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The Ubyssey Oct 11, 1961

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 Athletic
Day
Thursday
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIV.
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1961
No. 11
Construction delayed
More planning
needed—Cornwall
The AMS should plan a complete student union bjujldin|f
before starting construction of the presently propi^H ffrs*
stage, AMS presideri t Alah Cornwall:fefld thel'llst^flbi^
conference Saturday.
—Photo  by  Don  Hume
COME ON YOU CHAPS, get a move on. Classics head Dr. Malcolm McGregor, centre, urges
confederates Dean Geoffrey Andrew, right, and Dr. Dennis Chitty: to greater speed in the
Camp Elphinstone kitchen at the seventh annual leadership conference held over the holiday
weekend. See stories and pictures page 5. *»*j!	
Students   heckle
Communist speaker
By CHRIS FAHRNI
. A Communist speaker was heckled and pelted with lunch
bags by students Friday noon.
Bruce Yorke, office manager
of - the Unite* Fishermen and
Allied Workers Union, was twice
subjected to barrages of lunch
bags and apple cores, as he spoke
on "The Columbia Power Sell-
cut," before about a thousand
students in Brock Lounge.
Yorke was pinch-hitting for
Nigel Morgan, B.C.- Communist
Party leader, who was unable
to attend because of family illness.
PENNY PITCHERS
Throughout the speech pennies rained down on Yorke as
Applications open
for war conference
Two UBC students will be
given the chance to attend an
academic conference on the
causes of war at Sir George Williams University in Montreal
Oct. 31 to Nov. 4.
Written applications should be
in to council vice-president Eric
Kicker today. Applications must
list courses of study, previous
conference experiences and extra curricular activities.
tplicants should be prepared
ppear before a selection
boald Thursday. The delegates
selected will be expected to do
preparatory reading and present
a paper to the conference.
he said B.C. is selling out the
Columbia to finance Peace
power.
Twice a group of students in
the balcony began a count-down
and then bombarded the speaker
with lunch bags, pennies, milk
shake cartons and sugar cubes,
Said Yorke: "When I was a
student the worst thing that
could happen to a person was
that he would be thrown in the
lily pond."
Yelled students: "Let's throw
him in  the lily pondf"
Yorke charged Premier Bennett wants to sell out the Columbia River in order to subsidize
Peace power development. "The
reason he. is stalling present ne>
gotiations is because he want!
downstream benefits in cash, not
in power."
SECOND BEST
"Next to the question of war
and peace, this is the most important question facing the people of this province," he said.
"The Communist Party calls
for three moves: The scrapping
of the Columbia River Treaty,
the forbid ding, of export of
electricity, and the immediate
construction of the Mica Creek
Dam and full implementation of
the Dorr-diversion plan."
STUDENTS TO DEBATE
OVER PACKAGE DEAL
Student council vice-president Eric Ricker will take part
in a debate on the morality
of the "package deal" referendum today in Bu. 100.
Subject oi the debate is:
"Resolved that the package
deal is an improper method of
placing a referendum before
the student body."
Two members of ihe Law
Undergraduate Society will
take the affirmative. Negative
speakers will be Bruce Fraser.
Law 3, and Ricker.
The final building will probably cost between $3 million
and S4 million, Cornwall said,
and financing should be spread
over a period of 20-30 years.
Current financing problems mean
the building will probably have
to be built in three stages, he
said.
PLANNED ELEPHANTS
"If we don't plan ahead to the
final structure we'll be throwing up white elephants like the
Brock extension all over the
campus."
Cornwall told the assembled
leaders they should discuss the
whole program as well as facilities  in  the first stage.
This stage will cost $800,000,
Cornwall said. The administration will provide $250,000 for
food services in the building and
the remaining $550,000 will
come.from student levy.
STORES AND FOOD SPACE
"We should plan for a union
building that will accommodate
a university enrolment of 20,000.
The administration has assured
us there will be 20,000 students
here by 1965 and enrolment will
never be less," Cornwall said.
Cornwall said the new student union building could contain a store to supply most campus needs and profit-making
food service facilities run by the
AMS.
In a discussion later, AMS
treasurer Malcolm Scott said this
would amount to operating a
commercial enterprise which is
against the Societies Act of B.C.
under which the AMS is' constituted.
Tom Hughes, superintendent
of buildings and grounds defended present administration
food services and the bookstore,
stating that charges in excess of
cost were put into expanding the
facilities of both services. He
said an extension to the bookstore is being considered for
next year.
Cornwall said the building design should not go out to. architectural competition because of
the cost involved. After deciding on facilities to be put into
the building a professional consultant could be employed to
plan the functional arrangements, he said.
BOARD NEEDED
Cornwall said the new union
building should be controlled by
a Board of Directors for the society. This board would be directly responsible to the Student
Council.
This would be a policy-making
board for the Union. An executive director would be employed
by Student's Council to run the
Union.
He visualizes the new Unkmas
a building for all members of
the student body. Students would
have priority but alumni and
faculty would be encouraged to
use it. Cornwall warned that it
"should not be available for general public usage.
"If we were to become a self-
sufficient organization we would
bear the cost of maintenance of
this building," he said. "And
food services in the new union
should be run by AMS."
McGregor tells planners
Dont believe AC U literature
Student Council is wasting
time trying to plan the new
Student. Union building from
literature sup plied by the
Associated College Unions
group, a professor chargejl at
leadership, conference Friday.
Dr. M a 1 colm McGregor,
head of the Classics department, told delegates informa-
supplied by the association is
untrue and "nauseating dribble."
"The building committee
should discontinue using it,"
he said.
Student Council building
committee has been using
books and pamphlets supplied
by the group for the past two
years in plans for the building.
Dr. McGregor, speaking on
"Student Unit y," said the
council has to look no further than the auditorium cafeteria to find out what is really
needed in a student union building.
"At present, the .cafeteria.
is the best gathering place on
the campus and the cafeteria
in the union building should
have the same unifying force,"
Dr. McGregor said; -   -
He said the new building
should be a center of government, food' services, administration and have some-accommodation for overnight guests.
It must also include lounge
areas, an auditorium, chapel
and a book store operated as a
co-op, he said. It should be
open Sundays.
Dr. McGregor said he favors
a larger Brock without special
rooms for every club.
For student unity, and urt _
derstandirig of traditions frosh
should be compelled to attfend
the  Cairn ceremdhy,   it necessary, he said.
"I am all for flag waving
if it helps to increase student
unity", he said.
He also said student council
should not waste time debat-
More stories, pictures
see page 5
ing   buildings   and   grounds,
bookstore and food services.
"This is the work of the administration of the. university
and is looked after quite adequately by them" he said. PttQ'tf**"
THE
UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 11, 1961
:  6 «•*-     * '^TQ&xy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial Opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma  Mater  Society  of  the  University  of   B.C.
TELEPHONES:'CA 4-32*2; locals 12 (news- desk),
14' (Editor-in-Chief), 6, 15' (business dffie&s).
Editor-in-Chief: Roger McAfee' *
Managing   Editor     . Denis   Stanley
Associate   Editor        Ann  Pickard
News Editor  Fred Fletcher
City Editor Keith Bradbury
CUP Editor     .      Bob Hendrickson
Photography Editor George Fielder
Senior Editor       Sharon  Rodney
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Photography  Manager      .    .    .    .    .       Byron  Hender
Critics Editor  ...    David Bromige
STAFF THIS ISSUE-
NEWS:   Mike  Blair.  Lloyd   Drake.  Mike  Grenby,. Gail
•Neff, Chris Fahrni, Bert MacKinnon, Ken Warren.
TECHNICAL: Pauline Fisher, Donna Moris, Fred Jones,
Maureen Covell.
Letters to the Editor
Mr. Yorke:
You'll have to excuse the students at this University. Some
iaseittttnature; ,A,lot are hypocrites.
We thought that in an institution of this type, the students
would atr least attempt to assess the arguments of a speaker
whose ideology is different from theirs.
The Campus Communist club aaad yourself were apparently
unt^ flie same rnistafcen belief;
We also assumed that when the students had assessed the
argumertfe, they would propose counter arguments. It's called
intellectual discussion.
And we honestly believed that most had probably acquired
■the most'basic of manners: before coming here.
Your visit Friday proved us all wrong.
A small number of students threw things at the speaker
and the ehairanan. They are immature and bad-mannered. They
sde»'t'>d*s«*vecdnirnent.
The most disturbing thing was' the attitude of the rest of
the audience.
They laughed^ They thought it was funny that twenty-or
Jfchirty idiots* protected by a group of nearly a thousand could
throw things- at tWo people On stage and get away with it.
Yet, tt> condone such behavior is contrary to their desires.
They say they want freedom of speech, yet they tried to
silence one whose ideas are contrary to theirs.
They say they want academic freedom, yet they refused
to all others the same Tigftt.
They knew the attack Was u ttjustified and yet they
laughed.
These students refused to look at your party's plan for
developing the Columbia in an intellectual light.
The calibre of the questions asked indicated that most students knew little of the background* of the Columbia River
treaty. BCany who were atfthe'meeting' probably still don?ib know
that your partiy's program is essentially the same program proposed for the Liberal government by Gen. A. G. L. McNaughton.
And none of then*had the technical knowledge to trap
you,, as other politicians aire so often trapped when they try
to defend' their policies;
THus the demonstration boils down to the fact that it was
plahneid by a few immature students who wanted to see UBC
in the downtown papers, and' was condoned by a greater number of students who refused to do what is their right and duty
—listen to your program, assess your arguments' and then discuss them:
No, unfortunately, Mr. Yorke, you didn't have a chance.
The immature brought sugar-cubes.
The hypocrites brought only themselves.
You deserve an apology.
They probably also lack the guts to give it to you.
Alberto - USA
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
The Other day" I received a
letter from,' McGill University,
addressed to my home in Alberta, U.S.A. — obviously the"
mistake of some nitwit secretary. Since McGill is so particular about choosing students it
is ironic that they should be so
careless about whom they employ.
The point is many Canadians
know nothing—and don't cafe
—about different parts of their
own country. This is sadly true
among students, also. How can
a strong nation comprise people who don't care? How can
a weak nation assist in buil<£
ing a strong, free world? How
can We escape Communism if
our "free world" is weak and
meaningless?
Communism is out to destroy
freedom and those who Stand
for freedom. What is more,
communism is succeeding,- not
by conventional warfare, but
by a superbly organized "Cold
war" plan; We can only hope
to win the' cold war—and- bur
freedom—by making ourselves
strong and by taking the offensive in global conflicts and pressures.
We can only' become- strong
by   educating   ourselves,   not
merely'in our own affairs,'but
more'important; in those Of our
fellow humans. This'is our —
the fre6: world's-^-regpohsibili-
ty. If we abuse this responsi- '■■
bility; or if We fair tb! accept
it, then we ill deServe to die.
Yours truly,
GEOFFREY FOSTER,
Sciencel.
Even fifty cents
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Deaf Sir:
Not having - previously experienced the phenomenon of
British Columbia weather, I arrived- here three weeks ago
unprepared? for the moist climate. This was; I then believed,
promptly rectified by the purchase of a big, black umbrella
(for $4.00) at the College Shop
in Brock Hall.
The next day it rained. And
the wind blew. It turned my
big. new umbrella inside out,
breaking one of the ribs.
I was left with a big, black
broken and useless umbrella.
I was disturbed.
Desperately needing some-
token reassurance that my $4.00
was not a total waste, I returned, broken umbrella in
hand, to; the College Shop; I
expect«c^someo»e witft1 a receptive air about him to listen un-
derstandingly while I related
my tale—perhaps even the offer of a small discount (say 50
cents) on a new umbrella. Any
sign of sympathetic shoulder
upon which I could weep would
have sent me away happy (well,
almost), the purchaser of another big, black umbrella.
But it was an icy shoulder
indeed which was waved in my
direction.
"We can't guarantee our umbrellas against acts of God. Sorry, but we can't help you at all.
I guess you're stuck."
This approach was not a display of ranking intelligence,
but of rank stupidity and inept
fumbling. For the sacrifice of
a few cents my continued goodwill and patronage would have
been ensured. Now I feel
cheated and ill (I was caught
umbrella-less in yesterday's
rain).
I will never buv anything at
tiie; College Shop again, and I:
am forced by the venom within
me to publicly review this contumely.
Such   inconsiderate   actions
are committed through  ignorance. I would strongly counsel
the proprietors of the College •
Shop to acquire   some  know-,
ledge of customer relations.
Yours truly,
DAVE WELLS,
Engineering Till
Not dirty
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear* Siri"
Regarding that freshette who •■=
is becoming bored and shocked
by the discussions on sfex; may
I suggest that she is a prud#.
(That does not mean that she
has = been' Well brought up; but
rather that she is very narrow-
minded and limited in her
scopeO Sex does play an impor*
tant role and the fact that something so basic shocks;her shows'
great immaturity On her part. !
Sex is hot something dirty, J
and   some  people believe the
Freudian theory that all things >
in life have a sexual motive or;
basis. Of all the forms of self- 4
expression • sex is perhaps  the
most basic. This has resulted ih'
the' gr£at literature of the world-.!
in being well supplied withthis
topic.
■ One last word to the freshette before I close—think back
on this distaste for sex in a few
years and you'll start laughing
for you'll realize that without
sex: there is no- life' nor love.
Without love there is a void.
Yours truly,
PETER H. VON BITTER.
Sex again- -
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I was astounded by the stupid
dity and lack of insight shown
by (Miss) B. Baker in-her letter
published on October 5, 1961.
She saysthat Jack Ornstein was
trying "to prove the value of
loose morals and irresponsible
living," when he was actually
suggesting a cure for serious
social problems.
If (Miss) Baker had been born
into a social situation similar
to that of girls who are now
prostitutes, I would like to see
how much "faith, vision and
moral backbone" she would
have had.
It would do (Miss) Baker
considerable good if she was
attacked by a "sex starved"
(due to the elimination of prostitutes) bachelor.
I wish more people would
step down out of their hypocritical boots and consider
these problems realistically,
rather than taking the attitude
that' "tender years are an advantage" or "I don't care! I'm
Poor spellers
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Showing some European (and
therefore one would assume
more sophisticated?) visitors
around the campus I had diffi-
a good Christian and I'm going
to condemn this!"
Yours truly,
GINI SMITH,
Arts II.
culty in explaining to them
what such little gems of wit as
"Artsmen are Armpits" and
"Engysneers scare Finks" etc.
meant.
Whilst appreciating that such
artistry is at- best merely a
fairly socially acceptable way
of releasing one's inhibitions, I
contend that such slogans only
perform their natural function
when gracing the walls of public toilets, and are therefore
entirely unworthy of public
display on our Campus sidewalks and buildings.
Yours truly,
John T. Farr,
(Armpit 4).
Pick-up?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Ih reference to Professor
Dutton's comment on students'
garbage disposal methods, we
would like to know if he would
prefer'that the Students throw
their garbage on the university
lawns.
We maintain that the fault
lies not in the students' education in manners but in the fact
that the members of the Dept.
of Buildings and Grounds do
not pick the refuse up frequently enough-.
;   :      Yours truly,
DAVID LYNN,
Education II.
HOLGER HERWIG,
Arts II.
R. M. ROCKWELL,
Engineering I.
The parking save
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
As a former student I would
like to comment on the parking problem at UBC. One point
is being, overlooked, namely:—
that every car is a potential
eating place and study roojm
and on a rainy day many are
used for these purposes. This
is a service which saves the
University a considerable sum
of money in terms of cafeterias,
common rooms, etc., which
they do not have to provide.
From this point of view I
believe that the only solution
is adequate parking space
within walking distance of the
campus.
Yours truly,
G. M.BARTON,'46.
Ivy league?
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
I am sure that I am not alone
in deploring the architectural
monstrosities that have been
foisted on this university by
its supposedly competent architects. I refer to those metal
sheathed cracker boxes with
stairways tacked on as afterthoughts, which line the University Boulevard adjacent to
the Wesbrook building.
Perhaps the department of
Buildings and Grounds could
be persuaded to take the ivy
from the "temporary" buildings on the Main Mall and
cover the medical faculty's
nakedness and shame with it.
Failing this the plywood fence
that graced the area for the last
year should be replaced, as it
was undoubtedly much more
aesthetically pleasing than the
present structures which stagger drunkenly along the boulevard's verge.
Yours truly.
"a disgruntled aesthete". Wednesday, October 11, 1961
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Cuts
activities-
Student activities will have
to be curtailed in certain areas
this year because of a general
lack of funds, student treasurer Malcolm Scott said Tuesday.
Major areas affected are publications and the undergraduate societies, Scott said. Campus publications received 85
percent of their proposed budget and the undergrad societies 68 percent, he said.
"The extras and frills will
have to go," Scott added.
He said he was not too optimistic about finding a solution to the fund shortage. "We
will have to make some changes in the existing fee structure, or we might possibly
have, to ask for an increase in
the AMS fee," he said.
Scott urged students to participate in as many activities
as possible to make sure they
get their money's worth.
"People .should.take an inj
terest in the activities and
should take part in as many
of.them as possible," he said.
"Otherwise they're just wast?
ing their jin.oney."
Scott was referring to the
$24 AMS fee paid by students.
Actually only $14 of this
amount .goes directly to student activities. The remainder
.goes into the building fund.
Students vote on grad student fees
.Students will be asked to approve a referendum Friday
,  that :will require graduate students to pay Alma Mater
: Sc-ciety fees in their first year of studies only.
i, Grad -students,- now:pay $24 AMS fees .each year ,a»fljfJ:2;- \
,   towards the Thea .Keerner Graduate Student "-Centred V    *-;
To .pass, fthe; referendum must, be approved by^ two-   r
/thirds of the ballot: Twenty percent of the students must
vote. .  j
Voting wiU.be. at; eight polling stations from 10 a;m.
to 4 p.m. Frosh council will be elected at the same time.
-BUDGET-
ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of proposed budgetary allocations for the year 1961-62 in comparison
with.an adjusted
Statement of actual income and expenditure for the year 1960-61.
Unions net   raw  deal
ESTIMATED
INCOME 1961-62
Student Fees .  $300,000.00
Interest Income  1,600.00
Rental Income  2,300.00
Sundry Income    100.00
College Shop Profit  2,000.00
S306.000.00
DISCRETIONARY ALLOCATIONS
AMS Administration  -__;._  $ 28,000.00
Campus Activities & Events  7j800.00
Club Grants jL_   4.000.00
Conferences „_>.  4,000.00
Publications      _ ^._j  21,292.00
RBgistratipn- Photographs• I« :  1.550.00
Undergraduate Societies <_;  6J58.00
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY f  ----  s~72.800.00
NON-DISCRETIONARY ALLOCATIONS S    5.000.00
Accident -Benefit Fund _,:  l'.500;00
Brock Art Fund _     ;  6.250.00
Brock  Sinking Fund  125.000.00
Building Funds   53.750.00
Men's Athletics  3,900,00
NFCUS Fees*       10.000.00
Women's Athletics     .-_  12.500.00
World University Service 	
TOT.AL NON-DISCRETIONARY '..__ $217,900.00
OPERATING MARGIN MUST BE 5% .... _-- $.15,300.00
TOTAL ALLOCATION  $306,000.00
ACTUAL
1960-61
$274,426,00
1,950.00
3,051.20
262.71
1,878.00
$281,568.86
$ 24,079.50
11,172.43
4,471.98
3,065.37
24,692.03
1,930.20
6,065.00
$ 73,812.17
$    7,489.30
1,681,85
5,605.50
114,327.50
48,207.30
4,000.00
7.287.15
11,347.50
$199,945.90
$273,758.07**
employers can fire strikers and
use the newspapers to hire new
labor, while unions are denied
the use of the papers to fight
management.
O'Neal said the Combines Act
tion in private^enterprise.
freedom of association:
SUITS
DRESSES
&HQSTY
COATS
PANTS
SKIRTS
sweater:
DRY  CLEANED
DRY   CLEANED
**1960-61 actual expenditure (adjusted for comparison purposes).
f Non-discretionary allocations are those amou nts that are automatically allocated as a result of
general meeting or referendum directive.
Respectfully submitted,
MALCOLM G. SCOTT,
Treasurer, Alma Mater Society.
A.M.S. ADMINISTRATION
(Schedule I)
Office Salaries	
Student Government Expense __
Stationery and Office Expense __
Honoraria, Gifts and Donations _
Insurance Expense    	
Telephone & Telegraph Expense
Postage Expense        	
Audit and Legal Expense	
Bank  Charges   _ 	
Public Relations Expense  	
Depreciation _         -_
Bepairs and Maintenance	
5 DRESS
SHIRTS *
Pronosed
1960-61
1960-61
1961-62
Actual
Budgeted
Allocation
Expenditure
Expenditure
$17,500.00
$14,495.63
$15,000.00
2,300.00
2,214.89
1,800.00
825.00
445.08
900.00
2,000.00
•1,860.03
2,000.00
425.00
390.82
400.00
3,000.00
2,934.58
2,600.00
200.00
164:55
150.00
800.00
750.00
800.00
25-00
(3.45)
25.00
250.00
250.77
475.00
550.00
489.05
450.00
,125.00
87.55
100.00
$28,000.00
$24,079.50
$24,700.00
-
Room in home, separate entrance, $7.00 week. Can earn
with small jobs. Breakfast
possible. AM 6-7705.
Rental Service
TUXEOOS
Black Suits, Formals,
Costumes, -Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W.  10th      CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
Arts And Science
Graduating   Students
Campbell Studio, the official graduation photographer, will be photographing students in the
mobile studio, by the stadium, for the w«ek of
October 16 - October 20, 9 a.m - 3 p.m.
lose to Caropus Store,  4523 W. 10th.
By GAIL NEFF
Trade unions are segregated from the rest of society and
denied equality under law, B.C. Labor Federation .secretary
Pat. O'Neal.said on campus Tuesday.
O'Neal, speaking to, an. .audience of 120 persons at a New
Democratic Party Club meeting,
also lashed, out at Bills 42 .and
43.
'■Any society ?Which:.doesn't
recognize equality'..before the, law*
isn't doing the proper, thing,"
O'Neal said.
He said Bills 42 and 43, legislation forbidding unions to support political parties, are contrary to the spirit of freedom
of association.
In essence, he added, strikes
are forbidden by these laws as
W'SCOMIHG...
.... on FRIDAY!!
It's   so   exciting!!   Simply
toooo  fantastic!!   Never  be
fore   has   there   ever   been
anything like it!!
Our new restaurant is
opening, and it's really
worth screaming about! This
promises to be the thing
you've been waiting for.
Friday nite's the big open
ing so jplan to be there.
There's so much more to
tell you, but it would take
UP too much sp^ce,. Space
costs too much loot,: and
we'd rather spend" it iri pur
new restaurant, sp we'lLlef
you see the rest for yourselves.
2676 W. Broadway, RE 349916
Women's, Men's and
Children's
TENNIS & GYM
SHOtS
Women's ___ 2.9* to 5.98
Men's 3.98 to 8.98
Children's 2.7* to 3.48
Charge Accounts invited
.Wally Presley.
Mgr.
Campus Shoe Store
4442 W. lftth (Open 9 son. - 6 p.m., Fri. till 9)     CA 4-3833 I*age 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 11, 1961
Educations
new home
retfciy soon
B? kEN WARREN
The college of .education will
move into a new $1.1 million
building before the start of nexl
year's winter session.
. Dean Neville Scarfe said Tuesday the first part of a three million dollar education building
program will be completed by
August 1, 1962.
The building will be one of
four inter-connecting edifices. It
is located at the south end of the
campus opposite the biological
sciences building.
Included in the proposed "H-
. shaped"   complex,  Dean   Scarfe
■; said,   is   office   accommodation
for    his    staff.    Also    included
throughout the structure will be
special television unit and stu-
', jjios, „,.:
Dean .Scarfe said the closed
;veircuit telfevtsfian set-up will be'
wir)2<i so that students in various rooms can watch" both their
own productions and teaching
methods being employed in citj
... classrooms.
He said CBC could use any of
the faculty productions and "similarly we can take their programs."
Other construction on the
campus includes a $1.5 million
wing of the fine arts building
across from Buchanan and the
groundwork for a new half million dollar wing to the chemistry building.
The fine arts center, expected
to be completed by January, is
the first part of a fine arts complex which architects hope will
be a focal point for both the
campus use 4nd campus architecture.
"The fine arts center is so situated," said one of the architects,
"that it will be passed by or
through, by nearly every student
on cstopus,"
The building will house architecture and fine arts departments. Other units proposed for
later construction will house the
music department, a new art gallery and a theatre.
The chemistry extension, being
built at the north end of the
present chemistry building, will
house labs and lecture theatres.
At present the university has
spent about $15 million under
the development plan that was
started in 1956. The money is
part of a $35 million allotment
coming from the Development
Fund, Canada Council and provincial government.
Nfld. university gets
$20 million campus
ST. JOHNS, Nfld. (CUP)—Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt Monday presented the keys to Memorial University's new $20
million campus to chanceltyr Roy H. Thomson in a solemn
indoor ceremony watched by an audience of leading Canadians,
banquet,
YVONNE WIGHTMAN and John Chappel run through a scene
from Sean O'Casey's "Cockadoodle Dandy." Special student
preview Thursday night.
Special preview to bring
UBC drama production
CAMS
LADIES
WEAR
(Barbara Carr)
4469 West 10th Avenue
Jantzen Knitwear
Suzanne Sportswear
Morley Sweaters
Imported from
England
Coats by Wilson, a
complete size range
The Frederick Wood Theatre's
production of Sean O'Casey's
"Cockadoodle Dandy" will be
presented to the students in a
special preview Thursday night.
Admission is 25 cents.
The play, which opens Friday
and runs until Oct. 28, is being
presented in co-operation with
the Emerald Players of Vancouver under the direction of Dor
othy Somerset, of UBC's department of Theatre.
Leading actors Ed Greenhalgh
and Harry Bailly will be supported by John Chappell,
Yvonne Wightman and Tom
Shorthouse. The Cock, which
creates such havoc in their lives
will be playetl by theatre student Chris Harker.
An 800-guest state
largest ever staged in Newfoundland, was held in the evening to
cap the province's first day of
celebrations marking the opening of the new campus.
The 76-year old widow of
United States president Franklin
D. Roosevelt drew tremendous
applause in a brief address to
the audience, packed in the university gymnasium.
As special representative of
U.S. President Kennedy, she
brought "his feelings for this
land . . . and to the whole of
Canada."
She said Mr. Roosevelt in his
early years often visited Newfoundland to fish and hunt.
"I think he knew most of tb^
ports, on the coast as the best
places to go with a small sail:
feoat." ;*
Mrs. Roosevelt said the hew
campus represented "a very
great step for this area."
Presidents of 43 universities
in Canada, the U.S., the U.K.
and Portugal, seated on platforms extending outward from
each side of the main stage,
stepped forward to bring personal congratulations to Chancellor Thomson and Premier Small-
wood. Mr. Thomson, installed as
chancellor Saturday, is the Canadian-born publisher who owns
more than 90 newspapers in
North America and abroad.
Also on the stage for the hour-
long ceremony were Prime Minister Diefenbaker,   the Duke  of
Devon shire (representing the
British government), and Premiers Stanfield of Nova Scotia
and Shaw of Prince Edward
Island. None spoke.
Mr. Smallwood, who presided
as chairman, said Newfoundland
"was honored and encouraged
by the presence of the prime
minister . . . who makes us feel
very much as one with the whole
of great Canada." The two are
bitter political rivals.
Mr. Smallwood announced a
$500,000 gift to the university
for a new students' residence
from New York industrial promoter John C. Doyle, who spearheaded vast mineral developments in Labrador: Mr. Doyle,
in the audience, rose to a burst
of applause when; introduced
from the stage by the premier.
TO nominated for
Arts U S council
Only ten nominations for positions on the Arts Undergraduate Society have been received
to date.
"We expect difficulties in filling the forty-nine positions on
Council. Likely all will be made
by acclamation," said Mike Sharzer, Arts US president.
Nominations must be signed
by five members of the society
and turned in to Bu. 115. Deadline has been extended to October 17.
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"Buy  Name  Brands,  Buy With  Confidence" Wednesday, October 11, 1961
"«.•* ■ :	
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
Students view
problems of
AJfQ |fpwth
*-- How do yoij? predict the future
needs of a rapidly growing campus?
This was the problem facing
delegates at the seventh annual
leadership conference on the
weekend.
Delegates spent most of Saturday discussing what they felt
should be contained in the $800,-
000 student union building approved by referendum last
spring.
Students were asked to consider the needs of the campus
that is expected to reach a popu-
. lation  of more than  20,000 by
1965.
;,.:  AMS President Alan Cornwall
* asked  delegates   to   prepare   a
priority  list of facilities   t h e y
wished  to see   included in  the
■$800,000 first stage and in the
ultimate building; which he said
wsfruldT^?st irsore tiiatt $3 million.
< Students- felt   the I building
should contain an area for eat-
ing  bag ■ lunches,   small  dining
rooms • and coffee shops where
groups could congregate,   small
iounges and possibly a large ballroom.
Many discussion groups expressed the opinion that the student union building planning
.committee should be careful not
to duplicate facilities planned
by the administration.
It w^s suggested that a large
student; union building should be
built near the center of the campus to promote student union.
Some groups felt this would
be a mistake because the university might break up into colleges
with separate facilities as it expanded.
* Dr. Malcolm McGregor said
this is -doubtful because "the
system is completely and utterly
different from our present system."
He said current administration:
policy is to encouEggj-r', '^{.tfeMjnT
unity. ^ <   -
Several students"proposed that'
"the council hire a faculty member from architecture or town
planning to act as a consultant
in planning the building.
They reasoned that much time
is lost because student officials
change from year-to-year and
plans are changed accordingly.
Dr. McGregor suggested to
students that they explore the
idea of having a "pub" in the
building. He said a church college in Ontario serves beer.
Co-ordinator Doug Stewart said
cubicles for each club should be
eliminated and common work
rooms built instead.
He suggested as an alternative
that Brock Hall be kept for
clubs.
Cornwall outlined a tentative
program for planning of the
building. He said he hoped
planning would be completed by
January so tenders could be
called in the spring and construction started by July 1.
-Treasurer Malcolm Scott said
he didn't see how this could be
done because "we have no concrete plans and we don't know
what we are building."
—Photo  by  Don Hume
BOY, I'M GLAD THAT'S OVER. Dr. C. A. McDowell, head of the
chemistry department, stretches after spending a discursive
hour on the Elphinstone wharf. Discussion leader Fred Fletcher huddles in upper right corner.
Conference recommends
separate
Separate Homecoming celebrations should be held for
students and graduates, delegates to the seventh annual leadership conference decided Monday.
Homecoming chairman Kyle
Mitchell told the conference students ghpuld hold their own
dance because they cannot, under. tK? University Act, attend
the Alumni Association sponsored Homecoming Dances
whe/fc liquor is served.
Mitchell also suggested that
the celebrations be extended
from three days to one week.
However, Dr. Malcolm McGregor, head of the Classics Department, described the week
long celebrations held in the
U.S. as "drunken brawls".
Delegates also resolved that
the idea of a Homecoming parade through downtown streets
should be reviewed. The parades
were discontinued in 1958 when
a student was killed in an accident.
Campus yearbook
Nice cover but
insi
Totem costs too njueh.
That was.the verdict given by many students at leadership
conference when asked why the yearbook hasn't been selling
well in recent years.
Other stuuems ieit the price
would be fair if the content was
better.
NOT REPRESENTATIVE
"The book isn't representative
of the year it is produced or of
UBC," said one student. "It is
so general it could be any year
at any university."
Dean Geoffrey Andrew said
the book looks good on the outside but is empty x>n the inside.
Suggestions for improvement
were:
• to make the price part of
the ,"Afi|,i|^ lowering it ^o
about $2750 per student.
■■•• to produce a  book that is
more representative of the year.
• to include more about faculties in the book.
• bind faculty yearbooks in
with Totem. That is, to include
the Commerce Ledger in a certain number of the books and
sell them only to commercemen
and to do the same for other
faculties.
• to produce   separate year
books for all the faculties and
the about-to-be-grads and scrap
the over-all book.
Publications Cp-ordinator Dean
Feltham asked the students to
concentrate on Tbterh ih an attempt to solve its problems.
_Hg said the 2,000 books that
have beensold this year is below
what 'might reasonably be expected and indicates something
is wrong with the book.
In brief discussions, The Ubyssey came under fire for having
a "negative attitude" -and not
printing enough intellectual content.
Some groups also charged. the
paper with slanting ff^J^pagfr
stories.
Candidates meet
A meeting for all homecoming Queen condidates and their
publicity managers will be held
in the Brock Board, Room at
noon Thursday.     '■!'-''
Deadline for . Homecoming
Queen entries .is 5 p.m. Wednesday.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting and faculty
discussion of Psych exam writing. Thurs. Oct. 12, 12:30, Bu.
204.
Scott urges scrap
Brock sinking fund
Students at leadership conference Sunday passed a resolution
calling for the elimination of the
Brock sinking fund as a statutory
grant.
The resolution, proposed by
Treasurer Malcolm Scott, would
eliminate the fixed grant and
replace it with a grant to be
allocated in each year's budget.
Scott introduced the proposed
1961-62 budget to the delegates.
It is printed on page 3 today.
Scott said the move would
give future treasurers more freedom in allocating funds to best
serve the needs of the students.
The sinking fund is now administered by the Brock management committee.
Resolutions from the conference will be considered by the
student council. They are advisory only and not binding.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
1,000   Men's   Formal   Wear j
Garments to Choose From:
E. A. Lee Ltd.
One Store Only!
623 Howe St.     MU 3-2457
Presents
Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger
Wed., Nov. 11 — 12:39 — Auditorium
FREE
—Photo  by  Don Hume
MAN I'M BEAT but the party must go on. Hut 8 accordionist
Bob Mason strikes a happy medium. Half asleep, half awake,
and fully reclined, Bob keeps the party going.
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSOCIATION
THE ALL PROFESSIONAL COMPANY
presents
FIRST TIME IN VANCOUVER
OFFENBACH'S SPECTACULAR OPERA
TALES OF
HOFFMANN
Featuring International Opera Stars
TRF.NE TOUTS RICHARD
SALEMKA       RONEY CROSS
GALA OPENING PERFORMANCE
Thursday, October 12th
Sat. Oct. 14 - Tue. Oct. 17 - Thur. Oct. 19 - Sat. Otet. 21
All performances 8:30 p.m.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Seats: $5.50, 4.50, 3.50, 2.00 (tax included)
Saturday only: $6.00, 5.00, 4,00, 2.50 (tax included)
SEATS GOING FAST!!
HURRY!! LAST FEW DAYS!!
THEATRE BOX OFFICE—MU 3-2311 Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 11, 1961
Birds  prey on  Missionaries
* fteat WhStirrafv easily
but f ace H uskies next
Thunderbirds 16, Whitman 0
UBC's football Thunderbirds, fresh from a feast on some
young Missionaries, head for the Prairies Saturday and a match
■with some Huskies who aren't as dead as they were expected
to be.
Braves best,
es
UBC Braves won two more
Fraser Valley Junior Football
-"Lfeague  games this  weekend,
'  bnit it's not going 1x> help their
: ."ftli'yoff chances.
... Braves proved themselves the
.best.team in the league for the
second year in a row, but the
league has ruled them out of the
playoffs because they have used
ineligible plyers.
*     *     *
Braves defeated Richmond 25-
,   6  Sunday   and   Renfrew ,24-17
Monday, but Richmond will
take  the league's   eastern  division title by default.
Western division was won by
Surrey Rams, whom Braves
earlier beat 19-0.
The victories were UBC's
sixth and seventh of the year.
They have  lost  one.
Braves,, says the league, have
shifted too many players up and
•   down   from   the    intermediate
league Chiefs, although the players were all under the junior
';/r1(^jfei>il;";'ef;21.- ■•' " -  • - --
The Fraser Valley winner advances against the Junior Big
Four winner for the B.C. Junior the outside runs that Schriber
championship. Braves lost to excelled. Showing good speed
Blue Bombers in the final last j and manouverability, he continually managed to get the Birds
out of holes.
In the fourth quarter Carkner connected on a ten yard pass
to Don MacRitchie for the Birds'
second major. Barker again converted.
UBC's other two points came
on a bad snap by the Missionaries' center on their own 30-
yard stripe when Al Bianco
tackled the Whitman kicker in
the end zone for a safety.
Frank Gnup's Birds scored a
very ordinary 16-0 victory over
the Whitman (Walla; Walla,
Wash.) Missionaries Saturday, a
team that was as green as a certain Saskatchewan squad that
entered the Western Intercollegiate loop three years ago.
MEET HUSKIES
■; This Saturday, Birds meet
these Saskatchewan Huskies, the
team that was supposed to be
the doormat of the league again
this year, in Saskatoon.
Huskies, however; raised a few
eyebrows last weekend when
they tied defending champion
Alberta Golden Bears 21-21 in
Saskatoon.
Birds just managed a 14-14
tie "with the Golden Bears two
weeks ago, scoring a last-second
touchdown.
Last weekend against Whitman, good running by halfback
Jack Schriber and some wobbly,
but timely passing by quarterback Barry Carkner, gave Birds
the win, their first against a loss
and a tie.
DEFENSIVE BATTLE
The first half was a tight defensive battle with neither team
able to mount much of an offense. The only break in the
monotony>was a spectacular 50-
yard \ pass and run play from
Carkner to halfback Pete Black.
In the second half 4he game
-was openediqa, with both teams
going to the "outside In an effort
to gain an advantage. It was on
year.
Sunday, fullback Don Cran-
stoun crashed for three touchdowns, one a 55-yard sprint,
Quarterback Lloyd Davis got
the other major on a 50-yard
run, and Jim Everett kicked one
convert.
Monday, Davis threw to end
Walt Sivachua for a 60-yard
touchdown, and ran 40 yards
for another. Other majors came
from Bob Howard and Bob
Paulley.
Join "Grad team"
-Dioto by Don Hume
NET TOURNEY HAS THESE THREE UP A TREE
THREE BUDDING young tennis players, Monika Ahlen (left), Diana Lawrence (bottom) and
Judy Cornwall (right), will battle other western universities next week in Saskatoon at annual intercollegiate tennis championships. Mi ss Ahlen and Miss Lawrence were on last year's
team that finished third. The golf team, as well as the men's golf and tennis teams, leave
Thursday for Saskatoon.
Four Birds fly the coop
By MIKE HUNTER
Four UBC basketball players, two of them active on last
year's varsity team, have decided not to play for the
Thunderbirds this season.
They will instead join a new
team in the Senior A Men's
league, formed by last year's
Bobby Gaul trophy winner,
Ken Winslade, known as the
UBC Grads.
But the team is made up
largely of undergraduates.
It includes at least four
players who still attend the
University, and who are still
eligible to play for the Thunderbirds this year.
.So far it consists of UBC
graduates Glen and Barry
Drummond, Winslade, Ed Pe
derson,   plus   the   four   still-
eligible players,
They are:
• Mike Potkenjak, 6'4" forward and centre, in his fourth
year at UBC.
• Keith Hartley, 6'6" forward, who's had three years'
experience with the Birds.
• Bill McDonald, 6'2" guard
and forward, who hasn't played with the Birds for a year.
• Gordon Betcher, 5'11"
guard from Courtenay High
School, who played with the
Jayvees last year.
Hartley and Potkenjak were
both key players in plans for
the Thunderbirds this year.
Potkenjak played first string
last year until a knee injury
sidelined him.
Hartley played consistently,
but was never on the starting
five for more than a game.
He said he decided to play for
Winslade's team because he
didn't have time for the Thunderbirds.
Thunderbirds make at least
five road trips and practice
four times a week, he said. He
said Winslade's team held only
one practice a week.
Potkenjak said Winslade
formed the team purposely for
players who wanted to play
basketball seriously, with the
intention of competing in Canadian playoffs.
He said the team had the
1962 British Empire Games
and the ,1964 Olympics in mind
as well.
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LA 6-8665 Wednesday, October 11/1961
T HE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
FOR THE BIRDS
By  MIKE  HUNTER
Last week, the press, in a moment of deep thought, tried
to count the number of students who take their sport off-campus,
thank you. This in spite of UBC's vast athletic program, one of
the biggest in Canada, or anywhere else, for that matter. A
university for 13,000 students should have more top-flight
athletes than we have, thought the press.
.;.. We noted that most of B.C.'s athletic cream takes its higher
education elsewhere, usually about 200 miles south of here. This
must be taken as inevitable. This University doesn't put
Athletic ability before academic ability, and so it shouldn't. We
3on't have Harry Jerome, (but we do have the rowers).
What bothered us is the increasing number of athletes who
are attending UBC, but not playing here. This is especially
noticeable in UBC's two biggest sports, basketball and football.
<%£ Last week, we tried to explain this phenomenon, using a
topical example, basketball. We chastized basketball players,
notable Junior Men's League basketball players, for shifting
fheir affections from the Alma Mater. Such students were associated with thick stands of trees by the press. Pseudo-stars and
large roosters in small henhouses, said the press.
"Fowl!" cried several of the Large Roosters. "Turncoat!
jflave trader!" cried a Small Rooster. "We," they said, "just
don't have time to play UBC basketball.'
* * *
^ This, of course, is raw rationalization, a smokescreen. It
reeks of said thick stands of trees. No time, hell, that's a cliche
even Foster Hewitt would be ashamed to use. If you have time
tb play basketball for Maiden-Forms in the Junior Men's
league, you have time to play basketball for UBC Braves in the
■fanior Men's League, or Jayvees in the Nothing League.
You're not turning your nose up at the UBC teams because
Sou haven't time to play for them, chaps. You are either un-
ftappy with the way the UBC basketball program is run, or
you're a busher who would rather be a big duck on a little pond.
Now. by our calculations, there are either an awful lot of
bushers or an awful lot of dissatisfied athletes around. More than
likely, there's a combination of both. Last week, we generalized
and dismissed them all as the former. We wished we had some of
tfifem around, but agreed there's no point wasting valuable time
worrying about prima donnas.
* * *
-*•' However, there are a number of players concerned in this
matter with whom the press finds difficulty in dealing as
bushers. They are students who have played at least one season
in a UBC uniform. Their absence is naturally going to affect
the quality of UBC teams.
This year, Rph Parker, Keith Hartley, and Mike Potkenjak,
all big (over 17 feet, all together) and highly-respected players,
have chosen to play elsewhere. Parker is going to a new Junior
JKLen's. League team because he doesn't have time to play atJUBC,
ne says. Mike Harcourt, a teammate of Parker's on the Brave
team last year, is playing for the same team for the same reason.
Hartley, and Potkenjak are joining Ken Winslade's new
:eam in the Senior A League.
* * *
Every year, UBC teams lose top players—through ineligi-
Dility, to other teams, or because they "haven't time." Is there
something wrong with our system that causes any of these unfortunate situations?
Last week, there were more than 80 players out at the first
jasketball practice; all trying for the at most 45 positions. Most
>f the newcomers v were frosh-. Sophomores and higher-year stu-
ients think the top 20 spots are already taken on the Birds and
Tayvees.
And seven of the freshman team's spots are already claimed
>y the scholarship winners. We lose maybe 50 players annually
—players who are cut in the first week, or players who don't
show up because they don't think they have a chance among
hat mass of humanity.
* * *
Does this happen in every sport?
From this corner, then, it seems we're losing out two ways.
We're not getting as much talent as we could, and we're losing
ome of the players we do get, UBC- basketball can't help but be
iffected.
. Wouldn't we get more people out to the stadium for a track
neet if Harry Jerome were running? Wouldn't we get more
leople out to the Gym to watch the Birds this fall if Mike Pot-
:enjak and Keith Hartley and Ron Parker were playing?
There's nothing we can do short of athletic scholarships that
/ould get us Harry Jerome. But we could have Mike Potkenjak,
Ceith Hartley and Ron Parker et al playing for us.
* * -k
The same thing goes for football. How many UBC students
re now stars: in the Junior Big Four League? They're right on
up doorstep, yet they won't come in. Why? Are they all bushers?
Example: Roger Hardy, quarterback for the North Shore
'ougars and likely the league's most valuable player. The ver-
atile Mr. Hardy, in between English 200 classes, this year com-
leted 61 percent of 177 passes for 1,790 yards and 12 touch-
tfCvns in his first seven games. They don't come any better.
Vhy does he prefer the North Shore club to the Thunderbirds?
It's another example of places where UBC is missing out,
nd there seems to be no insurmountable reason for it. If UBC
rants athletic excellence, they must have excellent athletes.
i.nd excellent athletes are right in our backyard.
Not that we miss them all. We certainly have some fine
thletes on campus, particularly in the smaller sports.
But the press still sighs wistfully when, thumbing through
!ird Calls, and, coming upon name after name, all it can say
,, "I didn't know he was at UBC."
Maybe 13,000 is just an unlucky number.
GEOFF EALES
. fourth in feature
SHORTS
ATHLETICS DAY
Second annual athletics day
goes tomorrow at noon in the
Armory. The special event features displays by most men's and
women's athletic teams. Students
can obtain information and sign
up for teams at the booth.
RUGBY
UBC Thunderbirds had a bye
in the first week of action in
the Vancouver Rugby Union's
Miller Cup series, but the second
team, the Braves, opened on a
losing note.
Braves suffered a mild upset
at the hands of Trojans, a team
of ex-UBC players Saturday.
They fell behind 18-3 at half
time, finally lost 21-6.     -
Russ Chambers scored a penalty kick and Tim Cummings
added a try for Braves. Trojan
points came from such ex-UBC;
greats as Gerry McGavin, Paddy Sloan, and Ralph Bagshaw.
In Bell-Irving Cup play, UBC
Physical Eds defeated Trojans
3-6, but the frosh team lost 22-6
'o Ex-Vikings.
UBC second
to
iri
cross-counfry
UBC finished second in the
B.C. Cross-country championships at Brockton Oval Saturday.
Vancouver Olympic Club, perennial champions, took the title
by 18 points over the Thunderbirds.
But UBC's second' team took
junior honors, sweeping the first
three spots in the junior Simile event.
In the six-mile senior event,
VOC's Ray Hampton was the
winner in 34 minutes, 10.6' seconds. UBC's Geoff Eales slipped
to fourth.
In the junior event, UBC's
Tom Prior won in 19 minutes
6.2- seconds.
, The UBC team travels to Edmonton Saturday for an exhibition meet with the University
of Alberta.
UPPER
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Gowns and  Hoods
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FEATURING LEADING STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS
Drawing And Pain (in;
Owing to the number of registrants for this evening
course, the Department of University Extension will
offer a second section under Professor Lionel Thomas,
UBC School of Architecture.
The 20-week course has been designed specifically for students in architecture, medicine, civil
engineering, graphics and the natural sciences.
Classes will-be conducted on Tuesday evenings from
7.00 to 10:00 p.m. in Hut 0-17, School of Architecture
commencing October 10th. Late registration accepted.
For detailed information contact the Extension
Department, CA 4-1111, local 525.
LETS  GET TOGETHER
In keeping with COLLEGE SHOP policy to cut the
profit margin we have made these price reductions.
UBC Jackets  ,  ($16.25)—$15.95
UBC Blazer Crests (   8.50)—   6.50
Automatic Umbrellas  _..(    5.95)—   5.25
Regular Umbrellas (   3.95)—   3.65
BROCK EXTENSION
11:30-2:30
MON.-FRI.
Tte stArtt lifho woiMlilie to me,
MI use te savtng stmto^m
(ibiteoiiw^^
Bank of Montreal
A big step on the road to success
is an early banking connection
70 ! milOH CUUMK
Ffiil
Ul-61 Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October IT, 196?-
TWEEN CLASSES
Liberal Lang speaks
LIBERAL CLUB I
Former B.C. Liberal Leader
Art Lang will speak on finance
in Bu. 220, noon today. Everyone welcome. Senator J. J. Connolly will speak in Bu. 203
Thurs. noon.
* #  *
JAZZ SOC
Contemporary Jazz in concert
Friday noon in Aud. with the
Montgomery Brothers Quartet.
Members 25c, others 50c.
* *  *
SCM
Rev. R. French speaks on the
"Intolerance of the Chuich" at
noon today in Bu 202.
* * *
'CARIBBEAN STUDENTS   "
Meeting ThOrs.  noon in   Bu.
2$2.
* *  *
SPORTS CAR  CLUB
Rallye Chalk speaks on "Learning to Navigate" noon today in
Eu. 228.
AQUA SOC
Meeting of all divers and
those who signed up clubs' day
in Bi. Sci. 2000 Thursday at
1?:30. All welcome.	
Organizer cancels
anti-test  petition
The organizer of an anti-nuclear testjftg petition that was to
be circulated on = campus this
week has decided to call it off.
Graduate student Mamie Rogers, in a message to Student
Council said that 'because atmospheric nuclear testing has been
temporarily stopped by the
USSR the petition would not be
effective.
Vice President Eric Ricker
said council has passed the motion in principle and if the testing resumes the petition will be
circulated.
Miss Rogers brought the matter to council last week- in an attempt to stop atmospheric nuclear testing. The petition was to
be sent to the Russian ambassador in Ottawa. r
Why do some
undergraduates
hakaff
While most undergraduates adjust to campus
life without any trouble,
some find the going
rough. Almost all, at
some time or other, run
into difficulties over
money, family pressures, deadlines, competition, even marriage ! Twoarticies, the
ANXIOUS UNDERGRADUATE, and THE HARMONY
AND DISC0RD OP ONE
O A MPU S "*C A R RIA G E,
vividly demonstrate'
how a group of undergraduates met and
coped with problems
such as these.
Read these and other
stimulating articles iri
the October 21st issue of
BOOSTER CLUB
Important meeting noon today
in Bu. 104.
if.  if.   if.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
General meeting 12:30 noon
in Bu. 212. All members please
attend.
if.       rf.       if.
MUSIC DEPT.
First of the Wednesday noon
hour concerts at 12:30 in Bu.
106. Ernst and Marie Friedlander play sonatas by Archer and
Weinsweig. .
ifl       ^f"       ^f"
MORMON YOUTH GROUP
Pres. Weilenmann of the Alaskan-Canadian Mission will speak
on "The Nature of God", Bu. 100
Thursday noon. Visitors- welcome.
V     V     T*
SPECIAL EVENTS
American  folk singer   Peggy
Seeger presents a concert in the
Auditorium today at 12:30.
She plays the banjo and guitar.
The concert is sponsored by
the Special Events Committee
and is free.
UBC CLASSIFIED
LOST: 1 Sheaffers fountain pen
at Post Office, 11:00 a.m., Friday, October 5th. Would person who found it kindly contact Dolores at CA 4-9945 evenings.
UBC GRADUATE will coach
French or Spanish. Phone RE
6-6264, Mr. Kent-Barber.
LOST: Would the person who so
obligingly took my umbrella,
for safekeeping outside the
AMS office Oct. 5, please
phone WO 1-5382 or take it to
the Lost & Found. No questions.
PRESIDENT of the International Radio Institute of Radio Engineers, Dr. Lloyd V. Berkner
of Dallas, will speak on
''Space communication," — in
the Auditorium Thursday at 8
p.m.
LOST: On Oct. 2, between Campus and area of UBC gates a
brown pencil case containing
a parker 51 set. Finder please
phone Marjorie Premisschook
at CA 4-9033 after 6 p.m.
FOUND: Sports car rain deck on
Labor Day weekend, see F.
Vru^tman.  3218 Bio.  Science
■!   Bldg.
BRIEFCASE containing note^
missing following Bi 105 Lab,
Thurs. Oct 5, please turn in to
lost and found. Urgent.
exam a
Students sitting for Written
Bowling test for the P E Required Program exemption
should meet in rooms 211,213,
214 or 216 Thursday, October
12 at 1:30 pm.
Practical tests should all be
completed before the written
exam.
St. Anselnt's Annual
THRIFT SALE
Sat. Oct. 21—11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Dining Hall
Youth Training Centre
Acadia Camp
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEANS
4544W10th
Open 'titt 11:30
We offer substantial income
to two pleasant female undergraduates for work ot HgH*
nature on a part lime basis;
If interested contact Chafly
from 6 - 7 p.m. at RE 3-6312.
str&
CM* SALE TODAY I
WITH
CANADIAN CHEMICAL
COMPANY, LIMITED
This advertisement will be of most interest to graduates in chemistry,
chemicaJ^mechanieal and electrical engineering and engineering physics.
What interests you most about a;career? Opportunity
should. Opportunity not only lea advancement, but
opportunity for professional growth, through varied
and interesting experience. We firmly believe in diversified experience and, luckily, we can offer it in our fully
integrated operation. Wet find if s best for you (makes
life-mope' iaterestii^aad provides greater opportunity)
and best for us (we end up with senior people who are
fully experienced iH'owe business). Now, let's have a
crack at answering some of your questions.
What do we do? Canadian Chemical Company produces
basic organic chemicals, cellulose acetate flake and
acetate yarns, fibres and staple.
Where do we de it? At Edmonton. We have three plants
on a 430 acre site. The first produces chemicals-
alcohol, ester and ketone solvents, acetic acldr glycols,
pentaerythritol, formaldehyde and other orgarucs. The
second produces cellulose acetate flake. The third, acetate and Arnel yarns arid fibres.
Sales offices are located in Montreal, Toronto and
Vancouver.
What is our future? Very bright (It jus* happens to>ber
true.) We think of ourselves as a young, progressive,
fast-growing Canadian firm with world-wide- affiliations. TJie record bears this out. So does the operation
of-our Edmonton plant. And the fact that our engineering department is one of the largest and most diversified
in Canada.
Our raw materials are basic Canadian natural resources:
petroleum by-products from Alberta and cellulose &««£
the forests of British Columbia. Our markets are worldwide, and through our affiliates we have a strong alliance with companies in the textile, chemieat-aHd"*
plastics industries;
What would you do? As a qualified chemist or engtrteeir
; you could be working on product development, research,
process engineering, plant design, construction or some,
aspect of production. This is exciting work in many
completely newfields. As a chemist or chemical engineer
you could choose also a career in sales orleehnicatservice:
What else should you know about as? Lots more. You
can get more information and literature by- wriuag- to
Department "A" at 1600 Dorchester Blvd.West>
Montreal 25, Quebec. Of to the Personnel Department,
Canadian Chemical Company, Lhroted^^©;:Box*99,
Edmonton, Alberta.
CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY, LIMITED^
MONTREAL • TORONTO  •   EDMONTON   • VANCOUVER
P ETROCH EM tCAi.S

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