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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1961

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 Birds
vs.
Huskies
THE USYSSEY
Stadium
noon
today
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9,  1961
No. 22
—Photo  by  Barry   Joe
ANTI BOMB-BANNERS parade in front of Brock Hall Wednesday in protest against nuclear disarmament club's "Disarmament Week," being held on campus this week. They carried
banner claiming "Chamberlain also negotiated/ 'and a small
.bomb.
Scott hits student
union philosophy
Says   payed   director
"endangers   autonomy"
- LATE FLASH -
Two Russian students refused visas to attend war
seminar. Late story headlined on page 3.
Council
withdraws
"invitation
Student Treasurer Malcolm Scott said the student union
proposals put forward by the AMS president could bring student autonomy to an end.
/J
Football grads in
final appearance
Frank Gnup holds fall congregation today for the biggest graduating class in UBC football history.
The   Thunderbirds   meet   the
University     of     Saskatchewan
Huskies at   12:45  today   at   the
Stadium in the last home foot-
"ball game of the season:
Barring an east-west college
football final, which may yet
come about, the ganie will be the
last in Thunderbird'uniforms for
12 players.
Many of them have formed
the core of coach Grup's varsity
teams for the past three or four
years.
Making their final appearance
are.
• Tom Andrews, a former
Junior Big Four all-star and
UBC's top pass catcher this year,
despite the fact he's played only
two of eight games.
•'Jim Beck, last year's most
valuable, lineman, and team co-
captafti,. playing his fifth year
with itlffe 'team.
'•vjlay''' Bianco, a fourth-year
veteran who captained last
year's team, and won the most
valuable backfielder and most
inspirational player awards.
• Peter Black, a second-year
man, and this year's leading
rusher.
• Byron Kemp, a versatile
guard wno Joined the team this
year, after seasons at College of
Pacific and Oregon State.
\0': Stan Knight, last year's
starting quarterback and a defensive standout, playing his
third year with the team.
• Dave Lee, another third-
year veteran playing his first
full season at halfback after two
years in the defensive backfield.
• Bruce McCallum, an all-
round standout who made the
Evergreen Conference all-star
team two years ago.
• Gordon Olafson, a fourth-
year nalfback, and president of
the Kg Block Club this year.
• Arnie Smith, Birds' second-
{Conlinued on page  8)
So* FOOTBALL GRADS
By GEORGE E. RAILTON
Student council Monday night
re-affirmed its confidence in
student court judge Fred
Fletcher.
The council unanimously re-
cinded a motion passed one
week earlier "inviting" Fletcher
to resign his position and passed
another motion affirming their
faith in him.
After a student court ruling
on the recent council direction
to the Ubyssey to print certain
stories, Fletcher, news editor
for the Ubyssey, sat as judge on
lhe court which mled the council's action 1116?   .
The councf in "inviting"
Fletcher to resign said it was
doing so because councillors felt
"the concept of impartiality has
been violated in recent student
court activity."
The motion did not say
Fletcher was guilty of violating
the concept.
Law undergraduate society
president Chas. McLean, who
proposed the motion, said it was
not intended as a personal
attack on Fletcher but against
the principle of having partial
judges sitting on the court.
McLean said the original motion served its purpose and
brought the matter to the attention of all concerned.
He said in a five-page memo
issued to councillors: "We would
create within our own structure
the dry rot that would collapse
our autonoumous student government."
Student President Alan Cornwall proposed:
• The union building be built
for the whole campus community.
• Students run and operate
food services and other service
facilities.
• The hiring: of a student
union director,  j :.■■.■"
• We Jplan for a > complete
building "then- determine what
facilities present funds will
supply.
"HEALTHY   CONFLICT"
Scott said both students and
faculty gain in the present
"healthy conflict" between the
students and the administration*
but that the battle would- become "bitter and meaningless as
student autonomy will have disappeared under the gently settling heel'of the Union Director."
The treasurer disagreed that
students could not, as Cornwall
stated, direct their activity program.
Scott said the program presented by Cornwall is little
more than we now have "except
that it is to be more 'encompassing' and 'practical'."
"Paid staff should not be hired
to direct, to plan or to advise,
but merely as facilitating personnel — i.e. to do clerical and
detailed work,"  he  said.
Scott said we should develop a
philosophy of our own based on
the needs and traditions of our
campus and not try to copy
piecemeal the philosophies or
practices of other campuses.       .
Scott recommended the re*
jection of the Association of College Union philosophy and the
hiring of a competent building
planner who would "assess our
present need, inform himself of
our traditions and in consultation with us plan a facility to
suit our needs."
CONTROL QUERIED
Scott also rejected the concept
that students should control
their- own services within the
building. He-said food services
and the book store were already
in the hands of the university
and they were providing funds
for facilities in the new building.
Scott said the original aim
embodied in last spring's referendum was the construction of
an $800,000 student union building.
He said this is now felt, by
some te ^-^tb^^irsi: stage of a
S3 million Structure. He said
that such a plan was not even a.
firm hypothesis.   We have   not
See   Cornwall   proposal
page 2
yet established a need for such
a facility, and the students had
been informed by the university
that we could not borrow $3
million in one lump, if at all,
he said.
"To talk of an overall project
of $3 million or better is premature, and to talk of hiring a
director for the direction and
planning of the first and succeeding stages is folly, if for no
other reason than that we cannot   guarantee   to   build  these
further stages," Scott said.
 r
Prof Baker complains
Footballs and shrubs go flying
By  MIKE   GRENBY
Footballer, spare that
shrub!
This is  the  plea  issued by
student   discipline   committee
chairman   Eric   Ricker   to   students who play football near
shrubs on the Buchanan lawns.
English professor Ron
Baker began efforts to stop
the ball rolling when he delivered one large, detached
shrub to Ricker's office Monday.
He attached a note demanding some actkm to stop the
shrub-breaking.
"It seems to me to be completely inconsiderate of the
students to play around the
planted areas," Baker charged.
If   students   aren't   respon-
ERIC RICKER
BEATING AROUND BUSH
sible enough to keep their
football game away from the
ornamental shrubbery, student council will have to get
them to move, he said.
"Still, it does point up the
need for playing fields,"
Baker  added.
"Actually, I'm sympathetic
towards the students," said
Ricker on hearing the charge.
"It's unfortunate that the
university hasn't seen fit to
provide places for the students to toss a ball around.
"However,    I    don't    think ..
they   should    be   playing   on .
that   particular   area  around
the  shrubs," he said.
Ricker said that he had
written to Buildings and
Grounds requesting that
"Keep Off signs be erected. Fdge 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9, 1961
With  few  variations
By  Alan  Cornwall
Foil
ow
Following-- is the Meond
and final part of a report by
Student President, Alan
Cornwall, chairman of the
UBC Student Union building
committee.
We urge you to read and
comment on the statements
and concepts in it. A lot of
your money will be'spent on
a new student union building
on the. campus.-—Editor
Possibly the best way to
gain an understanding of what
a Union concept entails, is to
quote the Association of College Unions' preamble to all
literature dealing with campus
unions, and from there take
examples of applied variations
, of the ACU concept.
The preamble is as follows:
• The union is the community centre of the college, for
all the. members of the college
family — students, faculty, administration, alumni and
guests. It is not just a building; it is also an organization
and a program. Together they
; represent   a    well - considered-
■ plan for the community life of
the college,
• As the "living room" or
the "hearthstone" of the college, the union provides for
the services, conveniences, and
amenities the members of the
college family need in their
daily life on the campus and
.for getting to know and understand one another through in-
iormal association outside the
classroom.
• The  union  is part of  the
; reducational   program   of   the
college.
College centre
"As the- centre of college
community life, it serves as a
laboratory of citizenship, training students in social responsibility and for leadership in
our democracy.
"Through its various boards,
committees, and staff, it provides- a cultural, soeial, and
recreational program, aiming
to make free time activity a
co-operative factor with study
in education.
"In. all its processes it encourages self-directed activity,
giving" "maximwBft opportunity,
for self-realization and for
-growth in individual social
competency and group effectiveness.   Its   goal    is  the   de
velopment of persons as well
as intellects.
• The union serves as a
unifying force in the life of the
college, cultivating enduring
regard for and loyalty to the
college.
Of those Universities encountered during the UBC delegation's tour of student union
facilities, all were members of
the ACU. But the interesting
part and the most obvious observation was the fact that
every student union,. while
fundamentally the same, followed a different pattern in
operation, served different
needs and adhered to different
policies. This is because no two
campuses have exactly the same
problems, nor do they alleviate their problems in exactly
the same manner. Therefore,
we must realize that one cannot transplant a philosophy
which serves one situation,
onto another campus because
of these differences.
Typical philosophy
The majority o£ campuses
visited by a UBC delegation
last summer followed a typical
ACU philosophy—that is: the
Student Union Director and
his staff are employed and
paid by the University Administration. In some cases the
name "Student Union" was a
misnomer. The facility was
more of a "Campus Community
Centre" encompassing all parts
of the university family—the
faculty, staff, students, alumni,
and sometimes surrounding
residences. Pullman (Washington State College) was a good
example! of this. In this particular union, conferences are
held, hotel facilities are provided, and everyone is encouraged to use the facility—for a
price.
Other campuses followed a
varied ACU concept. Salt Lake
City encourages any group or
organization that is affiliated
with the university to use their
Union facilities—with the provision that student usage of
facilities maintains too priority.
The policy boards of the
above listed unions are conceived separately from student
government, and owe no responsibility   to  it.   The boards
THE  UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Mfi&SBEB: CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in
Vancouver-. by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editarial
(ipinians »xjiress^ Bre those of the Editor of The Ubyssey and not
tidSCessarUy   those-  of   the Alma   Mater  Society  or   the   University   of  H.il.
TELEPHONES: CA 4:3242, locals 12 (hews desk),
14 (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee
Managing  Editor Denis Stanley
Associate   Editor    ........       Ann   Pickard .
News Editor Fred Fl*teher
City Editor Keith Bradbary
CUP Editor       Bob Hendrickson
Photography Editor Don Hume
Senior Editor             Sharon Rodney
Sports Editor     .   Mike Hunter
Photography Manager              Byron. Header
Critics Edtitor David Br&mige
STAFF THIS ISSUE:
LAYOUT: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS:  George Railton, Mike Grenby, Pat Hchv
robin, Sharon McKinnon, Marjorie Gow, Joy Holding. M4ke Horsey.
TECHNICAL: Maureen Covell, Brenda Van Snellenberg.
Alan   Cornwall
are responsible in some cases
to the president cf the university or college or through the
director to the president.
Although no major conflict between the union boards and
student government was represented to us, in these cases
it was quite apparent that
student government had
neither the autonomy nor the
control over student affairs as
in our situation.
Only in three instances did
we encounter a student government set-up similar to ours.
At Berkeley, the Associated
Students (the Student Council)
ran the whole show including
the new $5.3 million Student
,, Union. Idaho State College
(Pocatello) and University of
Alberta (Edmonton) were the
other examples of a more complete student autonomy.
Variations   possible
It should be pointed out that
all these universities and colleges are members of ACU and
that many variations are possible within its structure.
Basically, we would agree with
the concept as outlined in the
quoted preamble to ACU literature. We recommend, however, that the UBC .union be a
"Student Union" which encourages through its programs,
active participation of faculty,
and alumni in the activities it
promotes. We- recommend that
outside organizations and campus affiliated groups not be
encouraged to use the union
facilities.
If we are to move into the
Student Union field, and hope
to initiate and administer a
successful union program, the
question of a director must be
considered.
The tour .delegation noted
that, on most campuses there is
no fine: division betweerf the
planned events of a union program and the activities of student government. In some instances, student government
took a back seat when it came
to activities. With the Union
Board and Student Council
both planning events,., coordination was needed. This
was accomplished, by having
the . elected ■ Activities Vice-
President sit on the Union
Board. Elected Student Activities . co-ordinators were ■ virtually noa-exlstent with the
exception of U. of Alberta. .
One   can   only   realize   the
need for paid staff to  admin-
concept
ister the union policy, when
one fully understands what a
union program entails. We
earnestly believe that a properly orientated union program
can make a substantial contribution to the cultural, recreational and educational aims of
the University. To quote a
thesis entitled, "The Essentials
of an Activities-Union Program
with emphasis on its Educational Implications," by (Miss)
Beryl Roberts of the Wilson
Compton Union at Pullman:
Greater   challenge
"One of the greatest challenges confronting education
today is that of enabling the
student to develop to his own
fullest capacity the art of understanding human relationships. This is, indeed, a large
order, but likewise the problems of human relationships
with which the graduate must
cope are of no mean magnitude. What a student gets out
of College is meaisured only in
very small by his degree and
what it symbolizes, but ultimately by his ability to take
his place in Society with credit
to himself, to his family, and
to his institution."
The    term     "activities,"    or  •
student   activities,   refers   primarily   to   those   extra   class
activities—the more organized
group experiences— on which .
many i college   students spend
much of their leisure. In general, activities include student  ''■■
clubs and organizations such as   :
academic   honoraries, . depart-
mental ctybs, and student government .boards   and  committees,  as   jvell  as  interest   and
hobby    gpups.    Traditionally,
activities ire a part of the college program  whether  or not
there is a Union on the campus.
The    term    "Union"   is  certainly   not   new  on a  college
campus but the underlying concept is often not e'ear. The Union movement,   though   dating
back as far as 1815, when the
organization    known    as    the
Cambridge Union was founded,
has- seen  within the  last  two
decades a rapid rise in the construction   of   Union buildings.
Many of these have been elaborate structures and the building trend on college and university campuses is continuing
upward.
the Union concept as is seen on
most American campuses. But
it should be noted that the Student Union in the U.S. is an
offspring of one of the first
student unions in North America—Hart House at University of Toronto. Although
there were other student
union-type facilities at eastern
U.S. colleges before Hart
House—this was the first major
step towards the contemporary
union of today.
It is our feeling that the time
is ripe for us to step into that
part of the union concept that
will best benefit our present
and future students, and provide further opportunity for
them to develop themselves
socially, intellectually, and cul-
tually through a student union
program.
It is our belief that paid
personnel must be employed.
Speaking in practical terms, .
the program may encompass
anything from art exhibits to .
jaaz concerts, classical music to
modern dance, or from poetry
to arts and crafts..It is up to
us, the students, to determine
what we feel will help to develop ourselves and others, but -
it is impractical to suppose
that students alone could set
up and administer such a program. This is where student-
employed staffing comes into
being.
Stand  in awe
The tendency for everyone—
students, faculty, alumni, and
the public alike—is to stand in
awe of a beautiful new structure and to be unaware, or
momentarily forgetful, of the
purpose for which it was built.
A College Union, however, is
far more than a building. It is
"an educational program designed to provide the students
with personal, social and cultural development; practice in
leadership and management;
and fullest enjoyment of leisure
activities. Its program also includes hospitality and recreational services for students,
staff, and faculty, and facilities
for alumni, friends, parents,
and visitors. It is a 'living
room' at the centre of the
campus, a laboratory in human
relations, in democratic action
and in living."
We do not advocate throwing    ourselves    headlong   into
No threat
■ h     There   is  no   threat created
to   student  autonomy  by   the
employ of a union director, if
he is employed in the manner
:(in   which   the    students   prescribe.   There   is every  advan-
: tage   in  having   such a  man,
[providing   he   is   qualified to
administer   the   business  of   a
union    and    orientated    to    a
union's objectives
He can supply continuity
and advice based on experience, two essentials in the
operation of a student union.
Experience is the lacking
factor for us at the present
time, and constitutes our
major problem in planning our
student union. Providing he is
employed by the students and
responsible to them he can be
a great aily in the fight to
maintain student autonomy
and help to carve a firmer
footing for students in the administrating and planning of
the uniyersity.
SUMMARY AND
RESOLUTION
Let it be known that vfe
advocate extending our activities into the student union
field, as conceived in the basic
philosophy by the Association
of College Unions, with stipulations and variations in the
program, organization, and administration such that they
best alleviate the needs of
firstly the students, and secondly, the other components
of  the  university   community.
Let it be known that we
advocate the employ of an
Executive Director for the
student union, to carry out and
administer the Dolicies as set
by the students through the
Student Council and to aid in
the cultural, and intellectual
development and recreational
enjoyment of the students in
years to come. Thursday, November 9, 1961
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  3
IDEAS
at large,
—NIGHTMARE^
By PAT HORROBIN
Ubyssey siaff writer
If we were Jack Scott, we'd
start this column like this: We
had the craziest nightmare the
other night.
We dreamed, it almost seemed,
that we were listening to a
news broadcast. It was five minutes of chop-sueyed news that
started out reporting a women's
league's suggestion that a mticli
travelled cabinet minister be
supplied with a chauffeur or a
"- helicopter for humane reasons
and ended up confirming that a
Mr. Manson and a Mr. Bennett,
having had vendettas with
everyone else in the province,
were finally getting around to
having one with each other.
We dreamed that1 sandwiched
in between these stories was an
unemphasized, innocuous 40-
word account of actions in the
American senate.
A  senator  (from Texas)  had
said that the U.S.A. was  in no
-^ particular   problems   After   all,
there was no reason it couldn't
have a ,50-megaton bomb too.
* *     *
The- announcer' shifted the
pitch of his voice slightly and
began another news fragment.
"It was announced today that
less than two percent of fresh-
'*■' men who enter the University
of British Columbia following
the successful writing of August suplementals . . ."
Our mind reeled back to that
short report from the Land of
the Brave and   the Free.
Did the senator from Texas
signal from his desk for the
speaker's attention, rise and
with simple triumph in his
voice remind the representatives that if all- they were
worried about was that Russia
happened to have a big bomb,
there was no problem? "Well,
« we can have one, too," did he
eay? Did he solve it all
humbly?
- "The Conservative party," the
announcer's voice went on relentlessly, we dreamed, "is encouraging constituents to wire
their    Social   Credit   MLA's   to
-v leave the' party, because of the
methods used to take over the
BCE. The only riding not being
canvassed is Kelowna South...:"
Did the senator from Texas
afterwards go down into  the
small, murky pressroom under
the    gallery   and   rumble   to
reporters,  "And  if these  United  States  of   America can't
afford one or two, Texas will
donate   a couple.  Har,   Har!"
"Traces bf radiation are rising
all over the globe, Canada's representative    announced   in   the
United   Nations   today,   calling
for . . ." it seemed we heard the
newsman say.
And did a senator from Texas
take the helm?
* *     *
If we were Jack Scott, we'd
end it off like this: Oh, we had
the craziest nightmare the
other night, alright.
The only trouble was, what
we actually did was turn over,
flick off the ten o'clock news
and stay awake till four.
Claim visas blocked
miss seminar
OTTAWA (CUP)—Two Soviet
students expected to attend the
Sir George Williams seminar on
"The Causes of War" failed to
turn ' up las-., week, but their
absence made more of an impression than if they had appeared.
A telegram was received by
the seminar committee of the
Montreal university from the
rtudent council of the USSR
Nov. 4, which charged that the
representatives couldn't attend
because visas were "delayed and
refused."
CABLE
• A cabled message also said,
"Student council of the USSR
voicing indignation of Soviet
students considers this act of
Canadian authorities who prevented us from participating in
seminar as unfriendly and dictated by cold war policy."
' A spokesman- for the Setfhinar
was quoted as saying it was the
fault of the Canadian government that the students Had hot
been able to come tb the meeting. Faculty advisor Prof. C
Nish termed the situation "disgusting."
Daniel Coates, student president said at the conclusion of
the ^seminar, "It seems the Russians were prevented from
attending the seminar and we
want to know why. I have telephoned the Department of Im-^
migration and they have promised an investigation."
NOT FACTUAL
The Department of Immigra*.
tion informed Canadian University Press Tuesday that the Soviet charges were not factual and
issued a memorandum which
showed the Soviets had changed
one of their delegates just two
weeks prior to the opening of
the conference.
A department spokesman said
that processing of visas normally
takes two to three weeks, de-.
pending on the circumstances.
The memorandum prepared by
deputy minister On Nov. 6 said
the first notice that the students
would be attending the Sir George seminar was Oct.  10
Applications had been filed
with the Canadian embassy in
Moscow on behalf of the students. They were described as
"postgraduates of Moscow University."
The applications also said that
the conference was under the
sponsorship of the University of
Montreal,  and did hot mention
Sir George Williams University.
The spokesman further informed CUP that on Oct. 19
word was received from Moscow
that there was a change in delegates and that a journalist of
"Pravda" would replace one of
the students.   -
Clearance for the visa was
issued to the original applicant
on Oct. 30, 20 davs after the
first notification of the application was received by the immigration department.
LACK OF TIME
The immigration memorandum- added "The< application
submitted on Oct. 18 in Moscow
on behalf of Pankin, the
"Pravda" journalist, was not refused but the time between the
receipt of this application in
Ottawa"Oct.' 19 a"nd the date set
for the; opening' of the conference Nov. 1 simply did'not allow
sufficient time for the processing
of this application."
The memorandum concluded
by saying: "It may be noted
that the-ages of the three persons     for     whom    applications
were submitted were 30, 29, and
30 respectively. None of the applicants in their applications
were described as students; two
were described as "graduates"
and the other as a 'journalist of
Pravda."
These facts raised legitimate
questions as to whether the applications were bona fide student applications. Further delay
and confusion resulted from the
fact that the applicants in all
cases stated that they Were destined to a conference Under the
auspices of the University of
Montreal.
Moot court Friday
The ' Annual International
Moot Court ivill go into session at 7 p.m. Friday in the
Law Library. . ■   .
Two University of Washington law students will argue
a prepared ease against two
members of the UBC third
year class, Rolf Weddigen and
Frank Iacobucci. There will be
a dinner at 5:30 and A dance
at 9 p.m. in Brock Hall.
Campus Barber
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00
Saturday   8:30   -   12:00
LOCATED IN
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body blinked, hi fact, when
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Las Vegas really as wrld at
they say? Read "How Wicked
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Yard Goods, McCall  Patterns
Sewing Supplies
Open Friday 'til 9
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Winning entries selected by independent judging
panel—cased on skill, sincerity, aptness of thought
and neatness. Decision of judges is tinal. All entries
and contents thereof become the exclusive property
of Benson & Hedges, who reserve the right to make
whatever use they may wish of the entries submitted
to this cfontest. I\o entries will be returned, nor any
correspondence entered into with contestants, other
than the winner. First prize is an Alpine car (no cash
equivalent). Winner's name available on request—
Send self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Entries limited to residents of Canada. Employess of
Benson & Hedyes, its agencies, Rootes Motors and
its dealers—and their families are not eligible.
Entries must be nostmarked not later than midnight,
December 9th, 1961.
Each entry must be accompanied by an Alpine package top (or reasonable facsimile).
Mail your entry to: Alpine Contest, c/o your favorite
radio station (listed above).
Vancouver
C-FUN
CKNW
CHQM
CKWX
CKLG
CJOR
Victoria
CJVt
CKDA
Nanaimo
CHUB
Chilliwack
CHWK
Kamloops—
CFJC
Nelson
CKtN
Trail
CJAT
J 1
1
I
I
i
I
I
1
1
REACH    FOR   THE
PEAK . . .
SMOKE ALPINE   _
USE  THIS  HANDY  ENTRY  FORM
I
i
ijggptjBijiS;.
attraction power
t
with a sports coal from
The Cavalier Shoppe
3573 W. 41st Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
KINEO *
Thursday, No
By PETER MORRIS
*THE MOVIE - "TWO WOMEN"*
Viewing TWO WOMEN (directed by Vilorio de Sica, Italy
I960) at. the Studio this week gives cause for reflection on the
tenuous nature of the factor that makes an artist 'great'. At one
time Vitterio de Sica was at the forefront of the post-war Italian
neo-realistic film movement. His films, UMBERTO D and
BICYCLE THIEF, evidence truths about the human condition with
a film form and structure so deceptively simple that it almost
defies analysis. They are amongst the greatest masterpieces of the
cinema. But somewhere between UMBERTO D and TWO WOMEN
de Sica has lost that intangible factor that once raised him to
exalted ranks.
LACKING SCRIPT
TBe script for TWO WOMEN in adapted from an Alberto
Moravia novel by CeSare Zavattini who was de Sica's writer for
BICYCLE THIEF. It has all the surface effects of neo-realism with
none of the sincerity of approach and sensitivity that typified de
Sica's earlier films, and can best be described (to collar an ancient
pun) as a piece of ham on wry. Set in the Italy of 1943 the story
concerns a youngRomanwidow, Cisera, and her thirteen year old
daughter Rosetta. At the height of the bombing they leave Rome
to seek the shelter of Cisera's native village where they become
just two more anonymous cogs scrabbling for survival in the,
'general chaos. After various happenings intended to show the
ietateol society and becoming ambroiled with an idealistic Communist, Ifficheli. they start their return to liberated Rome. Taking
refuge one night in a deserted church they are discovered and
raped by a group of lubriciously prancing Moroccan soldiers. This
experience separates Rosetta from her mother and only the news
of the death Ol Micheli reunites :them in a common tragedy,
TERSE DUBBING
The version presented al the Studio is dubbed which doesn't
help one's appreciation of the film. There are the usual terse, unnatural phrasings spoken with voices that are. an infinity away
from the actor's emotions. We even hear a German officer who
occassionally lapses into an Irish accent!
The texture of the opening scenes is admirable. A deceptively
simple style without elaborate ca^fa trickery • effectively conveys the fact that the story we are about to see is a microcosm,
All the cinematic subtleties that are used are totally predigested
in the conceptions of the scenes. Cisera's love scene with Giovanni
is certainly the most effective in the film. Subtle camera movements and lighting combine with Sophia Loren's acting to convey,
in cinematic terms, the Cisera's emotional conflict. At the end of
the scene we know and understand the complex woman.
LACK OF REALITY
Unfortunately, after the departure of fhe women from Rome
de Siea loses grasp with his material and the film slowly lapses into
melodrama. The characters introduced are without tangible roots
in reality. The role played by Jean-Paul Behnondo, a Dostoevskian
intellectual returned to peasant life in long muffler and steel rimmed spectacles never becomes integrated into the film at all. Some
of the peasant talk also strikes false notes being polemical rather
than naturalistic. The camera trickery in the rape scene is jarring
and reduces rather than enhances the emotional impact of the
scene. The closing scene is disappointingly sententious, for in TWO
WOMEN de Sica's usual effect of leaving his characters in their
moment of truth is shattered by the prolonged finality of the backtracking shot which announces all too heavily, 'closing tableau'.
REDEEMING QUALITIES
There are some redeeming features. The photography by
Pogany is generally good and avoids the Italian preference for
'flat' photography.. The sound-track, in the neo-realistic tradition,
makes the best use of natural sounds to aid the emotional effects,
Music is used-sparingly and only towards the end of the film degenerates: into .eonvential 'ear-battering' in the climaxes. It is
obviQHS that-de Sica realised the limitations of his visuals at these
points and; needed the assistance of 'dramatic' music.
The high jMSinl of the film, however,, is the superb acting of
Sophia Loren as Cisera. It is so brilliant that I suspect the whole
film was intended as a vehicle for her talents. Despite the generally poor direction she incarnates her part, suspicious, ebullient,
invincible but vulnerable, with unfailing skill. Her triumphant
beauty and herios grit overrides the rest and is so reviving that
one forgives the hollowness of the film that surrounds her.
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CONCERT
TODAY - 12:30 Auditorium
25C
STUDENT EDWARD APT'S latest sculpture, which stands near
the Men's Residences.
too much
Cc
SO  SI
That time of year arxi
last Wednesday for the D
COSSACK CHORUS A
DANCERS to make their
most inevitable annual visi
Vancouver. On this occas
it was the UBC Auditon
which received them. Th
probably those loyal admii
who come each year to h
and cheer this much travel!
largely Americanized gr<
but in recent years at It
the Don Cossack's have beos
an almost tiresome inelusior
the Vancouver musical seas
To begin with, they br
back almost exactly the sa
program each year with
same collection of serious ;
humorous songs, its same re
ine dances. This in itself wo
not be so bad if the singers i
dancers demonstrated entl
iasm for their program and f
sented it refreshingly. But si
is not the case. One observes
looking at the performers i
in listening to them a pervas
attitude of — let's go throi
the same thing again.
An exercise in control
dynamics. Lord Have Met
opened Wednesday's progrs
The two words of the title, H
poli   pomilui,   were   repea
From an excellent book
called PORNOGRAPHY AND
THE LAW, by Drs. Eberhard
and Phyllis Kronhausen (Ballentine Books), comes this
rhyme:
"ODE TO THE FOUR-LETTER
WORD"
(Anonymous)
Oh perish the use of the
four-letter words
Whose meanings are never
obscure;
The Angles  and Saxons,
those bawdy old birds.
Were vulgar, obscene and
impure.
But cherish the use of the
weaseling phrase
That never says quite what
you mean.
You had better be known for
your hypocrite ways
Than vulgar, impure and
obscene.
Henry Miller prefers to be
known as vulgar, impure and
obscene. The author of CANCER is relentlessly honest. We
read not only his four-letter
thoughts but also glimpse
starkly into his four-letter
actions. Why not? As he quotes
from Emerson, Miller's intention   is   to   set   down   "among
LITERARY   STUDENTS
ATTENTION
Ag-e ana sickness compels sale
of retired author's professionally
completed manuscripts, including1
all couyiH">it,=. ""al for man or
woman.   TB   6-6362.
what he calls his experience
that which is really his experience." The object is "to record
truth truly," no matter how
vulgar, impure and obscene.
The  book succeeds brilliantly.
Unlike the ethereal sexuality
of LADY CHATTERLY, sex in
CANCER is treated as a mere
fact related to the author's
existence. The lovers in Lawrence's novel, after their initial
meeting, indulge for an intellectual and aesthetic purpose:
they seek love, mystical and
burning, so that their bodies
act as a catalyst towards this
goal. Miller understands sex as
a function of the body, erotic-
TROPIC OF CANCER,
Henry Miller; Grove Press,
Inc. Black Cat Edition.
ally alive, and deserving not
only indulgence, but examination. In a style that is amazingly agile, he describes in
tones of honest vulgarity and
poetic rhapsody all that is
"truth truly," from concert
house to whore house, from the
rising of dawn to the rising of
his friend, Van Norden, as he
indulges in both social and
sexual intercourse. And because neither shame, guilt, nor
restraint, stains the narration,
we are presented with valid
and outrageously comic scenes
Jazz at The Celler
rear of 222 E. Broadway
featuring
the PAUL PERRY QUINTET
with satirist Ken Hodkinson
from   11   p.m. $1.25  only
that invite hearty laughter. I
like our reaction to most A
erican novels that sneakily d>
with the Rabelaisian inciijjp
we need not snicker, blush, r
apologize. Laughter, and p
haps a touch of understandii
is all that Miller expects fr<
his readers.
The worst in the writing
CANCER is no more harm]
than the worst that can
viewed in the cleanest pub
washrooms; but the stylis
best in Miller deserves atti
tion. Miller has a quickness
tongue, so that his words sn
into life, vibrates in the mir
"Suddenly it seems as if t
dawn were coming; it is li
water purling over ice andPt
ice is blue with a rising mi
glaciers sunk in emerald gret
chamois and antelope, gold
groupers, sea-cows mouchi:
along and the amber-jack les
ing over the arctic rim . : ." £
too, he describes with the sar
intensity, and with the saj
rapture, the climax of eve
sexual scene.
Miller is a patron of sex.
is an  aggressive   and   healt!
patronage. Aggressive becau
Miller attempts to be honest
every    sense    of   the   writt
word; healthy, because his al
tude is not without compassi
or  sanity,    perception
humour.  The author's   cry  i
fellow patrons is like a lone
millionaire finding  no kin
Poverty   Road;   Miller,   as  t
outlawed 1934 author, finds
kin   in   North   America:   "\
have   need for strong  hand:
he shouts, "for spirits who a
willing   to   give   up  the  ghc
and put on flesh . . ." Perha]
as a 1961 lauded and censor
author, Henry Miller will fii
readers   who  will  understai
his   call.     Nevertheless,   as
reading   experience,    TROP1
OF  CANCER is a call not
be missed.
—wayne s. choy r 9, 1961
THE      UBYSSEY
:ks  ring  monotonously
t the dons
Page  5
eventy-five times in various
iternating shades of loudness
nd softness. But what should
ave been a smooth if strongly
ccented procession of blend-
d harmonies emerged as a
tiroaty chorus  of near  shout-
.There followed the usual
lore' .or less expected item;
ike Dark Eyes, Song of the
"lea, Kaleenka, and so forth.
iThile there were some enjoy-
fetle inclusions such as Laugh-
19 Polka, those most popularly
eceived often depended on
dded effects such as imitated
oofbeats or embarrassingly
ad- whistling for- their impact.
Ih ihe chorus as. a whole
lere were individuals with
ne voices but there was also
; large stock of deadwood.
/hen forte passages boomed
utin unison, a raggedftess in ,
uality showed up. -cTfte; fahv-'-
us bassos tended to gravel aria
ip-off pitch as did the tenors,
he  Don  Cossacks have  long
been noted for their great volumes of sound and their extended pianissimos. We didn't
hear much of the latter on Wednesday though volume there
was. But a choir cannot depend
on volume alone. There must
be discipline in order to prevent a degeneration into shouting.
Unfortunately the general
impression left by Wednesday's
concert illustrated more of the
Don Cossacks' weaknesses than
of their good points. The memory of the overwhelming Red
Army. Chorus at last Summer's
Vancouver International Festival did not help mitigate this
impression. Certainly much of
the singing was quite entertaining, however. The Lezginka
and Kozatchok dancers were
colorful too: But the overall
stanclajd must have disappoint-
e3{tljb&e Iwhp remember the
Don Cossack Chorus "of some
year past.
—william littler
■X
R
I
T
I
:.7;€-
:.f .';■.
PAGE
EDITOR: DAVE; BROMIGE
Layout! Jones
-from   the   Bi'omige   collection.
HE COUNTRY GIRL, and not the Mental Health Monthly, is
esponsible for this picture, which shows a scene from the
avistock, London production of Odets' play. Country Girl
> currently being  performed  at the Cambie Theatre.
the soon -
seen scene
UBC PLAYERS' PRODUC-
ON of Anouilh's DINNER
ITH THE FAMILY opens
■xt Wednesday at the UBC
iditorium. Directed by Roy
>rnsin.
*     *     *
THE STUDIO is showing
VO WOMEN, which stars
phia Loren in a double role
e.g. quadruple. Vittorio de
za directs.
•k       ic       •&
BOBBY T. has now seen LA
)LCE     VITA      five     times.
Where do you stand?—See it at
the Stanley.       ,
*     *     *
VANCOUVER BOOK FAIR.
Censorship will he the subject
of an unfriendly talk by Pierre
Berton on Wednesday, November 15, at 8:30 in John Oliver
High School. Other functions
of the Book Fair: An Evening
for Ethel Wilson—Miss Wilson
herself, Don Stainsby, Dr. N.
McKenzie, John Gray of Mac-
Millans. Friday, Nov. 10, B.C.
Electric Auditorium.
US
VEGAS:
)S IT TRUE THAT ANYTHING
fiOES? "We've got bar* vice
presidents who come to gamble, people with women
who are not their wives!" So
says a Las' Vegas businessman. Where do they draw the
line? In this week's Post, you'll
read the shocking story—"How
Wicked Is Vegas?"
Thm Saturday Evening
POST
-placeb
mmm
o-
by george bowering
-EARLY POEMS OF ALLEN GINSBERG-
BEFORE    HART   CRANE
died he destroyed the manuscripts of his earliest poems so
that editors could not collect
them together after his death.
Only the few that had found
their way into magazines in
the years around 1918 survive
to fill an appendix- in the Complete Poems. Crane did not
want his ghost to be embarrassed.
ALLEN GINSBERG
should be so conscientious.
Empty Mirror is a collection of
his poems written between
1947 and 1957, some few published in mags, some delved up
from the furthest recesses of
his dufflebag. The collection
will be of interest, of course, to
students of Ginsberg..It will, I
think, be • a source of embarrassment for his fans.. I was
embarrassed.
■■—••»■■—«—immm^mmmm^ilmmimmmmimm.-
EMPTY MIRROR; early
poems by Allen Ginsberg;
Totem Press, 44 pp.; paper
$1.25.
A.G. WorkS with two. kinds
of poems as fair as form i£ concerned — the long • chanting
lines brought to fruition in
HOWL, and short prose lines
mounted in columns down the
page. The short ones- are.the
ones he should have left in the
duff lebag. The only near-saving grace is the rigid economy,
the solid Tightness, of some of
the lines. But they are still
stilted, compared to Howl. The
sense is niqre important than
sound:,arid rhythm,^ Which combined in the big -poem - to celebrate one another :, .-■;'■'"'     ■'■■;■
GINSBERfi WAS IN HIS
early:^twenties when' he wrote
these* poeriis.' "He miist have
been reading Audert-Spender.
Ther6 is the sense of inordinate
knowledgeability, the metaphysical af icion, There is little
of the exploring wonder of
the later poems, little of the
direct enquiry into experience.
TOMCHTTILLNOV.ia
IN  PERSON
JOHN LEE
HOOKER
Riverside Recording Star
BLUES,   FOLK,
RYTHMN  'N  BLUES
All seats two dollars
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
APPLICABLE   EVERY   NIGHT
EXCEPTING   FRIDAY   AND
SATURDAY
Coffee Bowse
726 Seymour St.
Open for Lunches
The young poet knows too
much about life and death; and
interprets rather than celebrates in the avowed Whft-
manesque tradition.
Too often we get the un-
Ginsbergian simile:
"Now mind is clear
as a cloudless sky"
and too often we get the omniscient American Poet looking
down at the whole sad 1935
expanse of the continent, seeing nothing but the economic
shape of the continent.
BUT: SOMETIMES WE GET
the prelude to the consciousness that was to produce Howl,
and we get the proof that poem
was written over the period of
a decade.. (We have already de-
ternune^kthat .the prpejaet was:.
well worth it.) We get a look.
at the rsynibolic objects that
make the later poems the reaj
"long panoramas of visions."
"negroes climbing, around
the rustestf iron by! theii^er,
the bathing pool hidden
. behind the silk factory
fed by its drainage pipes:"
AND: in the 1949 poem,
Paterson, the poet rolls otit the
long all across Artieriea lines
of; self-exposing W'hitman and
of the ften years later greater
visionary Howl: ;j
"I would rather so mad, gone
down the dark road to
Mexico,   heroin  dripping in
my veins ..."
HOWEVER: ALL TAKEN
together, Empty Mirror can do
little to abet the career of
Allen Ginsberg, mainly because it fails to become a song
ofi himself, hence fails to be^
Coine a song of his -country or
his time. It is a historical document, little' else. Robert Duncan says the poet should publish! all his.previously exposed
poems, In'order\to;keep a sort"
'of | developmental perspective.
Ginsberg, we .wish, will not do
it again, or if he has to, will
do it in a limited edition.
KEN HODKINSON, com-
edian, at the Cellar^ Friday and
Saturday night.
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
. '• '■' - Black Suits, Formats,
Costymes, ^Make^p
:     Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.   10th       CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
3rd week
HAND IN HAND
John Gregson
Sybil Thorndike
"Highly   Recommended"
LES   WEDMAN
Vancouver   ;Sun   Movie    Critic
Plus:
FOUR FAMILIES
Comparison of family life in India,
France, Japan and Canada, in
which author-anthropologist Margaret. Mead discusses how the upbringing of a child contributes to
a    distinctive    national    character.
PREVIEW
Every Monday 8:15 p.m.
Students
75c
VARSITY
Show
times     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
7:00-9:25  ]Qfh«t TRIMBLE CA 4-3730 Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9, 1961
Disarmament groups
claimed communist
Charges of Communism
against progressive movements
are quite natural, Nuclear Disarmament Club president Steve
Ranki said Tuesday.
"Red-baiting has always been
a tool against progressive movements," Ranki said. "It's just a
normal reaction."
His comments came after rejection of the Combined Universities Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament by three eastern Canadian universities was announced.
"I am distressed to see that
sort of reaction at this crucial
time," Ranki said.
"I. think . that the cause was
misrepresented by Roussopolos
(CUCND national chairman),"
he said.
- Roussopolps had charged that
a campus poll conducted by the
McGill Daily had asked opinions on policies that were not
those of CUCND.
"The   UBC   Nuclear   Disarmament club is not directly affiliated 'with CUCND but we support their aims," Ranki said.
*     *     *
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
Editdr-in-Chief    of   the   McGill
'52-Sunbeam Talbot 90 Conv.
New Top. Phone after 5 p.m.
AM'1-8041.
NOW
a complete incomplete stock of JAZZ
and FOLK records
available at increased prices from ....
JUST JAZZ
Recordings Ltd.
726  SEYMOUR  ST.
MU 4-6712 VAN., B.C.
SLEEP-LEARNING
ENGLISH
for    information    call
MU  3-8911
Eves:  HE 3-2630
Metropolitan Institute of
Nocturnal  Education  Ltd.
1014—736 Granville  St.v
announcing
FINE ART   PHOTOGRAPHY
KEN       Me ALL I ST ER
4331 West 10th        CA 4-5340
Daily today issued an answer to
the charges laid against her
paper by the chairman of the-
Combined Universities Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.
Miss Judi Zeisler said that the
Daily has no proof of any irregularities nor any reason to question the legality of results of the
poll on nuclear weapons conducted two weeks ago in her
paper. "Mr. Roussopolos (Dim-
itri Roussopolos, national chairman of CUCND) is in the same
position," she asserted, "despite
his accusations of ballot stuffing."
INDIAN TRADE Commissioner
G. P. Mathur speaks noon today in Bu. 100 on "India's
Economic Progress."
POINT GREY
25% REDUCTION
On all Merchandise For
UBC Students
(S*how  Student Card)
4435. W.ltthAve. CA 8-8718
UofT CUCND president quits
TORONTO (CUP)—The campus president of the University of -Toronto branch of CUCND has resigned his post
because CUCND members defeated a motion which would
have expelled U of T Communist leader Danny Goldstick
from the organization.
"I resigned on a matter of personal conscience," said
Howard Adelman. "I could not sit on the executive in
which   one   of the   members supported nuclear   testing."
The resolution, "that the CUCND, Toronto branch,
interprets the policy statement of CUCND as opposing nuclear testing by any nation for whatever reason," would
have made it possible to oust Goldstick from the organization on the grounds of his support of USSR bomb tests.
UPPER
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Where do we do it? At Edmonton. Wehave three plants
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Our raw materials arebas&Cattadianflatural resources:
petroleum by-products from Alberta and cellulose from
the forests of British ColufflrttAi Gar markets are worldwide, and through our affiliates wehave a strong;alliance with companies in the textile, chemical and
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What would you do? As a qualified chemist or engineer
you could be working on product development, research,
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What else should you know about us? Lots more. You
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PETROCHEMICALS Thursday, November 9, 1961
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  7
Little women run show
on campus next week
n*
Women, in pursuit of an
MRS. degree, can be found in
many places on campus other
than the Mildred Brock
Lounge and the various coffee shops.
They play an important
role in the residences, their
undergraduate societies, and
organizations.
* *     *
Women are in a minority at
Acadia Camp.
Thfey like it that way.
There are no rules.
They like that too.
Go to Acadia on Sunday at
dinnertime   and    see   all the
women   in   dresses and  heels
and   all the  men  in  T-shirts
and moccasins.
See the sign on the airraid siren — it wasn't the
women who put it there.
Who needs to be warned
about a panty raid?
The Acadia women are
smart   too.
They   know   when   there's
going to be a panty raid'.
They're tired of raids. The
-4,bo^F   should   think  of   some-.
thing new.
-^j' Go to Acadia and learn
)hotv to concentrate—it takes
'real will-power when you can
4-jbear the pages turning in the
.next room, i
.-■'■   Go   to   Acadia   and   learn
>novy to change electric fuses
r—you learn quickly.
There's lpts to learn at
Acadia.
Go to Acadia for a year.
It hasn't got covered walks
to the dining hall, but its got
atmosphere.
* *     *
v This term the opening of a
previously undeveloped area
on the Lower Mall saw 336
Sweet young things move into
four brand new brick institutions amid a chaos of rubble
and workmen.
The girls; displaying a pioneering spirit, soon overcame
-- the hardships of frontier life
and made overtures to the
360 native males
An "esprit de corps" developed. The men rebelling
against invasion challenged
the girls to a football game
but were soundly defeated.
"Spontaneous demonstrations
soon erupted, welcoming the
Great  Pumpkin and  Nuclear
-FaltoMt;
Thk. Lower;MsJU like its.
$iste| pe^jnanent residence in
FoftCajsp, is becoming eivii-
ized»-..;8Bcfc .will be when the
timnor inconveniences of porter and. late leaves are over'
come.
* *    *
The.two "women'-only" faCr
'illir.
TEMWE#S CBUEfiES
4% Students training to bi
gr teachers often show less
m, academic ability than
other college students. Yet
many of them go on to become licensed teachers. Why
don't teachers colleges crack
down on unfit students? You'll
find out in this week's Post.
ThmSmtmrdmy Earning
POST
ulties on campus, nursing and
home ec, tangle annually in
the "teacup game," sacrificing life and limb to provide
entertainment for the bloodthirsty students.
Women in both these faculties carry on a wide program
of social, athletic ahd academic events. The large dose
of sciences involved in both
courses proves that when it
comes to hard work, these
women can even equal the
engineers.
Women are active in all
undergraduate societies on
campus — with the exception
perhaps of engineering and
forestry. Many of them have
their own organizations, such
as the Women's Physical Education Organization, and the
women's pharmaceutical sorority, Lambda  Kaopa  Sigma.
*•       *       "k
.Women's organizations on
eampus include sororities, Associated Women Students',
Phrateres and Women's Athletics. '
The nine sororities, housed
in the Pan-Hellenic House,
maintain an intensive program of academic, sports,
philanthropic and social
events.
Every woman student on
campus belongs to the Associated Women Students. This
organization serve? as liason
between the Dean of Women's
office and the students, and
co-ordinator for all women's
activities. The AWS Council,
Chaired by president Mimi
Roberts, also sponsors events
of general interest such as
Women's Week, Spring Day,
and the Awards banquet.
For  women's  week
GLEEFUL WOMEN get their
chance to drag unwilling or
otherwise males to the Sadie
Hawkin's Day Dance/ sponsored by AWS, Brock Hall,
9 p.m. Dress is hardtimesancl
prizes will be awarded for
the best costumes. Women
are required to adorn their
men with vegetable corsages.
Tickets will be on sale in
Brock Hall and the AMS offices throughout Women's
Week. ■ '""
perfectly-matching skirts and
sweaters in "Twenty-one" orlon—fully-
fashioned, hand-finished, in many exciting
ew stylesfpr Fall—in many new high-fashion
shades! Above—% sleeve cardigan, with
roll back collar, new Wevenit dyed-to-match
skirt. Sweater, 34-42 ... $1QJ&
skirt 8-20 ... $14.98. At all good shops!
Without this label gififafC *S*l| jt is "ot a genuine Kitten.
Co-eds plan capers
The Fair Sex take over the
campus next week with a wide
program of events of interest
to women students and the
whole stuaent body.
Women's   Week,   sponsored
annually   by   the   Associated
)  Women Students, starts Mon-
'   day  with a  fashion, show  in
Brock Lounge at noon.
0 Tuesday noon, in Buchanan 106, Dr, Cyril Belshaw
will speak on the Canadian
Peace Corp, its history, philosophy, ideals and opportunities
in it for women graduates.
• Student councillors, faculty members and the engineers will participate in the
pep meet in the auditorium,
Wednesday, emceed by Forestry ' undergraduate Society
president Al Sawby. Other
participants include the cheer
leaders, forestry, and international house.
• This year, AWS is lending its support to the annual
Nursing-Home Ec football
game, November 16.
9 Tne climax of the week
is the Sadie Hawkin's Day and
Dance, Friday.
0 Friday, co-eds will be
fulfilling male needs—buying
them coffee, carrying books,
opening doors" etc.
0 Nurses will be doing
backrubs, Freshettes shining
shoes and giving manicures,
and home economists patching
clothes and sewing on buttons,
in Brock Lounge from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
0 Friday evening, the Sadie Hawkins Dance, concludes
Women's Week, and the girls
relinquish the campus to their
male   colleagues.
LADY GODIVA MUGS
18-oz., reg. 4.25 4.00
14-oz., reg. 3.95 3.70
«W-M**iWl»W
i&OTITE MUGS. Ite
mmm mugs. is-m.
, 12-oz. .... 2.25
J0KEMJGS ....„ 1.50
The College Shop
BROCK EXTENSION, 11:30 - 2:30 — MON. T FBI
I
FOR
THAT
SMART
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
JZfrk
Est. 1924
P.esrtibtioH OtWeal
We  use genuine  CORECTAL  tenses
— clear from edge to edge —
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discounts to Students Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 9, 1961
TWEEN CLASSES:
Organization man to be discussed
CIRCLE   K
Dr. J. C. Hewson, speaks on
"The Industrial Psychologist
and the Destiny of the Organization Man." Bu. 2218 Friday
noon.
* *     *
INDIA'S  STUDENT   ASSN.
Trade Commissioner for
India, Mr. G. P. Mathur, will
speak on "India's Economic
Progress," Bu. 100 noon today.
* *     *
VCF
"The Worldliness of God" a
lecture by Dr. John Ross. Friday noon in Bu 106.
* * ' *
NEW DEMOCRATIC  PARTY
Banned W. W. II propoganda
films: "Divide and Conquer",
noon today in Bu. 106. Adm.
25c. *     *     *
RED  CROSS
Meeting in Bu. 227, noon today.
* *     *
SAO.ING  CLUB
Lectures on boat parts, Bu.
203  at noon.
JR.  CHEM.  CLUB
Dr. H. C. Clark speaking on
"Fluorine Chemistry" Friday
noon in Chem. 250.
* *     *
GERMAN   CLUB
"Africa Rally" film of the
3,000. mile motor rally through
Africa. Friday noon in Bu. 204.
*.    *     *
EAST  ASIAN  SOC
Prof. Fujiwara from Ryuko-
ku, University of Japan speaks
on "Buddhism" noon today in
Bu. 202.
* *     *
MORMON YOUTH GROUP
Film: "The Mormon Tabernacle Choir" noon today in Bu.
104.
* *     *
PSYCHOLOGY  CLUB
Film: "Psychiatry in Action"
~Part II noon today Bu. 204
Non-members   10 cents.
* *     *
RIDING CLUB
Finalization of first steps.
Meeting noon today in Bu. 327.
All interested please attend.
* *     *
ALLIANCE   FRANCAIS
Two French films Friday at
noon in Bu. 202. Members free
others, 10 cents.
LAST MINUTE CLUB"
'.    Tickets    available:   for;    San
Pietrb   performance-tonight.
* ~k       -k
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Jazz concert 1-2 in Upper
Lounge,   noon  today.
From  page  1
FOOTBALL GRADS
string quarterback for the past
two years.
• Ray Towers, co-captain, and
standout centre with the Birds
for five years.
• George Turpin, 240-pound
three-year veteran,. this year's
president of the Men's Athletic
Association.
There is a possibility that
three or four of the players will
return next fall for graduate
courses.
UBC CLASSIFIED
WANTED: 10 girls for a "La
Dolce Vita"-type party. Phone
Ken, AM 1-1843 after 6 p.m.
WANTED: Mule student to share
view apt. Own room. $30.00
a month. Near campus. CA
4-0133. Ask for Chris Har-
wood.
WANTED: Ride for staff member from ViCxnity of Hastings
or Broadway and Nanaimo.
before 8:30 a.m. Also return
after 5:00 p.m. Vail Vida at
AL   5-0931   after   6:00.
RIDER WANTED: From vicinity
of 49th and Oak. Phone Bill.
AM 1-1574.
WANTED: A ride from 40th and
Granville for the week of
Nov. 20 - Nov. 24. Please contact AM 1-6266.
.-tIDE WANTED: For 8:30 lectures Mon. to Sat. Vicinity
12th Ave. and Oak St. Phone
RE 3-7007 after 5:30.
aiDER WANTED: West Van car
pool is in need of another
member with access to a car.
Vicinity of Mathers Ave.
Phone WA 2-0453- after 6:30.
LOST: Would the person who
picked up "Don Giovanni"
outside the Campus Cupboard
on Tuesday, kindly return it
to the record library or the
Tost and Found.
FOUND: Cameo ring. Loser
please phone CR 8-1607.
REWARD: For the recovery of
a brown briefcase lost in Lot
"C". Notes especially needed
immediately. Also lib. books.
No questions asked. AM.
1-2060.
SHOULD WE
CEN
son
TV VIOLENCE?
Newton Mlnow of the FCC
says the networks should
clean up shows »r get off
the air. TV bigwigs call this
eensorstiip. is it? Stvoultf
our government blow the
whistle on TV trash? Get the
story in this week's Post.
Th. Saturday Evening
!POST
RELIVE COLLEGE DAYS!
A M. S.
OFFICE
OR
FACULTY
EXECUTIVE
BUY TOTEM NOW

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