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The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1958

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 NINETEEN
STUDY DAYS
THE UB YSSEY
UNTIL
EXAMS
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1958
No. 27
*   4 *fiK
Controlled Life
Yields' Double —
Face" Psychology
The Communist Party is the Sigma Tau Chi of Yugoslavian
university students.
Since only four percent of the population belong to the
party, affiliation is very exclusive, and the student who attains
membership i.s assured of much greater security as well as
social preferment. I        	
BLOODY NURSES and flour-spattered Home Ec students battle it out for possession
of the ball in Thursday's Powderpuff Bowl Game. Despite the excellent blocking and
faking pictured here, the two teams were deadlocked 13-13 at the end of regulation
time. Long runs were the vogue of the day with all TD's being scored on fantastic plays
that the Lions have never heard of. — Photo by Brian Johnston
Feminine
Furiously
Footballers
For Hospital
Fight
Fund
Annual Feminine football fracas started with a flurry in UBC stadium Thursday noon.
Engineer-backed nurses, trying to avenge their defeat last year, were held to a 13-13 tie by
strong buxom Home Ec. line.
Nationalism
Over-stressed
By    Liberals
Liberal party policy in Canada came under fire Wednesday
as responsible for a lack of Canadian leadership in the British
Commonwealth up tu  1957.
Dr. J. S. Conway, UBC history professor, said in a lecture
I     Nurses, using the appropriate
I name — pan handlers, were the
! first on the field for their calisthenics. The crowd could hear
loud creaks and groans as the
girdles strained  mightly.
HOOLA-HOOPED ON FIELD
Then came the Home Wreckers who hoolahooped themselves
into shape —- "not that they
needed it," one pop-eyed fan
murmured.
Cheers were brought from the
s crowd as Frank Gnup vainly
tried to show them how the
plastic ring worked.
The game- got underway with
a   ! 5-yard kickoff that travelled
campus'    newly-formed   straight to Judy King, who wa.s
to    the
Commonwealth   Club   in   Buch-!
anwii  100 that the Liberal party
while in power had emphasized
Canadian     nationalism     rather
than   Commonwealth   unity.
Titled   'Canada and  the Commonwealth,"    the   lecture   wiij!
1!u   second   in   a  series   of  guest,
speeches sponsored by Cotmnou-
wi alth   Club.
Dr     Conway    began    by    explaining   Canada's    attitude    toward England and the common,
v. millli   in   the  past,   lie  said tho
Liberal    parly,    long    in    power.
See  NATIONALISM
(Continued on  Page 4)
Stuff Starts Studying
Final edition of The Ubyssey
lor trie fall term will be Friday. November 2B.
Notices of any events oecur-
ing   afler   thai   date   must   be
submitted  to The Ubyssey of-   ■
lice by   12.30 noon, Thursday,   I
November 27.
The Ubyssey resumes publication January 6 for the spring
term.
stopped cold with a gusset snapping  tackle.
Jackie Parker would have had
a   hard  time  finding    hi.s    way
through   the  solid   pan   line,   (It
was a pretty bed pan)!
57-YARD T-D
Wreckers finallv decided lo
try a reverse which led to a brilliant  ")7-yard T-D.
Pan then look Ihe ball and got
nowhere through the equally
well-padded wrecker line. The
resulting third down kick was
blocked, (by Pan's line) and the
Wreckers took possession.
FUMBLES  GALORE
A series of fumbles led to a
Pan recovery, who, vvith Bright-
like line plunging, picked up
their first T-D.
Subsequent touchdowns were
made bv a smashing (i() yard run
for the Wreckers and an incredible 50-yard pass and run play
for Pan.
Variety was added to the' game
by   basketball   passing   on   both
sides, only one of    which    was
completed and one intercepted.
THREE 'BOAT RACES'
Half time entertainment was
provided  by three  'boat races'.
Beer guzzling experts from the
Aggies and Forresters gulped
their way to a virtual tie — lhe
Aggies claimed Ihey won. In
the second race, two stalwart
members from the Ubyssey, Kerry's Feltham and White, challenged six shifty engineers;
while the redshirts waisted a
bottle a piece, {Uo two valiantly
swiggled six and claimed an
overwhelming victory.
Third race, Aggies vs. Engineers, was greeted by loud boos
from the crowd. Each team
tried its best to out-cheat flu-
other by pouring half the beer
on their heads, slopping it down
their chins and slyly spilling  it
(Continued  on  Page  4)
See  FEMININE FOOTBALL
This was one of the many
impressions of Yugoslavia given
by WUSC Panel Discussion
members Gordon Armstrong,
Paul Termansen, and Ivan Mozer.
Mozer, who lived most of his
life in Yugoslavia, pointed out
that Yugoslavia is under com-
plet dictatorship of the Communist Party. Students are allowed only "constructive criticism" and as a result, many
students veer from academic
subjects.
The result of this controlled
life is general suspicion, which
has caused a "double face" psychology of the people of Yugoslavia.
Anyone with the proper academic qualifications can go to
university—fees are paid by the
state and a monthly allowance
is given each student.
Armstrong gave the historical
background of Yugoslavia,
starting with its emergence as
a national entity after World
War 1. lie pointed oul the failure of democratic tradition to
take hold during the peace interlude, and the enlrenchmenl
of Tito a.s the strong man after
World War II. The Communist
Party grew oul of the Partisans,
one of the underground movements of the Second World Wai.
Armstrong expanded on the
"false front" two-party system
now in existence.
The   economic   side  of  Yugoslavia was given by Termansen.
who  emphasized   the  decentralization of bureaucracy in indus-
(Continued  on  Page  3)
See CONTROLLED LIFE
Tween Glosses
Booster Club Meet
Postponed To Wed.
THUNDERBIRD     BOOSTER
CLUB—Today's General Meeting is postponed until Wednesday 26 Nov. at 12:30 in Bu. 204.
•T* *•* *f*
UBC CURLING CLUB—has
room for 3 more members. Anyone who would be interested in
joining please phone Monty at
EL 1893. All curlers, including
beginners are invited to join.
*T* *f* if*
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT—"Faith and Doubt".
Vince Goring speaks on Friday
3:30 p.m. SCM room Hut L-5.
William Gowland speaks on
"The Church in Industry" Friday at 12:30 in Bu.  102.
ff* H* if*
UNIVERSITY      BAPTIST
• CLUB—Friday    12:30    in    Phy.
302, Topic:  "The  Blessed   Man".
Mr. F, Hadley speaks.
if.    if.    if.
UNITED   NATIONS   CLUB—
presents Dr. D. O. Akpore on
"Importance of Pan-Africanism" followed by a question period. Friday 12:30 Bu. 100.
if- if* if*
U.B.C. RADIO—-resents an
interview with controversial
writer Henry Miller, over all
campus sound outlets beginning
at 2 p.m. Friday. It is a 2-hr,
interview.
See   'TWEEN   CLASSES
(Continued on  Page  4)
BOOKSTORE SHOULD SHOW NO PROFIT
Students Re-act To Prices
■Too high," was Uu- general
opinion of sludents interviewed
on their opinions of the campus bookstore prices. Bul. most
of Ihe students confessed they
did not know enough about
downtown prices to make a
comparison.
The majority of the studenls
did not think t h o bookslore
sbould make a profit, but Ihey
thought (he high prices were
something they could do nothing about.
Loraine Rook, Ed. Ill, said,
•'the prices seem awfully high,
but since they have a monopoly it dosu't seem that vve can
do much about it." She continued, "I do not think that
the prices are fair if they can
possibly    manage   to    sell   the
books cheaper."
Don McKhmon, Comm, I,
thought c a m p u s bookstore-
prices were- pretty fair in comparison with others. He agreed
with Loraine in thinking that
a   profit   should   not   be   made.
Anita McLennan, Arts I,
seemed lo agree with most first
year students when she saiel,
"J thought I h o prices were
tremendous but since I never
bought books before I. don't
know Iheir  usual prices."
Btjh Thompson, first year
Arts said lie had not noticed
much difference but in some
cases textbooks seemed to be
even more expensive downtown.
•■The History 1.02 text, was
30 cents cheaper downtown,"
said first year education sludenl, Anne Epp, "If this i.s
the case in all books il could
really amount to some-thing,"
she continued.
"Paper    backs    are   making
fantastic profits,"  staled Peter
Coleman, Arts IV. He thought
the other prices seemed, "generally   reasonable."
"Too   high,"   said   Bonnie
Wing,  Ed.  She  was echoed   by
Chu  Wing Tin, a  second year
Engineering   student.
Gordon Sehultz, Ed LV, said
"the prices are- rather high.
They seem lo be rising even
more rapidly laterly." PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1958
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three time a week throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Kerry Feltham City Editor, Al Forrest
Features Editor, Mary Wilkins CUP Editor, Judy Frain
Chief Photographer, Michael Sone
Editor, Special Editions —Rosemary Kent-Barber
SENIOR EDITOR . . . BRUCE TAYLOR
Reporters and Desk:—Allan  Chernov,    Kerry White, Diane
Greenall, Diane Grant and Pat  McGregor.
ONE MAN'S OPINION
On The Existence Of God
Hollow Mockery
It is with the most profound regret that we admit no
official observance was made or even planned by the
University of B. C. of last Wednesday, Douglas Day. (Also
known as Centennial Day or B. C. Day).
Classes were held as usual; no extra flags or decorations were in view; there were not even any religious on
political rites. At UBC, Douglas Day was just like any
other day.
Why? Do we have nothing to celebrate on the
hundredth anniversary of the birth of our province?
B. C. has been the scene of the first criminal conviction of a cabinet minister while in office in the Commonwealth.
B. C. has a university which the provincial government
says must in future turn increasingly to the federal government and to its students for its operating income.
More than 100,000 B. C. citizens roam the streets every
day looking for jobs and not very many get them.
B. C.'s largest city is to lose a major part of its tourist
income because its beaches have been permitted to reach
an intolerable- stage of pollution.
A high-ranking official in the B. C. Power Commission
has publicly charged the government with corruption and
mismanagement.
And  we at   the  university  clo  not  celebrate  Douglas
Day.
Snugly Clad Coeds
Editor,   the   Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
May I express my sympathy
for James A. Forley who has
left the sophisticated old land
and is now pursuing his graduate studies here on the edge
of civilization where scholastic standards are unwillingly
maintained.
He is disturbed—presumably because UBC coeds attempt to dress in the same
manner as Elizabeth Taylor,
a European emigrant who was
''chased out" during the last
decade.
It is true that a good coed
so dressed could never compete in an English intellectual
circle. British intellectuals
prefer their women to be almost masculine- in their clothing tastes; at least this was
the case with Oscar Wilde and
I believe Sir John Gielgud
holds a similar partiality.
Handicapped as they are by
this freedom of choice in
dress, our women undergraduates can only look forward
to   eventual   marriage.
A.nd so until tshat happy day
when Mr, Foley returns to the
Old Sod where culture and so
phistication hold sway, he
must continue to endure those
most unBritish disturbances
caused by the sight of a smugly clad coed making her way
to the Main  Loan Desk.
Yours  very  truly,
DAVID  CODVILLE,
Arts III.
Facisfeciousmsm?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
This Anarchist sneering at
the Concept of Communism is
ludicrous. It is as embarrassing as the Modern Jazz Man
sneering at the primitive blues.
Amy Anarchist, worth hi.s black
cloak ought to realize that
Anarchism is the ultimate aim
of t h e most idealistic Com-
inunist —a civilization so high'
ly developed, a society so well
intes.; i'a U-d that il needs no
steering wheel.
When are the anarchists going to push aside some- of the
debris on this sheet to show
us  the   Way   to  salvation'.'
Most   respectfully,
R'lAXl'NE    GADI).
l\S— Could il be that this
growing organization is only
for the purpose of Facisloci-
ousuism?
The question of existence of
God is so much controversial
though of vital importance that
sometimes I wonder if anything would be gained by discussing it.
There are people who believe
in the existence of God and
others do not arid there are
still others who don't commit
themselves (though they may
be included in non-believers).
As everybody knows that
there are no direct or indirect
means available to us by which
one can swear this question
either in the positive sense or
the negative sense. This concept evades all our scientific
achievements because this has
more to do with belief rather
than laboratory instruments.
One day we might find some
laboratory proof but none exists at the present time.
It is natural to ask before
anything else what do we understand by the word existence
when it is applied to God.
Does He exist in the same
form as we do? Does He need
rest? Does He occupy space
and in case He does, whether it
is finite or infinite.
I don't feel myself competent
enough to define the term existence as applied to God. We
ordinarily (as all the major religious say) understand by it is
Limit Enrolment
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
At last we arc- approaching
the point of no return. The
question of raising the fees
comes up once more: and I hope
lhat vve. the student body, will
stamp hard upon il!
The present poliey is to admit more and more students into the University.
The result of this is thai wc
need more- money, more buildings, more- pay to more professors!
Where is the money to come
from?
It cannot come from students!
It is all very well for those
whose parents are well off,
and who send their offspring to
University in large cars, but it
is desperately unfair on that
vast, and hard working majority of students who have a
struggle to get through UBC on
the earnings of a summer's
work.
It is these assiduous and self-
sacrificing fellows, who for the
most part form the core of genuine hard working students.
Many of my friends managed
to get. jobs only two weeks before registration this year, and
are still working in the bush.
Many more can barely exist
al UBC this year, and I even
know a few who sleep longer
on week-ends to keep away
hunger.
We cannot afford lo pay more
fees!!!
Who   should   the   money   come
from   then'.'
It should come from the Provincial Government, but the
government just so happens to
have spent all ils money on a
ridiculously large road program --- and presumably still is
spending on a scheme to wipe
out ('.') our provincial debt.
What is the alternative-'.'
By I. H. MUFTI
Department of Maths
this; He is omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent, He
never gets sleep, He could hear
you no matter where you are,
etc., etc.
The people who believe in
God argue something like this.
Is the universe around you not
enough evidence that there is
some great genius behind it. Do
the moon, the planets and other
heavenly bodies not speak of
themselves that someone created them.
Is not the sight of a human
being, the best of his creations,
make your heart sing for the
glory of the Creator.
These mountains, the lovely
birds, the oceans and beautiful
lakes, don't they provide sufficient due to His existence.
The perfect harmony in nature, the motions of planets,
the sun and the distant stars,
don't they mean anything to
you. If they do then why do
you dispute about God's existence, who created you when
you were non-existent.
If there is no God then how
are you going to account for
the miracles, the healing of
hopelessly ill people. What
distinction are you going to
have between virtue and vice,
good and bad?
What is to stop you from
murdering, killing and looting
The alternative is either to
change- this policy of come one
come all, and have a bash, or
to elect a new and more con-
scientous government in the
Province.
To raise the- student fees is
to discriminate against those
who do have money; and is
obvinuslv not a solution to
what is going to he an ever-
increasing  problem.
The precedent must be set —•
either less enrollment, or government aid — and a firm
stand taken on one or other
solution.
What will it bc: Roads, a glorified high school, or University Education?
Most emphatically yours,
O. P. ST. JOHN
$1,500,000
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to submit the
following suggestion for raising funds to provide more bursaries and higher faculty salaries.
My plan is to post No Parking signs in all the student parking areas and all spaces large
enough to hold a parked car.
This will mean that .students
will be forced to park their
cars illegally.
Al the rate of one dollar for
each parking offence, at least
$1,000 could be collected every
school clay.
In order to fine all cars parking on the campus, I suggest
that students applying for loans
be encouraged to become deputies to make- out parking tickets
between classes on a commission basis, say, live- cents for
each conviction.
Yours respectively,
SARAH SMITH,
Science III.
other people.
Sometimes in the past even
mathematical reasonings have
been given to prove His existence and His being infinite.
Consider the following:
(Ed. Note: Please read "plus"
wherever "x" appears in the
following mathematics argument. It is technically impossible to print "plus" signs in The
Ubyssey.)
1-lxl-lxl-lxl-lxl-l x, 1-1   —
aleph.
First group them as follows:
(1-1) x (1-1) x (1-1) x (1-1) x
(1-1) x aleph equals oxo x
equals o.
Next:
lx(-lxl)  x  (-1x1) x  aleph
equals 1x0x0 equals 1.
So you see that out of zero
you get one i.e. out of nothiag
can be created unity. Mathematicians of the present time,
of course, won't agree to this
type of reasoning. But should
we take their word for it. To
pr.ove that He can be infinite,
but yet unity, consider:
l!> x xa x 1/8 x aleph
equals 1.
The left hand side contains
an infinite number of terms
yet the right hand side is 1.
On the other hand an atheist would at-gue that do you
really think that there is an
order in this world. If this is
so then how are you going to
account for all the earthquakes,
.storms, accidents and wars.
Is it not uncertainty involved
in everything. Can one with
certainty predict the path of
even a tiniest particle like the
electron'.' Why one should
sacrifice one's comforts" Is it
just lo win his favor or love?
Why should one go to a
church or mosque or a temple?
Is it because to sing His
glory'1 Why does He need
this1?
Why does He demand us to
say prayers, when this time
can be spent in some useful purpose for the betterment of mankind"
Why does He throw miseries
and epidemics on us? Is it only
to test our love for Him? Is
not the concept of God or gods
arisen out of fear?
Is it not true that people still
living in primitive stages regard snakes and alike as gods
because they happen to take
their lives?
Is it not the idea of prayers
and sacrifice to please Him?
If this is not so, then what is
the idea of Hell or Heavens?
Whv can't a man be virtuous
or good if there is no God"
Why can't the reality of virtue lie in itself?
In conclusion I must admit
that I have snot tried to solve
the problem, but have raised
more doubts.
It is for the reader to see- for
himself to which group ho belongs. But to whichever group
he may belong, he will agree
vvith me that he exists whether
God exists or not.
lie should make the best of
its being present in this world.
He should love mankind. Love
should hi- for love's sake only
and not for mere- selfish motives and personal gains. lie
should Ihink rightly and act,
accordingly without caring
what other people would say. Friday, November 21, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
UBYSSEY BOAT TEAM members, Kerry Feltham and
Kerry White demonstrate the excellent form that was instrumental in defeating the notorious Redshirts Thursday
afternoon. The Engineers had a very poor day suffering
defeat at the hands of the Aggies and Forresters as well as
the Pubsters. — Photo by Michael Sone
CONTROLLED   LIFE ilent to ,(fi50 in our currency' Bc"
(Continued from Page  1)       I fore 1950' the emphasis was on
try   into   worker   self-management in communes. This ties in
with    the    "social    democracy"
under which workers in factories have a say in their affairs,
but are closely restricted on in>
portant policies.
Thc average salary in Yugoslavia is 15,000 dinars per
month, which is roughly equiva-
j heavy industry, but there has
I been a shift to the manufacture
I of consumer goods since then.
j At the end of the discussion
i there was a question period and
the showing of slides.
Armstrong and Termansen
represented UBC on a WUS
seminar to Yugoslavia last summer.
MAYBE IT WAS AN OLD ALUM ?^ ft
B.C. RECORDS
"The House of L.P. Records"
556 W. Georgia St.     MU. 4-5724
• New Records
• "Stereo" Records
• Language Records
• 10rl  Discount
with AMS Cards
WEEK OF NOVEMBER 21 - 2!)	
Various Lectures and Artistic Presentations have been
arranged lo commemorate the 40()lh Anniversary of
the Accession of Elizabeth I. Watch the Ubysssey for
the times and place's.
WEDNESDAY,   NOVEMBER 20 	
WEEKLY CONCERT in Buch. 106 at V2./M) this week
features BARBARA PENTLAND playing her own
composition.
THURSDAY,   NOVEMBER 27 	
The Vancouver Symphony presents a  tree noon-hour
CONCERT in the Auditorium.
m
i„ MATINEE
you'll find the finest...
Its classic tobaccos give the ™
special quality you demand. Thc
delightful mildness is Matinee's
own, and thc pure, white filter
completes your enjoyment.
That is why you'll smoke
Matinee with the
complete confidence
you've found
the finest.
A cigarette of elegance... A Alter of particular purity
Homecoming was profitable
for more than the Committee.
One giant 7-up bottle, several
rolls of tar paper, two hammers, two pairs of pliers and a
truckfull of folding chairs dis-
appeard from the Field house
throughout the weekend.
Bob Ward, Homecoming co-
chairman, bites his nails about
the 7-up bottle. It doesn't belong to the university, and iff
worth forty  bucks.  .  .   .
if* if* if*
The four-foot diameter, five-
hundred dollar Chinese gong at
Leadership Conference is the
subject of some consternation
by Council.
At the conference, someone
put a hole in it with an axe.
The YMCA, who own the
camp have been writing dunning letters to the AMS to get
somebody to pay for it. Council
is holding a meeting Friday
night to find out who the guilty
party is. If he goes and confesses before he gets his name
out of the papers. . , . He's
one of our future leaders, yet. . .
Don't forget Jo go to the Cavalier Shoppe fo get one of those
silk paisley ties made expressly
for. the Cavalier Shoppe in London.
if* if. if*
Here's a quote out of the
Ocean Fall Review for March,
1955. . . , "C. Connaghan, (our
president!) in speech number
four, gave an excellent demonstration on how to handle an
army rifle a I the Toastmaster's
meeting to-day."
He keeps it in the council
room to use on people who talk
too long.
Whom did we see getting
ejected from the Georgia a couple of nights ago? Are they
prominent Brock habitues?
Try a button down ivy shirt,
or a tab-collar shirt at the Cavalier Shoppe at 41st and Dunbar
. . . they start at 5.95. . . .
Our Engineer friends collected six hundred and seventy
dollars in the festivities to-day.
.  .  It all  goes to the  Crippled
Double-Breasted Suits
eONVKKTKO   INTO   NKW
Singlc-Brcastcd Models
UNITED  TAU ORS
549   Granville     MU.   1-4649
PHOTOGRAPHERS
KITH and BUURAUD
CHARLTON    &    MORGAN
VARSITY      SHOP
CASHMERE  SWEATER
ScdsL
16.95
V-NECK PULLOVERS and CREW NECKS
18 95
CARDIGANS
10.95
SLEEVELESS   PULLOVERS
Our last big shipment from Scotland until the new year —
7;Vr pure- Cashmere-, 2;V<' lambswwonl . . , luxurious 2-ply
Sweaters in all the shades you want: chocolate browwn, charcoal, green, tan, grev, blue mix, etc., all sizes 30 to 46. Mew
3-button CARDIGANS included.
By Air Express from Scotland . . .
Real   Shetland   Bulky   Crew   Necks
16.95
CHARLTON-MORGANS
VARSITY  SHOP
4444   West   10th   Avenue
Children's hospital. ... A lot of
the credit goes to engineer Ross
Craigie. (our good show of the
week?)
if* if* if*
The Blue Cow is getting
known. An article appeared in
the U of A paper about it. . . .
The U of Toronto is trying to
abolish student fees entirely.
Maybe  we  could do the  same.
ip       if*       **r
Look in next week's column
for a complete description of
the "All expense paid trip to the
Georgia" contest, . . . It's good
for a whole evening.
You can get slim flannel ivy
slacks at the Cavalier Shoppe.
where you get quality clothes
. . . and they cost you less.
THE
TOP
SHIRTS
Professionally, LaMhdered
Stilly
'.
BERNARD the BEAR
Who Says:
Every winter when I lie down
for my long snooze I think of
all you dumb humans who
either fight the nasty weather or spend a fortune avoiding it. While I'm still up and
around and thinking about
it, I guess I'd better tell you
that since you are going to
stay up and fight the cold
Ihis winter, why don't you
nip on down to the shirt 'n
tie bar and get one of those
bulky knit or orlon T-shirts.
This is warmth without
weight.
shirt 'n
tie bar
592 SEYMOUR
(at Dunsmuir)
"QomsL in, and. Usl
jowl on." PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1958
NATIONALISM
(Continued from Page 1)
and therefore dictators of Canadian foreign policy, was a nationalistic party, and tended to
make Canada a completely separate  nation.
The Liberal party emphasized
this to such an extent that by
1945, Canada was in fact, said
Dr. Conway, separate nation
and had "thrown off the shackles  of   Whitehall."
Dr. Conway stated that up
until 1957, Canada was not a
leader in t h e Commonwealth
and that this had been due to
the policy of the Liberal party.
He added that as the Conservative party was pro-commonwealth, perhaps Canada's
role in the Commonwealth
would be much stronger in the
future.
Dr. Conway stated that of
those people who w e r e pro-
Commonwealth, some belonged
to the "old guard" who looked
to "mother" for guidance and
remained loyal in the sense of
'we will stand ty thee . . . ".
Those     belonging     to     the
'young guard,"  while  in a minority,   had   progressive   ideas.;
They  realized  that  what   undeveloped   countries    need    from
Canada is not money but interested people — people who
will go to these countries, not
to see how much they can exploit them, but to learn from
them and to serve them by
teaching them how to help
themselves, according lo Dr.
Conway.
After his talk, Dr. Conway
answered   some questions.
One questioner asked whether or not Commonwealth countries such as those in South Africa would be better off leaving the Commonwealth and
joining with other African countries.
Dr. Conway answered that
those countries are much better
off in the Commonwealth than
if they were out of it and that
he thought the countries realized this.
NOTICE
_.. A two dollar reduction will
be given to students wishing
to see Jan Cherniabsky, concert pianist, Friday night at
the Georgia Auditorium.
Tickets, originally selling
for $2.50, will be given to
students for 50c.
PITMAN OPTICAL
LTD.
Complete Optical Services
• NEW IVY LEAGUE HORN RIMS
• CONTACT LENSES
• OPTICAL REPAIRS WHILE YOU WAIT
• IMMEDIATE APOINTMENT
734 GRANVILLE ST .
Main  floor  Vancouver  Block
MU.   5-0928
Attractive Careers
FEDERAL   PUBLIC   SERVICE
For
Junior Administrative Officers, Economists & Statisticians
Dominion Customs Appraisers, Trade and Commerce
Officers, Foreign Service Officers for Citizenship and
Immigration, External Affairs, Trade and Commerce,
Archivists,    Finance  Officers
These- posts offer interesting work,  numerous opportunities   lor  advancement,   and   generous   fringe   benefits.
Starting Salaries $4140 and $4200
Uncler-gradunl.es in their final year of study arc invited to
apply hut appointment will be subject to graduation.
Students from all faculties are eligible- to compelu.
Written   Examination
SATURDAY,    NOVEMBER   22
Details regarding the examination, application  forms anel
descriptive   folders   now   available   from
UNIVERSITY    PLACEMENT   OFFICE
or  Civil   Service  Commission,   Ottawa
If you wrile to Ottawa, please specify the classes in which
you are  interested  and  quote  competition  5!)-26f)0,
Provincial LPP leader, Nigel
i Morgan, will speak today at
noon in Buch, 106. Topic will
be, "What Is Behind the Power
Scandal?"
Feminine Football
(Continued from  Page  1)
i on   the     ground.     Aggies    also
! claimed this race.
,     Second half of the game was
j marked by  the  bruising efforts
! of both buxum lines, and shouts
of encouragement    from     both
i line coaches who feared a dunking in the tank if their team lost,
i The game was interrupted by a
j typical engineer trick.    One of
their brave members swiped the
Aggie   bell.
The red shirts, trying to steal
the limelight, provided the cheer
leading, and the crowd greeted
their knobby kneed antics with
apple cores, empty bags and a
tew bottles.
TUXEDO fi
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE Ltd.
523 HOWE.
MU. 3-2457
|    'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from rage 1)
| U.B.C. DANCE CLUB —Attend the monthly dance in the
clubroom tonight at 8:00. Members 25c, non-members 35c. Refreshments will be served,
if.    if.    if.
L.P.P.—"What's   behind   the
Socred   Power   Scandal?"   Hear
! Nigel Morgan, Provincial leader
of the L.P.P. Friday  noon, Bu.
: 106.
if,    if.    if.
HIGH    SCHOOL     CONFERENCE     COMMITTEE—General
meeting   Fri da j   noon   in   Men';:
! club room Brock Hall.
if* ip *T*
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB—presents Mrs. B. Lepinsky from the
Vancouver Mental Health Centre, speaking on "Community
Mental Health" on Friday at
12:30 in HM-2.
•P        V        •¥*
RUGBY—Chiefs vs Oak Bay
Whites at UBC Stadium; Game
time 2:00 p.m. Saturday 22 Nov.
if.    if.    if.
GERMAN CLUB—will meet
today Friday noon in Brock
Exn. 363. All out in order that
refreshments may be planned.
**T*        V if*
LUTHERAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION—Rev. A. M. Vinge,
Institutional Chaplain for Greater Vancouver will present topic
on "Conscience" the first of two
topics. In Hut L-3 today noon.
if* if* if*
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
CLUB—Two films will be shown
this evening at 8:30 in the
house. "Wings to Finland" &
"Castles and Castanets." All
members welcome.
MUSIC CIRCLE—There will
be no meeting today as playback equipment is being overhauled.
if* if* if*
CAMERA CLUB — General
meeting Friday noon in Bu. 203
to discuss photographic problems.
if* if* if*
RAMBLERS ATHLETIC
CLUB — General meeting in
Phy. 301, Announcement on
Stag.
•T*        *f*        *T*
C.C.F. CLUB — invites all
members and others interested
to CCF Youth Seminar on Saturday 22 November at Boag
House, 2611 E. 54 Ave., from
10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Films,
Panel discussion, Lunch & Banquet on programme.
if.        if.        if.
NFCUS—Committee meeting
12:30 today in Bu. 221 to meet
Mr. Mortimer Bistrisky.
*r        wTt        •¥*
LIBERAL CLUB — Cocktail
party Sunday Nov. 23, 7-9 at
3538 Pine Crescent.
vf1        *P        *Tr
CONSERVATIVE    CLUB    —
Discussion Group at 8 p.m. on
Sunday 23 Nov. at 5290 Angus
Drive. Topic is "Conservative
principles as they apply today."
New members are urged to attend—all members welcome.
if* if* if*
UNDERGRADUATE WRITERS
WORKSHOP—will present two
hours of tape recordings of
"Beat Generation" poets reading their own works in Arts
101, 8:15 p.m. Monday Nov. 24.
All students and faculty members are welcome.
CCF
YOUTH
SEMINAR
Sat.
Nov. 22, 10 a.m. to
10 p.m. — 50c
BOAG HOUSE,   2611 E.
54th AVENUE
Panels
Films      -      Bt
inquet       -      Social
ROBERT
Speaker:
STRACHAN, M.L.A
., Opposition Leader
 ALL   WELCOME 	
POLYMER   CORPORATION    LIMITED
Sarnia,   Ontario
POLYMER CORPORATION LIMITED, an entirely
Canadian company, is the only producer of synthetic
rubber in Canada. Through constant research and technological development by the Company, it lias achieved
recognition throughout the world as a leader in the field
of synthetic rubber.
Employment   Opportunities
GRADUATES. —
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS — Bachelor or Master
degree, lor permanent employment in technical
positions, Chemical and Process Engineering Departments, and Research anel Development Division.
CHEMISTS (HONOUR) — Master degree, lor
permanent employment in Research and Development Division.
UNDERGRADUATES:
Summer Employment lor Seniors in Next-To-Final Year
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING — to undertake
technical projects in Process anel Chemical Engineering Depts.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING — to assist in
engineering assignments in Engineering anel Construction, and Maintenance- Departments,
CHEMISTRY   (HONOUR) — to undertake shorl
term   research   projects,   anel   control   analysis  ol'
raw materials anel product.
For  Company   literal lire   anel   interviewing   appointnienls
contact: Mr. J, F. McLean, University Personnel Services
Ot'l'ico.    Company  representatives  will  visit   the  campus:
Monday, Nov. 24   -   Tuesday, Nov. 25 Friday, November 21, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
STUDENTS IN THE DRAMA CLASS practice in the Freddy Wood Theatre, under the
supervision of Miss Dorothy Somerset. Here they practice a mime scene, as part of their
studies. — Photo by Hal Brochmann
Campus  Curious
Department Of Theatre
Now Offers Drama Major
Ed. Note: This is ihe second article in ihe feature series, "Campus Curious".
Watch for future contributions including articles on the
School of Nursing, the Architecture student, and International House.
By  DIANE   GRANT
U.B.C.  now  possesses  one of
the  four  departments of  Theatre in  Canadian Universities.
This year,  for thc first time, j
students may major in a drama I
Dorothy Somerset and Mr. Sidney   Bennett,   all   consider   the J Would-be
major   a   big   step   forward   in   competent
Canadian   theatre.
"We hope," Miss Somerset,
"to develop an understanding
and a critical appreciation of
theatre in studenls and therefore to create an educated audience."
instruction   in   their  craft   for
playwrights,     create
teachers   of   drama
PHARMACY
KEPORTCR
FREE  BOWLING
IOR UNIVERSITY  STUDENTS AND STAFF
THIS COUPON ENTITLES HOLDER to one FPvEE game- of
10 pins or 5 pins open plav at SEYMOUR RECREATIONS or
LOOMER LANES, 1105 and 1135 Sevmour St.; or one FREE
game- of 5 pins at CHAPMAN'S RECREATIONS, 1312 West
Broadway, Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 0 p.m.
(Only one coupon accepted from a student at a time)
Please accept our invitation io Vancouver's finest and largest
bowling  establishments.
(Coupon expires December 15, 1958)
B. Comm. - CA.
Interested In Commerce?
?
In Chartered Accountancy?
Yon are invited to a meeting; to be- lie Id next.
WEDNESDAY for presentation of full details ot
the program whereby qualifications for BOTH
the Bachelor of Commerce degree and admission
to Tho Institule of Chartered Accountants of B.C.
may be- obtained CONCURRENTLY.
This program is ol particular interest  to sludents
now enrolled in their first  ear al  U.B.C.
Remember the Date and  Place
WEDNESDAY,    NOVEMBER   26
at 12.35 p.m. in Buchanan 318
The  Institute  of  Chartered  Accountants   of
British   Columbia
By J.& M. BURCHILL
QUESTION:—How do ihey
try io cure a sore throat
in Japan?
ANSWER: —In Japan, the
eating of roasted orange
seeds is believed io be
effective for sore throat.
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
V/2 Blocks East of Pool
al. 0339
T>
\   »&'
ffmff
ExportA
FILTER TIP
CIGARETTES
for secondary schools, and give
aspiring young actors a chance
to test their talents.
The department, however, is I
not a professional school of \
theatre. As Dr. Soule pointed'
out in a recent interview, "We
do not feel that it is a univer- \
sity's job to turn out profes- <
sional actors. Only the theatre i
can do that."
The  major consists  of four]
courses,  one oi'  which will not
be  introduced   until   1959. i
Probably   the   most   popular!
course in Theatre 200, in which '
Miss Somerset teaches the fun- j
damentals   of   acting.   Twice   a ,
week,   enrolled   future   actors,
teachers,   lawyers,   and   clergy- j
men,    study    such    essentials!
as    observation,    concentration,
breath   control   and   voice   production.
John Spark, 3rd year Arts,
considers the concentration on
clarative speaking 'capital' for
teachers.
Two hours weekly are spent
in a lab in which the students
are currently working on improvisations.
One of the members of the
class, Mr. Wallork, who is plan
ning to enter Union College,
remarked, "One can't be self-
conscious after Theatre 200".
This suggests perhaps that it
is fertile soil for the cultivation
of   shrinking   violets.
Am aspirant to professional
theatre, Ken Kramer, 2nd year
Arts, feels that the course
teaches one to see more and
hear more in the world about
him.
As one fellow modestly tugging at his forelock said, "We
are sensitive, aware."
In a second course, History of
the Theatre, Dr. Soule lectures
on thc various periods of theatre. Instruction in direction and
staging is also offered, Dr. Soule
again being the lecturer.
Mr. Bennett, technical director of the department, has
formed a Technical Apprentice
Group, to help all productions
on campus.
Next year, a new course,
Forms of the Theatre, a detailed
study of styles in theatre will
be introduced to complete the
drama major.
The   department   is   also   re-
(Continued on Page 8)
See CAMPUS CURIOUS
programme   composed   of   the-       "To   fully   understand   thea-
atrica) history and technique,     i Ire,"  she continued, "one  must;
The  members  of  the  depart- j know  how it  is created." i
ment   Di.   Donald   Soule,   Miss       The courses will also provide
The Canadian National Railways
HAS OPENINGS FOR
Graduating and Post-Graduate Students
in   the   following   categories:
CIVIL ENGINEERING, ENGINEERING PHYSICS,
STATISTICS,   MATHEMATICAL.   ECONOMICS
Descriptive brochures and application forms
are available at  the  Universitwy  Placement  Office.
Interviewing Team from C.N.R. will be present Nov. 27
Personnel Office. Hut M-7
'""""<?}
SS<\
y*
He says he does it by Sfeady Saving
at the Bank of Montreal*
us.as
*The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed.
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C, KIRBY, Manager PACE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Fridav. November 21, 1958
RUGGER TEAM IMPROVING;
VARSITY HOST OAK BA Y
An improving Varsity fifteen take on the Oak Bay Wanderers from Victoria, Saturday afternoon at 2.00 p.m. in local
rugger action. This is the second Varsity game for the team
which downed the Victoria Presidents two weeks ago.
After a month of scrimmages, The"" backline" have "displayed
Rugger Coach Albert Laith-' clever, forceful running while
Waite has now a good idea of in the forwards, former football
the probable composition of his j Player Mike Williams, has been
„.,„.,, rp,1 .   .     i a  real powerhouse,
first    fifteen.    The    remaining |
weeks before Christmas will be' SATURDAY GAMES
spent  in  drilling   the  side  into
Other    games    Saturday,
Braves vs James Bay  at Aggie
a    polished    and    workmanlike I Fie)d at  2:30.  Physical  Ed. vs.
unit, in preparation for the big
games in the New Year.
From their displays in scrimmages and the recent game
against Victoria, it is evident
that the side is in need of conditioning and constant practice
in fundamentals. Back play has
lacked crispness in passing and
straight running in the centre,
while the forwards have shown
little "tiger", and have displayed an ignorance of the essentials of good loose scrimmaging.
Tomahawks, and Frosh A vs.
Frosh B at Mclnnes Field at
12:45.
CHIEF'S ROSTER
Chief's Team: Fullback: Sloan;
Wings: Rankin and Chambers;
Centres: Allardyce and Haines;
five eights; Hunt; scrim-half:
Preston. Forwards: Shore, Mcintosh,    Armstrong,    McGavin,
Squash
students have had a chance to
watch let alone play. For those
who know nothing about the
game, squash is played in an
enclosed court. The racquet
used is similar to a tennis ra-
quet. The ball is the size of a
golf ball and is made of hard
rubber. The game is not unlike
and Milne. McKee, Phillips, and tennis, the main difference be-
Bugg. ing that instead of hitting  the
SPORTS EDITOR,   BOB BUSH
WOMEN'S REP.: Audrey Ede, Flora MacLeod.
REPORTERS: Ted Smith, Tony   Morrison, Alan Dafoe, M. Sone.
DESK:   Irene Frazer and Elaine  Spurrill , Larry Fournier.
Interested In Squash?
UBC Team Enter Match
The University Squash team will be playing its first match
this Saturday afternoon against the Vancouver Raquets Club.
is  a   game few UBC
On the credit side, however,
Preston, a newcomer at scrim-
half, has struck up a fine un- j
derstanding with Hunt at fly- j
half. Chambers and Rankin j
have exhibited strong deter- j
mined running on the wings,'
and it i.s doubtful if the lineout
plav of McGavin and Milne will!
,    ',    ,,       , , .... i comnlete  cost  of transportation
be bettered by any opposition.   | compicic   t> ai ••
Skiing,Pleasure,Lodging
Planned For Ski Week
UBC Thunderbirds Ski Team are organizing the third
annual UBC Ski Week on Red Mountain from December 26th
to January 2nd.
Sixty-five   dollars   cover   the
STRONG  RESERVES
The team's biggest asset is
perhaps the tremendous reserve strength.
Braves' Coach, Byron Vick-
ery, has the makings of a very
strong side-, with a nucleus o!
experienced players blended
with promising newcomers like
Bill Miranda anel Eel Fyfe. bolh
of wmoin played a his; part in
I.. I'd Byng's victory in lhe New
Zealand   Shield   last   \iar.
Max Howell's Physical Ed.
team have been steam-rolling
all    opposition    in    scrimmage.
and accommodation. This charge
entitles those travelling to Unpopular skiing resort io transportation return by chartered
Greyhound busses, accomodation at Red Mountain Lodge,
unlimited use of chairlift and
tow, and New Year's Eve party
facilities.
Tickets may be obtained from
lhe LBC Ath'u lie Olfice in the
Memorial Gym. All m. mmy muss
be   paid   before   leaving.
For  further   information,  contact Don Sturgess at  Al 0947-Y.
: or Bob Davis at Gl 0805-L,
LIFTERS
LOOKGOOD
IN TRIALS
Trials were held by the UBC
Weight Lii'ling Team for their
meel November 20 against the
Doug Hepburn Gym Club.
Trial  results were:
1959 GRADUATES
CANADA'S    LARGEST    EMPLOYER
FEDERAL   PUBLIC   SERVICE
needs
CIVIL - ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS
An interesting and res-ward in" career may await you in. the
Federal Government if you are graduating in Civil,
Electrical or Mechanical Engineering in l!)!5f). A number
of new graduates in those fields will be employed at various Canadian centres on vital, unci challenging projects
involving applied research, design, development, construction and production.
STARTING SALARY IS $4740 — allowances will be
made for those completing relevant post-graduate training.
Candidates must write a General Objective Test at
2   p.m.   on  SATURDAY,   NOVEMBER   22.
Details regarding tho examination, application forms and
information circulars and folders are available from
UNIVERSITY    PLACEMENT   OFFICE
or Civil  Service  Commission,  Ottawa
Requirements in other fields of Engineering
will be made known later.
I'rem
Snalch
Jerk
Glynn  Srarl
lo a
100
210
IVI. Kabinovik
h 150
12;1
175
G. Smith   .. .
toll
150
185
Don   Ward
200
18o
260
Kiyo T'umado
140
.140
100
Rod   Hanson
140
111)
.185
ball over a net it is played off
the walls. Consequently, many
tennis players play squash over
the winter months.
FAST GAME
Squash is a fast, strenuous
game and half an hour's play
means a good workout for even
the fittest athlete. Since the
main strokes are relatively easy
to master, beginners have no
difficulty in picking up the
game. However, even the best
players have trouble with the
finer shots.
One of the beauties of squash
is that game, shower, and
changing take only an hour of
your time. When or if courts
are built on campus, sludents
will have ample time for a game
during lunch hour. At the moment the Squash Club members
may only play due to the kindness of the Vancouver Raquets
Club.
LACK OF COURTS
The absence of courts on our
campus is noticeable, especially, since every Eastern University has several. At McGill, for
instance, more students play
squash  than  any  other  sport.
Any o n e interested is welcome- lo come and support lis;-
team tomorrow between 1 and
4 p.m. ;il the- Vancouver Hack-
els Club iii  25th anti Oak.
Intramural
Road Race
CROSS   COUNTRY   TEAM
RESULTS
Tot
im
Total
Point
1,
V.O.C.    .
38
33
2
Forestry  	
...     02
30
3.
Ramblers
....     84
20
4.
Fort Camp
...   115
17
5.
Beta   	
    148
15
fi.
P. E	
....   152
13
7.
Zeta Psi   	
    182
11
8.
Phi Kappa P
i.   186
0
9.
Alpha   Delt
188
7
1.0.
D.U	
193
6
Individual
Winners
1
. R. Jessing,
Forestry.
2
. I, Mahon, VOC.
8
. Fort Camp.
SWIM MEET
Nine-teen schools from throughout the Lower Mainland will be
reprc-'onted in the 8th Annual
Inter high School Swim Meet.
Tho Meet is to be he-Id Saturday, November 22, in the Crystal Pool, starting at 10 a.m.
The entire Meet is sponsored
by the Aquatic Class of the UBC
School of Physical Education.
Highlights of the Meet are
some of the swimmers entered.
Included are Bob Wheaton of
Victoria, a member of the 1958
Canadian BEG Team, anel Marg
Iwasaki, thc wonder-gal in the
1958 BEG at Cardiff.
NOTICE
Meeting today, Room 214,
Memorial Gym, for all those
interested in playing JV or
Thunderbird football or jusl
interested in football, next
year.
P
I
z
z
A
at the SNACKERY Granville at 15th
MEN'S
SPORTS
SOCCER
Varsity of the Mainland Second Division Soccer League remains idle this Sunday. The
boys are at present waiting for
their California tour which will
consist of two games on November 29 and Decemiber 1 against
American opposition.
Grass Hockey
UBC men's grass hockey
teams see action on three fronts
this Saturday as second place
Varsity of the A Division tangles with West Coast Rangers
at Memorial No. 1 Park while
UBC Golds and Blue of the B
Division meet Blackbirds and
Juniors respectively. The former game will be at UBC No. 2
Field and the latter contest is
scheduled for UBC No, 3 Field.
The starting time for the A
Division fixture is 2:45 while
the two B Division battles begin
at 2:15.
PETER  MULLINS
dual worries, track and
basketball
cany scoring
Stops J.V.'s
Getting off to a rapid start,
Vancouver Sea Fun racked up
a twenty point lead before the
UBC Jayvees scored a point in
hist night's Senior "A" Basketball action. Tiu- Sea Funners
slopped t h e youngsters from
UBC 00-00.
Collecting t w e n t y straight
points before UBC got one, Sea
Fun moved ahead 29-6 by the
end of the first quarter. Continuing their relentless scoring,
Si a Fun went into the- second
half leading 50-20. Jayvees out-
scored the victors 20-10 in the
final frame.
Except for being down the
twenty points early in the game,
UBC played on fairly even
terms. Conch Mullins used most
of his bench strength throughout  most  of  the  second  half.
Sea Fun was paced by high
scoring Herb Olal'son who collected 25 points. Bob Pickell
picked up 19 points followed
by   Mel Brown  w!th  18.
Mike Polkon.jaek, playing
well on both back and fore
court, led the Jayvees scoring
with 1,7 points. Lasl year's
Most Valuable High School
player from Prince of Wales,
Bill Berardino, plotted eight
points for the losers,
BOX  SCORE:
Lusk   4,   Berze   3,   Kangas   6, I
Berardino 8, Jennings 3, Woot«|
ten  6,   Mac   Donald  6,   Potkon-
jack 17, Way 4, Worthy 3. Friday, November 21, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
BUCHANS HERE THIS WEEKEND
"ALL - STAR"   BUCHANS  MEET   BIRDS
TONIGHT, SECOND GAME SATURDAY
By TED SMITH
Seattle   Buchans,   the   best
basketball team that will play
in Vancouver this season, will
play  the   UBC   Thunderbirds
this Friday and Saturday evenings. Game time is 8 p.m.
This will be the toughest test
of the season for the new Bird
team.
For years Seattle Buchans
have been one of the best teams
in the United States. This year
they will bc even better. Now
playing in the National Industrial Basketball League against
perennial chamjpions Peoria,
Phillips and Denver.
IMPRESSIVE LINE-UP
In the visitor lineup wil be
several familiar names as well
as a few impressive additions,
Returning to Vancouver again
is "Mr. Automatic," Chuck
Koon, formerly a standout with
the University of Washington.
Koon was named as an alternate to the 1956 U.S. Olympic
team. Pairing with Koon in the
veteran guard capacity will be
Larry Ramim, 6'3" star, also
from U. of W.
Leading the newcomers on
the Buchans team will be Dick
Stricklin, 6'7" forward from
Seattle U. Stricklin averaged
20.7   points  per  game  last  sea-
JACK  POMFRET
. . . coach with a chore
son to break all John O'Brien's
scoring records. From the now
famous University of San Francisco which set records for consecutive games won, comes Art
Day, 6'9" centre.
FIRST GAME
U.B.C. will bc going with the
same lineup which beat the
Grads last Friday evening, with
the exception that Wayne Osborne,    6'3"   forward   will   be
making  his  first  appearance.
With many newcomers in the
UBC lineup, the Thunderbirds
are having much trouble perfecting the cohesion in their
offense. Many of the newcomers have beeo used to starring
on the teams they played for.
Now they must fit into a new
routine and are finding the adjustment difficult to make rapidly.
Against t h e Buchans, UBC
will be emphasizing ball control and will be playing down
the fast breaks. In order to keep
within range of the opposition
UBC must make sure they get
a shot away each time they control the ball. In the game against
the Grads and in a scrimmage
against Eilers on Sunday morning, the Birds were coming
down the floor time after time
without getting a shot away.
CLINIC
A very important part of the
Buchans trip this year will be
the clinic being run Saturday
morning at 11 a.m. by the Seattle squad. This school has
been run all over the Pacific
Northwest of the U.S. by coach j
Frank Fidler and Manager Bud
Honkvan. The clinic is being
run in the Memorial Gym and
everyone is welcome.
ON HAND TONIGHT AND
SATURDAY will be Buchan's
Larry Ramm. Bucham Bakers !
are perhaps the- strongest team
to play here this year. Game-
time both nights 8 p.m.
Quarterback
Club
The UBC Thunderbird Quarterback Club contributes greatly to the athletic program at
UBC. The following is an outline of the Club, its activities,
and its purpose.
Thunderbird Quarterback
Club incorporated just after the
war under the B.C. Societies Act.
Composed of UBC Alumni
and all interested parties.
Meet every Friday noon during the University session at
the University Club in downtown  Vancouver
Name is a misnomer because
supports all sports, not just
football!!!
Purpose is to promote campus athletics (all)
Give   Financial   help:
Annual High School Basketball Scholarship for the outstanding player in the tourney.
Last year ED GUSHUE of Lord
Byng High who is on the Birds
Basketball  this year.  .  .  .
Assist, w i t h Loans lo UBC
athletes —Bursaries.   .   .
Do not influence .students to
come- to UBC but help those
already   here  ,   ,  ,
Have helped a good number
of sports on campus
Headed drive to s o n d lhc.
rowers  to  Henley
Presidenl--Jack Arnold, like
others in Club, seldom miss
game  whether   home  or  away. .
Grads and those interested
are always welcome
KEN  WINSLADE
. . speedy playmaker
ED  PETERSON
. . . long set shot
BARRY DRUMMOND
. . . back for more
1958-59 Basketball Schedule
Date Opponent Place and Time
Nov. 21—Seattle Buchans    UBC, 8 p.m.
Nov. 22—Seattle Buchans         UBC, 8 p.m.
Nov. 28—St. Martin's College    - Olympia, 8 p.m.
Dec. 5—Totem Tournament   -    UBC, 7.30 p.m.
Dec. 6—Totem Tournament    UBC, 7.30 p.m.
Dec. 19, 20—Harlem Globetrotters     UBC, 7 p.m.
Dec. 29—Alberni Athletics   -   Alberni,  8.30 p.m.
Dec. 30— Alberni Athletics     .   . _    - Alberni, 8.30 p.m.
Jan. 2 College of Puget Sound         UBC, 8 p.m.
Jan. 3—College- of Puget Sound       UBC, 8 p.m.
Jan.  !■)—Pacific Lutheran College . . . .     Parkland, 8 p.m.
Jan. 10—Central Washington College   .      .      Ellesburg, 8 p.m.
Jan.  14—College- of Puget Sound Tacoma, 8 p.m.
Jan.   17     Western Washington College        Bellingham, 8  p.m.
Jan. 21- Western Wasringtou College  ... UBC, 8 p.m.
Jan, 23 Eastern  Washington College Cheney, 8  p.m.
Jan. 24-   Whilworlh College Spokane, 8 p.m.
Feb. 4 College of Puget Sound UBC, 8 p.m.
Feb. ."> Woslmonl College-, Santa Barbara       UBC, 12.30 noon
Feb.  13- -Whitworth College VlM\ 8 p.m.
Feb.  14 Eastern Wash. College UBC, 8 p.m.
Feb. 20 Pacific Lutheran College UBC, 8 p.m.
Feb. 21 Central Wash. College             UBC, 8 p.m.
Feb. 28-Seattle Pacific College                  .      . . Seattle, 8 p.m.
Mar. 6 and 7 -University of Alherta     UBC, 8 p.m.
P.E. Wins In
Volleyball
Alpha Delta Pi (I) and Physical Education (II) played off for
the final standing in Women's
Intramural Volleyball at noon
Wednesday, November 19.
In a fast moving game both
teams displayed excellent team
work. Physical Education won
the match with a "high to the
back" serve and a final score
of 21-4.
NOTICES
Free showing of Birds-
Central Washington game
on Monday, November 24, in
Buchanan 100 at 12.30. Last
showing of T-Bii'd games
ihis season. Sponsored by
ihe Thunderbird Boosier
Club. Coach, Frank Gnup,
will  commentate.
BUCHAN'S LLOYD HARRIS.
guard from Idaho State College, was given honorable
mention in All-American team
selection.
FINAL TWO
X-COUNTRY
MEETINGS
Winding up an outstanding
season of cross-country running,
I the UBC Thunderbird Cross-
j country Team competes in two
\ meets this weekend. The "A"
: squad will be heading for Se-
J attle while the "B" team will
i be in Victoria.
I Last weekend, UBC finished
second in an Invitational meet
with the Alberta University and
I Vancouver Olympic Club.
TOP FLIGHT
Two top flight contenders
from   UBC,   Jack   Burnett   and
I Jim  Moore,   will  be  competing
! against  the   best   in   the   North-
: west in Seattle when they meet
athletes   from   Idaho,   Washing-
; ton, Oregon and B.C. in the Annual Pacific Northwest A.A.U,
Meet.
| Both Moore and Burnett have
come- up against representatives
from the- competing centres and
have held their oven, Travelling
along with the other two UBC
l minors will be Mike May, Doug
VanNos, and Bernie Barton.
UBC DEFENDS
Saliircliij, in Victoria, UBC
competitors will be- running in
the   Annual   Royal   Koads   Meet
j which UBC won last year. Defending the trophy for UBC will
I be Stan Jaughin, Bob Bush, Ed
Mac Donald and John Montcrief. PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, November 21, 1958
CLUB NOTES
Strachan,  Maclnnes To Address Seminar
The    CCF    Club    invites   all, at 8 p.m. and will cost 2oc.
merrobers and any others interested under the age of thirty,
to attend the CCF Youth Seminar to be held Saturday at Boag
House, 2611 East Fifty-fourth
Avenue.
The program will be chaired
by CCF club member Tony
Gargrave, MLA, who is currently  taking Law  at UBC.
It will begin al 10 a.m. with
a CBC film "Skidrow" which
will be followed by a panel
discussion on "Social Responsibility."
The panel will include Professor W. G. Dixon, Director of
Social Work at UBC; E. Regier,
MP for Burnaby-Coquitlam; W.
Black, President of the B.C.
Federation of Labour; and Pat
Thomas, CCF Executive Panel
Chairman.
After the lunch, which is included in the registration fee I
of 50c, there will be a panel
on "Youth's Place in Politics"
followed by a panel on "Unemployment."
These panels will include:
Alex MacDonald, past President
of the B.C. CCF, George Home,
Secretary Treasurer of B.C,
Federation of Labour; Hugh
Clifford, of the CCF executive,
and Gargrave,
The evening's program will
include an address by Grace
Maclnnes, CCF Provincial
President; and a banquet al
which Provincial CCF Leader
Robert Strachan, for Cowichan-
Newcastle  will  speak.
Evening will end with a social
program.
if* if" H*
EL CIRCULO
El Circulo f;i 11 party is being
held Saturday at 1089 West Fifteenth   Avenue.   W.   Vancouver.
Entertain ment will be provided by a student accordianist,
Jorge Cuba, and a Flamencan
guitarist.   The   party  will   begin
at
drive the
wonderful new
A-55
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma
Dress is Latin American Bohemian. Those who have not
been contacted about rides to
and from the party are asked
to meet outside the Hudson's
Bay al Granville and Georgia
in time to catch the 7:30
to West Vancouver.
Students are asked:  B.Y.O.B.
Anyone interested is asked to
contact   one   of   the   executive   dance
at Room 256, Brock Extension,
—AL. 3153M, or AL. 1427M.
*f* *f* *t*
PRE  MED
PreeMed Club has spent the
first part of the year in an concentrated study of Cancer. Doctors Paterson and Abarsky have
given the club a thorough and
interesting insight into present
knowledge of the study of Cancer.
The club will now carry on
its programme with a more varied and general-interest theme.
Wednesday, November 26, at
12:30 noon in Wesbrook 100,
Dr. F, E. Bryanes will speak
on the subject: "What is Obstetrics?"
Dr. Bryans is an Assistant
Professor in the Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology at
Vancouver  General   Hospital.
Lecture is designed to give
the members a comprehensive
insight in the field of obstetrics and the doctor's relation to
it.
Wednesday, December 3, the
film '•The Delivery of Quadruplets" will be shown.
The   dance   programme   has
begin at 8:30 p.m. All members: a professor at Oxford, where he
wishing to attend must register
before next Thursday,
Names   and   desired   information   must  be  handed in   either
to the executive or to the Club
Office, Room 258, Brock Exten-
bus   sion.
Club Meeting Wednesday, November 26, will be the last
chance    to    register    for    thc
if* ifr if*
PHILOSOPHY
Philosophy Club is sponsoring a guest lecture by Professor J. L. Austin Monday, at
12:30  in Buchanan  104.
Dr. Austin, was until recently
been tentatively settled. The
"Surgical Stomp" will be held
on Friday, December 5, and will
took a leading part in the analysis of the "Ordinary Language" school. His work is
ranked with the best internationally   known   semanticists.
if. if, if*
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
This Sunday's event being
held by the Sports Car Club is
the result of the postponement
of the "November Ninth" previously reported here. The resulting chaos will henceforth be
known as "November Twenty-
Third."
"November     Twenty - Third"
CAMPUS   CURIOUS
(Continued from Page 5)
sponsible for the University
Workshop, now rehearsing Aristophanes', "The Birds" and for
the Frederick Wood Theatre,
which recently produced, "Mrs.
Warren's Profession," and is
planning to present, in December, an all-Canadian original
revue, whose writers will include Ernie Perrault and Eric
Nicol.
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3 fr 59 O
Out of this world!
Space travelers—-he on the alert! Make
.sure there's a cargo of Coke lucked
away in the rocke!! You may not be
able io buy your favorite sparkling
drink on the moon . . . hut that's just
about the only place you can't. So
when you're ready for the big lift, be
sure the cheerful lift of Coca-Cola
goes along!
DRINK
(MM
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
SAY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COLA'-BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF   COCA-COLA   LTD.--THE   WORLD'S   BEST-LOVED   SPARKLING   DRINK.
will test the- map-reading garbage-collecting, and driving
skills of club members, in that
order. Competitors may start at
any time between 1:00 and 2:00
p.m. Sunday afternoon from the
Paramount Drive-In. They will
be issued with a map on which
will be marked the locations
of several check-points which
they must visit, returning to
the finish a couple of hours
later with sundry articles specified by the check-points. He
who accomplishes this with the
minimum mileage wins. Entry
fee will be fifty cents.
P&u/ttiS$£ea&e
the MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette
An Open Letter to Students
OPTOMETRY AS
A PROFESSION
Many sludenis have already made a final decision as to ;i choice ot their life's vocation; others,
however, remain undecided. It is to the latter group
that this information is directed by the B. C. Optometries Association.
Optometry — the art and science of visual care
—- is one of the fastest growing professions in America, and the need for optometric services is almost
certain to keep increasing. The services of the
optometrist will be sought more in thc future than
(-ver before, and the outlook for his profession is
bright.
While optometry is a specialized profession, there
are many specialties within it; occupational vision,
school vision, research, children's (developmental)
vision, to name a few.
Young optometrists may prep.-iro themselves for
Iheir own practices by serving inlorns'iips in offices
of well-established practices. Partnerships are- often
available and opporl unit ies for purchasing a practice
from an optometrist about to retire arise from time
to time.
Tin- minimum educational reciiiiremenl for optometry is five vears of college training lending to the
degree "Doctor of Optnmol'w". A prospect ive sludenl of optometry should find out what, colleges are
approved by tlu- Board of Examiners in Optometry
in the province in which he wishes lo practice.
The U.B.C. counselling; and Placi-nu-nl office has
been provided with a kit which includes several brochures oul lining the work of an oplomotrisl, his position in the community, courses of study, colleges,
el celerii.
tf you are interested in a career in optometry,
do not hesitate to call on your local optometrist to
discuss the profession with him or write to the secretary, B. C. Optometric Association, 3907 Knight Road,
Vancouver  12, B.C.
H. W. JERVIS,
Chairman,
Student Advisory Committee,
B. C. Optometric Assn.

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