UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1952

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124919.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124919.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124919-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124919-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124919-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124919-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124919-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124919-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124919-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124919.ris

Full Text

 ^rmmmsii
WINS PREXY RACE
The Ubyssey
XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1952
-5 CENTS
NO. 47
Question Legality
Of AMS Elections
Second  Year Social  Workers
(Jlaim  Negligence At The  Polls
the constitutionality of yesterday's AMS elections* is being
contested by members of the second year class in the School of
Social Work. *	
GWynn Gilmour, second year
social work student told the Ubyssey Thursday timt five students
were refused the right to vote by
the returning officer at the Dus
Depot booths because they did not
have their pictures on their AMS
cards.
Earlier  ln   the  year  these  stu
dents refused to pay the 2j cent
charge for the photos on the cards.
As result, AMS officials ripped the
picture off.
Meanwhile, at the booth In Brock
Hall, two students, Doug Williams
and nil Sopp were allowed to vote
even though they , did not have
pictures on tlielr cards,
Five Refused Vote
The five who were refused the
vote, all social work students are:
L. D. Howorth, C. Taylor, P. J.
Fognarty, W. Ruclnlcki and K. A.
Holt.
Returning officer at the Bus Depot wrote "Refused to allow this
man to, vote without picture,'' Signed D.O.R. YJR.JP> on their cards
in the space where the picture is
regularly attached.
Gilmour explained that they refused to pay for the pictures last
fall because they felt the charge
was unjust. "At registration we
were pushed into a line and told
to get our pictures taken. Then,
later, we are informed that this
was not free—that there was a 26
cent charge," he said. *      . '
School  Backs Action
Social work students feel there
are three possible causes of the
confusion at the polling boths; first
the returning officers were not sufficiently Instructed; second negligence on the part of the return
ing officers; and, although this
possibility is remote, an attempt to
pervert the elections.
"But whtttaMF/ the ertnaV* Qfr
mour said, we fe#l that the constitutionality of the elections must
be questioned."
This action of questloili-g has
the approval of the entire school
of i-oiM) work although represented hy. only the .second year class.
Fuse j car students wer.> denied
t>e light to vote because ihey are
not in Hi campus at this time.
The students plan to bring the
matter before student council.
—Photo by Walt Sussel
RAGHBIR BASI, new Student Council president, smiles
happily as he learns results of Thursday voting. The fourth
year sociology student carried all polls but one to win the
prexy post over candidates Joe Nold and Mike Ryan.
10,000th Blood Donor
To Receive Award
Who is the mysterious Mr. or Miss B? This question has
been puzzling UBC students for the last two days.
Mr. and Miss B Is the ,10,000 per*
.-»-
Dr. Linus Pauling
Canadian Club Speaker
By BEVERLEY GARTRELL
UBC's Canadian Club lecturer for 1952 is Dr. Linus Q.
Pauling of the California Institute of Technology.
- * —— ■ * He will address a public gathering In the University Auditorium
at 12:30 on February 14, and a
meeting of the Vancouver institute on Saturday evening at 8:15
p.m. In Room 2*00 of the Physics
Building.
Dr. Pauling has received a long
list of .honors for outstanding
work ln the field of science . His
most, recent was the Lewis Medal,
awarded for his work on the structures of molecules.
Life Magazine devoted several
pages to the story of this successful research project. Dr. Pauling
was able to construct models of
molecules, ranging from simplest to
the most complicated, and he has
cleared up the principles that help
scientists to understand why atoms combine in the exact way that
they do.
Dr. Pauling has more than 200
papers and several text/books to his
credit, and his Investlgatons cover
a range .of suhects from explosives for rockets to substitutes for human serum and oxygen indicators
for submarines.
He ls professor and head of
Chemistry at the California Institute or Technology. Honorary degrees have been bestowed upon
him by the University of/Chicago,
Princeton, Oregon State College
Camibrldge, University ot London,
Oxford, Vale, University of Paris,
University of Toulouse, and the
University of Tampa. He holds
membership in all of tho leading
American professional and honorary societies and is nn honorary
nu'in'lipi* of major scientific societies in Kngland, SwiUerlartd, Italy,
I*'ranee, India, lielguini and Norway.
Dr. Pauling's non-hour address Is
entitled, "Thf* Place of Science In
the Modern World," and his Vancouver Institute address will deal
with "Chemistry and its delation
to .Medicine.'' Ills visit is made
possible through the special ige-
iiiivshlp ettLahlhdied by the Canadian Club.
—Photo by Bob Kendrick
BEAUTY ON THE SPOT
BARBARA LEE, 1st year
arts student took a moment
out from her busy sports
and Phrateres schedule to
pose for photographer Bob
Kendrick as this week's
"Beauty on the Spot." An
ex-Lord Byng High school
student, Barbara will go
into training at Vancouver
General   next  year.
sou who will give his or her blood
to aid the drive. This person will
receive an award at the dance to
be hold a In the B»ock as the climax to the blood drive.
UBC students will have tho opportunity to 'better the vNorth American college blood drive record
of 2810 pints next week when tho
Red Cross Clinic comes to the
Armouries.
In order to break this record donations for the five day drive must
equal nearly (100 pints a day. UHC's
quota Is 50 per cent of student enrollment—that  means 2778  pints.
If Uf!€ students should pass the
iO.0'00 pint mark for all-time, donations on the campus, the person
donating the 10,000 pint will lie
given the title of Mr. Ii. and will
receive an award from the UHC
Forest  Club.
To make tiie quota students will
VACCIN CLINK
TO BE NOD HERE
Students who have not had a
successful vaccination since 1H47
are advised to be re-vaccinated
states A. K. Young, M.D.. the Director of tiie Student Health Office.
This office wil hold clinics on
Tuesday, February 12 and Wednesday, February 13. Appointments
are being made at the Health Office ln the Wesbrook Building now.
Hamburg Trip
For COTC
Some lucky UHC army'endets lire
going lo **,ei four month trip t.)
Ilaimbiirg this summer.
('apt. Finley of Ihe COTC phoned
the Ubyssey lo say Unit Ottawa
has asked for oighleeii names lo l)*">
•sent so ihey coald choose who will
he sent from t III'. ,\ total of sev-,
enlyloui cadets, are yurii*, lio.n
Canada.
Fine Voices
To Sing In
AAussocOpera
Vancouver Theatre-goers will
never forget Tl'T's delightful
llrlgacloon, last season's outstanding musical production. Mr. Harry
Pryce and Mr. E. V. Young, two
men greatly responsible for the
success of that show, arc at present working on Romberg's Student
Pllnce, at   UHC.
Tiie Student Prince will appear
at   the   University   Auditorium   on
I'Vibrunry   21,   22.   and   21!   at   8:U»
p.m.   All   seats   are   reserved,   and
tickets    are    ou    sale    at    Modem
■ Music, ">;'(' Seymour Street.    x
I     Student   prel'ormances  are  lo  he
I held   on   Ihe    ISth.   and    2uth.   of
February.   Tickets   for   I hose   two
performances   can   he   obtained   a I.
1 tin*  "Quad"  ticket   office.   /I.oca led
eil.    lhe    east    unci    of    llie    bulletin
1 board.
Kay Stewart
New WUS Head
By JEAN SMITH
Raghbir Basi is the new president of the Alma Mater Society.
In a closely-fought battle with candidates Mike Ryan and
Joe Nold Basi came out on top by a count of 1378 to 1083.
have to show far .more enthusiasm
than during the October blood
drive, when they gave only an approximate 1500 pints.
Foresters are also offering a
trophy to the faculty attaining the
highest percentage of their quota
during the blood drive. Thla trophy
will be given annually.
Screen Dance
In Brock Sat.
Success of last years' Screen
Dance has induced Filmsoc to put
on a repeat performance.
Saturday, February 9th at »»:oo
in the Hrock Lounge, Filmsoc will
present tills year's Screen Dance.
Films of Louis Armstrong, Stan
Kenton, Eddie Howard, the Mills
lb-others and other of the country's
top music makers will provide
throe hours of dancing* and excel
lent  music.
The Hrock Coffee Bar will be
open during the evening.
Tickets are available at the AMS
office or from any Filmsoc executive  member at  11.00 per couple
Tickets will be on sale at the door j of WUS and Is thoroughly familiar
for $1.25 per couple. | with the organizational set-up
In the elections for WUS president Key Stewart won out over her
sole opponent, Marlene Buckle, with
the final count reading 456 to 26.1.
Chief Returning officer Bill Neen
culled it the best—supported election in many years. 2607 students
or 47Va per cent of the student
body turned out to /the polls.
Alike Ryan was eliminated on
the first count In the presidential
race. Count stood at 1088 for Basi,
769 for Nold and 604 tor Ryan.
SECOND COUNT
Second choices on the Ryan ballots gave 290 to Basl and 314 to
Joe Nold, but the final total was
still solidly in favor of Basi.
Eight polls were in operation for
the election, with heaviest ballot-
ting taking place at Brock Hall
and the Auditorium. Basl carried all
polls except the one at the Auditorium. Only 146 ballots out of the
total 2607 were spoiled.
In a statement to the Ubyssey
on his victory, Basi said: "I want
to thank everybody,, especially
those on my committee. Now that
I am in, I would like to say that 1
will do the best to carry out what
I suggested in my platform."
"I hope that the students will
co-operate with me so that we can
accomplish these things."
THIRD   YEAR
This is Raghblr's third year at
UDC. He ls a fourth year student
iu honours sociology, with three
years of university already to his
credit at the University of Punjab
In India.
Extremely active ln UBC affairs,
lie is president of the L'N Club, a
member of the executive of the
Civil Liberties Union and Chairman
of the International House Committee. He Is also on the executive
of the UN Association down town.
REDUCED RATE8
A few days ago he was elected to
the Canadian Institute of International Affairs. He Is a member
of the men's honorary fraternity
on the campus.
In his platform speech at the
AMS meeting Monday, Basl said
that he would campaign for reduced rates on the B.€. Electric and
student exemptions for the B.C.
Hospitalization scheme.
Kay Stewart Is well qualified for
the position which she will till,
Last  year  she  was  vice-president
SENATE TO CONSIDER
COMMERCE DECREE
The statement published In
the Ubyssey on Tuesday, Feb*
ruary 6th, with reference to
the proposed M. Com. degree
implied that a decision had
been taken on the matter. The
proposal Is to be considered by
Senate next week, and If the
degree -Is approved at) announcement will be made te
this effect.
'TWEEN CLASSES
Ex-Magee
Students
Return
EX-MAOBB students will get ft
chance to return to their old stamping grounds when the annual Kx-
Magee dance is held next Friday,
February 1*6. Magee graduate
Jack Humphries '&0, who la, in
charge of entertainment, promises "an outstanding program," Admission is 50 cents a couple, dress
is formal. School staff will be on
hand to renew old acquaintances.
* *       *
OTHEULO,   by   Verdi,   will   be
broadcast on Saturday, 11 a.m., in
the Men's Club Room, Brock. All
those wishing to hear this work
as sung by the Metropolitan Opera
Company ar« Invited to .attend..
* *      *
IMPORTANT MEETING ot the
Nurses Undergraduate Society will
be held Monday, Feb. 11. at 8 p.m.
In the south end reading room of
the 19&0 Nurses' Home VOH for
the purpose of 'electing officers.
* *       *
MUSSOC   will   hold   a, general
meeting Monday, Feb. 11 at 12:30
In H.M1. Everyone please turn out.
* *        *
PURE SCIENCE students will
hold their big dance of the year
"the Puritans Prance", tonight at
!> p.m. In the Lions Gate Hall.
* *       *
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents Valse by Arenskl; "The
Prospect before Us" by Boyce and
Hasson-Intermezzo and Serenade
by Delius on Friday, Feb. 8 at
12:30 in Double Committee Room,
Brock Hall.
* *       *
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents Suites No. 2 and 3 for unaccompanied 'cello by Bach on
Monday. Feb. 11 at 12:30 In Double
Committee Room of the Brock. '
BY CHUCK COON
MAD Asks $3 Fee Increase
(This is a continuation of
Chuck Coon's series on MAD-
Athleic Directory Policy.)
The Men's Athletic Directorate is still plumping for a fee
Increase of $3.
This would allow all UBC students to attend athletic events
.without paying an admission
charge.
The athletic department
maintains that if they were assured of a specific amount of
money from sate receipts, they
would he able to draw up their
luidgot ahead of lime and enjoy a moro secure financial
position.
600 CARDS  SOLD
The siile of athletic privilege cards is uncertain, and the
student name attendance even
more so. This year, (iOO privilege cards were sold at. $4 each,
Hill the resulting lake of
ij'iMuu is a small item he-side
lhe $IX,nun received from AMH
fees.
ll would In* more correct lo
say Ihiil lhe athletic department, wauls more money to
undertake its program. If the
fee Increase were approved
$ifi,25 per student, would be
going to athletics.
Probably the UBC athletic
hierarchy hopes to enter football and basketball competition
■with the other three Western
Canadian universities.
INCREASE
If this were done, the fee
increase would he an absolute
neeeslty. In fact, last year the
students nt the university of
Saskatchewan approved a similar increase, .hoping their
football team would again play
western Intor-collegiate foot-
hall.
Popular opinion at 'present
would seem to be against any
increase iu fees.
Any student  naturally tends
to  resist  an  attempt  to  make*
him   pay  moro  for  his  education.
CONVINCE   STUDENTS
The athletic department will
have to do a superior job of
public relations in order lo
convince the student his money
is  being  invested   wisely.
They will huve to point out
that it is everyone's duty to
support the -UBC teams and
timt this will not be difficult
as their admission to games
has already been  paid.
They will have to make sure
that the stadium gets Its
much-needed Increase ln seating capacity.
They will have to prove that
athletic 'betterment is Just as •
important   as   intellecunl   Improvement.
They vvill have to show us
that going to school is 49 per
cent athletic participation and
support and fit per cent going
to lectures and talking over
caf coffee.
5RYSTAL   CLEAR
When they have made this
crystal clear to a majority of
thc student body. U.BC's ath-
lelic program will really have
a   chance   to   prove   its   worth.
But until that, lime, they are
going to run into stubborn, determined opposition from Individual students and from student   organizations.
Few of us will be around
when tbe victor is announced, ~%*J
r-dti
teeubem:
WINS PREXY RACE
The Ubyssey
XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1052
-5 CENTS'
NO. 47
Question Legality
Of AMS Elections
Second  Year Social Workers
(Jlaim  Negligence At The Polls
The constitutionality of yesterday's AMS elections, is being
contested by members of the second year class in the School of
Social Work. ♦	
GWynn Gilmour, second year
social work tt tudent told the Ubyssey Thursday that live students
were refused the right to vote by
the returning officer at the Bus
Depot booths because they did not
Have their pictures on their AMS
cards.
Earlier  in   the  year  these   stu
dents refused to pay the 25 cent
charge for the photos on the cards.
As result, AMS officials ripped the
picture ott.
Meanwhile, at the booth ln Brock
Hall, two students, Dong Williams
and Eel Sopp were allowed to vole
even though they did not have
pictures on their cards.
Five Refused Vote
The five who were refused the
vote, all social work students are:
L. D. Howorth, C. Taylor, P. J.
Pogaarty, W. Rudnicki and K. A.
Holt.
Returning officer at the Bus Depot wrote "Refused to allow this
man to, vote without picture,'' Signed D.O.R. YjR.SN on their cards
In the space where the picture is
regularly attached.
Gilmour explained that they refused to pay for the pictures last
fall because they felt the charge
was unjust. "At registration we
were pushed Into a line and told
to get our pictures taken. Then,
later, we are informed that thin
was not free—that there was a 25
cent charge," he said. '
School Backs Action
Social work students feel there
are three possible causes of the
confusion at the polling boths; first
the returning officers were not sufficiently instructed; second negligence on the part of the return
ing officers; and, although this
possibility ls remote, an attempt to
pervert the elections.
"But whatcJKew the-tJiMiw.-"- Gilmour said, we feel that the constitutionality of the elections must
he questioned."
This action of questioning has
the approval of the entire school
of tcelal work although represented by only the .second yea" class.
Fuse '.car students wer.* denied
C*e right to vote because they are
not en th campus at this time.
The students plan to bring the
matter before student council.
-Photo by Walt Sustol
RAGHBIR BASI, new Student Council president, smiles
happily as he learns results of Thursday voting. The fourth
year sociology student carried all polls but one to win the
prexy post over candidates Joe Nold and Mike Ryan.
10000th Blood Donor
To Receive Award
Who is the mysterious Mr. or Miss B? This question has
been puzzling UBC students for the last two days.
iMr. and iMlsa B Is the JO.O00 per-4>
Dr. Linus Pauling
Canadian Club Speaker
By BEVERLEY GARTRELL
UBC's Canadian Club lecturer for 1952 is Dr. Linus C.
Pauling of the California Institute of Technology.
   ■ * He will address a public gathering 'in the University Auditorium
at 12:30 on February 14, and a
meeting of the Vancouver fhstl-
tute on Saturday evening at 8:15
p.m. in Room 200 of the Physics
Build ing.
Dr. Pauling has received a long
list of .honors for outstanding
work in the field of science . His
most, recent was the Lewis Medal,
awarded for his work on the structures of molecules.
Life Magazine devoted several
pages to the story of this successful research project. Dr. Pauling
was able to construct models of
molecules, ranging from simplest to
the most complicated, and he has
cleared up the principles that help
ac*lent 1sts to understand why atoms combine ln the exact way Ihat
they do.
Dr. Pauling has more than 2O0
papers and several textbooks to his
credit, and his lnvestlgatpns cover
a range,of suhects from exploslv-^
es for rockets to substitutes for human scrum and oxygen indicators
fo,  submarines.
He is professor and head of
Chemistry at the California Institute or Technology. Honorary degrees   have   been   bestowed   upon
—Photo by Bob Kendrick
BEAUTY ON THE SPOT
BARBARA LEE, 1st year..
arts student took a moment
out from her busy sports
and Phrateres schedule to
pose for photographer Bob
Kendrick as this week's
"Beauty on the Spot." An
ex-Lord Byng High school
student, Barbara will go
into training at Vancouver
General   next  year.
sou who will give his or her blood
to aid the drive. This person will
receive an award at the dance to
be ludd in the Brock as the climax to the blood drive.
UBC students will have the opportunity to 'better the \North American college blood drive record
of 2810 pints next week when the
Red Cross Clinic comes to the
Armouries.
In order to break this record donation:-* for the five day drive must
equal nearly (500 pints a day. UBC's
quota Is 50 per cent of student enrollment—that  means 2778  pints.
If UBC students should pass the
IO.A'04) pint mark for'all-time,donations on the campus, the person
donating the 10,000 pint will be
given the title of Mr. II. and will
receive an award from the UHC
Forest  Club.
To make the quota students will
have to show far .more enthusiasm
than during the October blood
drive, when they gave only an approximate 1500 pints.
Foresters are also offering a
trophy to the faculty attaining the
highest percentage of their quota
during the blood drive. This trophy
will be given annually.
VACCIN CLINK
TO BE HELD HERE
Students who have not had a
successful vaccination since 1947
are advised to be re-vaccinated
states A. K. Young. M.D., the Director of the Student Health (Mice.
This office wil hold clinics on
Tuesday, February 12 and Wednesday, February 13. Appointments
are being made at the Health Ut-
flce in the Wesbrook Building now.
Fine Voices
To Sing In
MussocOpera
Screen Dance
In Brock Sat.
Success of last years' Screen
Dance has induced Filmsoc to put
on a repeat performance.
Saturday, February »th at ¥»:uu
in the lirock Lounge, Filmsoc will
present this yenr's Screen Dance.
Films of Louis Armstrong, Stan
Kenton, Kddie Howard, the Mills
Brothers and other of the country's
lop music makers will provide
throe hours of dancing* and excellent  music.
The Brook Coffee Bar will be
open during the evening,
Tickets are available at the AMS
office or from any Filmsoc executive member at $1.00 per couple.
Tickets will be on sale at the door
for $1.25 per couple.
Kay Stewart
New WUS Head
By JEAN SMITH
Raghbir Basi is the new president of the Alma Mater Society.
In a closely-fought battle with candidates Mike Ryan and
Joe Nold Basi came out on top by a count of 1378 to 1083.
In the elections for WUS presl*
dent Key Stewart won out over her
sole opponent, Marlene Buckle, with
the final count reading 456 to 'ib'A.
Chier Returning officer Bill Neen
called it the best—supported elec*
tion In many years. 2607 students
or 47Ms per cent of the student
body turned out to/the polls.
Mike Ryan was eliminated on
the first count ln the presidential
race. Count stood ht 1088 for Basl,
769 for Nold and 604 for Ryan.
SECOND  COUNT
Second choices on the Ryan bal
lots gave 290 to Basl and 314 to
Joe Nold, but the final total was
still solidly In favor of Basl,
Eight polls were ln operation Tor
the election, with heaviest ballot
ting taking place at Brock Hall
and the Auditorium. Basl carried all
polls except the one at the Audi*
torlum. Only 146 ballots out of the
total 2607 were spoiled.
In a statement to the Ubyssey
on his victory, Basl said: "I want
to thank everybody,, especially
those on my committee. Now that
I am in, I would like to say that 1
will do the best to carry out what
I suggested In my platform."
"1 hope that the students will
co-operate with me so that we can
accomplish these things."
THIRD   YEAR
This is Raghblr's third year at
UHC. He is a fourth year student
iu honours sociology, with three
years af university already to his
credit at the University of Punjab
In India.
FAtremely active In UBC affairs,
he is president of the UN Club, a
member of the executive of the
Civil Liberties Union and Chairman
of the International House Committee. He Is also on the executive
of the UN Association down town.
REDUCED RATES
A few days ago he was elected to
the Canadian Institute of International Affairs. He is a member
of the men's honorary fraternity
on the campus.
In his platform speech at the
AMS meeting Monday, Basl said
that he would campaign for reduced rates on the B.C. Electric and
student exemptions for the B.C.
Hospitalization scheme.
Kay Stewart Is well qualified for
the position which she will fill,
Last year she was vice-president
of WUS and ls thoroughly familiar
with the organisational set-up.
SENATE TO CONSIDER
COMMERCE DEGREE
The statement published In
the Ubyssey on Tuesday. February 6th, with referenee to.
the proposed M. Com. degree
Implied that a decision had
been taken on the matter. The
proposal Is to be considered by
Senate next week, and If the
degree ..Is approved aq announcement will be made to
this effect.
TWEEN CLASSES
Ex-Magee
Students
Return
EX-MAOII students will get a
chance to return to their old stamping grounds when the annual Ex-
Magee dance Is held next Friday,
February 15. Magee graduate
Jack Humphries 'SO, who is in
charge of entertainment, promises "an outstanding program." Admission Is 60 cents a couple, dress
Is formal. School staff will be on
hand to renew old acquaintances.
* *       *
OTHELLO,   by   Verdi,   will   be
broadcast on Saturday, 11 a.m., in
the Men's Club Room, Brook. All
those wishing to hear this work
as sung by the Metropolitan Opera
t'ohvuaiiy ar« invited to attuUU-
IMPORTANT MEETING of the
Nurses Undergraduate Society will
he held Monday, Feb. 11. at 8 p.m.
in the south end reading room of
the 1950 Nurses' Home VGH for
the purpose of 'electing officers.
* *       *
MUSSOC   will   bold   a.  general
meeting Monday, Feb. 11 at Iii*.30
in H.M1. Everyone please turn out.
* *       *
PURE SCIENCE students will
hold their big dance of the year
"the Puritans Prance", tonight at
it p.m. in the Lions Gate Hall.
* *       *
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents Valse by Arenskl; "Tho
Prospect before Us" by Boyce and
Masson-lntermezzo and Serenade
by Delius on Friday, Feb. * at
12:30 In Double Committee Room,
Brock Hall.
* *        *
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents Suites No. 2 and 3 for unaccompanied 'cello by Baoh on
Monday. Feb. 11 at 12:30 in Double
Committee Room of the Brock. '
BY CHUCK COON
MAD Asks $3 Fee Increase
Hamburg Trip
For COTC
I1I111 by the University of/Chicago, Vancouver Theatre-goers will
Princeton, Oregon State College never forget TIT's delightful
Cambridge, University of London, migadoon, last season's outstand-
Oxford. Yale, University of Paris, ing musical production. Mr. Harry
University of Toulouse, and the Pryce and Mr. E. V. Young, two
University of Tampa. He holds men greatly responsible for the
membership in all of tho leading success of that show, are at pros-
Aiiiericaii professional and honor- ent working on Romberg's Student
ary societies and is an honorary Prince, iit UHC.
incumber of major scientific soclet- The Student. Prince will appear
ir.-i in  lOiigland, Switzerland, Italy,  at   the   University   Auditorium   on
Franco.   India,   Helguini   and   Nor-   February   21,   22,   and   2:1   at   8:K>
Some lucky UUC army cadets are I Way. p.m.   All   seats   are   reserved,   and
going   lo   gel   four   month   trip   t.i      Dr. Pauling's non-hour address is. tickets    are    on    sale    at    Modern
Hamburg this summer. i entitled,  "The  Place of Science  in! Music, r>.'.li Seymour Street.    *
Capt, Finley of Ihe COTC phoned* n,o Modern World." nnd his Van-; Student pre I'onnances are to ho
the Ubyssey lo say thai Ol la vvi; couver Institute address will deal 1 held on the 18th. and Until, of
has asked for eighteen names to Iv*,: wlf'li "Chemistry and its Relation ' February. Tickets for these iwo
Html so they could choose who will to .Medicine." llis visit Is made performance-* can be obtained at
he sent from CMC. A total of sev-,.possible through the special It-c-'the "Quad" ticket office. (Located
ctily four   cadet:*    are   yoing    I ro.11: I nre ship established by Lhe Canadr  a I.   the   eaat   end   of   the   bulletin
Canada.
an Club.
board.
(This is a continuation of
Chuck Coon's series on MAD-
Athlelc Directory Policy.)
The Men's Athletic Directorate is still plumping for a fee
increase of $3.
Tliis would allow all UBC students to. attend* athletic events
without paying an admission
charge.
The athletic department
maintains that if they were assured of a specific amount of
money from gate receipts, ttiey
would be able to draw up their
budget ahead of time and enjoy a moro secure financial
position.
600 CARDS SOLD
Tin* side of athletic privilege cards is uncertain, and the
student game attendance even
mure so. This year, (ihll privilege cards were sold at $4 each.
Mill Ihe resulting take of
$21011 Is a small Item beside
the $Koiin received from A.\1H
fees,
ll would be more correcl lo
say lhal Ihe athletic department wauls more money to
undertake  its program. If the
fee increase were approved
$if»,25 per student, would he
going to athletics.
Probably the UBC athletic
hierarchy hopes to enter foot-
hall and basketball competition
with the other three Western
Canadian universities.
INCREASE
if this were done, the fee
Increase would he an absolute
neceslty. In fact, last year the
students at the university of
Saskatchewan approved a similar increase, hoping their
football team would again play
western inter-collegiate football.
Popular opinion at 'present
would seem to be against any
increase in fees.
Any student naturally  tends
to resist  an  al tempt to  make
him   pay   more   for   his   education.
CONVINCE   STUDENTS
The athletic department will
have to do a superior job of
public relations in order to
convince the student his money
is  being  invested   wisely.
They will have to point out
that It is everyone's duty to
support the UBC teams and
that tills will not be difficult
as their admission to games
lias already  been  paid.
They will have to make sure
that the stadium gets Its
much-needed increase in seating capacity.
They will have to prove that
athletic 'betterment Is  Just as.
important   as   intellecual    improvement.
They will have to show us
that going to school is 49 per
cent athletic participation and
support and r,l per cent going
to lectures and talking over
ea,f coffee.
CRYSTAL   CLEAR
When they have made this
crystal clear to a majority of
the student body, UBC's athletic program will really have
a  chance   to   prove   Its   worth.
But until that time, they are
going to run into stubborn, determined opposition from individual studeiits and from student   organizations.
Few of us will be around
when tbe victor ls announced, Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, February 8, 1952
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized ns second class mall by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions $1.20 per year {included in AMS fees). Mail subscription 12.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published throughout the
University year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater
Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of tho Ubyssoy, and not necessarly
those of the Alma Mater Society or of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall ' For display advertising
iPhone ALma 1624 Phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LES ARMQUR
Executive ESdltor^-Allan Goldsmith, Managing Editor—Alex Macdillivray
News Editor, V. Fred Edwards; City Editor, Milo Ryan; CUP Editor,
Sheila Kearns; Women's Editor, Florence McNeil; Copy Editors, Jean
Smith; Director of Photography Bruce Jnffray; Senior Editors: Myra
Oreen, BJsle Oorfoat, Joe Schleslnger; Editorial Writers: Chuck Coon
and Dot Auerbach.
Letter* to the Editor should, be restricted to 150 words. The Ubyssey
reserves the right to cut letters and cannot guarantee to publish all
letters received.
Irosperity?
T,V AST week TIME Magazine not only gave its 2,000,000
J^,- readers an enthusiastic account of Canada's growing
prosperity, but also indicated that Canada now outstrips the
mighty United States in terms of per capita income available
f<& consumption.
'' Although this optimistic picture of our country may salve
thf national ego, we have to keep in mind the proper conception ©fithe nature of our country's prosperity, particularly
since we will have to pay for it in the future.
TIME states that "the average income for a (Canadian)
family of four is $4,000—$2*2 above the corresponding US
average."
It Is hard for us to accept this statement at its face value
With its implication that this ratio might represent the true
difference in the standards of living of the two countries.
In Canada the approximate $1,4*00 per capita share of the
national product compares unfavorably with the approximate
$1,800 of the United States.
Even TIME, in spite of its much vaunted research facilities, may have reached comparisons which are more apparent
than real.
Hie discrepancy probably results from the inclusion of
the huge amount of recent US investment in Canadian income
and possibly from its exclusion from the US income.
It is estimated that the US government is spending at the
rate of 25 billion dollars per year in foreign aid alone.
As Canadians, we always boast that we have never taken
in one penny of these "gifts," which now seem to be universally accepted as a kind of "manna."
However, we must remember that many more billions
are being invested abroad privately, and that much of these
Investments come to Canada in the form of oil exploitation in
Alberta, the Alcan project in B.C., and iron ore projects in
Northern Ontario and Labrador.*
; Undoubtedly these private investments have contributed
greatly to the prosperity we now enjoy, and explain to a large
extent the discrepancy in the two figures quoted above;
At the moment our treasury bulges with foreign currency
reserves.*How much of this is due to recent American stockpiling, we do not know.
We do know,' however, that if and when these stockpiles
become saturated, the prices of Canada's exportable minerals
will come tumbling, especially so since most of our mineral
wealth except nickel is duplicated within the borders of the
U.S.
US capital has been flowing into this country steadily. It
has fattened our payrolls and resulted in the naive belief that
our industrial plant will just keep on growing like the cabbage in our back-yard garden.
However, we must remember that some time in the future
we shall have to pay a hundred cents and then some on every
American dollar we have taken in.    .
Even the common cabbage needs water and fertilization.
At the moment the "fertilizer" of our industrial plant is being
supplied from outside sources.
The moment will come, when, if we want to maintain our
prosperity, we shall have to take care of further expansion
out of our own seeds.
As one authority puts it—we are now suffering prosperity. If in the future we are to enjoy it, we shall have to
wrest it ourselves.
No one will give it to us.
DADSON  EXPLAINS
Stand On Greeks
With reference to the motion I made at Council moo1:
Ing of January 2S regarding
Sororities and Fraternities 1
■would like to clarify my position In this matter. In the first
place the motion did not call
far a ban but merely a withdrawal of recognition of these,
organizations since I feel their
ideals, objectives and conditions of membership differ to
such an extent from other university organization, in tho second place I think Sororities
and Fraternities are permissible organizations for I fully
appreciate the advantages ac-
cruelng to some individuals
through contacts made by way
of tholr membership. Due to
the limited space allotted me
I shall briefly explain the reasons attached to my motion.
.  BIGOTRY VS   IDEALS
I know of several cases
where fraternties have refused
membership   to   people   based
solely on either their racial
or religious heritage. Since I
do not wish to bring individuals names or the names of concerned organizations into this
discussion I must ask the reader to accept this on the basis
of it being presented in good
faith. As I have nothing personal to gain from the requested action there is little purpose in my fabricating such
charges. Though restrictive
clauses may or may not be
placed in their constitution it
is an unwritten law in some ot
these organizations tp refuse
admission   on   these   grounds.
2. ALLEGIANCE  TO
FRATERNITY
Whether this is a dogma of
the organization fir not many
students do feel that they owe
their first support to the fraternity prior to the university.
This is displayed when fraternity and sorority functions conflict with* university   functions
Up A Tree
Chuck
(ooh
An editorial which appeared on this page in the Com*,
merce edition Tuesday tried
to defend the teaching of
Commerce at university.
"Business  problems  nowadays are just as complicated
as   the   philosophical   problems of yesteryear" it argued.
That may be jfrue. But the
philosophical 'problems  ot  today aro much  more complex
than    those    of    yester-year,
therefore more attention than
ever should be paid to teaching philosophical  problems  If
we were to follow that argument. ,
I like the definition of the
purpose a university education
as' given by a former president
of Columbia University, Nicholas Murray Butleo:
' "Tbe task of a college is, or
should be ... to offer the
youth for, three or four year's
opportunity for Carefully directed and supervised study in
some part or in many parts of
the field of liberal arts and
sciences.
"The purpose of this carefully supervised and directed
training is to give him the
benefit of his rich human inheritance . . , and thereby
bettor to prepare him for such
apeclf lc task as may await' htm
in the years of mature life."
I fall to see that making
money in a competitive 'business Is part of our '/rich human Inheritance."
Apparently there are some
who do.
* *       *
First sign of spring: I've got
one hell of a cold. Hear that
the consumption of Kleenex
bas ri*n 10 per cent on the
campus.
Flu and measles, the joys
of the new season, have also
made their annual appearance.
* *       *
Just when I was beginning
to think this country was becoming a nation In her own
right, Kins Oeorgo VI passed
away.
It makes you wonder when
the death of the king causes
such consternation in Ottawa
and has government officials
scurrying about issuing proclamations declaring Elizabeth
II Qlicen of Canada and taking
oaths of allegiance to the new
queen.
The newspapers were crammed with royal photographs,
royal biographies, royal anecdotes and even some royal
mews.
We are still tied emotionally
to the apron strings of Great
Britain, We still find it. difficult  to  think  for  ourselves.
Years of work trying to
pro ve to the world we are an
independent nation were erased   hy   a   king's   death.
* *        *
The local pubs did a roaring
■business  Wednesday.
Apparently scores of Varsity
men were so overcome with
grief at the king's death, that
they took a big chunk out of
the city's beer supply to help
forget   their   sorrow.
Or were thwy celebrating
the ascension of tlio new
queen?
when thoy feel it is their duty
to patronize theMr fraternal orders activity, it is also displayed at election times when votes aro cast,for fellow members
solely on the basis of the candidate being a fraternity brother or sorority sister. Several
cases of this practice I know
about and It is a fact that many
sororities and fraternities support a a candidate giving little
thought to tho candidate's potential competanco. ln the position.
. COST BARRIER
The membership fee charged annually is such as to prevent a largo number of students from joining the organization, (providing of course,
first of all, the groups felt that
llie rushee belonged to their
"set".) If Sororities and fraternities are an accepted phase
CAMPUS CHAFF
Fotheringham
"»***^ftViS»-"»t •-". .* <£■»■
(Ed. Note — The following article will illustrate how to say
nothing in 450 words. Those readers who are paying their
way through school by filling in blanks resembling "I like
Crunchie-Munchies because . . . " please take note.)
II to be in the    Georgia    <§>	
become   a   martyr.   And   that,
children, ls why it always pays
to bo attacked by tlio Ubyssey. (Mr. Edwards has taken
the lead as they race round
the copy, desk.)
ND fhe greatest premiere
Ij^now that spring ls here."
So salth the bard of the
Pub Office. V. Fred Edwards,
as he chased the circulation
editor  around  the office.
Yes   spring   has   definitely
sprung. V. Fred has recorded
the occasion for posterity with
his immortal lines:
Spring   has   sprung, .
The grass has.rlz;
1 Wonder where
The birdies is?
EXCESS GARBAGE
" Tiie'' Itwt ilert* bbdy Bf a
scienceman has floated down
the gutter paft the bus stop
with the. rest of the excess gar-
. bage. Studenta Who bave been
holed uj> in the cat aince exam
results emerged into the open,
air   yesterday   (or   the   first
, time and were immediately
struck blind by the reflections
of ihe sun off the dazzling
smiles of the candidates who
are running for AMS offices.
* One freshman even reported
that he had seen a live Engineer running loose without his
leash but the statement has
not yet been confirmed.
POX ALL'S FIENDS
THAT reminds me. Where
havo the Bnglneers been
the last, couple months. Mr
Foxall and his friends have
been laying, low. Gome out of
hiding O Men of the Redshirts.
My heart pines for the open
waters of Horseshoe Bay. Let
us throw off this disgusting
robe of respectability and coat'
menace to throw, mud at each
other again. (V. Fred is gaining on her as they past thro*
ugh the sports dept.)
To add to the gayety this
Is also Leap Year. The females
are supposed to step up their
pace ln their usual practice ot
chasing all red-blooded," healthy,  wealthy  young males.
DOCTORS PROTEST
The boys in the editorial
room aro sharpening up their
invectives preparing to launch
an attack on some lucky individual, He will be attacked in
I'byssey editorials, several
dozen leaders will write bitter
letters to the editor signing
themselves "Ad Nauseum", and
tho victim of the attack will
/\ln the history of UBC will
f*take place next week when
ithe no-doulbt world famous
University Student's Co-op Intramural basketball team takes
the floor against some nondescript bunch of scrub players
who havo been chosen as the
sacrificial lamb.
WIN OR CHEAT
The boys af the Co-op have
put In a hard two months of
training grouped around their
home brew crock and, amid
burps, have volwed they will
win the Intramural crown or
cheat trying. Under the strict
eye of their house mother they
have been made to run all
the way to the home brow barrel every night atyer supper.
This strenuous training schedule has strengthened their
legs, sharpened their eyes, and
sont three of them to the Canadian National Institute for
the Blind.
lint amid all this revelry our
story today ends on a sad note.
It is. becoming more and more
evident that the circulation
editor ls chasing V. Fred Edwards.
Ah well, he was a nice kid.
TRANSPORTATION**
RIDE WANTll) — 8:a0's DAILY.
Vicinity lftfch and Granville. Phone
f'H  1308.
LOST
LADIES SWISS WRIST WATCH.
Silver finish, brown cord strap.
Lost approximately 11 a.m. Thursday in the vicinity of tho bus 'stop
or Brock Hall. Kinder please return to AMS office.
LOST ON BUS LATE A.M. FEB.
5. A small blue canvas bandibag.
Will finder please phone Rich.
0943R. 47—4
BOARD   AND   ROOM
ROOM   AND   BOARD' FOR   ONE
male student. Phone AL 0076.
♦ ^-T_
CUROPi • MEXICO • HAWAII • JAPAN
of university activity there definitely exists a cost barrier to
somo  students  financially  unable   to   participate   in   these
f-oelelles   activities ' and  therefore in all phases of university
life.
4.  RESTRICT SOCIAL CONTACT
By having such groups which  •
are set. up- on the basis that
thoy   can   screen   and "choose
those with whom they wish to
associate there Is a definite
restriction of Social Contacts.
Thc students  irt those groups
through    such    practices     as
maintaining tables in the cafeteria   and   the   formation   of '
other   cliques   on   the   campus
are  therefore restricted  while
those students who are rebuffed by the organization are not-
allowed to take part In these   .
organizations     activities     no
matter how much they may de-
►    siro  to.
The above Is but a thumb
nail sketch of the motion I
made. The organizations concerned could be of benefit to
those fortunate enough to
gain membership if conducted
in the proper manner and subordinated completely to university interests, but 1 do feel
that, for the above stated reasons, they should not be recognized as a university body. If
recognition was withdrawn 1
feel such action would enable
oar Undergraduate Societies
and other organizations to receive greater support. Sororities and fraternities often attract the type of person who because of their understanding
qualities would lend valuable
assistance to the university or-
giHii/.ation and to the university.
Phil Dadson.
AND MEET THE PEOPLE
11 lx»«n»l/«l louri »W t'vdtMl
and ypei.ee' l«ecK«ri. OHUrMll
Compltltl teononltoll ColnM
(••dltt-on mo"*/ •own. Wl *
ond jwfrard tw Mitt*.
STUDENT TRAVIl
OVERSEAS PROGRAM!
WRIGHTS TRAVEL. SERVICE
767 Granville St. TAtlow 6186
// Likes You
Wilbur and Gui and tht B of M
OR expert advice on money
matters call on	
Bank of Montreal
Your Bank on the Campus . . .
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY,
Manager
WORKING   WITH   CANADIANS  IN   IVIRY  WALK   OF  UM  SINCI 1117
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
Hrs.: *9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books
Ahd Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C. Friday, February 8, 1952
THE UBYSSEY
Page Hires
UTEKAR
Pamela Steels-Literary Editor
4&   pipi^p. ...
Some criticism, other than in the form of Letters-to-
the-edjtor, have been levelled at the selection of material
on this page.
Now, after a great deal of discussion, controversy and
argument last Fall, a literary page was instituted in the
Ubyssey, to make up for the absence of the Thunderbird
this' year. Yet, so far, very few people have contributed to
this page. Granted the Literary Page has more than its share
of limitations. It is impossible, for example, to publish a
long short-story, or for that matter, a long poem; but this
page has room for stories somewhere between a 1000-1500
word limit, and it has room for some reasonable verse.
Undergraduate literary publications are an incidental
bi-product of continual, exposure to new ideas, to situations
and problems which are unique to life at a university—most
.i*i    . e    , - i   , *   *        ■ ;
universities which are worth their salt have one, if not
more. In some ways, the absence of the Thunderbird in the
past two years, and the reason for the limited material on
this page could be taken as a sign of both apathy and a
total lack of any creative writing ability on this Campus . ..
we would only be too pleased to be proven wrong . . .
We can see little point in continuing to print this page,
if a person-to-person campaign for manuscripts has to go
on every week, in order to scratch enough material, together
for the Friday issue—this method is neither desirable nor
satisfactory."    '" "' , *     ' • ftl$M
If you are interested in creative writing, if you have
written something which your parents and friends have seen,
and. muttered over, let's bee it, we will look at anything.
ED.
Andres Segovia ls a complete
artist and a great master of his
medium. Unfortunately, the literature for solo guitar is unsubstantial
and even the use of material originally for lute provides lt with
only campass, not solidity.
1 ■
Yet In spite of the fate that
has forced Segovia to be a
miniaturist, his recital was a
completely satisfying musical
experience. Rarely have I heard
sounds of such purity and radiance as he drew from the
guitar. The variety of tonal
colour,' the exquisite taste with
which such sounds were, used,
and the modest, almost reverent mode of presentation were
such as oae seldom encounters.
The Special Events Committee of the LSE deserves congratulations on their choice of ar
tist. It was a memorable evening.
^p      v      *p
At least Tennessee Williams
has the honesty to admit In
his prologue to "the Qlass Menagerie" that lt is a sentimen-
effective contribution to theatre technique. But such a technique is ln the Interests of a
fluidity. It ls a melding of present and past and requires a
slightly less mllk-sopplsh point
of view on the part of the play-
HM Oh m%ai£k
*■ \
&y John Brockington
T^p!aT,1Bo^W3ouffl7^^SF,
tastes.
The flashback technique adopted from the movies, which
enables* the narrator to play
a role in this drama of a mother seeking security amidst
poverty, a cripple daughter who
has retreated from Ufe into a
world ol cheap glass figures,
and of the narrator—son bound
to auppoft the other two yet
furtively dreaming of literary
success, ls perhaps a novel and
"w7lgBrTr™weTrea™noI^or,!o™
drown. Williams attempts to
give stature to a shrewish mother by allowing her to appear
self-sacrificing, he gives height
to a. neurotic cripple by finding
an ethereal beauty ln her glass
figures, and breadth to a sample
breadwinner by hinting at Inner struggles, supposedly the
common property of creative
artists. All in all a rather unhealthy point of view and not
even partially redeemed by a
sensitive ear for dialogue.
, Totem Theatre's production
was a strange, preciously light-'
ed affair, with two strong actors competing for the prises
which were being won by the
third, less voluble member of
the cast. Bruno Gerussl, as the
aspiring llterateur has obviously seen too many John Garfield
movies, i was absolutely fascinated by the way he smoked
those Cigarettes. As to his acting, so little of it was apparent that it hardly seems necessary to comment.
♦-
FLORENCE MCNBjkf,
Do not smile at my morning-frown face,
The^arly hour lias merely skipped across
And left Its tracks, but now they disappear.
r * m
And look! you will not know me very soon,
For I shall laugh at someone's blase jollity,
And tighten finger strings upon authority;
O tell me when you wish to call t£e tune *
And I shall play and dance to suit your whim-
Come, turn the crank and start the carousel,
See haw they chase each other round the ring,
And in the midst, I, Jester-like, cavort,
"©ear sir..." you say,—o lying fcypoerite—* ~""*r;
"Respectfully we wish to let yon know—"
Your herring eyes are glittering with greed
O cover up the light—I shall not see,
The incense that you 'burn before the calf,
Has wrapped itself around and stifled rae.
Now turn—the carousel Is stopped,
The grotesque figures stand in wooden fear
0 bend above the board and grasp, your pawns
Bereft of mind they move upon your will—
* * *
But I haVe known too long the hollow shell,
And when you Just now tipped your cardboard world,
1 tumbled .headlong into sanity.
CHAN AND MM
WITH AN IXTtA WW*
•AND OMATIN IMOOIH-
9INUINI IMPO*T» CO)*-
MlMsatffrti*
nt-raoM
uahuwjruL
Iff R^K *
SPARKLING RHINESTONE PINS
In Several Styles
1.00 ea
HEART-SHAPED COMPACTS
in jewellers bronze with compartment for
a cherished photograph.
There are many other gift suggestions for
your Valentine ...
AT BIRKS
see them tomorrow
OranviUe at Georgia — MArine 6241
w
THE SUN
has the witefA"
We live in exciting times and the news is not only vast in
quantity but also almost unbearable in complexity. So
The Sun, to ventilate and maybe simplify issues and events,
has assembled a group of free-wheeling writers who say
their pieces daily to the entertainment, and, we hope, the
enlightenment of our readers. At the top of this ad we
repeat our slogan about them. We think its mildly boastful
tone is justified when you consider that every day in The
Sun you get Jack Scott, Elmore Philpott, Harold Weir,
Barry Mather, Penny Wise, Mamie Moloney, Walter Lipp-
mann Dorothy Thompson, Marquis Childs and many others
of unmistakable merit.
Phone TAtlow 7141
For Daily, Home Delivery
• Ballerina length formals from a collection of American imports—particularly
swish for Spring dances.
Short white net—its floating skirt trimmed with white cord and rhinestones
that sparkle as you turn. May be worn with or without straps. 45*00
Dress Department, Second  Floor
Axiomatic with short formals—pretty shoes. These slippers are white satin
with silver colour and white brocade toes. •        14*05
Shoe Department, Second Floor
A delicate looking silvery and white brocade evening bag to hold your best
accessories. '  3*95
Handbag Department, Second Floor Page Four
.THE UBYSSEY
Friday, February 8, 1952
GIRLS' SPORT
Jan
Crafter
LAST call for all those
girls interested in Intramural Ski meet. You don't
have to be an expert skier to
take part in this meet. Whatever you may be, you are
guaranteed a good time and
lots of laughs. There are
points for participation as
well as skill. Date: Sunday
Feb. 17.
The ski meet will be ln the form
of a giant slalom on the Twin rillls.
Don't let the term giant slalom,
scare you, because actually lt ls
only a controlled course, that is a
few gates to keep you from going
out of control. Anyne with the least
skiing experience can easily manage the course.
Team consists of four girls uach,
with the best three times counted
in the results. Team .managers can
enter as many teams, as they are
able to make up.
Entor Now
Girls who are not on any particular team, but would 1'ko to race
may enter Individually.
All entries must be in at the
gym  by Friday,  Feb.. 15 at  4:80
I'.m. or you can phone them in to
Annemaile Leuchte at Went "JO'R.
*       *        *
THE VARSITY OUTDOOR Club
is offering free accommodations at
their new cabin for up to 50 girls
taking part In the meet for the Saturday night before their race.
Bring up your own meat, vegetables, potatoes and mush will be
supplied at about 10 or 15 cent.-) a
meal. .
f
Sh You Ms   ,
As far as transportation Is con
cerned,. bus'fes leave .the Pacific
. Stage Depot at 9 a.m., 2:10 p.m
and 7:3.0 on Saturday and at 0
a.m. on Sunday morning. Ail girls
taking part in the meet will meet
ln front of the ski lodge on Mount
Seymour at 11 a.m. Sunday morning. See you all up there!
Special Rates
For Students
(Special) — A travel
Jayvees
Topple
Highly Rated Cal Team
SPORTS
Sports Editor—BARRY DRINKWATER
Assistant Editors-CHARUE WATT and BRIAN WHARF
Soccer Squads
Fight To Draw
Birds Meet South Burnaby;
Chiefs Meet Labour Craft
'     By V. FRED EDWARDS
Soccer will swing into action again this .Sunday afternoon
as the Vancouver Soccer Season rolls into high gear after a
six week shut-down.   . *■
A Good Ref Would Have
Made A Different Story
By ALEX MacGILLIVRAY
People have been saying for years that a woman's place
is in the home.   •'*
Byt after yesterday's sorry exhibition of basketball refereeing in the War Memorial Gym, folks have picked up a new
axiom—some referees should be consigned to a home for good.
The Thunderbirds will meet
South Burnaby Legton In the feature garlle of the day at Callister
Park. The game wiil start at 2:15.
NEW PLAYERS
Manager Pete Prasloski, says
that some new players have* been
uncovered but will not releasVthelr
names. He expects at last one or
more of them to be in strip on
Sunday.,
The Chiefs will move into Jones
Park, at the corner of 35th and
Victoria Drive, for a game with
the Labor Craft Club. The Chiefs
will probably use the same line-np
as they did ln Mission last weekend.
CHIEFS GOOD    .
Yesterday afternoon In the Stadium tile Chiefs held the Birds to a
1-1 draw ln a game which saw
both teams using makeshift lineups.
Chiefs made life miserable for
the Birds during the whole game
(all two hours of It.)
BIRDS   PRESS
Although the Birds pressed
throughout the game they could
not penetrate through the Brian
Wharf-Koger Fox defense and
when they did there was goalls
been   established   by, Norm McLean, Johnny on the spot
OTTAWA-
servlce   has
the  National  Federation  of Canadian University Students.
Eight charter flights from Montreal to Europe have been arrang-.
ed at less than half the regular
fare with 02 seats for Canadians, as
well as shipping accomodations on
two Dutch ships also at reduced
rates, as a joint NFCUS-USNSA
Dutch project.
to thwart their efforts.
Playing in the Bird uniform, and
at times perturbed with their play
was coach Ivan Carr.
The Birds were the bettor team
but too many ol* them were inclined to be too lndlvidulistic and thus
spoiled the usually potent parsing
attack.
BIRDS h)ERE
Rugby CIAs
In Actio*
Tomorrow
The three varsit/ rugger
teams will all be in action to-
morrow afternoon for the first
time this term.
Top game will be held ln the
stadium at 2:30 when the Thunderbirds meet one of the best
down-town squads the .Vindex
club. Vlndexers led by ex-Thun-
derbird full back Hilary Wotherspoon, played steady rugger
throughout Miller Cup competition to finish ln the bumiber
one slot. Their only point loss
came when the Birds held them
to a 9-9 tie.
After their gruelling contest In Victoria last .week-end
Coach Albert ba-ithwaite plans
to use some second string players in order to rest bis star
players tor next week's McKechnie Cup game.
Speedy Hay Fee will take
over George Pull's spot on the
right wins tor the major
change while American football captain Dave McFarlane
is slated to see action ln the for
ward ranks.
The second division Braves
will take on the Vlndex's second team on Varsity's upper
field at the same time. In
their first start this term the
Braves will be seeking to emulate their past term's enviable  record.
For the refs, and believe U3
gentlemen we are being courteous
In calling you such, did their share
in helping California High School
All-Stars shade UBC Jayvees 45-
44 in a contest which literally
breathed  thrills,  chills and  spills.
It was a dubious foul call in the
last 30 seconds of play with the
scoreboard blinking 44-44 which
brought some 1400 Indignant fars
to their feet and gave the visitors
their second victory oU their Vancouver tour.
UBC   climaxed a  terrific come-
-i
back in tbe final half and actually
out-played, out-hustled and out-
scored the winners, if the. referees
had not aimed their -whistles. UBC
way throughout the coi.test, coach
Dick Penn's youthful hoop enthusiasts would li^ve been busy marking another st,0ry Into their record ljook.
Jayvees seemed slightly leary of
the highly touted Americans in the
opening quarter, which wasn't 'oo
Lou Murphy Shows Well
surprising considering the Yankees in had walloped a Vancouver
select prep squad 144-41 Wednes
day night.
However, once the, Varsity un-
iors started to get the feel of the
floor they had the home-town fans
pulses working overtime.
UBG trailed at the half by six
points 23-19.
They weren't able to catch up in
the emotion—packed second hall*
until one minute remained to play.
It was a skilfully handed laddie
named John McLeod who pumped
In   the   two   points   worth   whjch
gave UBC a 44-44 tie.
t
Lou Murphy made an appearance
ln Jayvee livery ln the third quarter. And the little guy reminded one
of that puppy on the new carpet—
you know what he's going to do
but you don't know whCn.
Ijou, brother of football's Gal,
tipped in six points in the Jayvee
drive but was strictly on the impressive list after showing his work
around and under the basket. He
just wouldn't be beat to rebounds,
Jump balls or what have you.
Huge Phil Barter wasn't exactly
out thel*e for decoration either. He
Chief Thorn Nets 17
put bis hook-shot to work for 11
points and the Jayvee top scorer
spot
Big   Billy   Russell   was   the   proverbial   thorn  in  the  home  club's
Cheers, men!
UBC Jayvees. Forward 3, Brinham, 3 Deinster 7, Murphy 6, Mat
Lend H>, Frith 1, Seymour 2, Barter 11, Herb, Bone 1, Carter, Hum-
INTRAMURAL
Cage Sked
Released By
Dick Penn
Intramural director Dick
Penn recently elected to UBC's
Hall of Fame Tjy virtue of the
terrific showing his Jayvee
club put on against the touring California All Stars today
released the mural schedule for
the coming week.
Thursday Is the only day when
hoop squads will not throng tbe
floor of the Memorial Gym at noon
time. On Wednesday, however, :>
separate times have been set aside
lor addicts of the cage game.
Monday,  Feb.  18
Saints vs Pharmacy
Frosh B vs Client Eng.
Phi Kappa Pi vs Pre Med.
Tuesday, Feb. 19
Alpha Delt B vs Fiji B
D.U. A  vs Teacher Tr. A
Zebes vs Teacher Tr. D
Wednesday, Feb. 20 12:30 p.m.
Phi'Delt C vs Sigma OF
Fort Camp vs Fort Camp B
Sigs  vs  Meds  B
Wednesday 7 p.m.
Psi  U  vs VOC
Alpha Delt A vs Maggie B
Pre Med A vs Newman   ,
Wednesday 8 p.m.
FIJI  A   vb  D.U.A
Zebes vs B.O.S
side all afternoon.  While the rets phrey.  Total  44.
blew   their   whistles   and   the   Jay-j    Cal. All Stars—Alblrae 4, Bluer 8,
vees and fans blew their collective; McKelvie 17, Hussell 8, Phillips 3,
tops  Hill  potted  17  points.
Although the Jayvees were losers of the contest lt must be said
that they are certainly a treat to
watch.
It's obvious that UBC's Dick
(Ogopogo) Penn has done a tremendous amount oi work witli the
club. And in doing so Coach Penn
has insured the future of this university's future Thunderbird
squads.
Swanson, Wagner 4. Total *15.
LEARN TO DANCE
•    QUICKLY
•    EA8ILY
'    •    PRIVATELY
3 Lessons $6.00-10 Lessons $15.00
Frances Murphy
Dance School
Alma Hall
CE. 6878
3679 W. Broadway
— BA 342!
FEBRUARY 22 AND 23
Alberta Here For Hamber Cup
Two weeks from today, February 22nd and 23rd, one of
the greatest events in the sporting history of the  University
of  British Columbia will take
place when the Powerful University of Alberta Uolden Bears
hockey   team   journeys   westward   to   our   fair    (although
trifle damp) city to meet UBC
Thundenbirds in two game hockey series for the coveted Hamber Trophy.
This is the only athletic
event on the campus that unites
two Canadian universities and
besides providing fans with unlimited thrills while enjoying
Canada's fastest sport It will also give students a chance to
cheer for their team in a purely
Canadian  sport.
*r V V
Friday and Saturday. February -':!nd and -ISrd will be two
mil:i. nights for all sports loving fans on tahe campus. Not
only will tliere be two rousing
hockey saines on those two
nights but there will also be
cheer leaders at each game,
UMC's brass band anil pipe band,
our own colorful and talented
majorettes with their twirling
batons, and to top off the festivities there will be a dance on
Ihe ice after the Saturday night
game.
To those ol you whose homes
are in the Interior of B.C. or
ln any of our prairie or eastern provinces you will feel
right at home dancing on an
ice surface after the many en-
joyaible "moccasin dances'' you
attended every winter In your
home town.
9p 9p 9p
College sports are undoubtedly the most enjoyable and thrilling events to watch and the
V. of A. vs. UBC hockey series
will certainly be one of the
better events. It is not very
often that we In B.C. receive
the opportunity to compete
with another Canadian university and these, rare opportunities should not be missed.
Last year the UBC hockey
team travelled to the I'niversily of Alberta at lOdmonton
and played a two game series.
Possession of the beautiful
Hamber Trophy was decided on
a total goal count which UBC
lost by one goal.
This year the Birds are raring «to go to will the trophy
back once more. They have
assembled a potent array ot
hockey talent and these boys
will lie giving their all for UHC.
They need your support to help
them  win.
A tier the wonderful entertainment provided by the U. of
A. last year for our team and
the great support given their
team by the Alberta students
we will have a tough job topping* their effort. But it can
be   done.
For the prestige of our university and for the financial
support of our Athletic Department the hockey team needs
your support ln the two game
series on tbe 22nd and 23rd.
Make It a point of getting a
big crowd of your friends together and forming a party to#
sit together in -the UBC section at these games. There are
tickets available at the AMS.
ofiflce right now and they are
the best sets In the house, right
at center ice.
Tickets may also be purchased at the New Oym or at Kerrisdale Arena. Any member of
the hockey team can also provide'you with good seats.
Don't forget the dates, Friday and Saturday, February
HL'nd and 2'!rd just two weeks
from today. If you buy your
tickets now you will be assured of good sea.ts in the UBC
section. A big crowd is expected from the speed iu which the
tickets are being sold so don't
Ih*   left  out.
*        *        *
(live* the hockey team your
best aiI'd heartiest support and
they will give their ail for you
.against the University of Alberta. It's up to you whether
our student body makes a success of this series and proves
to the U. of A. students that
we can equal and surpass their
efforts in the series at Edmonton last year. Come out for a
good  time.    .
STUDENT TOURS TO
EUROPE
STUDENT TOUR72 daya *1155 (8 addit,onal days at *d*
tlfWUlf ,vvn ditional expense to be spent on complk-
NO*   IS tlon of tour beforo sailing.)
Sail tourist class May 21st from Quebec on 8.S. Samaria. Scotland.
Enolish Lakes, Chester, Shakespeare Country, North end South
Devon, London, Holland, Belgium, Germany (the Rhine and Black-
Forest), Switzerland, Italian Lakes, Venice, Rome, Hill Towns.
Florence, Italian and French Rivieras, Paris.
STUDENT TOUR NO. 2: 52 days $995.
Sail tourist class with run of the ship privileges on the S.S.
Georglc June 25th from New York. Scotland, English Lakes,
Shakespfcare Country, London, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland,
Italian Lakes, Venice, Rome, Hill Towns, Florence, Italian end
French Rivieras, Paris.
ask for detailed itinerary
UNIVERSITY   TRAVEL   CLUB
57 Bloor St. West, Toronto Ki. 6984
Management: J. F. and G. H. Lucas
Knjoy ihe Ix'sl!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124919/manifest

Comment

Related Items