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The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1925

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 3ttp HbgBB^
Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 12th, 1925
No. 15
SENIORS MAKE
CLEANSWEEP
Girls Of '25 Are Varsity
Champions
The keen struggle for the Chris
Spencer Cup which takes place annually between the women of the University is now nearing its close. This
cup was presented by Mr. Chris Spencer in 1922, with the object of encouraging inter-class competition a-
mong the women of the University and
it can be easily recognized that it is
yearly doing a great deal to stimulate
activities.
This year it can be said that, although the competitiion is not yet
ended, Arts '25 has practically been
successful in capturing the much-coveted cup. In the aTack Meet held last
term Arts '25 proved themselves the
victors while '26 came 2nd, '28, 3rd
and '27, 4th. In Swimming '25 also
came first with '27, 2nd, '28, 3rd and
'26, 4th. Arts '27 captured 1st place
in Badminton, while 28 and '25 tied
for 2nd with the Aggies 3rd. Basketball was another victory for '25, with
*26 in 2nd place, games for 3rd place
not yet having been played.
The number of points gained by
each class up to date are as follows:
'25 14%; '27 8; '28 6%; '26 7. There
are yet 2 points to be played for by
'27 and '28 but this will not greatly
affect the present standing.
In the different athletic activities excellent support has been given to the
athletic reps, ia taking part in events
and turning out to practices and this
has done much to run athletics on an
efficient basis. Throughout their college career, the girls of Arts '25 have
done good work in athletics, and during the last four years women's athletics have gone ahead by leaps and
bounds.
In 1921-22 the only inter-class competition was the relay won by Arts '25.
The women of the year decided to put
up a cup in order to keep np interest
in this event.
In 1922-23 the Chris Spencer Cup
was established and both this and the
'25 cup were carried off by '25. Last
year Arts '27 won both cups with '25
close runners up for it. This year
'27 again got the Relay Cup while
'25 has the Spencer Cup.
Doris Shorney, President of Women's Athletics, a keen follower of
sport during her 4 years of college, has
inspired great enthusiasm into athletics and has done much to raise
their standard. The Track Champion
this year was Clara Gould, and the
Swimming Star, Sylvia Thrupp. Others taking a prominent part in different athletics are S. Thrupp, I. Russell,
M. Bell, D. Shorney, F. Gignac, L.
Mowatt, D. Murray.
Remember the 28th—
Keep It Open!
See the Greatest Event
in the History of the
Varsity
Some snv "fiUu_
"Ue  turds To Vicrorio."
8uf 1 saij "«i\u mae
bird  would 3i<a« m
V<3^\coovce.,,
fir Leslie    spread
Cke "old oi!"droui\d
U. B. C. DEBATERS SHOW WELL
</ IN INTER-PROVINCIAL DEBATE
Home Team Has Good Arguments, But Loses By Odd Vote
Good Crowd Out
By the odd vote in three the crack
Saskatchewan debating team defeated
the representatives of our institution
in a debate on the Geneva Protocol
held last Thursday evening in King
Edward High School auditorium. The
audience, as usuaj, voted strongly
in favor of the home team.
Mr. H,arryvPurjiy_-of Arts '26 opened
the case for the affirmative, outlining
in a clear and forceful manner tihe
evolution of the League of Nations as
a force for World Peace and showing
how the adoption of the Protocol was
necessary to complete the work of
the Covenant. Mr. Purdy's delivery
was remarkably good and especially
so in view of the fact that he had
had only two or three days to prepare
for the battle.
The argument for Saskatchewan
was opened by Mr. J. C. Jocelyn. He
decried the effectiveness of compulsory arbitration, while admitting the
virtues of voluntary conciliation. Mr.
Jocelyn made no attempt after effect,
but contented himself with a well-
organized logical argument based
solely on facts. He avoided the use
of technical terms and kept strictly to
the subject under discussion.
Mr. T. W.'Brown now took up the
white man's burden. He was the
heavy artillery of the home team. He
brought up fact after fact and ihurled
them at the opposition, with devastating effects. By specific references he
pointed out just where the Protocol
was  an  advance  over  the  Covenant.
He was not quite sure of himself, but
his argument was well presented.
He was followed by Mr. W. J. Mc-
Lellan of Saskatchewan. Mr. McLell-
an resembles nothing so much as a
machine gun. Facts and arguments
pour out of him with startling rapidity,
and he is by far tihe most specific in
his arguments.
Following Mr. McLellan came Mr.
Eric- Dunn of Arts '25. For one so
ytrarrg"tKTsr individual showed remarkable signs of aggression, launching a
vigorous attack on the opposition citadel. His argument was almost all rebuttal, a fact which he himself cheerfully admitted.
Mr. E. C. Leslie now took the floor,
and discoursed eloquently on the Vancouver climate, western hospitality,
following the birds to Victoria, and
other matters pertinent to tihe issue.
Then he attacked the Protocol, with
the result that the affirmative case
was left looking like a devastated area
in Northern France. His use of the
Japanese amendment was extremely
skillful, and his attacks on the preceding speakers witty and effective. Mr.
Leslie was the shining star in the
Saskatchewan firmament.
Saskatchewan's rebuttal was in the
capable hands of Mr. McLellan who
again demonstrated that rubber tired
spectacles often conceal a keen brain.
Mr. Brown then stood on the burning deck whence all the rest had fled
and made a last attempt to make the
(Continued on Page 2)
VARSITY MAY
JET GET GYM.
Victoria Reconsiders Varsity
^Gymnasium
It is with great pleasure that the
Campaign Committee are able to announce that the present need for a
vigorous campaign has passed. The
government has modified its absolute
refusal to build the gymnasium and a
gleam of hope is once more visible on
the horizon.
Last year the student body managed
to raise, by divers means, the sum of
$8,500 for playing fields at Point Grey.
During the summer, work was commenced and a good start was made
by a small group of students on the
larger field. At the beginning of the
new term, the whole question of the
location of a permanent field was thoroughly gone into and a block of land
north of 10th Avenue at the University
boundary was selected. A contract
for clearing, draining and levelling
was let about two months ago and
work has been proceeding very satisfactorily considering the state of the
ground and the very heavy rains of
the   preceding  month.
The work, however, has proved more
costly than was at first expected and,
although there are two good fields in
preparation, the fund is absolutely depleted.
There will be a Campaign Meeting
on Wednesday, February 18th at which
a full report of the situation will be
placed before the student body. Everybody should be out to hear the final
summary of the work of the committee—next Wednesday noon.
CONSTITUTION
CHANGES CARRY
student Mass Meeting Endorses
Council's Scheme, 464-145
That the proposed changes in the
constitution of the A. M. S. would be
essentially advantageous in the enacting of student affairs at Point
Grey next year was manifested at the
meeting of the Alma Mater Society in
the Auditorium last Friday noon when
464 students out of 589 voted in favor
of the amendments.
Before the meeting was opened for
discussion, the chairman, Mr. Dal
Grauer, President of the A. M. S., gave
an extensive explanation of the proposed changes. He stated that the
advantages of the amendments would
be found in the solidifying of allied
activities, the reduction of the council, the prevention of its increase with
the advent of new faculties and the
handing over of powers of discipline
to those who can best handle them.
Eight out of the eleven speakers
who took the platform were in favor
of the change. They corroborated the
arguments put forth by the President
and claimed that it was necessary to
change immediately so as to have an
efficient council at Point Grey next
year. One speaker mentioned that
as the outsiders are interested in tihe
University as a whole, fewer individuals representing all the departments
(Continued on Page 2)     .w THE   UBYSSEY
February 12th, 1925
SATIN PUMPS
The Last Word
IN
Evening Shoes
This showing includes strap,
gore or plain effects, with
Louis or Spanish heels. Very
smart, and a perfect fit assured.    AH sizes at
$7.50
Women's Oxfords
Brown or black calf oxfords
with low heels and round toes.
All Sizes.
$5.00
**
David Spencer
Cimited
LUNCH     TEA     SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nora Scotia
VARSITY SECONDS
/LOSE HARD GAME
U. B. C. Put Up Plucky Fight
The second team went down to defeat before the league-leading Vancouver-Engineering Works team in a
game illumined by poor shooting on
the part of the winners and plucky
fighting by the losers. Without Evans
the forwards needed compasses to
steer by, although the work of Cant
and Reid was scintillating enough at
times.
The Varsity team found the tactics
of the Engineers more than strenuous
and after five minutes play Mcintosh,
diminutive outside left was injured
and rendered unable to continue. The
V. E. W., however, were playing exact
football but were shooting wildly.
Shields at fullback for Varsity throughout the entire game gave an exhibition of kicking and tackling that made
him the outstanding player on the
field. V. E. W. scored the only goal
of this half on a penalty against
Crees.
With the second half a free kick
was awarded against the Engineers
outside the penalty area. This Shields
converted spectacularly. Shortly afterwards he failed in his second attempt.
V. E. W- scored their second goal after
some tricky inside football when their
inside right snapped up a rebound
from Sutherland's good save. Cant
and Reid squirmed and wriggled up
to the opposition goal, beat the fullbacks and when the goalie came out
Reid slipped the ball past him for a
tying goal. This proved his last foray
for as he shot he collided with a defender and had to be carried from the
field. The Engineers put even more
iron into their play but while Crees,
Robertson and Shields defended well,
Warden miskicked pitiably and during
the game was hopelessly off color.
With a minute to go V. E. W. were
given a penalty against Hunter which
they utilized winning the game 3-2.
U. B. C. Loses Debate
(Continued from Page 1)
world Safe for the Protocol.
Possibly the best feature of the
whole affair was that all the speakers
constantly kept in mind the fact that
their principal duty was to interest
the audience, and avoided references
to statistics, blue books, papers, and
what-nots.
Reg. $30.00 Check-Back
OVERCOATS
Popular new styles, with raglan or set-in
sleeves,  full  or half belts  and  quarter-
j quilted Venetian linings.   Light, medium
■   I      or dark plain colors, or fancy mixtures.
Clearing now at only
$16.50
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
Agents for the World-Famous JAEGER Lines
45-47-49 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
FIRST ELEVEN ON
TRAIL TO TROPHY
J/   Mainland Cup In Sight
Varsity's first soccer eleven fought
their way into the third round of the
Mainland Cup series when they scored twice at the Powell Street grounds
last Saturday, getting no response
from the Army and Navy squad. The
veterans threw quite a scare into the
supporters of the Blue and Gold in
the first stanza when they held the
fast stepping collegians scoreless.
Varsity sharpshooters did not get going in the first canto and passed up
many opportunities to boost their scoring averages. Although the inside
forwards got quite close to Pilkinton,
the Army and Navy net minder only
had one really hard shot to save before
the interval, a scorcher sent in by Jeff
Emery.
Upon resumption of play, however,
the collegians came to life and bombarded Pilkinton from all angles. The
losers custodian was in brilliant form
and it was some time before the students broke through. Their efforts
were at length rewarded when Bobby
Jackson lobbed one out of the goalie's
reach after receiving a well placed
pass from Evans. Max Evans is a
new addition to the first team aggregation, being transferred last week
from the TJ. B. C. squad. The former
North Vancouver star showed up well
and should be doing his stuff regularly
with the first team for the rest of the
season.
Varsity's second goal came within
five minutes of time when Crute scored on a penalty awarded against one
of the loser's defenders for handling
in the dreaded area. The Sea men put
up a stubborn resistance for most of
the game but Roy King had little to
do between the posts and Mosher who
was standing behind to act in an advisory capacity, remarked that he had
never had things so soft when he was
playing. Howard, Kennedy and Pilkinton, starred for the losers whilst
Emery, and Wilkinson were the pick
of the winners. Varsity played without Baker and Butler.
Varsity Line-up—King, Crute, Wilkinson, Buckley, Phillips, Ledingham,
Emery, Evans, Huestis, Jackson and
Cameron.
Constitution Changed
(Continued from Page 1)
and activities would be a better "go-
between students and public." The
speakers of the opposition argued that
it would be advisable to withold the
amendments in view of the fact that
difficulties may arise in the new premises which would result in another
change of council. They also saw
the possibility of the faculty presidents losing prestige by being removed from the council. In reply to an
attack against the marshal system the
President denied it was organized
with the intention of checking up the
drafting of money.
A motion to defer the voting in order to allow the students more time
to discuss the subject was defeated
by an overwhelming majority. At the
conclusion of the meeting, however,
Mr. Grauer suggested that all elections for the coming term should be
advanced one week, which met with
the hearty approval of the audience.
Those who spoke in favor of the
changes were: Mr. J. Craig, Mr. C.
Arnold, Mr. M. Hunter, Mr. T. Taylor,
Miss MacGill. Mr. Oliver, Mr. A. Buchanan, Mr. Moore, and those against
were: Mr. A. Maxwell, Mr. Shore and
Mr. J. Keenan.
Mother—"Did I hear you say darn?"
Mary—"No I don't use baby talk."
—Putman Prattier.
''£My !   What a
"Dandy "Display."-
That's   what   she   said  about
our VALENTINES.
It's quite true— they are here
in hundreds. A pleasing variety of shapes and sizes. Just
the kind you'd like to send
to your best friend or worst
enemy.
VALENTINE FAVORS
and NOVELTIES
for
DANCES, PARTIES. Etc.
Lots of new ideas and clever
suggestions.
GEHRKE'S *
PRINTERS. ENGRAVERS,
SOCIAL AND BUSINESS
STATIONERS
651 SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAMS
IRealFruitJuiceI
pAflTY PUNCH
PURE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C. GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue Will
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Midway ^
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
Definite announcement is made that
the Women's Debate with Oregon
State Agricultural College will take
place on March 3rd. U. B. C's debaters are working out the case for and
against exclusion of Japanese very
carefully, and a spirited debate is anticipated. This will be the first dual
debate that our women have ever
staged, and the hearty support of all
the students is necessary to make it
a big success. The question reads;
"Resolved that the restriction of Japanese immigration on a quota basis
is better than total exclusion." Great
interest was taken in a recent inter-
class debate on this subject and all
should make it a point of hearing
what our Oregon friends have to say
in favour of total exclusion. U. B. C
will be represented in Vancouver by
Misses Vera Mather and Jean Tolmie,
and in Corvallis by Misses Helen MacGill and Miss Phyllis Gregory. February 12th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
NEW NECKWEAR
JUST ARRIVED!  THE NEW 1925
DESIGNS IN CREPE TIES.
$1.50 each.
DROP IN AND LOOK THEM OVER.
TURPIN BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
l"t»l»>«»'>»»-SMtw«*«W>..|HS.Hll». I
COLLEGE INN
752 ROBSON ST.
Just West of Granville.
COSY AND SELECT
Club Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners
50c. up
Also, A la Carte.
I
PARTIES SPECIALLY CATERED
FOR.
8 a.m. to midnight.   Open on Sundays
Phone, Sey. 8096
!•••»•••••••••••••»•••••••»•<
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
■»..»..«■»..»..»..».•«»»..»..»..»..»««..«..«.■«..».
THE LESTER
Dancing Academy
SATURDAY  EVENING  SOCIAL
DANCE (by Invitation)
i
Instruction by Appointment
LESTER COURT
Seymour 1689
•j***-**
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
BADMINTON
RACQUETS Re-strung
and Repaired.
Workmanship Guaranteed.
February BRUNSWICK RECORDS
Now On Sale.
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653      718 ROBSON ST.
VALUABLE HINTS
ON RELAY RACE
Ezra Corntassell Foretells Result
In spite of the fact that there is to
be no betting this year Ye Sports Editor has been appealed to give a prognostication of this year's results. He
gave the correct placing of last year's
team which he didn't believe himself
until it came out that way. But this
year he finds that the dope is badly
mixed up owing to great strides made
by dark horses in the local seat of
learning. Hence, for fear that he
should get the horse laugh after the
event he has appealed to his friend
Ezra Corntassel, former well known
Aggie trainer who has since retired,
but .is nevertheless in close touch
with the relay teams.
Ezra writes as follows:
Deer Buck:
Am pleased to hear that yer not
bettin this yeer. Course I knows thet
yer never did bet much but I think
yer wise to refrain altogether this
year. I'm powerful disappointed in you
farmers what calls yerselves Agriculturists. Yer aint like yer used to be
when I was training yer and you cant
win the race nohow unless yer durn
lucky. But I reckon thet yer kin still
give them there Arts '25 gazoos a run
fer there money—heh hen! But this
here back to the land stuff has bust
yer up somethin fierce and I dont see
much signs of Hope in Aggie and you
fellows dont seem to Russell like yer
used to or it would be Pye for you.
I dont like to admit it Buck but between you and me and the gatepost
that there Mottley bunch of steers
in Arts '27 look like winners. Them
there go-getters has been training ever
since Matilda broke her leg in the far
pasture last fall, consarn 'em.
Ive heerd a lot of talk from some
of them there Arts '25 critters wot
copped the race last year, of repeatin.
But you know Buck how them there
seniors dissipate. Why even yer good
for nothin Aggies may beat them because although you hev got some old
grey mares youve got a durn good
Paddock and there ain't none of you
got no Charley horse neither. Them
there seniors is gettin too old and
stiff, and carryin them there gowns
around like thay have all year is awful
hard on the constitootion.
Fourth place is hard to figger and
if both the old grey mares '25 and
Aggie get second and third it seems
only naturel to me that a dark horse
should come fourth. But I somehow
figger that a Brown horse from Science '27 might get a place and if
spark plug runs the last lap for them
he might lick one of them there old
grey mares that I figgered for third
or second.
The Freshies aint a dark horse this
year they're a white elephant and them
there elephants never was much good
at running, besides they aint got no
horse  sense.
Arts '26 may get a little Balm added
to their feelins in the second lap and
we Cant altogether Bar Science 26 on
that lap either. If Tarr proves a good
sticker for Agriculture they may get
Bucked up by the end of the race too.
I heard this morning that the guy that
Wass on the first lap for '25 aint there
no more and jest to show you how
ancient they're gettin they're figgerin
on comin in on the last lap by way of
the old Ark.
Times has changed since my day
Buck, when I ran for the Hickville
Hustlers in their annual race from
Alfalfa Corners to Eggville. I jest
got right off the hay mow and without
takin off my jeans I stepped out and
beat all the farmers around and a
couple of dressed up city guys too—
he! he!    I didn't have no gels drivin
JUNIOR SOCCER
/MEN DEFEATED
St. Mary's Win Close Game
Varsity lost to St. Mary's 2-1 on a
perfect pitch at Trimble Park, but in
doing so almost upset the jinx that
has been following them. The game
was fast and clean, and the Blue and
Gold wearers put up one of their best
exhibitions, throwing a terrible scare
into the ranks of the "enemy." On
the play they deserved better fate,
but it's goals that count.
Settling down after a wabbly start,
Varsity defended stoutly, Davies getting in some good kicking. Black took
an opportunity finely and crashed one
past the Blue and White goalie, and
after some splendid combination, Pit-
ters put a bullet drive past only to
have it disqualified. It was perhaps
the finest goal of the match. Shortly
after this a weak clearance by a Varsity back let the ball roll out to the
unmarked outside left, who was rather
luckily placed, and could not have
missed. Varsity pressed, but during a
raid by the Churchmen a clearance unluckily struck one of their men, and
the wind gently propelled the leather
just over the line with no one near.
However, Varsity pressed for the rest
of the half, but with no results. Following a short spell in which the winners had the advantage, Varsity took
the game in hand, and forced the visitors into their own goal mouth, their
custodian making several brilliant
clearances, but nothing got past him,
and the game ended with Varsity one
down. The work of Miller in goal
deserves note; he substituted for Stewart, and while he was not overworked,
he did his duty perfectly, and had absolutely no chance on either of the
goals. The revival to form of the forward line is another pleasing aspect,
and some real good combinations was
served up, notably the McKinnon-
Goadin and Taylor-Black, types. The
backs played well.
The Team—Miller, Smith, Dyres,
Howarth, Davies, Taylor, McKinnon,
Jaudin, Pitters, Stevenson and Black.
Arts '27 and Loyalty
Its rather unfortunate for Arts '27
that they could only get second place
in the swimming tournament. They
have so far won the basketball, badminton, soccer, tug-of-war, anu track
meet, and hope to win the relay, boxing, rugby, grass hockey, rowing,
checker and tiddledywinks championships. One must hand it to the sophomores—they have got lots of class
spirit.
Without any reflection on this class
and faculty spirit, which is a very
good thing, an observer can't help
wishing that some of it could be directed toward a little college enthusiasm with regard to sport. When one
sees grandstands empty of Varsity
rooters at the football games, one
wonders whether some of our pep
meetings would serve a better purpose if they were staged at Brockton
Point and Con Jones Park, when the
McKechnie and first soccer elevens
are struggling against strong opposition to bring credit to tiheir Alma Mater. Why should the moth-eaten,fungus
growing, auditorium be the only place
where Varsity Students get together?
me out over the course timin me and
holdin my hand either like some of
these Arts '27 critters—bad cess to
em.
Men were men in those days Buck!
Your old friend,
Ezra Corntassell-
Very New !
Guard Coats
Designed by O'Rossen, these
boyish double-breasted Coats
are leaders among the new
Spring Fashions. Nipped-in
lines at the waist give them a
mannish air that is very smart.
In the new suede-like cloths.
$25-00
On display in the
Downstairs Shop
**
■zdls-^
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
p0LLIN'P|ty
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
One of the aims
1020 has in
mind is to be
lower in price.
And since coming
down here we
have cut prices
unmercifully.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1A^A  GRANVILLE
AvAU  STREET THE   UBYSSEY
February 12th, 1925
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued every  Thursday by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural  Subscription,  $2.00  per
Session.
For  Advertising  Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange Editor John  Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy  Editor    Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters — Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, G. W.
Ashworth, James Dunn, Dave Taylor,
T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmick, Alice
Weaver.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager H. A.  Thompson
Circulation   Manager E.   J.  Eades
Business Assistants....!!.  G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F. McCulloch
EDITOR   FOR   THE   WEEK
W.   C.  Murphy.
PLEASE CO-OPERATE
The Editorial Board find it their
painful duty to remind students that
its office is a place where work is carried on and business transacted, and
is not intended to provide a drawing-
room for idle students. Especially
should this be born in mind during
Monday and Tuesday of every week,
when sustained and concentrated work
is necessary if the UBYSSEY is to be
ready for students on Thursday.
We are very glad to have friends
and still more pleased to see them.
But we feel that, pro bono publico, we
must deny ourselves of their presence
for certain hours in the early part of
the week. Not that we wish to retire
into the splendid and self-sufficient
isolation of a periodical monastery.
By all means, if you have anything
whatsoever in connection with the
UBYSSEY'S activities to see us about,
drop in and we'll talk it over. If
there's something you don't like about
the rag, come in and slam us. We
won't care. (One of our editors is a
big-block man and another plays rugby
and knows how to box). Perhaps we'll
fall in with your, suggestion. Even if
you can't pick a fight you may have
something to contribute to your own
paper.- By all means, knock and be
admitted.
On Monday's and Tuesday's, we have
a busy sign on the door. It'may not
be artistic but it was written in all
sincerity.    Thank you.
l/TH
THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY
Just ten years ago the Players' Club
was rehearsing for its inaugural performance of "Fanny and the Servant
Problem," which was presented at the
Avenue Theatre on February 18, 1916.
In May it was repeated in Victoria
and New Westminster, and also again,
by request in Vancouver. Press criticism was extremely favorable, the
Club was commended on the splendid
acting and staging, and was acclaimed as a worthy innovation in the University life. Gradually the presentations became more ambitious and the
repertoire of the club began to include
the masterpieces of Wilde and Barrie.
In 1920 the players toured the Okan-
agan for the first time, two years later
they included the Kootenay district,
and last year the spring play was performed at seventeen different places.
Such a cursory summary gives but
an inadequate conception of the
achievements of the Club which, in
the small space of a decade, have
been remarkable. Perhaps no other
organization has done as much to
convince  the  people  of  the  province
of the possibilities of the University,
just at a time when it was absolutely
necessary that many prejudices regarding it should be broken down.
Apart from this, the Players' Club
has succeeded in stimulating an interest in the literary drama, not only
throughout the college, as was originally purposed, but throughout British Columbia. Financially too, the
Club has more than justified its existence, for during the first years large
rums were donated for war purposes,
while more recent profits have been
devoted to educational and university
interests.
Now, on the tenth anniversary of its
formation, the Players Club is about
to enter into a new phase of its existence, and everything points to a
notable era in the field of the drama.
The new theatre at Point Grey, is not
only a vast improvement on the auditorium, but has Ibeen declared by
competent critics to be the best in
Canada. On entering the building, Mr.
and Mrs. Carroll Aikens were immediately struck with the atmosphere
which is admirably calculated to produce the proper dramatic mood, and
with the possibilities of the stage for
all the latest equipment. It is not
without just reason, then, that we are
expecting great things of the Club,
under the continued guidance of its
capable director, and if the past is
any indication we are certain of not
being disappointed.
Professor Eastman
/ Talks On League
On Monday last, Professor Eastman,
under the auspices of the-ST C. M.,
gave a very interesting talk" on "The
League of Nations and its necessity."
He started by pointing out that the
great mass of humanity desired peace;
this being true, not only of the Christian world, but of the whole world.
He then went on to show that the
reason the desire of this large number
of people was unattained, lay in the
fact that the advocates of peace were
not united—that they were prone to
fight among themselves. He then answered some of the objections that
are raised to the League.
To the pacifist—the one that objects
to the use of force in any form, even
corrective—he pointed out that, to
change the world to a unified, peace-
loving humanity, would take time, a
great deal of time, meanwhile what
would happen to civilization, yes to
the human race itself? Destruction!
"Science," he said, "has made satanic
progress in the past few years. We
cannot afford to wait till the human
heart is perfected. We would all be
dead by then."
To the man who argues that the
League is political and does not use
the weapon of religion in its fight
against war, the speaker reiterated
the fact that the League cannot take
one religion for its ally since it is to
embrace all nations. So, therefore, it
must take the only other course; it
must be political.
To the man who says it is only a
"Capitalistic League," a union of
capitalists he gave the obvious answer,
'No matter what the form of society
is the world needs the League." He
went further and showed that, inasmuch as the League includes all kinds
of countries, it is not purely capitalistic—some countries are "pre-capital-
istic," some have evolved beyond that
stage.
Professor Eastman closed with
words to the effect that, the world was
to-day faced with two alternatives—■
mutual suicide, or mutual co-operation, i.e., the League.
By The Way
It was refreshing to hear a real debate, with a genuine attempt to present arguments on both sides,—after
the tea-party repartee with which we
were lately entertained.
 O	
"His poise was ever lofty, gentle,
and symmetrical,—an excellent thing
in chairmen."
Every year matters are brought up
by the Council that necessitate voting
upon by the student body. Every year
one or two students who are "agin the
govt." on principle perpetuate the
childish practice of throwing monkey
wrenches in the machinery by clamoring for postponement and delay after
everybody has had oodles of time to
think the matter over. It is an old gag
and a frightfully hackneyed one.
the Varsity Clothes
Shop of Young Wen
Some men make up their minds, and
most    women    their    faces—but    the
ladies have something to base it on.
 o	
No, Alonzo, dead beats are not necessarily pickled.
PRESS CONTEST
Considerable interest is being evinced in the Players Club contest, for the
best report on the Spring Play, "You
and I." The details were announced
in last week's issue of the Ubyssey.
Reports should contain between 200
and 250 words, and must be handed
in not later than Thursday, February
19 th. They are to be left in the rack
in the main hall, addressed to Miss
Jean Faulkner. To the student submitting the best report, the Players
Club is offering a prize of two orchestra seat tickets. So find last week's
Ubyssey, fill your pens and get to
work to beat the other fellow.
OUR
LOOSE ENGLISH
DRAPED SUITS,
with wide roomy Trousers,
have arrived.
We invite you to come and
see them.
You will find us as willing to
show them as to sell.
Tlios, Foster &Co„ Ltd,
Tasbion Craft
608 Granville Street
OUR IDEA OF A JOKE
Re-papering the Halls of Fame.
Putting up "No Trespassing" signs
around the Sands of Time.
Just calling a toll system at the
gates of Heaven.
AFTER THE ALL BLACKS
WHAT NEXT?
Varsity vs.
Vancouver Rep.
OUR MOST
CRUCIAL GAME
Saturday, Feb. 28
REMEMBER IT!
WEAR A VARSITY SWEATER
FOR SALE
THURSDAY NOON
LIT.  AND SCIENTIFIC  DEP.
Cheaper
light
'THE tallow candles and oil lamps
used by our ancestors cost, for
the same amount of light, much more
than does the electric light we use.
The cost of light has gone down
while everything else we use has
gone up.
The modern tungsten lamp is 500
times more efficient than the pioneer
carbon filament lamp.
This increase in efficiency together
with the reduction in the cost of current make electric light one of the
cheapest commodities in the present
day.
British Oomjmbm lift EiECTRicRfflw/iyCo.
HEAD OFFICE
VANCOUVER^,, B.C.
72
Ii3Sn5Q3JSfi!!l3fi!!^^ February 12th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
n
VARSITY"
Outstanding Styles
In Young Men's
OXFORDS
Scotch Grain Calf.
Black and New Shade Tan.
Toes—Square, Plain,
No Box.
Soles—Oak Leather, Crepe.
PRICED
$8.50
WILSONS
TWIN SHOE STORE
157.159 Hastingt St., W.
Home Cooking.
Entire Staff Canadian Women.
Phone, Seymour 8403
KRGYLE TEK ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale's
Mrs. Aenes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
BREAKFAST AFTERNOON TEA
25c. up. 25«- »P«
LUNCH, 40c up.     DINNER, 40c. up.
Evans & Hastings
~.     ~-      PIONEER      -:-      -:-
BETTER QUALITY, PRINTERS
Prices Right
0®
A    34-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN    VANCOUVER    PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE ARE   FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S WORTH.
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2024 Beach Ave.    Phone, Sey. 9032
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Placet and all Accommodation.
CLUB WORKING HARD|
\ / The cast of "You and I" are hard at
-work on rehearsals, the first complete
performance of the opening act being
held last Monday noon, before the assembled Players Club, directors, members, and all. Although some slight
improvements were suggested, much
satisfactiion was expressed at the favorable way in which the work is progressing. Besides the cast, the members of the various committees are
all working hard to make this year's
performance the "Chef-d'oeuvre" of
the Club's presentation.
!
4» ■•■•■■••'•"•■*»•■•-•■
;    Correspondence
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility  for   any   of the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following  Thursday.
HARD ON THE WOMEN
Sir:
As regards the coming election of
officers on the Student's Council, I
should like to deplore the lack of interest on the part of our fair co-eds.
It is not a lack of.power to be interested for when discussing the last
dance or the next new dress they get
excited enough to upset the entire
Reading Room. When they finally
tear themselves away from these alluring subjects to go and vote, their
choice of candidates is influenced by
personal good looks and powers of
light repartee. Apparently outward
appearances rise above spiritual and
inward glory. Nor do they show any
more intelligence in the election of
those of their own sex.
Yours for some glimmerings of intelligence on the part of our women.
Sincerely yours,
A Man Who Thinks.
MORE HASH
To Hon. Editor, Universe of B. C.
It are my most humble intentions
to hold up late Hon. Old-Fashioned
Freshette. As later correspondent to
your unestimated circulationer of ancient noos, cf. Hon. Hashimura Dago,
have narrate to unworthy world an ex-
tremest attack on most intellectual
and kindly female, Hon Freshette. He
are very ungentleman. He are ignor-
antest and unscience. Indeedly he are
muchly wrong. Does not Hon. low-
down member of the land of my own,
if any, intelligate that most diabolical
muffler deteriorate muchly feminine
eyes? How can Hon. Freshette gard
his step of the foot if loud rag of Tut
or color of Hades, but hardly his
optikal membrain, which are anecksed
to muskuline Larynx (exteriorally) ?
Expect he that Hon. female can absorb undigestible lessins from prof,
when "every decently mamnucured
gents" is arrayed with necks like peacock's tail. Teers of simpathly overcome me for sake of Hon. Freshette.
Foreverly I will pugnate against masculine mufflers. The tongue of me and
my hart is at her foot.
Hoping you are the same,
Yours extremely,
Mashnomora Musho, esq., X. I. X.
Arts '25 Wins Game
As the result of the game on Monday against Arts '26, Arts '25 has
proved itself winner of the inter-class
basketball competition. Arts '26
stands second, while Arts '27 and '28
have yet to play for third place. From
the start, the game was marked by
fast play and was witnessed by a large
gallery. Arts '25 displayed good combination, while firm checking by both
sides was the cause of the score not
being higher. At half time the score
was 6-4 in favour of the seniors, and
when the final whistle blew it stood
at 10-6.
Arts '25 Team—D. Shorney, D. Murray, I. Russell, M. Bell, C. Williamson,
E. Angell, K. Inglis.
Arts '26 Team—W. Straight, D. McKay, F. Musgrave, G. Swenciski, A.
Moffatt.
BRIT. BROCK MAY
MAKE MAINLAND
On Saturday, the 14th of February,
the world famous All-Blacks,now visiting Vancouver, will meet British Columbia's best in a game that will undoubtedly be remembered for many
years to come. The seat sale has been
tremendous, and the largest crowd
ever assembled at a game in Vancouver will witness the battle. Among the
thousands that will be present, will be
many University students, for the
game has a double attraction for the
followers of the Blue and Gold. They
will be there to root for their city
and their Dominion, represented for a
few hours by the white-shirted players of the All-Mainland team. But this
is not the only reason they will turn
out in force. Although at the time of
going to press, the All-Mainland team
has not been chosen, it is almost certain that at least one University man
will be among the fifteen picked players. If such is the case, the favor will
probably fall on Brit Brock, well-
known member of Science '26 and star
of the McKechnie Cup Rugby team.
Of all University players, probably no
better man could be chosen. Brit is
a steady worker, always where he is
needed, and a fighter to the last trill
of the whistle. His entire season's
play has been of a very high calibre,
and the few University rooters who
saw the Varsity-Victoria game a few
weeks ago will never forget his sterling work. Witih five regulars
off the scrum he led the patched
up team in brilliant style, saving try
after try by heavy tackling, and inspiring the rugby team with the spirit-
that eventually held Victoria scoreless. With Brit representing the University, as is generally hoped, all
rooters should turn out and cheer
Canada's representatives on, if not to
victory, at least to a shameless defeat.
Arts '27 Takes Cup
For Second Time
Arts '27, unless the miraculous happens, have grasped with the greed of
Shylock the Governor's Cup for their
second time. These intelligent sophomores have won five firsts and one
second in the great inter-racial, interdenominational, inter-class games to
date and are far ahead of all competition. Perhaps it would be interesting to enumerate the events in
which '27 has left the others struggling
behind. It is like descending to a
treasure. One views all around the
bones of dead ships, the wreckage of
ruined enterprises. The sophs, won
the track meet rather unexpectedly,
the basketball, badminton, tug-of-war,
soccer and took second place in swimming. They are conceded a chance in
rugby and the relay. Arts '27 has won
by taking each event seriously and
training conscientiously for it. The
year has thus established what is apparently a record in inter-class sports.
New Arrivals In
WOMEN'S COATS
For Spring Wear.
New, smart and practical coats
for everyday wear. The attractive shades have the correct
tone for the early spring, and
yet the models, in many cases,
are fully lined, so that the
chilly air, still prevalent, is
wholly excluded. Fashioned in
small blocked velour or new
plaid designs, showing double-
breasted front and belted back,
or smartly bound in contrasting
shade; tuxedo front. Almond,
taupe, rust and numerous sand
shades feature in these early
arrivals.    All sizes.
16.50
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
-OF-
C0MMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can b« of any service to you,
give us a call.
Plinn.. J Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rne*l Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA
HUDSON'S  BAY COMPANY
RESEARCH   FELLOWSHIP
The above fellowship, of the value of $1,600.00,
tenable at the University of Manitoba, in any
branch of pure or applied science, open to
graduates of any Canadian University, will be
filled for 1925 about May 1st- Applications
should be in the hands of the Registrar of
Manitoba University, Winnipeg, Manitoba, by
April 1st. Further particulars on application.   Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
AMBASSADOR CAFE
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarter* for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9.00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. u
THE   UBYSSEY
February 12th, 1925
We have a large
variety of
Beautiful Playing Cards
Loose-Leaf Books and
Refills
Fountain Pens
Propelling Pencils
Drawing Instruments
and Materials
THE
Clarke & Stuart
Co., Ltd.
-:- Educational Supplies -:-
550 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE. SEYMOUR 3000
No Charge for Extra Passengers
5   Can Ride for the
Price of One.
PHONE
SEYMOUR
4000
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
UfattEral Sirrrtara
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE, FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
»••**$>
Phones: Fair. 77, Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HftLL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
\    MEN'S ORATORICAL
The Men's Oratorical Contest Try-
outs are to be held on Monday afternoon, February 16th, at 3 p.m., in
room 23. The Contest itself will be
held abou: February 25, and with refreshments as a drawing card to say
nothing of the fine examples of oratorical excellence, it is expected that
there will be a large attendance. All
those intending to make an attempt
to secure the gold medal are requested
to hand their names in to H. Moore,
'26, before Friday, February 14th.
Science Shuffle
l/Is Snowy Success
It was thought, after the Science
Dance last year, that a degree of excellence had been reached which
could not be surpassed. But this year
words fail and one can only marvel at
the depth of ingenuity in a Science
man's mind.
The decorations were novel and original. Countless flakes hung motionless in the air. Two huge snowballs
were suspended on either side of the
room. Green streamers draped the
balcony. At one side of the.orchestra
loft was mounted a huge electrically
lighted University crest, across which
flashed "U.B.C. Science." On the
other side a large pumpkin ! face
smiled, frowned and winked at what
it saw. To add to the enjoyment of
the evening there were moonlight dances—very often.
The supper was a credit to our
home catering. There were meats,
cakes, ice-cream and coffee in abundance. On the tables were placed novelties—feathers stuck in burrs, whistles, horns and paper hats.
After the supper the snowballs opened to let fall hundreds of smaller
ones and showers of silver confetti,
which caused a great deal of good na-
tured amusement to the dancers who
immediately engaged in a good old-
fashioned   snow-fight.
Another original note was struck in
the programmes which were cut in
the letters, S. C.
Peter's Orchestra contributed the
most necessary part of the entertainment in a way which was delightful
to the guests and brought credit to
themselves.
The Science women, that is, the
nurses, made the snowflakes and snowballs, twenty-two thousand flakes and
three hundred snowballs, which
materially added to the enjoyment of
the evening. The Science men report that a sum of sixty dollars will
be donated to the campaign as the
proceeds of "The Perfect Dance."
Canadian Rugby
Varsity Seniors went down to defeat before theJ5x-King_George'team;
while in the junior fixture the Blue
and Gold boys won a rather listless
game from the Tillicums.
In the second ihalf the Ex-King Geor-
performances this year, Varsity had,
if anything, a slight edge on her opponents, during the first two quarters-
The game see-sawed back and forth
with a great deal of scrum and little
wing work. The second period closed
with the Score even, 6-6.
In the second half the E-King Georgians adopted new tactics. They began to rely more and more on their
lightning-like backfield and wing plays.
Varsity continued to use the direct
centre pass system, and, though they
dented the ex-students again and
again, they could not break through.
Result—the game ended with a 11-6
win for the Ex-King George team.
Bates, "the tower of strength," and
Winn who bore the brunt of the centre
rushes, were marked men and therefore were unsuccessful in their attempts to carry through this type of
play. Noble put up a game worthy of
his name. However, the man to whom
the rest of the team can take off their
hats—helmets is more nearly correct—
is Anderson. Though small of stature
he certainly is "all there" when it
comes to stopping the enemy. He
tackled incessantly and brilliantly.
^IIGH~JINKS
Time—7:30.
Place—Auditorium.
Girl—Every one (no men allowed).
What to wear!
"A rag, a bone, or a hank of hair."
Don't forget.
FRIDAY, THE  13th!
{LITERARY CORNER!
i/OUR WAY TO LOVE.
We will go to the winds' end,
Where the clouds are all blown by,
To the seas' end and the stars' end,
Only you and I.
And you will leave your bashfulness,
And I leave all my fears,
O! we will go on loving there
For age on age of years!
Where the seas end and the stars end,
And the clouds are all blown by,
There we'll learn the way to love
Only you and I.
Interesting Lecture
^yOn Ancient Athens
"Athens, the Glory that was Greece,"
was the theme of an illustrated lecture given by Rev. J. Williams Ogden,
F.R.G.S. at the .Vancouver ^Institute
last week. 	
The speaker rapidly surveyed the
remarkable progress made by the
founders of early Greek architecture.
He reviewed the work of the old masters and traced the gradual growth of
the disthetic sense among later exponents of the early principles.
The slides which accompanied the
lecture were of a most entertaining
nature. The solemn grandeur of the
magnificent ruins was very impressive and words of sincere appreciation
were tendered by the chairman at the
close of the evening.
Mr. Nelson of the Arts Historical
and Scientific Society under whose
auspices the main speaker for the
evening had been secured, spoke
briefly on the financial needs of that
organization and urged public co-operation in the work of the local museum.
An illustrated lecture on "Forests
and Water Supply" is the subject for
to-night. The speaker is Prof. H. R.
Christie.
A Jewish gentleman knocked at the
door of a K. K. K. office.
"Who's there," inquired the guard
from within?
"It's me, Sol Cohen."
"Go on. Beat it," commanded the
voice from within. "Don't you know
you can't join this organization?"
"Vot? Join?" replied the son of
Abraham. "I don't vant to join, I
vant to see the man vot buys the
sheets."
—Technique.
From the Ground Up.
Percy: "By Jove! Hasn't that girl
in the daring gown wonderful eyes?"
Willie:   "Dunno, old deah. I haven't
reached her face yet."
■•■■■■§■>■■—
Co-Ed—"I suppose you've been in
the navy so long that you are accustomed to sea-legs?"
Middy—"Lady, I wasn't even look-
in'."—Tiger.
The young man approached the
father of his sweetheart with the request to marry her.
"Can you support a family?" the old
man asked.
"Heavens," said the indignant suitor,
"I only asked for the girl."
Prof.—The first member of my family to arrive was a baby. The second
addition was twins. My mind was
greatly relieved by the third addition in the form of triplets.
Student—Why?
Prof.—It might have been a geometric progression.
We Cive 10% Off To Students
CAPS
IN TWEEDS, VELOURS AND
CHINCHILLAS. %
PATTERNS AND BLOCKS OF
THE NEWEST STYLES.
Specially Priced
.95
$1
Values to $3.00
NEXT TO CASTLE HOTEL
GRANVILLE
We Cive 10% Off To Students
ENGINEERING and
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
Canadian Distributors for
A. W. Faber Pencils
Carl Zeiss Binoculars
Icacameras
Hughes Owens Co. Ltd.
6alt Building
WINNIPEG  -   •  Manitoba
"A Good Photograph speaks
a language all its own"
X
Charlton $ Rathbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hastings St., E.
(JuM Eait of B. C. E. RIy. and Carrall St.)
Phone, Seymour3369
After the Show—
Visit Our
Soda Fountain
•*~*K§}*-«*
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
/ BADMINTON
Last Saturday the second team playing in the Beatty St. Drill Hall beat
the Kerrisdaie—BHdminton Club by.}
13 games to 11. The games werefl
keenly contested throughout. Var/t/;
slty was represented by J. Shakes^,*
peare, O Marion, J. Hockin and Mj0j
Rankin. g|
The Club's Open Tournament star£T
ed on Tuesday in King Edward Gymr
the opening rounds in all events be-,,
ing played off. Play will continue on
Saturday evening at the Drill Hall.
The finals will be played at King Edward on Tuesday, 17th February. February 12th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
J.W.Foster Ltd.
7^5 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See US Before Buying
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
Badminton Bridge
The Badminton Club is going to
hold a bridge on Monday, the twenty-
third in the auditorium for the purpose of raising funds for the Club.
Many tables are already spoken for
and all indications point toward a
great success. Those interested are
requested to make up tables and secure tickets as soon as possible from
Esther King, Jack Shakespeare or O.
Woodman. A charge of fifty cents
each will be made and in order to
minimize expenses, each table is asked
to bring their own cards and score-
cards. It is possible, too, that there
will be a few tables of Mah Jong.
As an added attraction a musical being arranged which will take place
during refreshments.
Mrs. D. Heckin has generously do-
aated prizes for the event. These will
oe drawn for from the leading couples
of all the tables.
The following have kindly consented
'O act as patronesses—Mrs. J. Allard-
ce, Mrs. D. Hockin and Mrs. S. J.
Schofield.
McKecknie Game Near
\
A crisis is approaching, a crisis in
the  history  of  Varsity  senior rugby,
namely on February 28th, two weeks
from Saturday, when the McKechnie
sam stacks up against the Vancouver
.'.ep.   A win or a draw means that the
"cKechnie Cup will reside in our halls
■■• another year.   A defeat means the
ss of the cometed trophy—and this
unthinkable—the    Varsity    MUST
n.
'The team is doing its share—they
nave been training hard, and for the
next two weeks will be at it early and
late. The game promises to be the
best of the season, and it will certainly be the most important.
INTERMEDIATE B
z/tfAS GREAT TRIP
Varsity's Intermediate "B" basketball team, which trolds the Provincial
Championships, played two games over
the week-end in the Interior. The
Kamloops Intermediate "A" and Revel-
stoke Internjediate_'-'JJ" were their opponents. On Friday the team played
against Kamloops.
Varsity started the scoring and had
three points before their opponents
registered, but the students were
unable to hold the Kamloops team
down and when the whistle blew at
half time the score was 19-8 in Kam-
loop's favor. In the second half, however, the game was more even, but the
Varsity team were unable to overcome
the lead of their opponents and when
the game was over the score stood
29-19 in Kamloop's favor., The people
of Kamloops were very kind to the
boys during their short stay and
gave them a good time.
The next evening the Varsity squad
played against the fast Revelstoke Intermediate "B" team. Varsity got
away to an excellent start and at half-
time were seven points ahead of their
opponents. The second half, however,
was very disastrous to Varsity. Some
of her men were hurt and this seemed
to turn the tide; for it was then that
Revelstoke took the lead for the first
time during the game- Some good
combination plays were made and
every basket was well earned. The
stall system used by Varsity was new
there and although it did not meet
with the approval of the crowd it was
effective in getting two baskets. The
final score was 39-37 for Revelstoke.
The Revelstoke people gave the Varsity students a good time, showing
them the famous ski-hill and other attractions about the town. One thing
that must be commented upon was the
wonderful support given to the home
teams, which helped materially to
their winning the games.
Those who made the trip are—J.
Swanson (Capt.), E. Lee, S. Arnold,
W. Turpin, B. Taylor, K. Thurston and
K. Stewart.
Brilliant Student
WilVAddress S.C.M.
Mr- Ariam Williams, of India, will
address a student meeting on Tuesday next, at noon, in Room Z. His
subject will be "Some Phases of the
Indian Problem."
Occasionally we are offered the opportunity of hearing of movements
first hand. Ariam Williams' visit in
Vancouver next week is just such an
opportunity. Mr. Williams is a native
of Ceylon and a graduate of Singapore
College. For the last five years he
has been doing graduate study in London and Edinburgh, making a brilliant
record for himself as well as doing
considerable work among his fellow
country men. He is now on his way
home to take up educational work
there. This winter he has been on the
staff of the Student Christian Movement, and has been progressing
through the colleges by easy stages,
with the intention of helping us to
arrive at a clearer and reasonable
view of our attitude towards other nations. He knows the student movements in India and Great Britain and
has had an active interest in the 13.
S. R. Add to this fund of experience
an arresting personality and the art
of forceful speech and you can judge
that it will be worth your while to
look him up during his stop here; also
to attend the meeting on Tuesday, at
11:45, when he speaks on "Ghandi"
and his influence on India.
BASKETERS IN
CRUCIAL GAMES
V
For the next three Saturdays the
Senior Basketball team will be playing very important games. All three
must be won if the Varsity team is
to make first place in tihe League once
more. The capture of the League
Championship will mean a chance at
the Vancouver Island teams for the
B. C. championship. The games to
be played in the next three weeks
are therefore crucial and worthy of
whole-hearted support on the part of
students. Watch the Saturday papers
for details and time of the games.
Feb. 14, at Y. M. C. A.—Varsity vs.
K. E.  O. B.
Feb. 21 at Normal, Varsity vs. Rowing Club.
Feb. 28, at Y. M. C. A.—Varsity vs.
New  Westminster  Y.M.C.A.
Victoria College Basketballers will
invade Vancouver Saturday to meet
Varsity in the return contests. The
College has decided to send their best
men and women for the games which
will be held at Normal.
Varsity's fast Intermediate "B"
squad will meet Victoria's men, while
the Senior "A" women will oppose
the Victoria co-eds. A dance will be
held at Normal after the game.
Scholarships For
j Science Graduates
Graduates in Science from this University will be glad to know that there
will be six new scholarships open to
them this Spring. The first is a fellowship of the annual value of $1,500
from the University of Manitoba, in
any branch of pure or applied science.
The Research Council of Canada is
offering Bursaries of $750.00 to students graduating with high distinction
in scientific studies. For original postgraduate reseach in science the council offers studentships valued at $1000;
and a fellowship of $1200 to a graduate capable of conducting independent research work.
Besides these, a Ramsay Memorial
Fellowship and a Scholarship of the
Fellowship of the British Empire Exhibition, both tenable in Great Britain,
and of the value of $1500, will also be
given to students showing a high capacity for independent research.
Application blanks and circulars
containing full information can be obtained from the Registrar.
Arts '28 Notes
The Freshmen's undefeated rugby
team Will play Victoria College in a
return game this Saturday. The Victoria men were beaten in their home
town by Arts '28, but the game was
stopped before time on account of the
muddy  condition  of the  field.
It is supposed that the teams will
battle on King Edward grounds on
Saturday morning, but (definite (arrangements were not made before
the Ubyssey went to press.
*    *    *
Eight Freshmen will run from Point
Grey site to this institution in the
Arts '20 relay at 4 p.m. next Wednesday. The men have a good chance
to come away with first class honors
and it is up to all the students to
turn out "en masse" and support them.
MR. SHORE PLEASE NOTE
/ If on any Thursday at twelve noon,
Mr. Shore will attempt to propel himself along the middle landing near
the reading room door, when a thousand odd students are making a synchronous rush to a stack of Ubysseys,
and the banisters groan and bulge outwards, he will perhaps be convinced
that the Publications Board commands
more than a "small sectional interest"
in the life at U. B. C.
ENGLISH
GABERDINE
GOATS
WOOL-LINED
Reg. $25.00
Special
$17.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
M COMMERCIAL
and Secretarial School
INDIVIDUAL COURSES
709 GEORGIA STREET, W.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
BOOKS
All Kinds of Books
Usual and Unusual.
LANG'S
Old Original Bookstore
1184 Granville St.
Phone, Seymour 1013
WEEK'S EVENTS
Thursday, February 12th—
La Canadienne at 1004 11th Ave. W.
Speaker, Miss Portsmouth.
Basketball at  Normal, Varsity "B"
vs. Ex-Normal.
Vancouver Institute.
Friday, February 13th—
High Jinks.
Men's Smoker.
Saturday, February 14th—
Rugby: All-Blacks vs. Varsity.
Rugby:  Freshmen vs. Victoria College.
Basketball    and    Dancing,    Normal
Gym.
Tuesday, February 17th—
Mr. Williams of India;   Speaker on
Ghandi, 11:45 am. in the Auditorium.
Wednesday, February 18th—
La Caucerie.
Inter-class relay at 4.00 p.m.
EK^NORMALS DEFEAT
^    WOMEN'S "A" SQUAD
The Women's Varsity A Squad was
decidedly defeatSa ~by the Ex-Normale,
Saturday evening. Varsity's form was
noticeably poor, though during the
first quarter the co-eds lead 6-4. During the second and third quarters the
teachers advanced from a two-point
lead to a score of 14-6.
Alice Berta starred for the winners,
and as usual Flora Musgrave won the
honors for the co-eds.
The Team—Ex-Normal A.—Alice
Berta (6), M. Moore, B. Moore (4), Bea
Garlick, Eve Eveleigh, Jean Simpson-
Varsity Senior A—Doris Shorney,
M. Bell, Flora Musgrave (4), Gay
Swenceski (2), W. Straight, K. Reid,
Isabel Russell, Jean Gillies. I /
THE   UBYSSEY
February 12th, 1925
..-.     MARK    ,.
%3#
*fs
SPALDING'S
FOR
Rugby and Soccer
Equipment
Eliminate the bumps
by using Spalding
Pads and Head Gear
SPECIAL PRICES
TO
ALL STUDENTS
f      r      OF canapa/limiteo
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER. B. C
WE HAVE THE BEST
Adjustable Clamp Lamp
ON THE MARKET.
Can be attached anywhere.     Movable
Shade.   Indispensable to every student.
Price, $2.50 only
including six feet of cord.
For sale only at the
GREAT WEST SALES CO.
Room 309, 315 PENDER ST., W.
Say you saw it in the "Ubyssey"
BAGGAGE
XO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
DANCING
x
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
t
*
•
t
?
T
>>"S'H"«»t»<''»'>«*«>»>"t''*»>M»«>«»">«t''«->"*"»<}'
James Peter Fergusson
TEACHER OP
Elocution, Public Speaking, Dramatic
Art, Acting and Interpretation.
Second place obtained in B. C. Musical
Festival. 1924.
Pupils Coached for 1925 Festival.
For terms apply :
Studio   -   -   70 Fairfield Building
Phone, Seymour 2734
Residence-   1504.14th Ave., W.
Phone, Bayview 4101-R
Our Best Cross-Word Puzzle
HORIZONTAL.
1. Ill-considered.
6. Feudal dwelling.
11. A part.
12. Amount  (abbr.).
14. Sharpen.
15. First name of a noted Boer lead
er in the Boer war.
16. Indian coins.
17. A slightly sweetened raised cake
with a glazing of sugar and
milk on top crust.
18. A preposition.
20. Noise.
22. Holy person  (abbr.).
23. Not of (obsolete).
24. To be in. a careless, secure state-
25. A yellowish-brown color.
26. A weight.
28. No.
29. In the wrong way.
30. Leader in the French Revolution.
31. A low island.
34. Over (poetic use).
36. Able.
37. Pony (India).
38- A large legendary bird.
40. Our president.
42. A preposition.
44. Part of the verb "to be."
46. Towards.
47. Cry of the sheep.
49. Strips
50. Light hit.
51. Strong.
53. Whim.
54. Is sick.
55. An acid of the cayetic series.
56. Thus.
VERTICAL.
1. An artifice.
2. Bed of rock immediately over bed
of coal.
3. Fort on the Rhine.
4. Of (French).
5. Embracing all substance.
7. Exclamation.
8. A round projecting object.
9. Burden-
10. Lets.
12. Preposition.
13. A color.
19. A grand personage.
21. An absolete form of "began."
23. A kind of kettledrum.
25. A number.
26. Thanks (baby).
27. An insect.
33. Clear profit.
32. A tall drinking cup.
35- Plunder.
37. A resinous liquid.
38. To forbid the use of.
41. A thicket of brushwood.
43. Hill (Boer).
44. A product of 1917 (abbr.).
45. Perish (backward).
46. A mineral.
48. Continued pain   (obs.)
50. An elementary substance.
52. Youthful intemperance  (abbr.).
54. Two vowels.
WRITE-UPS FOR
ANNUAL OVERDUE
The following write-ups are long
overdue, and must be handed in immediately. Individual write-ups should
be from sixty to eighty words, club
write-ups approximately the same
length as last years'.
Women's Lit.
Men's Lit.
Engineering Discussion Club.
Historical Society.
Senior Rugby.
Second Rugby.
Boxing Club.
Intermediate B. Basketball.
Senior A. Basketball.
Ice Hockey.
Men's Swimming Club.
Women's Swimming Club.
Men's Grass Hockey.
Women's Grass Hockey.
Women's Senior A Basketball.
Women's Senior B. Basketball.
Rowing Club.
Women's Track Club.
Agric. '25 Class History.
H. R. Cant.
, L.IMIT1P *
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
The Correct
Foundation
FOR YOUR
SPRING OUTFIT
1 I JHE youthful Gorselette we
* offer is very different in
line and material from the
corsets of previous years. Exclusive materials and perfect
workmanship make these new
styles distinctive.
Let our corsetierre fit you to
your particular model, which
will control your figure without
changing its natural graceful
lines.    Prices from
$2.95
Vaughn Moore
and his staff
CORRECT ALL
FAULTS
It is the speed with which
our skilful instructors pick
out and correct all faults
that has made students say
YOU WILL LEARN
MORE HERE
in  two   or  three   lessons
than   you   would   believe
possible.
Remember this— Beginners
may start any time.
Private Lessons 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
It will pay you to drop in and talk it over
with us.
Opposite David Spencer's Store
VAUGHN  MOORE
PRIVATE DANCING SCHOOL
518 HASTINGS ST., W. Seymour 707
D. B. Charlton.
C. A. Dougan.
Eric Dunn.
G. F. Hagelstein.
Harold  Henderson.
Molly Jackson.
C. A. Kelly.
Edith Martin.
M. Miyazaki.
Dorothy Murray.
Frank Painter.
jlfrSfflTWiffiTTJW^^
A GOOD DANCER
does not always make a Good Teacher—but Good Teaching
does make a Good Dancer, and that is the important factor in
Our Tuition.    Also, our steps are up-to-the-minute.
Broadway Dancing School
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bay. 5834 "We Correct All Faults."
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead

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