both salaries and academic standards low) or else they can retain their present teaching staff
and raise both salaries and stan-
Russians Confiscate
Six Canadian university students had their photographic
films confiscated by Russian customs officials at Brest on the
Russian-Polish frontier.
The six, members of a.group
of twenty-six, on the second annual Eastern European Tour,
sponsored by the National Federation of Canadian University
Students, were crossing the Russian-Polish border June 30 when
the films were taken. .
All the personal mail of one
of the students was taken at the
same time. The letters were returned after being read.
The students were told that
the pictures, some taken in Helsinki, would be sent to the Russian Embassy in Ottawa after
being developed.
WORD BROKEN
Mr. Selevanof, Second Secre-
iary at the Emjbassy, assured the
students before the trip there
would be no film restrictions.
Mortimer S. Bistrisky, President of the National Federation
of Canadian University Students, wrote a letter to the Russian Ambassador, protesting this
confiscation: He requested that
the Embassy investigate this incident and that the films be returned immediately.
Repeated  attempts  to  obtain
dards. The colleges can continue
to spoon-feed their students with
an antique pedagogy, or they
can force them to take an active
part in their own education.
West
needs
"pool,
week.
HELP!
Van   student   urgently
to form or enter a car
Can   drive 2   days  per
Phone WA. 2-5476.
Ask for Guy
HELP!
information on whether or not
the films will be returned have
been made, but no positive word
has been received.
The" Embassy says the six
must have broken some regulations and taken some objectionable pictures.
MISTAKE POSSIBLE
It is possible that one or two
members of the group did unwittingly overstep the bounds
of regulations.
Contact with the Soviet Embassy will be continued in the
expectation that it m(ay yet be
possible to have all the films returned or at least that portion
which is not objectionable.
It is expected that this incident will not prevent future
tours. Plans for the third annual tour are being made.
West Point Printer
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Brief   Casas  —   Slide   Rules
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3 bedrooms, full basement bungalow. Automatic
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Phone MONTY CREAGH
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i £PAGE SIX
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September 29th,  195f
CLUB'S DAY EXTRAVAGANZA EXPECTED
TO REACH NEW HEIGHTS OF ENTICEMFNT
Over 5000 students are ex-
'pected to attend Club's Day,
■ U.B.C.'s once-a-year publicity
extravaganza.
Club's Day will play host to
over  60   club   displays.
It will be held from 12:30 to
2:30 on Thursday, in the Armories.
. Politics, religion, psychology
or sports, whatever your interests, there is a club for you to
join on Club's Day.
Jack Cullen, local disc jockey
has been imported by Radsoc to
" M.C. the stage shows and to play
music.
Stage shows will be presented
every 10 to 15 minutes.
Local   radio    station   C-FUN
. has given Radsoc the use of their
remote broadcasting unit to feed
the campus network of speakers.
' As well as being broadcast
throughout  the   campus,   Club's
Day Stage program will also be
taped by Jack Cullen for use on
his own show.
"We want every club to participate as much as possible and
thus get the maximum arftount
of publicity," said Radsoc manager Barry. Short.
Jazz enthusiasts will be able
to hear cool jazz by U.B.C.'s
own Jazz Society when they
have their "Big Band" on the
stage for  over  fifteen  minutes.
Another stage display is being sponsored by the Dance
Club. They expect to make at
least four appearances.
Included in their program is
a tango, a Mexican and Folk
dancing arrangement.
Two Mussoc members will
sing "Its Never Too Late To
Fall in Love". The song is from
their last year productions.
The   Players   Club  will  have
their own stage. They are constructing a miniature stage and
proscenium in their booth.
Another miniature display
will be by the Social Credit
Club. Their- traditional bridge
display is said to be bigger and
better than.ever this year.
There will also be activity
outside the Armories. Roped
climbers will climb up ' and
down the  Armories  walls.
This is part of a "rappaling"
demonstration sponsored by
members of the Varsity Outdoor
Club.
Other V.O.C. members will
be seen wanderirng around campus in their skiing and climbing
equipment. The traditional
"Goon Hat" will also be seen
strolling through U.B.C.'s
-grounds.
A tent will be pitched outside the  door of the Armories.
This is part of the V.O.G.'s
equipment display.
Their "Wooden Shack" booth
inside will be mainly for signing up members.
The Sailing Club will be featuring their recently completed
"penguin" class sailing boats.
The Sports Car Club intends
to display two or three cars, including a "D"  type Jaguar.
Caribbean Students Association, one of the Ethnic groups,
will feature their steel drum
band with a show on the stage.
The newest .in office furniture
design will be shown by the recently formed Ad and Sales
Club.
The Ramblers, U.B.C.'s lone
intramural sports club will of'
fer noon hour competition in a
variety of sports ranging from
wrestling and soccer to ping
pong and golf. A substantial social program has also been planned for their members.
The Ramblers plan; to attract
all perspective joiners with an
informative intra-mural handbook.
Both the Liberal and C.C.F.
clubs will feature colored sildes
in their booths.
PRESIDENT'S ANNUAL
ADDRESS POSTPONED
President MacKenzie's annual
iddress to undergraduates has
been postponed to October 15.
The address, originally scheduled for Thursday, will now be
held in the Armoury beginning
at 11:30 a.m. October 15.
The event has been postponed
to allow the president to attend
meetings of the United Nations
Educational, Sccientific and Cultural Organization in Denver
this week.
The president's address is primarily intended for freshmen
but upperclassmen are also
urged to attend.
li
THE
90-10
»>
OF A COLLEGE DEGREE
/
"A college degree may count 90%
toward your getting a job but seldom more
than 10% toward your holding it."
Anonymou*
that's one "90-10". there's another and
that is the 90%'of Canadian industry that
recognizes its obligation to foster higher
education if it is to continue to grow and
prosper.
I We at Cominco appreciated this need some
I years ago. Today in Canada's major universities there are science graduates working
on Cominco Fellowships and undergrade
ates with Cominco scholarships. We have
made many grants in support of university
expansion programs and research projects.
IWe organize special visits to our plants for
science classes and welcome visits from
faculty members.
Through such programs we hope to secure
,the future of our own industry and help
Canada hold her prominent place in the
scientific world.
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News And Views
li you have attended only one
Canadian   university,   you   may '
not be aware of the great diversity that exists between them.
Fortunately, there is an organization which helps to remedy
our regretable lack of knowledge about our own country.
This is the Canadian Univer*
sity Press.
Through its services, a student
in B. C. can have first-hand information about the clubs, functions, interests, and attitudes of
say, Dalhousie University in
Halifax.
The mutual exchange of University papers becomes especial*
ly useful in the case of Quebec,
where conditions are considerably different from the rest 6t
Canada.
In order to insure that th*
student gets the best possible
coverage from his paper, the
C.U.P. carries on a continual
competition.
Every year at Christmas th«
editors from all papers meet to
decide which paper is the best
by categories, such as features,
photography, and news items,
and which papers are the best
in over-all make-up.
Last year The Ubyssey won
the award for best photography.
Besides the impetus which
competition inspires, the papers
also gain constructive criticism
from other editors in conference.
Any paper having a news
story of national interest sends
the story to the C.U.P. Wire
Service.
The story is then distributed
from four refile points to all
papers in Canada.
The usefulness of this service
cannot be underestimated, as it
allows university newspapers
to give students the news while
it still is news.
This year, The Ubyssey is putting forth every possible effort
to win the McGowan Cup,
awarded to the best newspapef
published more than twice a
week.
■ The Ubyssey is also planning
to increase coverage of C.U.P.
items in the interest of a disc
tinctive Canadian culture.
A comprehensive-insight int#
Canadian University life in gen*
eral is  deemed    essential    fdU ■
this. Tuesday, September 29th, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE 6EVEJT
BIRDS CLOBBER HELPLESS HUSKIES
Alberta Game May Decide Championship
U.B.C. - 48, Saskatchewan - 6
By MIKE HUNTER
U.B.C.'s Thunderbirds completely annihilated a green U.
of Saskatchewan football team Saturday before 1500 drenched
fans in Saskatoon. The Birds dominated the game both offensively and defensively, allowing Saskatchewan only one first
down, and a total of MINUS 110 yards rushing.
From  the opening whistle it
was apparent that it was no contest. On the first play from
scrimmage, Varsity had both
deep men behind the Huskie's
weak pass defense. Jon Morris
underthrew them, but that play
set the pattern. The Birds moved
at will against the inexperienced
Huskies, collecting 300 yards
rushing and competing 5 for 10
in the passing department. Roy
Bianco with two, Tonis Tutti,
Pfive Lee, Gordy Olafson,
Waynei Wayne Osborne, and
Bruce McCallum scored TD's.
Dave Barker booted six extra
points.
HUSKIES BIG RUN
Saskatchewan's only points
eariie on the opening kickoff of
the Second half. Ron, Graham
fojtok the Birds by surprise on a
reverse and scooted 90 yards
down the sidelines. But that was
.the only glimmer of hope. The
big   Birds'   line   allowed   only
three rushes to pass the line of
scrimmage and gave up only
two complete passes.
Coach Frank Gnup said that
the Huskies had no real experience and that they needed a
lot of seasoning to become dangerous. The Huskies could be
strengthened next year if a
dozen or so players from the
Saskatoon junior Hilltops joined
them.
An example of Saskatchewan's weakness was the fact
that Jack Henwood, who hasn't
even practised at QB, ran the
team for a quarter. Henwood,
not known as a Randy Duncan,
threw for 2 TD's.
BIG GAME SATURDAY
So the stage is set for the
"big" one, next Saturday at
UBC, against Alberta. Coach
Gnup won't express an opinion,
except that this will be a good,
hard-knocking game. Alberta
also   beat   Saskatchewan   by   a
sizeable score, but no comparison can be made until the teams
are on the field. Both teams
should be at full strength for the
game and the Golden Bear's
running game sliould make it interesting for the Gnuppers.
This game is the one not to
miss, and a big crowd is anticipated. Date cards are good for
this one. BE THERE!
FILMSOC'S
Premiere Presentation
FOR THE 1959-60 SESSION
The Man Who
Knew Too Much
starring
James  Stewart  & Doris  Day
Hear Dodo Day sing "Que Serasera"
Admission - 35c
PLACE-AUDITORIUM
|This is a case of mistaken identities—which turns into
and exciting spy story.
IMES - 3:30 p.m. & 8:00 p.m. TUESDAY, SEPT. 29
35c 35c
Rugby Desperate
Players Needed
UBC's . English rugby teams
need more players.
The teams practise Tuesday at
3:30 and Thursday at 12:30 behind the Gym. All interested
people should come out this
week. There is a particular
shortage of scrum men. Previous
experience is not necessary.
The rugby teams also need
managers. Interested people
should contact Dr. Max Howell
at the P.E. Department.
Let's get out and maintain
UBC's tradition as a center of
top-notch English rugby.
Returning veterans include
such top players as Captain Gerry McGavin, who. played against
rthe British Lions Saturday, and
I Vice-Captain Phil Willis, last
year's fullback. Other outstanding players include Neal Henderson, who toured Japan with
the B.C. team, Don Shore,
front-row veteran, Peter Bugg,
Bob McKee, John Lecky, David
Howard, Ean Rankin, Don Sloan
and Don Hill.
The major loss is outstanding
back Ted Hunt who has left the
university.
U.B.C. defensive end, John Barberie, gets ready to tackle
another receiver.
Staff: Stu Robson, Ann Pickard, Alan Dafoe, Mike Hunter, Fred
Fletcher. .
Infra murals Start
MEN
Meeting the Women
Big Block Holders
There will be an important
meeting of all Big and small
block winners in the Women's
Gym, Wednesday at 12:30. All
winners should be the-te as Football Ushers are needed for the
big game on Saturday.
. . . "The public affairs of this province will always be in
good and safe hands as long as intelligent youth takes
a keen interest in them, and that's what U.B.C. Conservatives are doing, and THEY ARE DOING MORE THAN
TALKING !"
Capital Column, James K. Nesbitt, Vancouver Sun, May 30, 1959
YOU rvm invited to pin
UBC Conservative Club
CLUB'S DAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1
Jttrm*^
Men's intramural competition
kicks off on October fifth.
The Men's Intramural Association offers a wide range of
activities. If you are interested
in taking part in an intramural
sport contact your faculty sports
representative.
Entries for swimming, volley^
ball, bowling, and touch football must be in by October
first. The remainder are due
soon after. So don't delay.
The Rambler's Athletic Club,
last year's intramural champs,
invite interested persons to drop
into room 363 in the Brock Extension or to attend the general
meeting Tues., Sept. 29, at 12:30.
SOCCER
In exhibition soccer games
played on. Sunday, North Van.
blanked Varsity 2-0 at Confederation Park. Goalie John Isberg
and halfback Frank Iacobucci
turned in fine performance for
the university side.
Meanwhile Hungarian Turol
whitewashed UBC 3-0 at Mc-
Bride Park.
WOMEN
First Intramural events of
the season will be the Swim
Meet and Tennis matches. Faculties, clubs, and other interested organizations are preparing
teams for these contests. Don't
be left out. See your representative on the Intramural board to
day and sign up.
SWIM MEET
Managers notice that your
team must be picked and ready
(with or wittiout flippers) by
1:30, Monday, October 5th. Get
your entries into the I.A.B. today.
TENNIS
Tennis entries  are due  Monday, October 5th, at 12:30. Managers   should  have   their   team
lists in by then.
FROSH
Any Frosh interested in playing in the Intramural Swim
Meet or Tennis matches may
sign up on the Women's Gym
Intramural   bulletin  board.
GRASS HOCKEY
According to team manager
John Swan, U.B.C. cannot maintain four teams in the two divisions of the Lower Mainland
Men's Grass Hockey. League unless replacements show up. Experience is not necessary.
All those interested may sign
up on Clubs Day, Oct. 1 and Oct.
2 in the Armoury.
CROSS  COUNTRY
All those interested in competing in cross-country or track
and field events should attend
the organizational meeting Wed.
Sept. 30 at 12:30 in room 216,
Memorial Gym.
Training and the cross-country schedule will be discussed.
All those interested but unable
to attend should contact John
Minichiello at HA  1399L.
Nick's Restaurant
• FINE FOODS
• DELICIOUS HAMBURGERS
• FOUNTAIN SERVICE
• SOFT ICE CREAM
• ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
Near Campus
5778 University plvd.
ALma 1679 PAGE EIGHT
THE      UBYSSEY
BROCK BOASTS BUT
FIENDS FIND FAULT
University Food Services spent more than $50,000 in renovating the Brock Coffee Shop but they still serve the same
old coffee.
The large coffee urns are the only pieces of equipment left
from the old set-up. Everything else is brand new.
The only change is that now you have to fill your own
cup as you go down the line.
"The coffee is just as bad as
it always has been," claims Lois
Young, a third year Education
student.
But Terry Gibson, Commerce
2, said, "I enjoy my lunch much
more, and the coffee has definitely improved."
Miss Donna Smith, the dietitian, said that the improvements cost more than the $50,-
000 estimated, but was not sure
how much more.
Miss Smith said that the dining room area had been increased at the expense of the
kitchens.
Twenty-five new tables, and
100 new chairs have .been
moved in, increasing from 200
to 300 the capacity of the hall.
Even then the tables are further
apart than they were last year,
she said. More chairs and tables
could be moved in.
Bob Knowlton, - Arts 2, does
not want any more tables. "It's
still too crowded," he said.
John Poole, Arts 2, agrees that
it is still overcrowded, especially
at lunch time. He said the coffee
shop is "considerably better" for
the changes.
UBC Announces Medical
Professor's Appointment
UBC CHORAL
SOCIETY APPOINTS
NEW HEAD
UBC Choral Society announced the appointment of
Harold Ball as this year's new
director.
Harold Ball will replace Teo
Repel, the director the society
for the past three years.
Repel was forced to retire because of ill health.
The new director from Oliver,
B.C. has directed the South Okanagan Choir for ten years.
Students who enjoy singing
ate welcomed to the choir's
weekly rehearsals beginning
Oct. 7, in Physics 202 from 5:45
p!m. to 8 p.m.
The choral" society will perform two radio broadcasts, their
annual Vancouver concert, and
end the year with a tour.
VARSITY THEATRE
4375 West 10th
ALma 0345
September 28 - October 3
The Comedy Masterpiece
"THE GREAT DICTATOR"
> » Starring  the inimitable
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
FIRST NIGHTER'S PREVIEW EVERY MONDAY
8:15 P.M.
See the big ones first
STARTING TUES., OCt. 13
2 Outstanding Comedy Hits-
"THE CAPTAIN'S TABLE"
"CARRY ON SERGEANT"
"Considering I spend most of
my time here," said Keith Gil-
ley, Arts 2, "a few decorative
paintings would be appreciated." He also wanted more
comfortable chairs.
A first year Forestry student
remarked, "Clocks are grim reminders of approaching lectures
and as such should be removed."
Roger Jerriene, first year Education, wants more chairs, tables
and air conditioning, while Malcolm McLean, Commerce 2,
wants beer machines and TV.   .
Brooke Campbell, Arts 1, see
a lack of atmosphere, and Jon
Fladgate, Arts 1, would like
better looking waitresses.
"Nice and big," says Len
Geddes, Arts 4, "but antiseptic.
I want something more worn."
Many students do not think
the improvements worth the
money spent on them.
Ray Crosby, Com. 3, said, "a
big bottleneck — nothing improved and 12 ft. taken out of
the lounge."
GEORGE ELLIOTT
B.C.'s provincial health officer was appointed professor in
UBC's Preventive Medicine De-
''• partment, President Norman
MacKenzie  announced Monday.
Dr. George Elliott will assist
Dr. James Mather, head of the
Preventive Medicine Department, and will work with voluntary-health agencies in the province.
Closer coordination between
the University and the provincial health department will result from the appointment, said
Dean J.  F. McCreary,  head of
UBC's faculty of medicine.
Dr. Elliot graduated from
Queen's University with his
medical degree in 1935, received
the degree of doctor of public
health from the University of
Toronto in 1940, and interned
at the Vancouver General Hospital.
Since then he has done work
in provincial mental hospitals,
the Canada quarantine service,
and venereal disease control.
Dr. Elliot became assistant
provincial health officer in
1948.
Frosh Retreat
Application Form
NAME    v. -	
Given Family
PRESENT ADDRESS 	
 ►-■■- • -	
HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDED 	
 * ■- -—	
Please attach list giving full information on
Grade 10, 11 and 12 activities
pretty girl
pretty shoes
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"JET"
• Black Suede
OF COURSE THEY'RE . .
SOLD AT ALL SHOE STORES WHERE FASHION COUNTS!
BY CREATIVE

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