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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1961

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 Mardis
Gras
Pep Meet
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY  12,   1961
No. 37
Council to get transfusion?
~"V?$£
THE NEW PARTY is talking of boycotting the Food Services during elections but these en-
thusiasic lunch eaters are doing as much already. Crowding the hall in front of vice-president's   office,   they   quietly   eat  their   luncheses uninterruped.
UBC spends  $1,660,000
on  four  new  residences
Food services boycott
part of NBC plan
A possible boycott of food services facilities was one of
the topics discussed Wednesday at the first public meeting of
UBC's new AMS voters association.
"We  would  set  up soup kit- ~ ~
chens in Brock Hall to feed students participating in the boycott," said chairman Ken Hodkinson.
This is but one plank in the
platform put forward by the
new group, which calls jtself
New Blood on Council—NBC.
Hodkinson explained to 100
students that the purpose of the
NBC group is "to generate some
interest in student elecions."
He described last years' AMS
elections as "almost a farce."
"We hope to get a group of
students to run as a slate on a
definite program," Hodkinson
said.
Four new women's residences
instead of two as previously announced, will be built at UBC
at a cost of $1,660,000.
President N. A. M. MaceKnzie
said UBC would borrow funds
'through Central Mortgage and
Housing which has been authorized to lend money to universities for residence construction.
Prior to the federal legislation enabling Central Mortgage
and Housing to lend money to
universities for residences the
provincial .government had
authorized the UBC board of
governors to borrow money for
construction of two residences,
the president said.
As a result of the later federal
legislation, the board had decided to extend the contract for
two residences to four.
The construction contract for
$1,293,332 has been awarded to
Dawson and Hall Ltd. The residences, which will be ready on
September 1 of this year, will
accommodate 336 women students.
President MacKenzie said the
*need ^or women's residences
was growing more pressing. "At
present we provide accommodation for only 450 women students   and^ we   anticipate   that
Wiffin gets
scholarship
Frederick W. Wiffin of Sar-
dis, B.C. a student metallurgical
. engineer at UBC has been
awarded a $500 scholarship by
American Society for Metals'
Foundation for Education and
Research. ,
there will be 4000 women enrol- residences for men. A central
led at UBC next term," he said, j dining and recreational building
The women's residences will j already open, will be used by all
be constructed on Marine Drive students living in the residence
to the north of the four existing 1 development.
Deadline at hand for
NFCUS scholarships
By HILLARY BROWN
Next week the deadline for students entering the NFCUS
Scholarship plan will be passed
The deadline for all applications is January 15th. The forms
are in the NFUS Office in Brock
Extension and should be submitted to the office of the Registrar.
One of the Exchange students
at UBC on the plan gives her
account of the Plan here:
The NFCUS Scholarship Exchange Plan is aimed at students who are known for their
conscientious attitude towards
both their course of study and
the student affairs of their University.
The purpose of the plan,
which is an Inter-regional Scholarship Exchange Plan, is to promote closer and more informed
relations amongst the students
of the Universities of Canada.
A student who is accepted as
a NFCUS Exchange scholar
spends one year in the acedemic,
social, administrative and cultural life of another Canadian
University, under the financial
auspices  of NFCUS.
Apart from the obvious responsibility which the Exchange
student will feel towards the
advancement of his own general education, he should also assume a responsibility towards
both   the Exchange   University
and   the   University   which   he
is representing.
He should actively participate
(Continued on Page 6)
See NFCUS
Major planks in the proposed
dividual students who would
no vote ori only seven of the
22 council positions, instead of
13 of 13.
He said that small faculties
such as pharmacy and social
work should not have the same
representation as larger faculties ,such as Arts and Frosh.
'<We will abide by the wishes
of the students, however," he
said .The group will run candidates for the six executive
positions only if the amendment
goes through,  he said.
"If the amendment does not
go through, we will have a
much    stronger    representation
platform were outlined in The  on Council," said Hodkinson
Ubyssey Tuesday. Hodkinson assured prospective members that
the platform is still open to
amendment.
MONEY POOLED
He said candidates would run
as a slate and that the $25 expenditure allowance per candidate would be pooled and one
campaign conducted.
"We are planning to embark
on a fairly active campaign under the name of NBC," said
Hodkinson, "and we will present an NBC spectacular at the
end of the month."
He said the spectacular will
be a satirical review of present
student problems, and would
have the purpose of raising
money.
Hodkinson said the NBC opposes the student government
amendment being presented at
the special meeting, Jan. 19.
He charged that the new systems would reduce the say of in-
POSSIBILITY
When asked if the NBC would
run candidates in the Undergraduate Society elections Hodkinson said it was a, possibility.
"It's something we will go into
at our next meeting."
He assured questioners that
NBC would be disbanded after
the AMS elections and would
exert no control over its members on Council. "The regular
•Thursday noon grievance meetings we propose would keep
the council to its promises," said
Hodkinson.
Hodkinson told The Ubyssey
that NBC is not connected with
any club or organization on or
off campus.
The executive of the group'
consists of: Hodkinson, chairman; Bob Thompson, vice-chairman; June Walker .secretary-
treasurer ;and members-at-large
Gail Gordon, Ian Lee and Yain-
nis Calamitsis.
Ping-ti Ho defends Mao Tse-tung
Dr. Ping- ti Ho, said Tuesday that the Chinese communist government today is not as
corrupt as Chiang Kai Shek's
Nationalist regime was before
the communist's took over.
Dr. Ho spoke to a large
crowd in Bu. 102 on "The
first decade of Communism in
China", as part of UBC's Far
East Week program.
He stressed the improved
economy^ of China under the
Communists. "We always
have the impression that
China is a land of famine", he
said. "This is confined to certain northern provinces.
China is close to self-sufficiency in food."
"The Chinese have been
forced by economic circumstances to experiment with
almost any edible food. Any
shortage is accounted for by
great economic needs."
"A new and larger geological
survey shows that China must
rate among countries rich in
mineral resources. China is
self-sufficient in most minerals, and her coal production
is only slightly under the
American figure."
"Till last year, emphasis
was on heavy industry, but
the government has not overlooked the possibility of small
and medium scale industry,"
Dr. Ho said.
He spoke briefly on the
social transformation under
the Communists. "Pre-com-
munist China was more family minded than public minded. This has been shattered.
Now the Chinese dedicate
themselves to the state.
Dr. Ho mentioned the new
marriage law which' has-
emancipated Chinese women.
He      criticized     misrepresenta
tion of the results of this law
by some of the Western press,
and said that the social misfits resulting from the change
in status of women are not
as many as appears.
Dr. Ho said that under the
Communists education has
come closer to realizing the
Confucian goal of equal education for all than it ever
had before.
He ■ said that the Chinese
revolution was one of the
most significant results of
World War Two, and must be
placed along side the Russian
and French revolutions.
"Since 1949, the United
States has refused to recognize the importance of the
Chinese Revolution, although
the late Mr. Dulles, super-
president of the United States,
was convinced the Chinese
Communists were firmly entrenched", said Dr. Ho. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January ]?,, 1961
THE UB YSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the-University year
in Vancouver l>y the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
■University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Aini-i A!ate:   M>cierv of the  University of B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
i sports ), 14 (Editor-in-Chief), 15, 6 (business offices).
| Editor-in-Chief: Fred  Fletcher
..'• Managing Editor Roger McAfee
! News Editor Denis Stanley
i Associate Editors    .    .    . Ian Brown, Ed Lavalle
t Photography Editor Byron Hender
f Senior Editor Ann  Pickard
i ■ ' Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Critics Editor Dave Bromige
! CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
j Layout:  Clarence  Buhr,  John Bonenfant
REPORTERS   AND   DESK:   Susanne   Clarke   (Assistsnt
News     Editor);     Dick     Arkley,     Keith    Bradbury
Christine   Chester,   Nick   Gilbert,   Diane   Greenall,
Judy Lewis. Sharon McKinnon, and Ruth Robertson.
TECHNICAL:    Engraving,   Fred   Jones';   Files,    Sharon
■ Rodney.	
New blood
UBC has spawned a vox populi.
The New Blood on Council group has had a public meeting and has produced a 15-point platform.
Many of the points  on the platform are  salutary,  and
; should be considered by any student government. Others are
not so obviously beneficial. We would agree with pressing
. for the removal of sales tax on text books, for a special car-
. fare rate for UBC students, for the abolition of compulsory
physical education.
There are other planks in the NBC platform which are a
- little more dubious. A boycott on Food Services would be un-
.likjely to produce an improvement in the food. Better food
■ means higher prices. It's as simple as that. We who are al-
- ready having two-thirds of our education subsidized should
think twice before asking for more direct concessions.
Is the bookstore making a profit? So what—the administration has to get its funds from somewhere and a non-profit
bookstore might very well mean higher fees.
The reduction of the AMS fee by $10 is a salutary aim.
■r But, lower fees mean fewer services; or, if it is done by ceasing to use student money for constructing student buildings,
it means two things:: A) that students will have a long wait for
extra-curricular facilities; B) that students, who seem to regard themselves as a privileged class, will once again have
•. tiieir hands out for money for what many taxpayers rightfully consider to be frill facilities.
The NBC has both good and bad planks in its platform,
as do most such groups. Students will have to pass judgment
on them, each for (himself.
But there is a bigger issue. The basic question is: Should
we have this form of party politics in an AMS election. There
is a possibility of wild promises and massive campaigns.
On the other hand, we may go on as in past, voting in
. what are essentially popularity contests, with few people
knowing the real qualifications of the candidates and few can-
■ didates having  real  platforms.
These are the alternatives. The choice is yours.
A first for The Ubyssey
By JACK ORNSTEIN
A fragment carbon—dated at 3000 years (old) has been
discovered by a Ubyssey columnist, Jack Omstein, as he
searched for a pure specimen of hemoglobin for his pet bat
in the wiKis of Transylvania. The fragment has been idiotically translated by I. Dunno who claimed that it could change
-the course of history (the past). We offer it here for the first
.time. Its title is IBID.
"My essay may well be the most frequently reffererl-to
In history — not only because of my theory about who killed
Cock Robin but also because of the short title (Ibid). What I
have created is the theory of . . . •
Here the fragment ends. What is amazing about this long-
sought-for document is that it HAS BEEN the most frequently referred-to-work in history. Yet it was discovered only last
week!
We phoned the world famous psychiatrist, Dr. Unowho
of the Shock Clinic at Metro Goldwyn Mayer who explained
this phenomenal document.
"People have known about Ibid because deep in the unconscious is the id which is connected to the super-ego which
is connected to the backbone. There are two b's in 'backbone'
and none in 'honey'. H-enc&'tlhe theory is in the subconscious
because the b's won't give us honey and because ..."
Dr. Unowho was unable to finish his explanation because
he was due for a shock treatment. The Ubyssey has sent, at
great exnense, a contingent of Buster's tow trucks to the
wilds of Transylvania to tow back the rest of the document.
Donations to senr! them further down can be sent to Dracula
Ltd., Two Holes Transylvania.
John
chal-
Letters To
The Editor
Wrong Question
The Editor,
Ubyssey
Dear Sir,
The   trouble   with
Kekes,    in  his   atheistic
lenge to God and religions, is
that he is seeking a religious
answer to a philosophical question. But as Bishop Stephen
Neill recently reminded us,
you cannot obtain a religious
answer unless you ask a religious question.
Of course John Kekes is
quite justified in asking how
it is posible to conceive of a
God, both benevolent and omnipotent, who allows suffering of the innocent. This is a
philosophical problem which
has been discused by men of
all ages, and nowhere more
cogently than in the Book of
Job.
Christians certainly do not
claim to have a determinative
answer. On the other hand,
Christians do claim that suffering can be a vehicle for
positive action and for good.
Through suffering and love,
we believe, can be achieved
the reconciliation of man to
man, and-the world to God.
Chrisitans believe that it is
necessary to begin this work
of reconciliation by involving
ourselves in the world, and
in every aspect of its life and
of its suffering. We do not believe in a God who sits above
us, oblivious to our cries, and
who is powerless or unwilling
to hear us.
Our God became man, and
lived our life to the full, suffering with us unto death, that
all men everywhere might be
reconciled   to   Him.   Our   faith
EXAM MARKS TO BE CUT 10%
A HOAX . .  .er, do you happen o have a stomach
old  boy?
On   Raven
pump.
Editor turns critic
forms human beings into real
men, strong and free. A purely
transcendental God would
have no relevance to our
earthly   lives.
Nor do we seek to bring in
the kingdom of God only on
the far side of death, but
rather in the centre of life,
in all its manifestations. "Our
joy is hidden in suffering, our
life in death", says Dietrich
Bonhoeffer in his "Letters
from Prison". When he was
about to be executed by the
Gestapo for his confession of
faith and his refusal to compromise, Bonhoeffer went on
to say:
"During the last year I have
come to appreciate the world-
liness of Christianity as never
before. The Christian man is
not a 'homo religiosus', but a
man, pure and simple, just as
Jesus was man. It is only by
living completely in this world
that one comes to believe . . .
This is what I mean by world-
liness — taking life in one's
stride, with all its duties and
problems, sucesses and failures, its experiences and helplessness. It is in such a life
that we throw ourselves utterly into the arms of God and
participate in His suffering in
the world and watch with
Christ in Gethsemane  .  .  ."
God is weak and powerless
in the world, and that is exactly the way, the only way,
in which he can be with us
and help us. Matthew 8:17
makes it crystal clear that it
is not by his omnipotence that
Christ helps us. but by his
weakness and suffering," ,
By  FRED  FLETCHER
Raven number nine is a welcome surprose.
The difference between this year's little book .edited by
David Bromiges and Raven number eight is remarkable.
The first thing to catch a newspaperman's eye is the typography. Last year's effort was experimental, so experimental
that it was awkward, clumsy, without pattern.
The present volume is clean, easy to read. It has a professional air about it, without being stereotyped or unimaginative.
The cover design is masterful. The title page tells us that credit
and our hope is in this loving    for this must go to on Chris Bergthorson. Well done   sir
and redeeming God who trans- THa „„ , ,. ,.   .... '
The same (essential) difference is evident in the literary content. It has a professional air. The writers seem to be masters
of the words they use, and not mastered by them.
The poetry is simple and meaningful. We understand it,
feel it. It is not confusing as was last year's hodge-podge of words.
The prose is competent and interesting. We are treated to
another of the reminiscence-of-youth pieces by George Bowering
—a form that seems to be a great favorite of his. His examination of the concept of death is sensitive and revealing.
To Michael Sinclair's undoubted competence with words
is added a depth of feeling beyond that which we had believed
him capable of. In our opinion, The Keep is a first class short
story.
An In Between Time, by Barrie Hale, is too much the usual
story that one reads in an undergraduate literary magazine. The
aimlessness and feeling of the emptiness of society is all too common a theme. We have been told enough of the situation. Writers
should offer some solutions or remain silent. ,
Another of Michael Matthews' rabid ravings is also foisted
upon the unsuspecting reader. In Portrait of the Artist as a Mad
Dog, Matthews spews for th his usual wordy absurdity, this time
in a not so absurd plea for someone to cut off the fertility that
is creating such a proliferation of creativity. We sincerely wish
that Mr. Matthews could see fit to take his own advice.
He carries over his undoubted talent as a ham from the stage
to the printed page, spreading across the pages of Raven nine
a phantasmagoria of unnecessary and obscure words that send
the average reader scurrying for his dictionary (should he have
the tenacity to desire to understand Mr. Matthews ravings). He
apparently forgets that the essence of art, and indeed all writing,
is communication.
But all in all, the little book is well worth fifty cents. The
writing is provocative and interesting, if not brilliant (although
Mr. Matthews has the temerity to call the members of his group
"artists"), and the whole things has an air of competence about it.
The first year student would be well advised to invest fifty
cents. The reviews of English 100 novels are both competent and
interesting.
But, all this is mertly one man's opinion — and this man
makes no claim to literary expertise. Your best bet would be to Thursday, January   12,   1961
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Going to college
soon too expensive
The  Easterner
Eastern Washington  College,  Cheney,  Wash.
How much does a college
education cost? For a great
many qualified young people
the answer soon may be too
much.
In the past five years the
cost of college has gone up
33 per cent. It is likely that
it will increase another 33
per cent in the next five
years. If this trend continues
some education authorities
predict that by 1970 a four-
year education in a public
college will cost an average of
$10,000.
At the present time the-
average cost of one year of
college is almost 1/3 of the
average family income.
The cost of college is not
the only "expense" to the
student. He is also out the
money he would have earned
had he worked at a full-time
job instead of going to college.
Assuming that ordinarily
he would have earned a minimum of $1,000, college is costing him $4,500. Therefore,
upon the completion of college, the student's earnings
for those four years are almost $20,000 less than what
they would have been had he
worked instead of going to
college.
*  *  *
But don't let this discourage you. According to the
U.S. census bureau, the average college graduate will earn
about $100,000 more over a
lifetime than the average high
school graduate. Consequently, the cost of college can be
looked at in terms of a good
monetary investment.
Apparently many people
are looking at is just this way.
In 1900, 4 per cent of the
18-21 age group were enrolled
in college; ast year 40 per
cent of the group were enrolled.
What are these people do
ing now to meet the cost of
college? What can they do in
the future?
For the student from the
average income family there
are four basic ways of paying for his college education:
• He "works his way
through."
• He gets a loan.
• He gets a scholarship.
• He has a good pre-college
savings plan.
Working his way through
now seems to be the primary
method.
If a person is unable to
find work this necessitates
application for a loan. It has
been estimated that during
the current academic year
roughly $75,000,000 will be
loaned to students, counting
amounts coming from the federal program, state programs,
various foundation programs
and the colleges' own loan
programs.
For the student who must
provide for his college education, numerous scholarships
are available. Various scholarships range from $50 at
small colleges to $2,800 at
some larger colleges or universities. However, many of
the most needy students don't
qualify for scholarships.
Finally, there are several
plans by which a young person and his parents can save
a portion or all of his college
funds by the time he completes high school. Among
them are insurance and investment programs.
In the final analysis, the
student's education funds, in
the face of skyrocketing college costs, will probably come
from a combination of these
. sources.
In any case, paying for a
college education in the
future, if not now, is going to
be a long term project.
University education
the government's baby
The Ontarion
OAC, OVC, and MacDonald Institute, Guelph, Ont.
Higher education — who
should pay?
Yes, a question that has
been thrown around an awful
lot; that has been a political
football; that has been the victim of many pens but a question that we think deserves serious consideration by people
who are in a position to answer it; and action.
We realize that financial aid
is being provided for higher-
e ducation. Our campus is fortunate in this respect, but not
in a unique position as is evident from the costs at some
of the Western Universities.
When the number o± 18 to
21 year olds is expected to
increase by almost 50 percent
between 1960 and 1970; when
the cost of obtaining higher
education is expected to rise;
when the need for educated
people has never been so
great, should there not be
more assistance in this field?
We don't endorse free higher
education for all, but do maintain that not enough is being
done by those who are in a
COLLEGE
COMMENT
Editel by Keith Bradbury
Learn now pay later
—is it the answer?
it
portion to rectify this condition. We feel that the greater
part of the responsibiliy lies
with the government.
Canadian
scholarships
laughable
The  Silhouette
McMaster   University
Hamilton, Ont.
An Oxford student who recently visited McMaster described the number and
amount of scholarships and
bursaries in Canada as
"laughable."
It is apparent that federal
and provincial governments
have failed to recognize the
principle that higher education is not only a privilege
which the student must work
for, but also a right which he
deserves if he is suited.
Yet they defend their policy in the field of higher education merely because of
scanty    financial    resources.
There are intelligent people
in Canada, thousands of them,
who do not reach their fullest
intellectual capabilities simply because they don't happen
to have been born into rich
enough families. Every student on this campus knows the
financial struggle some people
must endure in their search
for higher education.
As a remedy for this situation, the National Federation
of Canadian University Students, to which every McMaster student belongs by virtue
of having paid his tuition fees,
has proposed a plan to provide bursaries and scholarships for university students.
The NFCUS proposal, which
calls for 10,000 scholarships
and buraries of $600 each, is
not a suddenly conceived and
arbitrary formula.
Political prognostic a t o r s
point to a general federal
election in the spring, and if
enough public interest can be
aroused in the real plight of
university students, political
parties will adopt the proposal, perhaps in a modified
form, as part of their program. If they know that this
can gain them votes, they will
do it.
University Jazz Society
presents
THE QUARTET
of bassist — composer
CHARLES AAINGUS
"The most controversial musician in contemporary jazz"
Friday, Jan.   13 — Noon — Auditorium
The Loyola News
Loyola College, Monreal, Que.
There is, it would seem, a
premium on education in this
country, or perhaps, more
accurately, on this continent.
The sure way to acquire recognition of one's nobility, is
to talk about financial support for students. This is prominent in two areas. The first
is industry, and this is industry's business.
Government support of
education is based on the
assumption, as yet unproven,
that the more education a
society has, the mOre satisfactory that society is.
*  *  *
We can place all college
and university students in
two categories. Those who
want to pursue university
studies and those who do not.
It is also becoming increasingly obvious that those who
don't want to attend college
and attend, succeed in doing
nothing but wasting a minimum of four years of their
life.
There are two Insidious aspects to government supported education. The first is that
if society is going to invest in
education, it has a right to
demand-what society requires
and it seems that there is
nothing more fatal to univer-
become
sities than that  they
Training Schools.
The other aspect is that,
like it or not, every citizen
in this country is forced to
put people through college,
who either don't want to go,
should not be going, or, and
this is the most ironical part
of all, if they should be going,
are satisfying their own desire for development or a
bright future, and any benefit
society derives is incidental.
* * *
But there are students who
require assistance: Indeed
there are, probably the majority of students. But the assistance they require is cash now.
Students are called upon to
lay out anywhere between
$1,000 and $2,000 annually,
at a time when their earning
capacity is less than any employed member of society, regardless of education.
What there is a real need
for is some kind of loan
system that will let students
pay for their education, and
there is no reason why they
should not pay, when they
acquire some earning power.
College could probably be
completed in three years if
summers were available, and
if education could be completed on a have it now, pay
later plan, summers could
easily be made available.
Tk SWetdt well equipped
tW medicine...
MEMBERS 25c
NON-MEMBERS  50c
The student well equipped to treat
himself against the chill of Penury
builds up his-resistance by making
regular deposits in a B of M
Savings Account.
op
I
Bank of Montreal
(frutadcfo "pinat S<uc6 fan Student*
Your Campus branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KERRY, MANAGER Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, Jai
The Ubyssey: always the I
Sports
Genial Mike Hunter is boss
of The Ubyssey's active Sports
department. Mike is doing a
first-rate job this year in bringing mirth and merriment to
The Ubyssey's Sports Pages via
his   column,   For   the   'Birds.
Mike is also known as the
Mad Punster . . . prepared to
pain you with a pun whenever
you fall into his clutches.
A prerequisite to becoming a
sports reporter is a minimum
knowledge of the English language, complete memorization
of Mother Gooses' "Rules of
Games" and a, facility to dodge
the irate coaches and players
who are never satisfied with
any story printed.
Critics
Campus music, art, drama
and literary lovers can feel
secure that they are ably represented on The Ubyssey by
Critics Editor Dave Bromige.
Dave produces a weekly
two-page spread titled "Criticism and Reviews" through
which the opinions and intellect of that penumbral group of
campus intellectuals, future
literary and theatre greats and
Bohemian types are expressed.
Any similarity between the
Critics page and English 100 is
purely coincidental.
CUP
Editor in charge of Canadian
University Press material is
affable Bob "Wolf" Hendrickson, who also dubs as The
Ubyssey's postman.
Bob gleams other university
papers for material that would
be of interest to students on
this campus. Cream of this
material appears in a plagiarized form in Bob's regular column "CUP Capers".
Bob is always on the look
out for French students willing
to tackle the job of translating
the newspapers of Quebec
Universities.
Bob is discussing a controversial subject with Associate
Editor Ian Brown.
Photography
The Ubyssey would lose
much of its appeal were it not
for the efforts of Photography
Editor Byron Hender and his
happy staff of shutterbugs.
Campus camera enthusiasts
find a great chance to exercise
their talents on The Ubyssey
staff ^because the paper features as many as ten pictures
per issue.
Many more are taken before
Eagle-eye Hender is satisfied.
Without their editor, are
shown a group of photographers admiring one of their
latest creations .From left to
right, Barry Joe, Bill Ayles-
worth, Don Hume, George
Fielder.
Page photos are by Byron
Hender and Adrian Tanner.
Ubyssey:
a Tale of
Production
A visitor so unlucky as to
find himself in the environs
of the North Brock Basement
on a Monday, Wednesday, or
Thursday afternoon would
attach little credulity to the
statement that at that time a
newspaper is, in effect, being
produced.
The visitor -might be surprised to find, upon further investigation, that out of the
chaos and madness which
seems to characterize the pub
office, an organized plan is
being- put into effect. For The
Ubyssey is the most disorganized organization on campus.
At the beginning of the noon
hour, reporters are given
assignments and special departments prepare their offerings for tomorrows news-
hungry or indifferent students,
mostly indifferent.
The average reporter slogs
to the various campus meetings he or she has been assigned to, and depending on-
the nature of the event or
activity, sits in painful boredom, acute interest, or indifference for the full noon-hour.
STAFF BUSY
At the office, other staff
are busy re-writing news releases and the layout department is placing the ads on
their respective page-positions.
(Campus pundits infer that
this is done in an alcoholic
atmosphere but this is rumour
and should be disregarded.)
At some desk our visitor
may over hear an editor futiley
arguing that the Campus Pet
Lovers Association is not newsworthy enough to justify a
two page feature.
Reporters return and write
their stories; they are edited
and usually rewritten. No one
can guarantee the happless
news hack that his story will
even appear in the paper.
Deadlines for photography
and news approach and a
flurry of activity begins about
one minute before.
LAST MINUTE ACTIVITY
Last minute re-writes and
changes are fitted in and the
paper leaves for the printers.
Important stories and last
minute items, forgotten or lost,
are worked on at the office.
At 5:30 the Lay-out people
go down to the offices of College Printers, on twelfth Ave.
A sumptuous .90c meal is exchanged at the White Spot for
Ross   Craigie's   signature.
The lay-out staff must stay
at the printers until late at
night, ironing out unforseen
mistakes, correcting galley
proofs, and a host of other
minor items.
The staff must be prepared
at any moment to pull the
front page, should any news
story break out while they are
down at the printers. If this
occurs, it is quite possible they
are there for an all-night
stand.
Usually, the staff leaves at
about one o'clock.
Next morning the paper is
printed, and is ready for distribution at about 11:30.
Edited by:
The Ubyssey has been
readers for a feature desigi
how The Ubyssey is produc
"How Pubsters Play," ■
a fact well known by all, es
how do pubsters work?"
In answer to this plea
commemorating   those   w'ho
your newspaper. If there is
are laying it on a little thic
Editor
Boss-in-chief Fred (Fea:
been reproduced above, is tl
Notice the angelic expressio
strong, determined, faithful,
sion his countenance imparl
Needless to say, this pid
Boss-in-Chief of The Ubysse,
Actually, if you could si
nize (aim. The late and long
publicity hounds, low (75%
Ladies' Aid teas, CCF'ers, C"
made him a hardened journa.
He hates people  who  <
cream spilled on his desk, F
in his orange juice, ivory fan
As far as we know, all he
Martagii
You have undoubtedly i
Roger MacAfee, Managing E
Roger is the Editor-in-C
It is his duty to see that
is as technically perfect as ]
The Managing Editor is i
staff recruitment^ and moral
Most important function
ordinate the activities of the i is, 1?61
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LAVALLE
ged by many thousands of
show in picture and story
Gertrude Snork, Ed I, "Is
ly by those of my sex, but,
this fine two-page spread,
c  so  Valiantly   to   produce
poinion that, perhaps, we
.1, please excuse.
on campus
Policy and
Aims Given
By Editor
News
Fletcher, whose image has
ter figure of The Ubyssey.
cool, calm confidence, the
iming, considerate impres-
as taken before he became
now, you wouldn't recog-
the ceaseless prodding of
cs, the endless number of
inks, and Sun scoops have
nake  deadlines,  puns,   ice
ads, missed stories, vodka
nd radar traps.
5 The Ubyssey.
A
Editor
Simon Legree, now meet
right hand man.
>er comes out on time and
ible fpr office supervision,
means parties).
Managing* Editor is to co-
departments .of ..the. paper.
What are the aims of The
Ubyssey?
The Ubyssey has one basic
aim, namely, to serve its publishers— the students of this
university.
This can be done in three
basic ways. First, by keeping them informed on what is
going to happen, what has happened, and what is happening
on the campus and in student
affairs nationally and internationally.
Second, by serving as a
sounding board for campus
opinion. This means presenting ail sides of all questions.
We attempt to do this by soliciting opinion to some extent,
but mainly by adhering to a
policy of printing as many letters and contributed articles
as space permits.
WEIGHTED OPINION
Letters are chosen in an attempt to represent approximately the weight of opinion
received. It is unfortuately impossible to print all letters,
so we try to select the best
letter representing each point
of view on a question.
In order to present- stimulating views, Ubyssey columnists are free to say what they
like with very few exceptions.
They are not forced to toe any
editorial policy line.
The Editor himself reserves
the right to express his own
opinions in editorials. He feels
that it is his duty to speak out
strongly on points at issue.
A third task is to entertain
the readers. This we attempt
to do by making informative
and stimulating material interesting, by reporting humorous and entertaining svents, by
printing strictly humorous
material and cartoons.
SUCCESS VARIES
We don't always succeed in
our attempts to entertain, but
it must be remembered that
budding Eric Nicols, and Len
Norrises do not wander in
every   day.
Two more things should be
stresed. First of all, The Ubyssey itself has no axes to grind.
We attempt to give complete
and unbiased coverage to all
important events. Unfortuately, because the Ubyssey is a
volunteer organization, the operation is not perfectly efficient.
Certain bias creeps into all
newspapers. This is unavoidable. But we are making a sincere attempt to keep our news
pages free from bias of any
kind.
On our editorial pages, we
reserve the right to print our
opinions as we see fit. We have
complete control of the editorial policy of The Ubysey
and we will fight to retain it.
We recognize no one's right
to censor The Ubyssey before
publication. We are responsible
only to the Student Council,
as the duly elected representatives of the student body.
This is our pledge to you :we
will be free and we will inform
you and protect your freedoms
in every way we can.
Backbone of The Ubyssey is
the News Department, presided over by fun-loving Denis
'Burpie" Stanley.
Denis has the difficult job of
sifting through the many
scheduled and unscheduled
events and activities which
occur on campus and, establishing a priority for these
items.
The job is a thankless one
because it is impossible to satisfy everyone.
Denis' staff of able reporters
do much of the footwork for
the paper, mud-slogging across
campus to find and report the
events of to-day.
Layout
Ann Pickard, Senior Editor,
is responsible for the layout
and make-up of the paper. Her
capable staff of lay-out people
spend many frustrating hours
putting stories, ads, and other
material in their respective
page positions.
A lay-out editor spends
twelve to fourteen hours before the paper comes out next
day. At 12:30 the lay-out editor
begins to place ads and what
story material is on hand.
The lay-out department continues to work throughout the
afternoon and at about five
o'clock, they go to the printers
where they often stay until
three o'clock in the morning.
Engraving
Fred Jones, is The Ubyssey's
chief photo engraver. Besides
engraving the bulk of the
paper's photo work, Fred takes
care of the photo and cut files.
The strange machine Fred is
concentrating on is the Ubyssey's new photo engraving
machine, the Scan-A-Graver.
This machine allows the
paper to do its own engraving.
Besides the elasticity this
gives the paper in its photo
deadlines, the engraving machine saves the students at least
a thousand dollars a year in
engraving   costs.
Printers
Near finished, The Ubyssey
is sent down to College Printers, where, under the capable
hands of printers like Jim Mil-
liken and Don Bliss, The Gem
that will be tomorrow's Ubyssey is put to bed.
Senior   Editor   and    lay-out
staff  keep  a  late night  vigil;
proof reading and ironing out   *
the     last     minute     problems
which always crop up.
The Ubyssey, a tabloid, has
a daily circulation of eight
thousand. Every one of these
is hungrily snapped up by inquisitive students.
MfUHH Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 12, 1961
Duggan  optimistic,
60's belong to Africa
I960 was the African Year, and the next decade promises
to be Africa's also,  said William Duggan, American Consul
General to Tanganyika, inhis noon hour speech to the UN
Club, Tuesday.
There are now 26 independent
nations in Africa, 25 of them in
the U.N. A few years ago there
were only four. Reaching nationhood is much of their problem.
Mr. Duggsn said, "There were
four basic policies prevalent in
Africa:
1. Dedication to the fact of
self  determination.
2. Concurrent desire for economic   independence.
3. The prime, deepset need for
education.
4. A great demand for higher
social standards.
He stressed that these young
nations were greatly in need of
our help. United States recognizes their importance, and have
a large staff of workers "in 20
embassies, 10 consulate generals,
and 12 consulates, he said.
"Aid is being given to Africa
in the way of loans, technical
knowledge, and by encouragement of commercial ventures,"
he said.
"In the province of Tanganyika there are a thousand missionaries who carry out half the
educational work and a third of
the medical work."
GRADUATES IN ARTS AND SCIENCE,
PHARMACY, AGRICULTURE,
COMMERCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION
THE UPJOHN COMPANY OF CANADA, a rapidly expanding
ethical pharmaceutical manufacturer offers:
• A challenging, stimulating career in technical sales
• Excellent opportunity for advancement
• A position that rewards individual achievement
• A well established company in a stable industry
• Excellent retirement and fringe benefits
• Expenses—automobile furnished
• Excellent salaried position
Our representative will visit your campus on
TUESDAY, JANUARY 17th
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18th
Student Placement Office  -   HM 7
For additional information please read our brochure, "A JOB
WITH A FUTURE," and "CANADA CAREERS DIRECTORY
— 1961" obtainable from your placement officer.
Biq. ba&h at
(fhUtiwack
~\\ From page one
NFCUS scholarships
Flash! All pubsters are requested to investigate the reported Ubyssey excursion to
Chilliwack this Saturday. Official buses to the UBC Thunder-
bird-Montana State game will
leave the Bookstore at 6 p.m.
Saturday evening and will return after the game.
Pubsters are requested to
check Pub bulletin board for
details.
in the NFCUS committee, report
on the student and academic life
when he returns to his home
University.
A brief outline of the Plan is
this: The Universities across
Canada are geographically distinguished into four regions.
Every University which sponsors the Plan sends two undergraduates for one year to a
University in another region.
The   applicants   are   asked  to
give three choices in order of
preference.
All applications are screened
by a committee comprised of the
Registrar, NFCUS Chairman,
and the Student Council President, who "cnoose the two applications whom they consider will
best .represent  their  University
The forms or Uiese delegates
are then sent to the NFCUS
clearing house, which attempts
to send every delegate to the
University of his choice.
MEN'S UMBRELLAS
LADIES' UMBRELLAS
AUTOMATIC $5.95
STANDARD $3.95
(NEW STOCK) $3.95
New shipment of UBC Melton Cloth Jackets — $16.25
FULL SIZES IN FACULTY SWEATERS
Arts, Aggie, Forestry, Education
ALL FACULTY PINS AND JEWELLERY
jaTiBjjljiJajjmmmimtmmmmmmmtmmmWmmmmm^mmmWmm
ROYAL   CANADIAN   NAVT
OFFICERS
will be here
to interview and  counsel  students
interested in a sponsored education
and a career as an officer in the RCN
on 26th and 27th January, 1961
at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
IN THE UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
Make an appointment for an interview through
your University Placement Officer at:
THE PERSONEL OFFICE
or UNTD Office, Armouries
Today at Noon—
MARDI GRAS PEP MEET
See the King Candidates skits and the Mardi
Gras Queens parade. Your only chance to vote
for your King candidate.
Come out and support the
Children's Foundation with the
purchase of a Raffle Ticket
thi MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette Thursday, January  12,   1961
THE      UBYSSEY
Page
Lineup of events
for Far East week
Summer in Sweden for three siudenis
Lectures and movies spark the |
remainder of Far East Week j
during noon hours. |
The program is as follows:
Thursday: A Japanese award
winning   film   entitled   'Ugitsu
Monagatari",  will  be  shown  in
Bu. 100.
Friday: Mr. B. C. Binning
speaks in Bu. 102 on "Architecture and Gardens of Japan."
Far East Night will close the
week in International House
with gala exhibitions and displays. Foods from China and
Japan will be sold throughout
th evening.
Patrons for the Week are Dr.
N. A. MacKenzie, Dean Soward,
Dean Chant, M. Kripri (Pres.
International House Assn.), Mr.
M Tanabe (Japanese Consul) and
Dr. Che (Chinese Consul).
For your dancing pleasure
ERIC MUIR
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Phone YU 7-1257
WRITER'S SERVICE
Let us sell your story, article,
book,  TV, songs  and  poems.
1065 East 17th Ave..
TR   6-6362
open   Evenings
Wind-up Friday
Aggie Week winds up this
Friday with the Farmer's Frolic in the Armoury, hard time
or western dress, 9 p.m. to
1 a.m.
Half-time entertainment will
be provided by the Trinidad
Primitif daneers who will perform the limbo dance.
A cigaret Rolling contest between the Aggies, Council, the
Engineers and Foresters will also be featured.
Dan Romanuk and the Tumble weeds will provide the music.
A coat check and concession
will be provided. Admission to
the Frolic is $2.50 a couple.
Today the Aggies are selling
barbecue chicken, chips and
milk at 50c a plate, at noon, outside  the Armoury.
Deadline for applications to
the WUSC Summer Seminar to
be held in Sweden this year, is
Feb.  6.
A local selection committee
will choose three UBC students
to join 37 other Canadian students in the six week session of
discussion and observation. The
theme for the Seminar will be,
"The Well-Being of the State
and the Individual."
Applicants must be returning
to UBC for another year of
study, and will be selected on
the basis of academic ability and
Need a Haircut
or a New Look?
the answer
will  be  YES  when
you see our
"french flair"
Visit  or Call  CA  4-1231
Zsa-Zsa's
Beauty Salon
4395   W.  10th
VOLKSWAGEN   OWNERS!
We have over 250 satisfied V-W owners patronizing our
station. Qualified V-W mechanics make expert repairs and
service a specialty.
Why not give us a try!
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
10th Ave & Discovery CA 4-0828
FREE  PICK  UP AND  DELIVERY
The California Standard
Company
Calgary, Alberta
offering  careers  in
Petroleum Exploration in Canada
will conduct campus interviews on
January 16 and 17
FOR POST GRADUATES, GRADUATES AND
UNDERGRADUATES IN:
Geological Engineering Permanent and  Summer
(Options 1, 2 and 3)
Honours Geology Permanent and Summer
Physics and Geology Permanent and  Summer
Candidates   will   also    be   considered    for   employment    in
operating geophysics in Canada with Chevron Oil Company
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS MAY BE MADE
THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, HUT M-7
WANTED
A tutor in Eng. 200 for two
UBC students. Phone CY
8-5452 or RE 3-0205.
willingness to impart what was
received at the Seminar upon return to Canada.
Details and application forms
can be obtained at the WUSC
office, 257 Br0ck Extension.
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
PARTY?
You can't be the first so why
not be the second?
Nothing we like better than
a   party—especially   yours.
We specialize in fraternity
and sorority functions. Give
us a try—we give great entertainment too!
MU 3-6015
1208 DAVIE ST.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try  our  daily  special.
Open 'till 11:30
4544 W. 10th
DEAN'S
Dependable Repair
Service
and
Shoes of Quality
are
a   specialty
at
Sasamat Shoes
4463 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-1017
REQUIRES:
Engineers and Scientists of B.Sc, and Ph. D.
training for Research, Development, Production, Exploration.
Senior Undergraduates in certain Engineering and Honours Science courses for summer assignments in laboatoies and plant der
velopmet goups.
Interviews With Representatives On
February 6, 7 and 8
Your University Placement Office can provide details
and literature about Cominco and arrange an interview.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND
SMELTING COMPANY OF CANADA
TRAIN FOR TOMORROW
serve your way through university
You can become an Officer in the
Canadian Army, and complete your
education with financial assistance
by enrolling in the tri-service
Regular Officer Training Plan.
Your tuition and
university fees will be paid
You will receive an annual
grant for books and
instruments
You will receive a monthly
income
• You will receive allowances
for board and room
• You will receive free
medical and dental care
and, best of all, you will be
beginning an interesting
and adventurous career as
an officer in Canada's
modern Army.
Call your University Suppott
Officer today or write to:
•   Directorate of Manning  ■
| Army Headquarters |
Ottawa i
.!■*?...?■-«■ .'." ,...f.Jt*..       ..X-^.v;,'  ,..Wh,.- ...imm-.J".    '
Pbge 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 12, 1961
Tween Classes
Mingus Quartet,
music Jazzsoc style
JAZZ SOC
-Concert Friday noon, Auditorium, Charles Mingus Quartet.
Members 25c, n0n members 50c.
* *  *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Valid Faith by Mr. John Williams. Bu. 106, Friday noon.
* *  *
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Lecture by Dr. Brown in Bu.
225, Monday noon.
* *  *
CCF CLUB
General meeting to discuss
policy for Model Parliament.
Noon today in Bu. 205.
* *  *
HAMSOC
Code and Theory class in Bit.
315 Friday noon.
* *  *
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Friday 13m meeting cancelled. Meeting Tuesday no0n in
Bu. 104. Discussion "Current
Problems in Psychology" by
Prof. Belyea and Dr. Read.
* *  *
SOCIETY OF
BACTERIOLOGY
Meeting Friday. Discussion on
Open House, noon Westbrook.
* *  *
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
Important meeting of all Uk
rainian Students in Bu. 216 Friday. ""■'--..   -
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
General monthly meeting Friday neon in Bu. 224.
* *  *
HIGH SCHOOL CONFERENCE
Meeting  Friday  noon  in  Bu.
;21.
* *  *
PHRATERERS
Voting today in Phi Room
10:30 to 4:30.
Contest for
shutter bugs
Canadian university students
who enjoy photographing campus scenes will have the chance
of turning their hobby into recognition and cash.
Cash prizes totalling $800
have been donated by John La-
batt Ltd. for the best pictures
both in color or in black and
white. Entry forms and completed applications must be placed
in the NFCUS office BE 258, before the 15th of January.
Winning photographs will be
displayed in Universities across
Canada during a tour which will
continue until the fall of 1961.
Gala show for
Far East night
Far East Night at International House will feature demonstrations, exhibitions, floor shows,
and exotic food, Friday from
3:30 Jo 11 pvm.
"Floor 'Show attractions include Japanese Folk Dancing, a
Chinese Male Choir, Chinese
lion dance, Japanese Traditional
Sword Fighting, and a classical
Chinese orchestra.
Japanese flower arranging,
calligraphy ana Chinese painting will be demonstrated during
the evening.
There will be a photography
exhibit, "Student Life in Japan," a Chinese art and lino display, a. book exhibit, and a Japanese art display.
Chinese and Japanese girls in
traditional costume will serve
tea. Admission is: students 25c,
others 50c. Exotic foods of Japan and China will be sold
throughout the evening.
TEVIE'S PLACE
PRENTICE LIVE SOUNDS VIA LOS UNIVERSITARIOS
Sunday Night 9-12
Opposite Spanish Banks on Marine Drive
COME AND ENJOY GOOD FOOD AND MUSIC
Sunday, January 8 at 8:30 P.M.
Actors Theatre Presents The Delightful French Comedy
"THE SHEEP HAS FIVE LEGS"
Starring  FERNANDEL
Tickets for Sunday performances at H. Kaye Books,
750 Robson
Tickets $1.00 each, Students 75c
or admission by appropriate donation at the door.
THE CAMBIE ART THEATRE — 635 W. Broadway
IV2 blocks west of Cambie
CLEARANCE
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SHOES
SAVE $2.00 TO $5.00 A PAIR
FLAT, SQUASH, QUEEN ANN,  ILLUSION  AND  HIGH  HEELS
SUEDE  OR  LEATHER
Not all sizes in each lines
"RUBBER RAIN BOOT"
Zipper and fur trim, black or white
Reg. $8,98, Sate——-  ._,—
$597
CAMPUS SHOES
4442 W. 10th
CA 4-2833
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 19:
5 or
More
ea.
This year add humor to your Mardi Gras
-^r Congratulations to URC on the Broadway Theme
__ Celebration
We are featuring  items at prices from  here to there . •  .
• Guys    and    Dolls—Bowler • Porgy   &   Bess—Make   up,
Hats, Long Eyelashes, Bon-     etc . . .
nets ... • Annie Get Your Gun—Cap
• My Fair Lady—Jazz  Gar-      guns . . .
ters„ Eyelashes, Long Cig- • Desert    Song — Snowflake
arette holders ... tablets   . .
• The King & I—Bald Head,
Wigs, Grant Diamond Rings
Dozens of Horror Masks & Nice People Too!
KRAK-A-JOKE SHOP
872 GRANVILLE STREET
Open  til Midnite
Ph. MU. 4-4738
Next door to
Orpheum Theatre
WE PA Y YOU TO TRAIN
FOR A CAREER IN
RETAIL MANAGEMENT!
HERE'S WHAT ZELLER'S OFFERS YOU:
Interesting Work
Management Training
Programme
Good  Starting Salary
• Merit  Increases
• Promotion from within
the Organization
• Liberal  Benefits
Visit your Director of Personnel Services for Information and
to arrange a Personal Interview with the Company Representative on January 31st,  1961.
80 Stores
Across   Canada
ZELLER'S
RETAILERS    TO    THRIFTY    CANADIANS
Stores in:
Vancouver
Burnabv
Whalley
New
Westminster
FROM UNIVERSITY
TO INDUSTRY
WITH
t
CANADA
Representatives of our Company will be conducting employment interviews on the campus January 18th, 19th and 20th and will be glad to discuss
with you our 1961 requirements for regular and summer employment.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT
We have a number of attractive openings in process, development, maintenance, design and methods engineering, sales and technical service, export,
economics, statistics, finance and control, and in analytical chemistry, for
graduate and postgraduate students in chemical, mechanical and other
engineering couirses, chemistry, science,' arts, commerce, economics and.
statistics. Applications are invited also from women graduating in engineering, honours chemistry, statistics and commerce.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
As Assistants to Process, Development and Design Engineers and for
vacation relief in production, accounting and the chemical labororatories.
Applications for employment are invited from male students in the courses
and years listed below.
Class of
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
CHEMISTRY (HONOURS OR MAJOR)
COMMERCE OR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Application forms, details of actual openings and interview appointments
can be obtained through Colonel J. F. McLean, Director of Personel Service.
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
Personnel Division
P.O. Box 660
Montreal, P.Q.
1962
1963
1964
X
X
X
.   x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
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