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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1958

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 ASUS
MASSES
THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1958
No. 17
PEDRO THE  PANDA is off to Dalhousie!
The giant Panda mascot, over which the University of Ottawa and Carleton College fight in
an annual football classic was kidnapped by some vile pranksters from Sir George Williams
College in Montreal.
Having informed Ottawa University of this deed, the pranksters promptly shipped Pedro to
the West Coast, clothed in a dirty Sir George jersey with a pennant pinned to his chest.
Now with a UBC pennant stitched to his wooly hide, Pedro is winging his way to the Nova
Scotia university, —Photo by Mike Sone
5 Student Editors
Fired In 5 Months
OTTAWA, (CUP) — Three more student editors have been
fired from the University of Ottawa's la Rotonde, bringing to
five the number of La Rotonde editors fired within the last five
months.
A public notice distributed on the campus announced Louis
Cliche, Pierre Trudel and Roger Roy had been dismissed from
their posts on the Editorial Board.
The mimeographed letter was signed by Rev. Leonard
Ducharme, Dean of Students,
The mimeographed letter was
signed   by   Rev.   Leonard   Ducharme, clean of students.
The   three   editors   had   been
body and the University."
"NO DISTINCTION"
"To ensure  also  that  in  the
unanimously   approved   by   the   interests of the student body the
journalistic process used by La
Rotonde be consistent with professional ethics." — the three
were fired, he said. Criticizing
the issue published three weeks
ago the letters said the editors
made no distinction between editorial and news," and had not
Students' Federation of Editors
for this year.
CAUSE OF FIRING
Cause of the firing was publication three weeks ago of the
opening issue of La Rotonde.
The issue contained a full report on La Rotonde—written by! been "limited to facts while
Normand Lacharite, one of the j speaking of student activities."
two editors fired last summer. Publication of the report from
Lacharite    and    Jean    David ! La   Charite   was   censured   by
were  fired   for  a  special  anni-, Father Ducharme.
versary issue  they wrote,  level-'. mm^mmmmm^m^mmmm^mmmmmmm^mmmmmmmm
ling criticism  at  the  university ]
for "paternalism." '
Father Ducharme's letter said;
the university "regrets to be j
obliged to forbid to the present!
members of the editorial board
any participations In any way |
in the activities of La Rotonde." \
The action was taken 'to en-j
sure the maintenance of good j
relations   between   the   student I
LAST CHANCE TO BUY
59TOTEMSFOR $4
This is the last week to purchase year books at the reduced price of $4.00.
Totems are on sale at the
College Shop, Totem office or
Publication Board office.
ELMORE PHILPOTT, renowned spokesman for the
Vancouver Sun and the free
world, speaks Wednesday at
noon in Buchanan 100.
Music To
Dine By
Mozart's Concerto No, 20 in
D Minor will be presented at
Wednesday's noon-hour concert
in  Buchanan   104,
The Concerto was written
when the composer was 29 and
consists of three movements: Allegro, Romanza and Rondo, allegro assai.
Soloist will be Edwina Heller,
accompanied on the organ by
Hugh John McLean.
Commonwealth Of
Nations Unique
President N. A. M. Mackenzie was the first guest speaker
of the newly formed Commonwealth Club.    He spoke on the
British Commonwealth of Nations Monday noon in Arts 100.
He   described   the   Common-1 ""
General Meeting
ASUS Today
wealth as being a unique group
of countries banded together for
their common good and to promote understanding between
them.
The Commonwealth countries
periodically hold conferences
and Dr. MacKenzie has been to
all but one of them. In his address he outlined conferences
and the benefits they had
brought about.
Next week President MacKenzie leaves for Paris to be
present at a meeting of UNESCO
which, he hopes, will further
the knowledge and understanding of all countries concerned.
MAIN PROBLEMS
When asked what the main
problems of the Commonwealth
are, he said that in his opinion,
the pressures of population plus
racial differences probably
cause more trouble and misunderstanding than anything else.
The new Commonwealth club
was formed to better the understanding of the problems of the
member countries. The club's
functions will be: 1) to have
guest speakers; 2) to hold discussions in members' houses; 3)
to present to the members special movies of a documentary
nature.
Mart Kenney
At Dance
Kla-how-ya—it is homecoming
time, and as you climb into the
loft to wait for your little pigeon, remember:
1) Mart Kenny and his Western Gentlemen will perform at
the annual homecoming Dance,
November 15. It will be his 59th
performance in B.C. as part of
the B.C. centennial.
He has been home before,
2). Nominations for Homecoming Queen must be in Box 150,
AMS office, before Thursday.
Candidates must be nominated
by an Undergraduate society or
Fort or Acadia camps,
Burns Asks
Tolerance
"Internationalism" is the only
cure for excess nationalism, said
General E. L, M. Burns in an
address to the UBC Fall congregation Friday,
"Imperialism is the dirtiest
word in the Middle East propagandists dictionary," said Gen.
Burns.
"There can be no going back
to imperialism," he said. "The,
conflicts -of nationalism can be
solved, with justice to all, if
there is tolerance and patience."
The Gentral warned, "Peace
will not be kept in this world
unless men are prepared to risk
being killed to keep it,"
Meeting of Arts and Science
students in Bu 100 today will
be asked to ratify a new constitution.
Core of the constitution it
the introduction of representative government in the Undergrad Society.
With interest being displayed in the idea of supplanting
the AMS Council with a representative system ow student
government, outcome of the
A.S.U.S. experiment is of
"vital interest" to the whole
student body, according to
George Stevents.
'Tween Classes
UBC Radio Presents
Coup D'Etat On Air
TODAY
U.B.C. RADIO will feature a
rebroadcast of the Coup D'Etat
of the AMS General Meeting today at 1:30 over all the Campus
sound outlets,
ff-        ff* ff*
CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION—
presents Apartheid in Africa-—
an illustrated lecture on conditions in South Africa.
**T* fr ff*
NEWMAN CLUB—Mass will
be said in the Newman Chapel
in St. Mark's College today and
every following Wednesday at
4:30.
*T* **V ff*
V.C.F. — presents a student
panel with topic: "Does prayer
change things?" Tuesday noon
Bu. 104.
9f» 9f> 9ft
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS UNION—'Special   General  Meeting
in Buchanan 102 — by-election
ff*        ff,        ff,
PRE-MED SOCIETY — AH
members must attend tomorrow's
meeting for verification of eligibility and designation for Field
Trip Groups, Membership cards
will be given out to those who
have not yet received them.
ff*        ff*        ff*
UNIVERSITY HUMANIST
ASSOCIATION — Mr. P. A.
Hewitt of the Unitarian Church
of Vancouver will speak on Uni-
tarianism and Humanism at
12:30 Tuesday in Bu. 221,
(Contniued on Page 3)
See  'TWEEN CLASSES
English Students
Mr. John Greaves, Honorary
Secretary of the Dickens Fellowship, will address students
and faculty on the topic:
"Great Expectations," at 12:30
in Buchanan  106. PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1951
THE VBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS.
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscript'.ons $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisii Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
sfiou.ii not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
rifh' to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
recrjved.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook      City  Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone     Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Asst. City Editor, Kerry Feltham   C.U.P. Editor, Judy Frain
Editor, Special Editions —   Rosemary Kent-Barber
SfeNlOR EDITOR, BARB BIELY
Reporters and Deskmen: Pat Macgregor, Kerry White, Robert
Sterling and Mike Raynor.
The General Meeting
Student government at UBC appears to have reached
an impasse.
The fall general meeting Thursday didn't get a quorum.
The Arts and Science Undergraduate Society general meet-
iog last Tuesday didn't get a quorum, either. If ASUS can't
get enough iwewrbers together to have a general meeting,
it won't be able to participate in representative government.
And without ASUS, any scheme of representative government can not be representative.
Besides, the system of government can't be changed
Without the approval of a geheral meeting. What happens
if general meetings continue to fail to obtain quora?
If it never meets, the general meeting can't abolish
itself. It can't conduct any business, either. It can't even
lower its quorum.
Clearly there has to be at least one more valid general
,meeting, if only to make constitutional changes clearing
•the way to a more efficient method of student government.
This issue would draw a crowd, but it is quite likely
that this crowd would vote against the general meeting's
abolition and we'd be back where we had started.
Thus, if UBC's vaunted student autonomy is to survive,
the general meeting will have to be interesting enough to
attract a quorum, unlike it was Thursday.
Let's face it.   Very few .students are g'oim; fo attend a
general  meeting  it  there's  nothing  more  eonirnvcrs-ial   to
discuss than changing the name of Women's Undergraduate
Society to tho Associated Women Studer.ts or naming the
auditors for next year.
Very few are going to want to listen to student councillors giving oral reports on national meetings of NFCUS
and WUS. Such reports could be mimeographed and distributed to all students, and their more important aspects
are described in The Ubyssey anyway.
We don't mean that students shouldn't go to the meetings, but are only trying to point out that they won't go
and why they won't go.
The agendas of general meetings must be streamlined
somehow,, and more provocative discussion topics must be
presented, if we are to preserve our present autonomy in
student government.
Big the Question
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Your editorial in the Tuesday, October 21, issue of The
Ubyssey, entitled "Must They
Beg?", seems to me to beg the
question.
In effect you state that once
we hand over the responsibility for all human welfare to
the Government, "we are assuring decent standards of health
and welfare."
A moment's thought might
have convinced you that Governments are no more likely—
indeed not as likely — to meet
human needs as aroused and
interested voluntary organizations. That, in fact, has been
the history of social welfare.
Governments have many competing objects for their tax
dollars and if there are not
aroused and interested voluntary associations to supply competing pressures to the other
pressures that are on them, social welfare is not likely to get
the necessary share of the tax
dollars in order to meet human
needs.
I suggest that you ask yourself whether the simple handing
over to government of the responsibility, for example, for
old age pensions or mothers'
allowances or family allowances automatically ensures
that the needs of old age pensioners or mothers or children
are automatically met.
Your editorial falls into the
common fallacy of thinking that
our social responsibilities can
be handled in a neat, efficient
and painless way, while still
ensuring that adequate standards are maintained.
The Community Chest enlists the services of many
thousands of volunteers. Were
t'-'.cir functions to be taken over
!>y the Government, all these
v inn'arv services would have
tn ive paid for and this; would
add to the total tax bill and
perhaps detract from the level
of service given, ■
It was the experience of the '
British, after they nationalized i
their health service, that they
still needed voluntary workers
and   voluntary  associations  to
AUTOMOBILES
Call FRANK FRAZER at Collier's Ltd., MU 1-2311 or residence BA. 8089. New Chev-
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makes.
MMa
Second year girl (Lab Tech)
wishes Housekeeping Room
or Room & Board in friendly
home with other girls. Easy
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Anne, ELgin 3503.
The Coming Ice Age
What caused the " glaciers
which once buried New York
and much of the West under
an ice sheet two miles thick?
More important — will they
come back? November
Reader's Digest tells how
two geologists are finding the
answer in an unlikely place
— on the bottom of the
ocean. Here is a true scientific detective story — with
ahivers!
Get your November
Reader's Digest today: 38
personally helpful articles cil
lasting intereit,
FILMSOC     PRESENTS
— The —
WAR
Tues.-"Nazi Strike" 12.30 and 1.30
Wed.-"Divide and Conquer"
12.30 and 1.30.
Thurs.-'Battle of Britain"
12.30 and 1.50.
Fri.-"Battle of Russia" 12.30 - 1.30.
Admission: 15c or Series Pass
I
I
provide the personal interest
without which social welfare
becomes an impersonal bureaucratic operation and indeed
more expensive.
Finally, the percentage of the
total health and welfare bill
which is collected voluntarily
is only about 10% of the total
bill for health and welfare services, but it is the 10% that is
on the frontier of new health
and welfare development.
It is the "venture" capital
that allows interested and
aroused citizehs to help shape
the direction in which our social welfare services should
develop.
The tax burden does not necessarily fall equitably on all
persons in all kinds of circumstances and some measure of
voluntary contribution does
permit people to contribute in
the light of their individual
circumstances over and above
their tax responsibilities.
The Income Tax provides for
charitable donations and in so
doing recognizes what the
country at large presumably
approves of, and that is that
our society is a mixed one, in
which voluntary action as well
as governmental action still
plays an important role.
I for one like the mixed society and do not want all manifestations of human generosity
and human concern to be channelled through governmental
sources. I think quite literally
we should "all be glad we can
give" individually as well as
collectively.
Yours sincerely,
G. C. ANDREW,
Dean and Deputy
to the President
ALMA    CABS
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MU. 1-3311
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THE   UNIVERSITY   NAVAL
TRAINING   DIVISION
presents the
NINTH  ANNUAL
B
ARNACLE
at
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H.M.C.S.   DISCOVERY
FRIDAY,   OCTOBER   31
Dancing 9'till 1.00
3 BARS ! !
Semi-formal, $3.50 per couple
•
Tickets available at AMS office,
Navy office,   Armed Forces office
in Armouries
•
J/uixdiiwnaUi^ rt Jinn (pahh^ Tuesday, October 28, 1058
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
CLUB NOTES
Pre Med Society Offers
Many Exclusive Features
An important general meeting of U.C.C. will be held Thursday at 12.30 p.m. in Buchanan
205.   Every club has been asked to send a representative.
Despite his ability and qualifications, the Vice-President of U.C.C. has had to resign his
position, and the election of a new Vice-President will take place at the meeting.
"The position of V.P. of U.C.C. is an important one, for it entails much Council work
as well as providing an opportunity for the per son to learn a great deal about the clubs," said
Patience Ryan, UCC Club section editor.
9ft 9^ 9ft
The Pre-Med Club included
students interested in medicine,
pharniacy or nursing, as well as
those in pre-med. This year the
membership is more than 175.
All members are extremely
enthusiastic, and the club is far
more active than in previous
years. General meetings are held
on alternate Wednesday noons
in Wesbrook 100, and go on for
about !twerity minutes before the
film !or lecture scheduled for
that Moon hour.
-Ygfcus' ACfivfrms
Activities for the year include
films, lectures, a field trip pro-
grantme and dances.
Tl* tirst thrtee filths will be;
a sertes of cancer films, the second to be shown Wednesday,
Wes«*ook 100 and the third on
November 12.
Other films will include Mental Health, the problems facing
a paraplegic, and the problems
facing a new doctor.
The fiist lecture was given
by Dean Gage, and on Wednesday, Nov. 5 and Wednesday, November 19, will be two lectures
by Doctors Zbarsky and Patterson on "Research in Cancer."
These lectures will tie in with
cancer films.
OTHER LECTURES
Ofner lectures will include one
by Dr. Bryans on "The Obstetrician's Role in Medical Practice,"
and one by Dr. Campbell, the
assistant Dean of Medicine.
All the lecturers are leading
doctors in Canada and are famous across Canada in their individual departments.
FIELD TRIPS
!flhe field trip programme is,
this year, including trips to
Crease Clinic, Essondale, Willow
Chest, The Children's Hosfpital
and the Cancer Clinic.
tfhese field trips will take
place on Thursday, when cars
Will depart fdr the destination
at 12i35. ^hepr'ograjttme will be
from l to 2 so that the students
^can Ue back at the University
by 2;80.
SPECIAL FEATURES
Under this programme, members will be shown only the most
interesting and valuable features of the yarious institutions,
and will receive information
which is not normally given to
other groups.
Pre-Med Club will hold its
first informal dance in the middle of November. Their second
social will be either a formal or
a semi-formal with the doctors
from the Faculty of Medicine,
the administrators of the various institutions visited on the
field trips and the studens from
Medicine all invited.
In this way, students from the
Pre-Med Club will be able to
meet and mix with people already in the field of medicine.
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Pag* 1)
JAZZ SOCIETY — presents
Bob Smith giving a lecture on
the Blues with trio to give demonstrations. Physics 200 Tuesday noon.
9ft 9ft 9fi
S.C.M "The Christian Student" in S.C.M. Club room Tuesday at 12:30.
ijt 9ft 9ft
CAMERA CLUB MODELING—
Mr. R. Ford will speak on lighting and posing in Bu. 315 Tuesday noon—all girls interested
please attend.
V *r **r
CCF. CLUB—Meeting will
be held today at noon in Bu.
212—elections will be held—
Everyone out.
•F ffi V
MUSIC CIRCLE — Recordings
df Kathleen Ferrier will be played today at noon in the Music
Room df Brock Hall.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB—
Elmore Philpott, Sun columnist
and former Liberal M.P. will
speak on "What I saw inside
China" this Wednesday, October
29 in Bu. 100. Mr. FhilijfMftt has
recently returned from a tour of
Communist China, Hong-Kong
and Japan.
*¥ •!• *V
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT—Bible study—The
Young Church in Action, SCM
Room Wednesday at 12:30, Hut
L.5.
9ft 9p 9p
EL ClRCULO-^Meeting Wednesday noon in Bu. 217 of all
students taking Spanish courses
100 and above for the purpose of
arranging Spanish plays and
times for the Spanish conversation classes. Club room now
moved to Brock Ext. 238.
SPECIAL CONCERT—British
pianist Kendall Taylor Wednesday, October 29, 8:30 p.m. Tickets Modern Music and at door—
$2.90. Students $1.00 A.MS.
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Compus Barber Shop
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MCORPCRATED   Z"°    MA'v   i6~"G PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 28, 1958
WOMEN'S
NOTICES
Girls Rules Basketball:
Practice: Tuesday, Oct. 28, at
4:30 in the Women's Gym.
Boys Rules Basketball:
Senior "A" vs Eilers "B" —
7:30 Wednesday, October 29—
John Oliver Gym.
Junior vs Eilers—7:30 October
30—Winston Churchill (54 th &
Heather).
Girls' Volleyball Schedule:
Game 1 to be played at 12:35;
October 28—
(1) PhB 1  vs. Nur. 1.
P.E. 1 vs Ed. 2
(2) W.R.  vs  New,
October 29—
(1) KAT vs ADP 1
ADP 2 vs P.E. 1
(2) PhAl vs AC
HA2 vs DPE
X-COUNTRY
Unexpected winners in the
B.C, Cross-Country Chamtpion-
ships was Ray Hampton of the
Vancouver Olympic Club.
Hampton won out over a field
of 32 runners including eleven
from UBC on a course of six and
a quarter miles held at Brockton Point, Saturday.
UBC's Jim Moore placed third
and teammate Jack Burnett
picked up a fifth place medal.
UBC's "A" team placed second to VOC and the "B" team
finished third.
.- Photo by Michael Sone
Defying UBC Thunderbirds' rushers is Whitworth Gary Turner (64) as his teammate, Von Buck (22) carries towards UBC line.
Rushing in from behind to attempt the stop is UBC's John Barberie (far left). UBC Jim Beck and Roy Jokanovich, (far right)
head in to support Barberie.   Whitworth beat the Birds 28-7 in an interesting football game played before 2,20.0 fans.
THUNDERBIRDS FAIL TO CLICK,
STOPPED BY STRONG WHITWORTH
By BOB BUSH
Injury prone UBC Thunderbirds ran out of drive as they went to their first defeat in three games. Saturday afternoon, the
powerful and strong Whitworth Pirates stopped the Birds' attempt for three consecutive wins with a 28-7 dubbing in an action tilled
exhibition Evergreen Conference Football game played at UBC  Stadium before 2,200 fans.
UBC, never fully picking up spirit or spark, found it necessary to pace themselves while the stronger Pirates kept  rolling  up
yardage. Already lacking in reserve strength, the Thunderbirds now
have the added worries of finding a replacement for speedy ground
gainer, Don Vassos. Vassos received a shoulder injury that will
keep him out of action for at least one game
Breaking the Birds back were the tremendous and unbelievable catches made by thundering Whitworth end, Bill Cole.
UBC got off to a penetrating
start as they brought the ball up
field from the opening kick.
Vassos carried the kick back up
SPORTS EDITOR,
Deskmen: — Irene  Frazer,
Audrey Ede, Mike Sone, Alan
For the first time all three
UBC men's grass hockey teams
were triumphant against competition in A and B league play.
On Saturday, at Chris Spencer
Field the Varsity eleven whitewashed India 4-0 in a rough A
division game. Vic Warren and
Nelson Forward accounted for
Varsity scoring with two goals
apiece.
Meanwhile Golds edged India
B squad 1-0 in another roughly
played contest. Dave Epp fired {
BOB BUSH
Elaine Spurrill, Flora MacLeod,
Dafoe, Tony Morrison, T. Smith  *° his °wn 48 before being stopped.    On a UBC fumble on the
 „____ - j pirates' 49-yard    marker,    Jim
Beck recovered for UBC. Going
into punting formation, Roy
Bianco booted the ball to the
Pirates' 16, the closest the Birds
got to scoring position in the first
quarter.
The Pirates got over the UBC
goal line on a pass to Bill Reid
from Denny Spurlock    at    the
Three Wins In Crass Hockey
BELLINGHAM INVASION
Let's all go to Bellingham this Saturday, November 1,
■when our UBC football team clashes with Western Washington!
Buses will leave for Bellingham from Brock Hall Saturday
morning at 10.30. Bus tickets are $1.75 return, and may be
obtained from the AMS office, from the Thunderbird Booster
Club office, 354 Brock Extension, any noon hour, or from any
T.B.C. executive.
Arrangements have been made for special rates for the
game.   Game time is 1.80 p.m.
4iBE A 'BIRD BOOSTER!"
the game's lone marker as the
Golds picked up their first win
in two years.
In the afternoon's second B
division game Blues swamped
Crusaders   8-0.   Charlies   Sauer
notched  four   goals,   Bob   Tulk.,„,„ ,     „ it
... 1    „ j iv/ui „ c~,ji 110.48 mark of the quarter,
got three goals, and Mike Smu-      ,. M ,,
Vassos began to click ior the
Birds as he made gains on over
centre plays. Starting in the
first quarter and carrying into
the start of the second, UBC
made their stand. Using his
right and left flankers, Quarterback Jack Henwood applied the
pressure until the ball was down
on the Pirates' 10, but there the
Birds died.
Tired, but not through, UBC
Thunderbirds kept the threatening Pirates back until Vic Ferguson scored Whitworths second
major with three minutes left in
the half.
Ferguson was the big gainer in
the Whitworth attack, rushing
115 yards and collecting two
touchdowns.
Whitworth started the second
hall: with a quick succession of
lie added a single goal to complete the rout. Good passing and
a strong forward line combined
to give Blues their victory,
SOCCER GAMES
Grandview Legion defeated
Varsity 2-1 in Second Division
soccer action on Sunday at Powell Street Grounds.
An overflow crowd saw the
two elevens fight to a 1-1 draw.
Varsity broKe through in the
several shots on goal, Grandview
crushed Varsity's hopes for at
least a tie by scoring with less
than five minutes remaining.
Dayton 64 trounced UBC 5-1
South Memorial aPrk on Sunday.
plays using a wedge that found
holes in the tired and unreplace-
able UBC line.
Ferguson put the Pirates ahead
20-0 at 9.48 of the third quarter.
VASSOS SCORES
Wayne Aiken started the lone
UBC touchdown drive on a run-
back to the Birds' 36. Bianco,
running with Aiken and Vassos,
brought UBC up to scoring position on the Pirates' 2-yard line.
On a pitch out from Henwood,
Vassos scampered around the end
for the Birds' T.D,
Henwood converted, leaving
UBC behind 21-7.
With six and a half minutes
remaining in the game, Whitworth scored the final touchdown, making the score 28-7 in
their favor.
UBC out rushed Whitworth,
gaining 191 yards to 164. But
the Birds' air attack was not a:3
efficient as they only gained 39
yards, while the Pirates picked
up 144.
Wayne Aiken lead the Birds in
rushing with 94 yards and also
passed for 11. Vassos rushed for
69 yards and Bianco for 26.
INTRAMURAL HOCKEY
Engineering 2 vs Fiji—•
12:45 p.m.
D.U. vs Kappa Sigma—1:30 p.m.
at   Kerrisdale  Arena.

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