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The Ubyssey Dec 3, 1957

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 THE    UBYSSEY
>40«'»«0«>«>«'l«)«l«l«»*<
I  I'M WEAMINP* wyy ^rV\i
i of a pitivifTi © 11 y
jaaw
christmas
|     CHRISTMAS     *
EXAM
*
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Caged Lion
Champing
At the Bit
By   BARBARA   BOURNE
Where were you when the
stroke hit?
If your name is John Foster,
you are listening to your mother
reading your favorite bedtime
story, "Suzy of Suez."
If your name is Vice Nixon,
you and several of your buddies I
are singing,  "It  Came  Upon  a
Midnight Clear."
If your name is Adlai,
you are tuning your violin
fcr your final concert.
Whoever vou arc, wherever
you were, the news of the death
of Nick, the great general 'f
C-Day, was as personal as a
body blow or a wire from the
defence department.
James F. Minnow, veteran
White Pole correspondent, stat-,
ed that "without warning thc
central pivot has slipped out and.:
we are left without a leader at
the most crucial time of thc
year."
As telegrams poured in to thc
White Pole you could not help j
but realize that Nick's life-long
helper,   "Twinkle    Toes"   #vas
right when he said, "The stroke
has been felt around the world."
"We  can  only hope  that the
many   reindeer  and  elves   who
have been life-long assistants to
Nick can carry  the heavy  burden of responsibility which has !
fallen   on   them   in   these* most
difficult times," stated the fam-1
ous   London   observer,   Beverly I
Baxter. J
How do his many personal
friends feel?
"We know that for us the void |
can never be filled but we have j
gained strength from the heart- j
rendering example of Mamie |
Claus, who despite a great per-1
sonal loss has taken the reins in ;
hand and will carry on," stated i
Rudolph.
"It is many a shoe we have j
hammered together and many I
a sucker we have delivered to j
an unsuspecting house in the call
of duty," said his oldest gnome, ;
Max. Raeborn. I
Thc stock market, at its lowest point since the death of Rin-
Tin Tin, showed a slight sign of
recovery when it was learned
that Dancer and Prancer would
carry on despite the lack of leadership.
The lights still burn in Nick's
study,  a  mute  reminder of the
fact that "Old soldiers never die, j
they just decay away." '
BOTTOM
LUNASSEY
*»c»c*<»c*c»o»cw<»off<»cw<»c»i»<»c»«»i»ir»«»«»«»€.
THE VILLAIN WAS SNAPPED in the hideous act of slaying Santa Claus by an alert Lunassey photographer. What
a filthy coward.    He sure looks like one.
ABOUT FACE
When you come right down to
it this is the bottom of the page.
By JACK  GARBAGEMAN
Christmas is going to be sad
for five-year-old Barbara Bit-
chley. Three days ago her
mother, father and brother
were killed in a motor accident
in Bellingham. And then last
night little Barbara's pet dog
Fidelt was hit by a car.- And
then this morning her house
burned down, leaving her
homeless. And then this afternoon it was discovered she was
in the house.
I was told this heartwarming
Christmas story exclusively
this evening.
*T* *r **T*
Hither and Jawn — Sometime employed saxaphony and
phiddle player Jarsh Blow-
harsh is willing to accept the
job of manager of the new
civicod, if the price is right;
which it is—And Elvis Presley
is—thanx for thc $100 Jarsh—
Elvis Presley is not coming to
Vancouver today.
**T* **T* **V
In the Grey Cup parade the
men from Vancouver were
wearing nothing under their
suits but blue flesh. This
Garbageman finds out EVERYTHING. Actually I was told
by parade chief Aid. Franks
Baker who IS running.
*t*      **t*      *>t*
Scotch  Brothel —  It  is  not
true that a local call house is
(Continued on Page 4)
DEAD
The jingle bells are silent. The snow has turned to watery
dirt-slush. The tangerines are somehow rotten. And little children everywhere have lost their Greatest Friend.
Santa Clans is dead.
Murdered.
It happened in the department store. Eight-year-old Churly
Callahan quietly stepped from the line up to Santa's knee.
"I didn't think it was very funny last year when I asked
for a loaf of bread and you sent me a stone," said' Churl*.
Then suddenly he whipped out one of those rubber daggers and gouged out both the jovial saint's eyes. He drew jelly
on the first cut.
Fourteen thousand little kiddies, eagerly awaiting those
sacred few moments in communion with their patron saint,
were horrified as young Callahan went berserk before their
guileJess eyes  (and after Santa's).
Berry Logan, 7, of 1546 West 83rd Avenue, deftly seooped
up the fallen eyeballs and is now reportedly using them for
marbles.
His mother said the lad had suffered severe acid burns
to his face when a toddler, and became bitter from too many
times being chosen to play the villain in school dramatics.
Many    eyebrows    have    been ''
raised because of tiie gruesome:
event, notably Santa's.
Later it was revealed that the
culprit was actually a hired
killer, 25-year-old midget Hercules Shrum, secured by the
Junior Chamber of Commerce.
A statement by the Jaycee's;
president is printed on today's \
Lunassey Editorial Page.
The city and hospital morgues !
were full, so the old man's re-!
mains  were  taken  to  the  Van-j
couver Sin morgue. Pearl
Smith, country editor, wanted
to fly the corpse at half mast on
the Tower as a memorial gesture, but was overruled by his
more squeamish co-workers.
Upon examination of the
body, it was found to be composed entirely of rubber and
paraffin wax.
Coroner Eyewash P. Bottles,
laughingly remarked, "He may
have been some philanthropist,
but he can't hold a candle to
Bennett."
Upon further examination,
more oddities were discovered.
Never mind what.
The Lunassey, your friendly
johnny-on-the-spot, quickly 'thot'
to dispatch its Nudes Editor,
fearless, cheerless, peerless Barbara Bourne, who works the St.
Nick beat, to the scene.
We found Miss Bourne sobbing brokenly ir; a musty corner
of tho SCM room.
She had heard.
Countless efforts were made
' to cheer her up, but to no avail.
"He was going to bring me a
' year's supply of twong pouches!"
she wailed.   (Barbara is a rather
i strange girt).    "He was going to
I fill my stocking with artichokes.
They're    out    of    season,    you
know."
We sent Barbara on her way,
finally, with the promise that we
would make sure her Christinas
WHAT THE HELL am I
going to do for income this
Christmas wonders a typical UBC coed as she surveys
the local economic picture.
elsewhere   in   this   paper,   and
aptly titled "The North Poll."
"Pshaw," you may say, "We
here are all learned students of
the university, wise to the ways
of the world. We know what
Brock Chasm says a boa I Santa
is so. What care we whether
thc Christmas myth lives or
dies? Next thing, you'll be having him roll away the stone and
rise again.    Pshaw!"
Well, then, for shame, callous
university students! What of the
millions  of  dewy-eyed   children
tree   abounded  with   artichokes   of  the  world   (and  the  Dewey-
and twong pouches, come Christmas   morning.     (Where     we're
eyed ones in the College of Education) who will awaken Christ-
going   to   get   them,   God   only i nmas   morning   to   empty   stock-
knows).
Miss Bourne made a quick re-
ings,   never   more   gleefully   to
shout, "'Look what Santa brung
action  poll,  which   is published  me! Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE LUNASSEY
Not authorized for mailing. Handing a copy to a friend
is also illegal.
The Lunassey i.s published once annually to wish all kind-
hearted businessmen everywhere a Merry Profit. Subscriptions
available at the door. #
EDITOR-IN-CHEESE   HOLY MOTHER
Managing Editor     Feritlity  Kult
Nudes Editor   Mildred Milkdrinker
Beer Editors     Dave, Bob, Joe,  Bill,  Frank,
Julie, Virginnia, Kenneth and Wayne
Senior Editor "Jerry"
Statement
(Editor's Note: The following is a statement from a
spokesman for JCC, thc organization behind the murder
of Santa Claus.)
The shocking news on our front pages this morning has horrified you all. But there is a bright side.
With the death of Santa Claus, the last vestige of the
true Christmas spirit has gone. The Wise Men, the Dog in
the Manger Scene, the Prodigal Son, tho Weatlh of Nations, all lose their significance.
At first, this seems sad. And it  is,  in  a  way.
But we did this with the common weal in mind.
It is our belief that the spiritual side of Christmas has
been blatantly over-emphasized — Santa Claus has been
getting here earlier and earlier, the familiar carols. "Rudolph, the Red-nosed Reindeer," "Frosty, the Snowman,"
etc., have been played to death on the radio. Ed Sullivan
wished us Merry Christmas on the first of December —
things like that.
We think that this spiritual trend has served to
subordinate what i.s good, what i.s real, what i.s American
about Christmas.
And that, dear hearts, Is this.
Ihe commercial side of Christmas.
With Santa gone (bless his whiskered soul) the nation
will focus its whole attention on the stores, on buying
things, on spending money, and all like that.
And that's what we need, by George.
A commercial revival. Have Cyrus Eaton speaking
every night in Madison Square Garden. Publish books
by H. R. McMillion on "The Power of Positive Spending."
And spend  money. Spend.  Spend.
ELWOOD SPASTIC,
President, JCC
SanicL SuqqstiJLbui
THE LUNASSEY'S SUGGESTION LIST
(Modelled on Santa's Suggestion List, courtesy the Bay.)
"INFANTS — FIRST YEAR.'*
The    child    is    satisified    with       Ubyssey Suggest: Guns, bows
simple manipulation." and arows' colored dolLs' etc' At
this  time you  should  construct
Ubyssey   Suggests:   Keep   an an  enclosure  of  some  kind   in
eye on him. He is at a difficult whjch   you   cfm   imprison   the
stage.  He will be pleased  with chik| whon hc is unrulv A leash
prayer beads or oranges. Do not or  chain   is  jndjsponsablc.   The
let   him   eat   anything.   (Except child is now old enough to hit,
tod, on occasion.) A jar of beetles Hlt  him  whenever yc see him>
will be a pleasant surprise for whethcr or not ho appeai.s to be
him  every   now  and  then,  but doing sometnlng wrong. Chances
not too often, or he will tire of are |ie js
this  delicacy.   Children  of  this
stage tend to slep a lot, especial- "SCHOOL AGE—-6-9 YEARS:
ly if you give them pills for it. The   child   learns   to   play   with
This   will   save   you   time   and other children. He enjoys build-
Our Thought For Today
U8C   EMPLOYMENT     .
OFFICE, (j
"My mother thinks I would be further ehead -to  quit  and   learn   a   trade."
What ThU CatnpuJ heeMt Heed
trouble.
ing and repairing things. She has
become the ideal houswife—the
little    mother.    The    classroom
!f%
"TODDLERS   —   TWO   TO
THREE  YEARS:   The  child   be-   „uidt,s U)cir interests -
gins  to  push   pull  and  manipulate objects.''
Ubyssey Suggests: Push-pull
toys( e.g. baby brothers and sisters, cats, .small dogs). Ming
vases, subtly located atop an
end table or other readily as- *K
cessible article of furniture.
Building blocks (leave out "x".
A lot a dirty u ords have "x" in
; hem.) Cuddly I'ag Dolls (oily
r.iye   best.)
■ im;k school     -   ::   to   fi
Y 1'IA h'S; The <■'> i Id mli-mol'ms ii is
sniac mmry play. II-' m:i> lx come
si I'ini ho\ , . lie ,i nu im. •. The c!s i id
is physical ly nn um sic! i ve and
J ingers coord inate wiih I he increased  mental capacity."
By NEVA BIRD
From the number and variety
of her needs, our poor old Alma
Mater is in pretty sad shape.
But wait! So what if she does
need a great deal? Think of the
multitude of things she doesn't
need.
More library space for instance. By getting to the library when it opens at eight
o'clock, he is also certain to get
a seat at one of the tables.
This "Early to Rise" technique
is employed by a great number
of students who, when prodded
awake, claim that the method
is foolproof.
Lazy? Don't give up. You
can still find a place t0 study.
And privacy is guaranteed by-
locked doors. (No. I didn't
mean that, but perhaps, as a last
resort).
You haven't heard of the
thesis room? It's a delightful
little place, and it's never full.
All you need do is go through
the formalities of taking out a
thesis at the desk. Once locked
in the thesis room you can spend
the day studying without fear
of interruption.
Too much work filling out the
card to take out a thesis? All
is not yet lost. Look around
you man. Look at all those
parked    cars.      Most    students
claim they get much more
studying done here than anywhere else.
And speaking of parked cars,
that reminds me of another
thing   we     don't     need.     More
parking space. Ingenuity is all
you need lads.   Ingenuity.
Look at all the parking space
used up by Austins, Prefects,
Volkswagens and Morris'. They
could so easily be stacked one
on top of the other. Say three
to a-parking space.
You don't like them stacked.
Well then, at least they could be
parked beneath larger cars.
Even this would give twice as
much parking space.
And if twice as much parking
space isn't enough, Spanish
Banks-is near enough for student
parking. More parking lots?
Nonsense!
Oh, there are so many things
we don't need. Look at all that
beautiful scenery. Think how
much more work students would
get done if those mountains
were removed, leaving no excuse for them to sit outside
looking at the view.
The list is endless. Buzzers
in Brock. Totem Poles and Statues. People who come to work.
Rules and regulations. Christmas exams. And how about
those visionary souls who write
to tell us what this campus
needs?   All should be abolished.
Mystery:  what happened to this girl ?
Don't panic.
Xothing really serious hsm happened   to  ! his   , i:l.
S m's   real ly   an   upri :.hl   .-'"c. i
\ oi um. cer.a r i.mi t r.\ a'.'. t-> .md,'
I'he onlv I'm.-on
h"" I ms w.i. i -
li.e  way  the  p-siul Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
I  Don't Care, Care...
By DIANA SMITH
As a human being of little renown, but still possessed with
the desire of locating myself in
a situation of notoriety, I feel
that it is my duly to express my
sorrow at the rather untimely
death of that perennial favorite
Santa Claus.    .
Actually though, I sympathize
with the feelings of the person
responsible. We all have to admit that Santa is outdated.
Why, you say? Because he
continues to promise unsuspecting youngsters, gifts that are
beyond all terms of reality, and
then blithely goes "off job" and
forgets these rash commitments.
Another thing too, children are
beginning to realize at younger
and younger ages that he doesn't
exist.
DAMMIT
Remember that song, "I Saw
Mommy Kissing Santa Claus."
That little child became a neurotic. He was so frustrated after
witnessing his mother—a supposed pinnacle of virtue and
vvomanly dignity—a n d some
fantastically clothed creature enjoying the rites of connubial
bliss, that this youngster proceeded to contradict any, and
every reference to the joys that
Santa can bring.
Yes. he was the one that said:
"Christmas should be absolutely
buy-passed."
On this I agree. Why shouldn't
I" I don't have a stocking to tie
up. I don't even have the
strength to tie something worthwhile on. Simply , . . I don't
have any money.
Therefore I feel that I would
be quite satisfactory as Santa's
substitute. But only under one
condition will I consent to take
over this position—I insist upon
a change of title.
You can see my point? A
change would be as good as some
guest. I fill the bill, and, I'm
opposite too.
I don't believe in all this
bally-hoo of giving gifts. I just
like to receive. But, I'm not that
selfish; in that, I do find a sense
of giving in receiving. The receiving gives me pleasure.
GREETINGS
Another attitude to which I
am firmly opposed is this feeling
of complacency which exudes
from all the various greetings
that one receives during the festive season. A man goes all year
feeling that he is unable to do
anything worthwhile. Unfortunately, quite often he is correct
in his assumption! Then, all of
a sudden he is over-flowing with
Merry Christmas's and similar
idiomatic foolishness.
lAiwsdL cl raw
with
Cosmetique
Sans Soucis
NOW ON SALE
at   the
COLLEGE SHOP
Free   Beautv   Consultations
Every Tuesday—11:30 to 1:30
How much more appropriate:
it would be, for him to bubble j
forth with something along this'
line: "Well, you old sbn of a I
gun, who the devil are you any-!
way, trying to display your!
Christmas spirits, when you
can't even afford the cheapest!'' I
Or   perhaps   this   would   be
more  to  your  liking:    "Well,  I j
see you were caught with your ;
beard down." . j
This   is   reality,   rather  than j
that  skeptical   approach   which
simply demonstrates your ability
to forget what is, in an attempt
to be what isn't, and could
actually'never be . . . anyway.
WILLING
So you see, I'm qualified to
be the new Santa. I'm dogmatic
enough to realize that Santa
could never really "be." But
I'm very willing to show you
what he wasn't Of that I am
extremely capable.
The new name angle? How
about Manta Claws?  In it, there
! tk>¥
TYPICAL REACTION of innocent little children everywhere to the murder of Santa Claus.
An ifcu a (jeixiuA ?
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their reading skill. Speed reading can develop efficient
reading comprehension and concentration. With speed reading skill you can read and understand business reports* and
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A FREE scientific test will show you how speed reading
can lighten your reading load.
WESTERN  READING LABORATORY
2594 W. Broadway, Suite 2 CH. 7513
is the touch of the old, accompanied with the instinctive animalistic approach that we are
slowly but surely coming back
to. There is also enough of the
opposite to fully establish me as
an entity unto myself. I could
not be compared or even contrasted  to  the St.  Nick of old.
A parting thought . . . I've
always wanted to be a substitute
for Santa, and at last I can realize my ambition without the
interference of the original. I've
always been rather peculiar, and
sometimes quite unaware of my
previous actions.
But, Santa's finally dead: Long
live his successor!
ARTS BUILDING
TO BE NAMED
It has been announced that
the Board of Governors and
the Senate have passed a resolution that the new Arts Building be called the Buchannon
Building, after the former head
of the Arts and Science faculty,
Dean D. Buchannon.
The building, although some
faculty offices are in operation
there now, may not be opened
to the student body for lectures
until next September.
ATTENTION STUDENTS
for good reliable transportation   you   can   afford   .   .   .
Contact
HARRY PRYKE
at
ZEPHYR  MOTORS
130 W. Broadway — EM 2191
Exclusive British Ford
Dealers
Phone me now about how you
can earn spare cash.
NORMAN MacFRENZY
... to hang
EVERY YEAR
IT HAPPENS
UBC President Norman Mac-
Frenzy will hang some Christmas paintings in his living room
early next week, to celebrate the
festive season.
He does this every Christmas.
But this year he is going to hang
early for the convenience of it.
This is only one of the new
hangings promised for Saint An-
slum's Church, on the campus.
You're wondering how the
hanging can be both in Mc-
Frenzy's living room and St.
Anslum's church''
It can't,
Dr. JOHN B. R0SEB0R0UGH
DENTIST
2130 Western  Parkway
Behind the  Canadian  Bank
of Commerce
University Boulevard
Phone ALma 3980
HOME
TRIMBLE SERVICE GARAGE
4494 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, B. C. ALma 1551
$1.00 CASH!  with •very
purchase
of 5.00 and over.
Just bring your A.M.S. Card
Specializing in
IVY LEAGUE SHIRTS, SWEATERS, SOCKS, ETC.
"See our Christmas gifts''
MEN'S
CASUAL SHOPPE
230 E. Broadway EMerald 7027
Cat/J Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
Premier Sparks
New Match Plan
Premier Bennett today announced he will match any grant
up to $100,000,000.99 for the
purchase of a new Santa.
Parent - Teacher Associations
all over the Western world called for an emergency meeting of
the NATO.
Dulles has accused Russia of
plotting the Santa assassination,
and of causing new tension in
the Middle East.
Eisenhower has declared that \
the U.S. will not recognize the j
new Santa unless he is cleared
by the FBI of any ua-American
activities. j
Thc old Santa, it was discovered,   bore  a   name plate  which!
said "Made in Japan." The Canadian Congress of Labor has an-)
nounced it will refuse to recog-'
nize any new Santa unless it is
union made in Canada.
WIERD SIGHTING
NOT IDENTIFIED
CHEEK
A woman's tongue is a flight
of steps leading to calamity.
Karl Slesh, of Ketchup, Kansas, gave a talk yesterday to
3,000 enthralled students about
his sighting and riding in an
unidentified Flying Object last
year.
To quote Mr. Slesh:
Well, I was just setting my brain
for a long winter's nap when 11
hears   this   jinglin'   noise,   and I
clatter, an' I hops outta bed to j
see what was wrong. ]
"Then this fat guy, wearin' I
red fur pants, comes slidin' down {
the chimbley. He had a stump \
of a pipe that he held in his j
teeth, and the smoke, it circled
his head like a wreath. You
know. Well, he drops a parcel j
on the floor, tilts his head to J
one side, and disappears up the ,
Chimbley, so I followed 'im.     i
"Up on the roof, he whistles
at his machine,  and I  jumped |
in   it,  and  away  we  flew.  All •
this  time   he  keeps  yellin'   'O,
Sasha, the dancer, the  dunder-1
head Nixon, oh stupid let's answer an' we'll really fix 'em'.
So I .vas figuring maybe he's a
R sky, and knows something
about U.S. foreign policy.
When questioned further about
his suspicions, Mr. Slesh stated:
"Wei, he was wearin' them
red tur pants, see?. And he
coulda' come from Siberia the
way he was dressed.
Anyway, on this flight, he
keeps stoppln' and droppin' these
packages, I figured they were
bombs, all over, until we got
back to Ketchup.
"Then, when he left he yells,
'Happy Christmas to all and to
all a good night,' with a decidedly foreign accent. He musta been
a subversive."
This is thc main context of
Mr. Sleshe's speech, given in
Engineering 200 yesterday. A
tape recording of the speccli will
be rebroadcast next Tuesday if
demand warrants it.
'■'■-'.       -. f
-   BROOD
GARBAGE
(Continued from Page  1)
now catering to the drive in
clientele. Actually they are
offering curb service. What
happened to the six bottles of
rum at the Policemen's Ball?
and why did she do it? A nice
'un to look at, but a rum un
to go?
Pandorama—Convicted sex-
layer Jack Ripley was seen
hanging around Central Burnaby early this morning. If you
are wondering about Ripley's
insistence to the very last that
he is innocent, forget about it.
He gave a * demonstration of
how he raped five-year-old
Barbara Bitchley for fellow
Death Row inmates. I learned
this exclusive heartwarming
story late tonight. Vancouver
Sin police writer Grabba Holt
told me.
*V *ft* *r
Garbagemania — And    did
you hear the one about the columnist who bought his column
at a buck an item and got the
rest of his column from a beautiful spitfire.
Typical reaction of UBC
students to news of Santa's
murder.
Nothing
The Lunassey, in the inter-
Vst of tne spiritual cravings of
its readers would like to draw
attention to a little-known fact.
Realizing that this paper is
used to wrap garbage and keep
frost off the windshield, wo
have hesitated to mention this
before.
In this province, where already one Minister has gone
from pulpit to pot-hole we feel
that the time has come to tell
you that Jesus was born on
Christmas day.
EATON'S
OF CANADA
l.    ,-. ..A........ ■-.     i,.   .    .    ..:.v».:
THE
CAIPRNID STANDARD
COMPANY
CALGARY, ALBERTA
will conduct
EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
on the campus
January 6, 7 and 8, 1958
Positions in  Petroleum Exploration and Production
GEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION
Graduate, graduating and third year students
in Honours Geology and Geological Engineering.
Permanent and summer positions.
GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION
Graduate, graduating and third year students
in Honours Physics and Mathematics, Engineering
Physics, Electrical Engineering, Honours Geology,
Geological Engineering. Permanent and summer
positions.
PETROLEUM PRODUCTION
Graduate and graduating students in Minh.g
Engineering and Geological Engineering. Permanent positions only.
For interview appointment, please see
Office of Personnel Services — Hut M7 4     '	
VOL. XL
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1957
No. 31
UBC To Spark Centennial
Students And Staff
Plan Varied Projects
UBC is playing a big part in the B.C. Centennial Celebrations in 1958. She will also derive much benefit from them.
Both the students and staff are participating in many varied
projects. Contributions are being made in the fields of literature,
music, drama, history and sports.
"Or. Reg Watters of the English •      ---  ---
Department    is    compiling    an-i
anthology of the best writing on
'Tween Classes
British Columbia. Many of the
students and staff have had
their work accepted for publication.
Dr. Margaret Ormsby, history
professor if writing an oficial
history of British Columbia,;
which will be released early next
year.
Professor   Osborne,   fhe   Ath-
NFCUS President
Speaks to Students
EVERYBODY   WISHES   the   Food   Services a Merry Christmas.
Reid  Labels Teacher
Training Courses "Criminal"
One-year teacher-training courses were labelled "criminal" *   —
and much of the educational system "garbage" by Professor j il ^«*|A/^L*^
Chris Reid in his discussion of education here relative to that', fVlCI ill TwDCI
in Russia at the Vancouver Institute lecture Saturday night.!
He told an overflow audience: 13 ^%    am!au«
that   the   teaching   of   children   |V"""I1 I "ID
! was much too important a job to!     mi ,        . ,   «      ..  .
be entrusted to the products of I     The   University   of   Manitoba
ithe    one    year    ..methodology'., Student  Union  Council has  de-
i   „,,_„, , . cided .to   re-enter   the   National
courses. i
1 .    . , , . Federation of Canadian Univer-
"fn   Britain   students   achieve     .,    „,,  . s .
i , „ sitv Stuocnts.
at   the   age   of   14   what   they
] achieve academically here at' T!ie decision, 28 to 7, in favor
! 13. he said. "It may be the same of NFCUS, was reached at a
: amount in total knowledge but| hectic three-hour meeting, which
j unfortunately most of it is Gnr-!saw the national president of
j ij.^y |iere >• i the   Federation,   Walter   Tarno-
,,,,,,      ^        ,.    ...    ..   polsky, present to answer ques
Proaded  by  Dean  Neville  V.   ,. ,. ...
TUESDj Y
WALTER TARNOPOLSKY,
NFCUS National President, will
lelie Director, i.s in part respons- speak to die student bodv on Ihe
ible for bringing to B.C. the Grey ,opit.: ■•rJniversitv • Scholarships
Cup for 10r>8. Canada's richest 0ur Gri,.lt Xeed- ;it nf)0n in
($50,000) golf tournament and a,.{S ion.
the   Macdonald   Brier   national i •+%.%,
curling playdowns at Victoria.   \     CONSERVATIVE CLUB gen-
Dr. Malcolm McGregor, bead '. eral meetjng noon today in Arts
of  the   Classics  Department,   is!106.   John Tavlor, M.P., will be
a member of the board of Directors of the B. C. Centennial Committee, and Chairman of the Cultural Activities sub-committee,
arranging art and cultural presentations for B.C. next year.
Student members of Holiday
present to answer any questions.
*t* **T* *T*
PARLIAMENTARY  COUNCIL
Executive meeting today at 3.30
in Brock Extension.
9ft 9p 9f»
VARSITY    Christian   Fellow-
Theatre   will    be   touring   the,  ,.
province's  school  with  a   Cen-/sh,p, gT,era„Lmeeting  no°n  t0"
tennial  piay,  "The Magic  Nug
day in Ph. 201, to discuss future
program  of events    and    hear
get," during the summer.
The  highly  increased tourist ^hn B.rcl^speaking on Urbania
trade will provide many additional summer jobs for students. (Three million visitors
are expected next year.)
Another benefit will come
from at least $20,00 to be
awarded for scholarships.
This money will come from
the profits of a souvenir booklet
**f* v . v
SLAVONIC CLUB Inaugural
meeting — next term's program
to be discussed — in Arts 102 at
noon today. If unable to attend,
please phone Laurence at Alma
0615-Y.
ff* ^ if.
VOC — All raffle tickets and
money   to   be   returned   to   the
ERHART REGIER, M.P.
CCF Could
Win Fifty
tions   regarding    the    organiza-
. ,      , ,   don.
tion,     Protestor    Reid    charged
that •first-rate teachers are in a       Manitoba had been a member
1 minorilv " ' of NFCUS until 1935, when as a
j result of a student referendum,
REJOINDER ' .lu> nnivrrsjty' pUHod out of tiie
Dean    Scarfe    rejoined:     "we
can't  prove that as easily as we
can state il."
Scarfe of the College of Educa     °   "*<"»"«
A motion asking that a  referendum  be once  more conducted
Federation.    Thursday's council
debate was the first time in two
years   that   the   issue   had   been
The  Chemistry  Professor des-   brought  up at  a  meeting of the
cribed    the    current    Education   council.
School   program   as   inac.equate.
To the crowd's apparent delight
he slated "here our teachers take   m<1  „.[[h  (U,f|>.(t   .m.;  C0UIU,n   im.
;,- a federal election was call-   one year to learn  bow to  teach   nu,di;iU,;v ..forwards (U,,idod to
ed   now   the CCF  would  win  ;>(>   but  not  what to loach." reenter   NFCUS
s. ts. according to Ernie Regier. -I don't think a teacher who Follow im: the decision. Mr.
CVF MP for Burnnby-Coquit nnlv ,,,.,.( „r second year Fresh- Tarnopolsky said: "I am very
• ■■'<■ man   UliciniMry   can   tmmh    Ihe   phased ili.at Manitoba saw sit to
'."T.e CCF hold.-  l?.a s(-ats in  the    suhiem    Lo   children    over   ei.uiit    eemn'cr   N!'(Ts-S      1   I'ei 1  cirtain
Id."  r
to be published for the centen
nial.  A  contract  with  the  pub- i clubroom at noon today.
lishers provides that 820,000 or *      *      *
30 per cent of the profit, which- j     LUTHERAN  STUDENTS  As-
ever  is  the  largest,  will  go  to; sociation   last   meeting   of   die
provide scholarships. j tei'm    at     noon  today  in  HL-1.
We will benefit from several | SUld>' of Book 0)' Galatians to
sports events io De iielu at tne j bc continued. Everyone wel-
University, two of which are j comc-
the Highland Games on July 5!
and the B.C., swimming cham-■
pionships to be held August 15 i
and IC. ;
A colorful event, if it material- j
if* *f* ff*
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS'     COUNCIL   presents  Wayne  Hubble  and  Mike
ir.es, will result from thc recent Jeffries discussing the McGill
challenge by University of Tor- j International Affairs Confer-
onto  students  to   UBC   students   ence   Wednesdav   noon   in   Arts
]>■ ■ mm   House. yea
■■Peeking   "doi'd.m.    to.  stmlents. I'mim    ia
Im 1     I Oil,     edge ■    staled     I ha! uni m m .;    e. ■ >ne     ill     I a
! •. rease   m   se; [ ,   won M   I ike j U
n:    :    : ;■ im   'maun  'I I    e" Secia! a
m-       rem. a, '.<<-  <m   I'imm   (.'( V a  >■
i Co-.". t'tu;p;
". n  Pd:/o
it
-•   Hatlv. ;m,!    Im    las:    a.■tion    l!     has    dis
n , ucli    .   as ire pia; v-i I'm  I na ■ quniil u ,-s el'  lead-
lesei ■ " e'-.ds ii ■   Im     '.iisi-i"i mber   ri 11 iVi': i-
..(!    ssa    ,m    i s -. c I icat ieii    ■ ■! ! i' as   i'.    indica;!...:   'inn'   'he   mil;.
eiarn' \     ei.; i m-i ..     . i,  u, L' u. '    1 "   i e!"rn i   i he   \..t loan I   Fi d
'. h"    I '.(Inc.! me    (..', i! li    ;, m .i' :. a i    i.;    ! :'oni    '/'.thin    iiiln    Le'
'■        .    ' ■   r  .'. ilea   e
ntr.succ
on   Pacro   7)
to a cross-Canada tandem bicycle
100.
race.
MUSSOC     pre
sonts   Handel's
TODAY LAST DAY
Messiah. Leonard
■ducting   l he  New
Bernstein con-
York  Philhar-
TO CET FORMS
monic,   Wcdncsda
club room.
y   noon  in   the
Today is thc  last day  lo
-•f*       *
*                                 i
get  your Totem  forms  into
VOC   last   gene
ral   mecning   of          - -i
the AMS office.
year   rati le urs
w. too!  Everv-
You    can    still    pick    up
olic  out.
forms    in    the    Totem    and
.V.            *>•>-,
•¥■
■ AMS offices as well as from
P.r.U.S.     .enm
d    ma etin. .,    -!1
your USC  members.
I'd die- -Is.;     a!    .   ,a
■:   111   Idiom   214                    \
The Totem needs  this in
'. i e: 11 e ■' a i .   { : ' ;, a 1 a
:
formation   for  ihe   graduate
iCcmmsms-d u
i
i Paqe  \?)                        ]
section.
See 'TWEEN
(
r i a c,'-. T "
.* Lj f\ fc.1 .^ ... ^j Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE VBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail.  Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to cut letters, and cannot' guarantee publication of all letters
received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   PAT MARCHAK
Managing Editor   "Al Forrest
News Editor  - — Barbara Bourne
CUP Editor     Laurie Parker
Advertising Manager   Bill Miles
Business Manager    Harry Yuill
Assistant News Editor Bob Johannes
SENIOR EDITOR.   MARY WILKINS
Reporters and Deskmen:—Kerry Feltham, Neva Bird, Diana
Smith, Marlene Marleau, Brenda  Runge,  Wayne Lamb, Audrey
Ede, Bill Picket, Elaine Bissett, Al Springman, Peter Irvine, Ron
Hansen, Dave Robertson, Al Forrest, Barry Stuart, Lynn Clarke.
a U&hii Vrbwaj io:
0
% Professors who have to'mark our exams and see the
results of their lectures.
0 Freshmen who took our first editorial so seriously that
we have no staff.
> Russian scientists for providing us with editorial material
and the Vancouver Institute with an audience.
I Undertakers who are "horrified".
I Advertisers who have heard we're having a development
campaign.
) Mr. Bennett who is currently "standing on his record".
I Mr. Gunderson who is following suit.
I Mr. Sommers who is in a suit.
I Pie-eyed Engineers.
I Students' Council because it has such nifty parties.
I The College of Education for providing a topic to the
Debating Union.
I Graduates   who   forgot   to   go   to   Campbell's   for   their
Totem pix.
I The Faculty Committee on "bowling".
i The Food Services Committee for selling us such nice
big ice cream cones.
P' ' :
I ASUS for sponsoring the cocktail party for Honic^cofti-
coming Queen candidates.
i : |
The Football Team1 for being consistent.   ' i
LETTERS to the EDITOR
"Ivory Tower"
NOTICE
Students wishing tu contribute to this or other pages
of the Ubyssey are invited to contact the editor or editorial
board members (see masthead) during the holidays. The
editor may be reached at CEdar 8072; the news editor at
WAlnut 2-55W.
News reporters are especially required. If staff continues to be at a minimum, publications may have to be
decreased  to  two  issues  per  week.
News reporters should have some grasp of the English language and be willing to attend noon-hour events
and speeches, extract from speeches that which is of importance and interest to the readers without deliberate
bias in selection, and write facts into a concise news
story.
Writers who wish to contribute articles of an editorial
nature on any subject which i.s of interest to university
readers should contact the editor as soon as possible for
relevant information. Students or professors who do not
have a particular subject in mind but vl.o would like to
contribute will be assigned topics.
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
It was with a great deal of
regret that I read thc Ubyssey
editorial of November 28, 1957,
wherein an "Ivory Tower" was
built around the Students'
Council. I cannot help but feel
that the time has come to remind the editor that unless
this practice stops we will soon
be laying a granite tombstone
in memory of the student cooperation and student enths-
iasm that once was.
When an editorial page degenerates to a level where it
is nothing but a series of attacks on people who are con-
seientously trying to serve the
interests of the sludents, if is
time to question its value. The
need becomes even greater
when these attacks arise out
of the editor's own spite and
pettiness.
I do not mind seeing some
self-appointed crusader defend
the cause of the oppressed, but
it does disturb me when the
methods adopted are callous
and attacks made are not justifiably provoked.
The truth of the matter is
that no one wishes to destroy
this "Ivory Tower" feeling —
if one in fact exists — more
than the Students' Councillers
themselves. If they are not doing what they might to help,
they do not mind being told,
but a far more effective approach is a little constructive
criticism instead of these continual staJDs in th'.> back with
the very tusk of which the
tower is supposedly built.
It is hardly in order for someone vested with the responsibility and authority of our
newspaper to act like a spoiled
child every time she does not
get her own way. Just because
Council does not succumb to
her every wish and because
she has aon .over-apparent
hatred for Greek Letter Societies, she does not have to
continually attempt to create
clissention between these and
other   groups   on   the   campus.
Tiie editorial bpard owes a
duly to the student-body to perform its duties to the best interest of the student-body. It
cannot be said that this duty is
being fulfilled by threatening
to resign when the majority of
the student-body demands undergraduate pictures in Iheir
"Totem"; nor by writing spiteful editorials about their elected
representatives.
To quote one of your recent
headlines: "Get off the stick,"
Ub\ ssey.
Yours very truly,
GRANT   MACDONALD
; *     tf     tf
Council  Not Ivory
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dt ar Msidain:
In reply to your editorial of
November '„'<(. 1 would like to
draw the attention of the student body lo a feu points which
are not mack' clear in your
criticisms of "Ivory Tower"
policies  in   this  year's   council.
We cannot deny that the
Ubyssey reporter was asked
"to retrain" from publishing
details of three facts of last
Monday's meel ing. The reasons
for one of the requests are
clearly stated in the editorial
and the action behind the other
two  should   be  fairly  evident.
It would be very convenient
to follow the practice of past
year's    councils    and    adjourn
into committee of a whole
whenever discussion is to center around issues which have
not been fully explored or by
their nebulous nature may die
before further investigation.
While we are very optimistic
as to the possibilities of the
radio transmitter being placed
into operation all investigations
into this matter to date has
been done by a very small committee which last Monday was
merely presenting the results
of preliminary investigations
in order that Council be informed. This whole discussion
could have taken place either
in committee or over a cup of
coffee and the outcome would
have been the same.
Because of the small research
committee, many people who
will have a direct bearing on
the outcome of this proposal
knew nothing about it and
therefore will have been taken
completely by surprise as a result of Thursday's press statements. May I cite as an example the commercial broadcasters of this area whose cooperation will be required to
put this plan into an operative
state.— Only one station officially knew of this project.
We are not condemning the
Ubyssey for its. action as we
realize they have an obligation
to keep student informed. However premature announcements
can cause u great deal of em-
harassment as may well be
shown in this case.
Your council this year is not
setting itself aloft and trying
to push motions through without relaying the facts to the
students, however as the
Ubyssey so ably points out, it
has brought up topics of discussion which must sometimes '
be held until they are ready
for release.
The reason the Ubyssey has
been aware of those moves is
because the President has consistently    refused    to   go   into
Committee-of-the-whole feeling
as   he   does   lhat   an   informed
reporter can write a much better story when the time comes.
It is felt that the reporter who
has an insight to an issue from
its  inception   can   better  relay
information to the student body
than the reporter who hears a
discussion   when   the   motions
are finally put forward.
Yours truly,
HANDLE  JONES,
AMS Public Relations
Officer.
Debate, A Disservice
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
The debate on the resolution,
"Our teacher-training faUs the
cause of education," left me
wondering (a) what was its
purpose and (b) does the debating union train debators?
Regarding this resolution, I
read in two issues of the Ubyssey the' following quotes: "we
are not condemning our system
but simply examining it" and
the hopes that "an examination of potential remedies as
well as consideration of present
faults will be made." The meet-
ing did, however, condemn our
system by its vote and some
faults, while rhetorically considered, bore no fruitful remedies, (suggested: Elimination of
profit motive, elimination of
school boards, etc., etc.)
Not one of the members attempted an effective delimina-
tion of the terms—"teachers-
training" and "the cause of education." This, with the chairman's co-operation, set the
stage for audience impertinence. Then, after "serious"
weighing of these impertinences, a vote condemning a resolution which was hardly touched on, was taken. What manner of thought-discipline is
this? Is this how we are training our citizens (and taxpayers)
to reach a decision?
The Union has surely done
great disservice to U.B.C.
teacher-training (and real debating) by following a resolution to be so openly seduced
and ignominiously raped.
Here's hoping for real debates in the future and a Merry
Christmas to those who are
working to improve teacher-
training.
WILL ARGUE,
(No relation to Dr. K. Argue)
tf        tf        tf
*
tf     tf
Old, Old Story
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Every year the new Star.
Knights on Campus present
the readers of the Ubyssey witli
the old, old story. With an infinity of its and huts the problems of the gutty challenge-
meeters of the U.B.C. gridiron
are solved, and ' dynamic!'
U.B.C. blazes a path of football
glory into the golden west. This
time, il scorns we can even end
up with a profit, as well as a
winning team. Vancouver support, glory, recognition, etc.,
etc. Stan even throws in a bit
about Rugby, as a primer we
must suppose, to show that he
knows nothing of that game
either.
The old editorial football is
is pretty well worn-out this
year, but Stan's last boot
seems to demonstrate that the
football problems at U.B.C. will
always be ready for an old
solution.
H. BARKER. Arts 2
Grovy Coming
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
Any fool vvhb con read
those cute jingles on the men's
toilet walls in the Library can
see, fight a!way that this University ip not one of these bookish, ivory-tower places. We've
got our poolhall and football
team like any regular place,
■ and now the Real Estate boys
of Vancouver are sponsoring a
/course in house-selling which
will be featured by the commerce faculty.
With housing so scare its
great that we can train fellows to hunt up houses and do
all that wbrk like putting signs
on lawns. And they'll be able
to stop these racketeers, like
private owners who sell for
$15,000 when the house would
fetch $16,350, and people who
hold up the economy by tying
up good real estate with cheap
skate  pensioners and students.
If we really show our appreciation of what's being
done for us there's no tolling
what might, come. MacMillan-
Bloedel could smarten up our
old - fashioned leaf - raking
methods; Mr. Bennett might
give us a lecture series on. "All
the people all the time," and
B. C. Sugar Refineries could
chip in with the bakeries and
breweries to sponsor ' Price
Manipulation 403."
Anyhow it's some great to
known that we are coming into
our own and the gravy is be-
gining to seep down to is.
KEITH   CROWE
ARTS. 4 Tuesday, December 3, 1957
Teacher Training
(Continued from Page 5)
"If a person really knew his
own subject and had a basic
knowledge of Psychology and:
English . . . h<* could teach", he |
said. "I can't see the need of
eighty courses . . . when they
can't  even  wrae  English/'
Neither Professor Reid nor
Dean Scarfe let Society off the
hook in their discussion of education. Dean Scarfe pointed out
that the schools taught what the
public demanded.
PROPAGANDA i
Professor Reid said propagan- i
da and higher wages were necessary to raise the prestige-rating
of teachers so that higher-calibre
students would enter the profession. But he said the emphasis
on "making money" was as
much to blame for the low stand-
arcs.
"Our educational system is
competing with 101 methods of
wasting time. How can it win?"
he asked. "Education is made
to appear important only as a
means of making money."
He blamed this on the influence of mass media advertising
on teenagers.
MOTIVATION
The problem, according to
Professor Reid, is to provide
better motivation for students,
and to do away with the "garbage."
"What do we give up?" Dean
Andrew asked in a lively ques- j
tion period following the panel
discussion     between     Professor
Reid and Dean Scarfe.   He point- j  TWENTY FIVE CENTS
ed  out  that  it  would  be  more'
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
MR. WALTER TARNOPOLSKY (centre) discuss the National Scholarship Campaign with
Ben Trevino and George Nagler. The NFCUS President will speak to the student body
today on 'University Scholarships — Our Great Need," at noon in Arts 100.
s —photo by Al Groves
Our Miss Lucas Snatches
Third Beauty Queen Crown
FOR RAVEN■ ISSUE
By AUDREY EDE
By now everyone knows that  Carol Lucas, a  first year
Education student, as Miss Grey Cup reigned over the festivities in Toronto during the weekend.
In addition to her latest title, •	
difficult to achieve a concentration of objectives in an indivi-i
dualist society than in a socialist;
society. j
The answer from Reid: 'Loafing."
Custom Tailored Suits
(or Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Mat* and Wozny
I'SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
548 Howe St.       MArine 471 5
Raven day is almost here!
You intellects who wait
baited breath can catch this
black bird for a paltry quarter of a dollar. There are
44    beautifully    decorated
pages of scholastic variety
designed for those students
who are choosy about the'x
reading as well as for those
who choose to read.
Remember Thursday is
RAVEN DAY.
Carol   has   three   other   beauty
queen titles under her belt: Miss
Burnaby,   Miss   PNE   and   Miss
; B.C. Lions.
! Reeve MacSorley of Burnaby,
Mayor Hume of Vancouver, and
a representative of President
MacKenzie were among the hundreds of citizens who met Carol
when she arrived home on Monday night.
When this reporter spoke to
Carol's mother on Monday, Mrs.
Lucas said, "We're very proud
and happy for Carol and pleased
that    the    honour    has     been
brought to Vancouver,"
Carol was given the opportunity of a two-day trip to New
York, but turned it down because she was tired, had a cold,
and was worried about her
Christmas exams.
In addition to an MG convertible, Carol won a trophy, a radio
and a watch.
Mrs. Lucas said Carol would
be returning to school either today or Wednesday.
AMS At
A Glance
At the Monday meeting of
Students' Council: Walter Tar-
nopolsky. National President of
NFCUS, spoke on plans for the
coming term. Among plans he
listed efforts' toward the gaining of r ed.eralT'rovincial bursaries.
He answered Council questions regarding NFCUS sponsored life insurance, the NFCUS
Travel Department, and the job-
settling of Scottish students
brought over last year.
Wayne Hubble and Mike Jeffrey reported on their trip to the
McGill Conference on World
Affairs. The Conference, according to the returned delegates, was a success. Detailed
reports will be given to the student body Wednesday noon in
Arts 100.
Jack Giles presented a brief
to Council requesting a grant of
$120 for Parliamentary Council.
AK'S Council agreed the purpose of the Parliamentary
Group was meritous, and granted $100 from General Funds.
Position of the proposed
radio station on campus
was discussed, also the
sources for operating and capital
funds. There is no official administration approval on the
project yet, although the faculty
has expressed interest in the
possibilities of campus broadcasting.
McGILL CONFERENCE
REPORT TO BE GIVEN
Wayne Hubble and Mike
Jeffery will speak on the
McGill Conference on World
Affairs in Arts. 100, Wednesday noon.
Hubble and Jeffery were
to speak last Friday but due
to unfortunate circumstances
the meeting had to be postponed.
They will talk on Canada
and NATO, and Canada and
the U.N.
Varsity
Theatre
ALma 0345
December 2-7
Unforgettably John  Ford's
Finest Film
"The Rising of
The Moon"
(Actually filmed in Ireland).
- starring
The Abbey Players
ADDED ATTRACTION
"CHASING THE SUN"
(A Holiday in Florida)
N.,xt Attraction
Ernest Hemingway's
'The Sun Also Rises'
December 23-25
Spend Christmas with
CHARLIE CHAPLIN in
"Modern Times"
Christmas   Sale
All Merchandise Now Reduced 25%
Shop Now and Save!
Small Deposit will hold 'til Christmas
WATCHES • DIAMONDS - ALASKA BLACK DIAMONDS
ETC
POINT GREY JEWELLERS
Custom Made Jewellery
44.15 West 10th Avenue
Watch and Jewellery Repairs
ALma 4336
GO FORMAL ON CHRISTMAS
AND NEW YEARS
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NEW YORK COSTUME SALON
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ALMA 15G0
couturier-inspired!
V ,,«*        ^
Kitten interprets the Chanel
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in this new heavy-knit, "Shetland-type", Orion
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sizes small, medium or large.
$14.95 at good stores everywhere!
I
S
ffi,
SP438
'•HI
l
I
I
*
1
f
I
I Page 8 _________
Marquis Named
Music  Professor
Dr. G. Welton Ma.nuis has been appointed professor in the
Department of Music at Universiity of Britirh Columbiia. Dr.
Noi man MaeKenzje announced today.
Dr.   Marciuis,  who  is  at  pre- 'pn)r;rams.
sent studying and teaching on a       Dr   MarqUis  has  had   exien-
Fiilbrigiit Fellowship at thc Uni-  sive teaching and administrative
vcrsity   of   Oslo,   Norway,   will   responsibilities    in    both  these
take   up   this   appointment   on   [■,v\tjSt
Jimel. 1958. and will be rcspon- p^.,, ,n Walla WaHa Wash.
s;:.le for developing an expanded lngton> he WM educatcd at
program of musical studies at. -Vllitman college, the Cornish
1 -BC> ! School of Music in Seattle, and
The University hopes to ex- the University of Southern Cali-
p-aiid jts existing program of fornia, where he obtained his
musical studies as part of its, Ph.D. degree in Musicology in
: . "fri| uvU: and teacher training   1950.
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
CLUBS MUST SUBMIT
OPEN HOUSE PLAN
All     faculties     and     clubs
which have noi yet submitted
plans   and   budgets   re   open
|   house, are asked to do so im-
j   demiately.
Plans have been submitted
j   from   39   clubs,   for   displays,
I   and 22 have    noi    yet    been
heard from.
, He was appointed head of the
department of Music at the State
' Teachers College of Northern
Illinois ii) 1931. For the past
4 years lie has been Dean of the
Facully of Music at the Women's
Ccfrlege oi the University of
Northern Carolina, where he
cstrbliihed a new curriculum in
music conducting.
i
Fund
Builds
; Advance gifts to the UBC Development Fund have reached a
total of .$1,401,000, according to
:F-ul E. Cooper, general chairman.
The public appeal for a minimum   of   S3.000,000,    the   first
general   public   appeal   ihe   university has ever made, will start
; in January.
"While we have set SS 000,000
ai our minimum goal, I wish to
point out that a substantial oversubscription is urgently needed,"
said Ccopcr.
J\ problem in administration
F
T,
.o meet new trends and opportunities, modern industry
requires ever swifter financial and operating reports,
conf filtrating on significant data.
To achieve this faster, more useful flow of information,
C-I-L's finaiK'i■;! control stall is continually attaching the
Company's vast data-processing problem. Thc solution is
being sought in advanced mechanical and statistical techniques and in the critical anal; sis; of important variables.
Tins i-s one of the many areas in C-I-L where graduates
in Arts, (iiiiiinii'it c ii.cl Businc-; Administration are controlled with stiiiiula'ii g problems for which their back-
gromid ol study !,.;> paiticislsii!    fitted tln-m.
Cm.uii.ui Indus'.rics Limit"d own; and operates 22
plants across (ai.ada in which are produced 'Tcrvleiif'
polyester    fibre,    pain's.    y,n|--MuMic   resins,    industrial
Campus Visit
C-I-L. Company Representatives will visit the University of British Columbia on
Tuoday through Friday,
Junior, 7 to K) inclusive, to
interview students seeking
ivm.dor employment upon
graduation in 193H. Ap-
I iuhr.ents can be made
: mom .:•. y o u r University
l'imcuu nt Oil'iee. Tl is o^'mo
(an al.-o provide application
I inns lor summer employment..
chemicals, ammunition, fertilizers, coated fabrics and
commercial explosives. Many types of trained, versatile
people arc required to maintain C-I-L's position of leadership in these fields and to aid in the development of new
products and improved processes.
CIL is therefore vitally interested in employing graduates of Canadian universities and colleges and can
ofler them not only a bright future but a stimulating
challenge. To give you some idea of thc scope and
character of C-l-L and thc opportunities available, we
hove prepared a booklet entitled 'Careers for University
Graduates". A cop\ can new
be obtained from jour Uni-
vcisitv I'laceiuciit Office.
C*fc
CANADIAN   INDUSTRIES   LIMITED
Sating Canadians Through Chemistry
MR. A. E. SAWYER
Lectures   To
Mark  Conrad
Anniversary
The Fine Arts Committee and
the Students' Special Events
Con nittee are sponsoring a
scries of lectures to mark the
100th anniversary of tne birth
<•" tho novelist, Joseph Conrad.
The lectures will be given by
Mr. A. E. Sawyer, of the English
Department, who for some time
past has had a special interest in
Conrad,
The talks will be given at
12.110 noon on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, December 3,
-1 and rt, in the Auditorium.
Mr, Sawyer is basing hi.s talks
on the following aspects:
1. Joseph Conrad's life and
the reception of his work.
2. Characteristics of his fiction.
3. Political and social matters
— an evaluation.
V/ANTED
Your old double breasted suit
. . . to be made into a smart
• "■*'      . llli IO       u. ('...-.UJ       li.uiK i
•i! h !' e i.ew trim notch |-pel.
UNITED TAILORS
' > Granville
P.\ Kill)
DO YOU WISH
TO MARRY?
Mere is the modern w. y
to   meet   somcuno    most
likmy    to    le    congenial.
Many    highly    edi'eab d
men and women of excel
lent    personal    qualifier. -
i iom;    h ;i v e    registered
ui.h ■-
Commonwealth
McrrieRoie   Bureau
709   Dunsmuir   Siicoi
M'J.   3-3405
director:  D. L. BROWN, B.A.
(IJ3C  "iS)
> :
(.; :
HAVE YOURSELF
SOME GASSIN'
HOLIDAYS'
THE 711 SHOP
LTD.
natural   clothes   for   men
78!J Granville
7 11    S II O 1* Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
CLASSIFIEDS
NOTICE — Four piece Campus
Band available for parties,
dances, etc. Contact Norbert
Boyce, AL 0079.
NOTICE — Caribbean Students
Association W.I. students liaison officer interviews students
on Thursday 5th, Friday 6th
at Brock Extension club room i
'and addresses CSA on 7th —
watch for posters. j
WANTED — Ride to Calgary or j
Lethbridgc after 17th. Willing j
to help pay for gas and help <
driving.   Steve   Dcnecky,   CE
9472.
LOST — Tuesday, Nov. 19. a
Gladstone Grad pin (Red "G"
with date "1955-56" across
center). Finder please turn in
to College Shop.
LOST   —    Slide   ruler,   system
Darmstadt,   made   in   Japan
marked L.M. Please phone AL
1964R. "Reward."
WANTED — Lift from Nortli
Van for 9:30 lectures, 212 W.
4th. YO 9241.
WANTED — Ride from Ren
frew and Grant or vicinity
for 8:30 lectures, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Phone
HA   6077R. j
WANTED    —   Typing,   essays,
theses,   anything  —  will  de- j
liver if within reasonable dis-1
tance   of   home.   Can   Helma,
EM 9a96.
WANTED — Pair of 6' 11" or 7'
second-hand, skies for less than
$30. Also a safety harness.
Phone Jack Boulding, AL
2351.
WANTED — Two "gentlemen"
wish transportation to and
from Toronto, Ont. (or thereabouts) over Xmas. Will share ;
expenses and driving. Phone
Bill, AL 0198R or George,!
AL, 1512M.
LOST  —  While  wool  scarf  in i
library washroom, between 6i
and 9:30 p.m., Tuesday night.
Please return to coat rack, my j
ears are cold. i
WANTED — Third party for 5-
room  apt.  in  West  End,  .$36
month.   Ask   for  John   Beare \
noon hour in Chem. Engineering "Pit" rear of Chem. Bldg. '•
ROOM — Sleeping room, male
student, near 13th and Sasa-
mat, AL 0124L.
FOR SALE — If you are interested in a portable typewriter,
Seethe Famous Olivetti? Phone
Godwin Fassler, EM 5879.
LOST—Saturday, pair of brown
horn - rimmed glasses. WA.
2-4083, ask for Pete.
LOST — Tan wallet belonging j
to   A.   M.   Donaldson,   please
phone KE 1778Y. j
FOR SALE — One pair size 9
Austrian ski boots, almost new
condition. Also one pair alum-!
inum poles. Phone KE 6552L. j
FOR SALE — Crescent tape re-!
corder with tape and mike at- !
tachment, just $70. Gordon, j
YO 4559.
FOR SALE — 1956 motor scooter. Isocc Vespa with all accessories. Excellent condition. BA
7660.
WANTED — A fellow to share
room. $25 month, 3820 W. 21st
.AL 2945L.
FOUND — in Auditorium Bldg.,
one initial ring. Owner may
claim by identifying. Phone
AL 1412L, between 5 and  7.
FOR SALE — 1948 Austin 30
for sale. Good transportation,
SI 16. Phone MU 3-7074 after
6 p.m.
LOST — Broun leather wallet,
black stitching. Left in Bus
Stop phone booth 9:30 Sat.
a.m. Valued items. Finder
kindly call Dave Dewhurst,
KE 2809L.
LOST — One set English 434 j
notes, Tuesday, probably in j
stacks. Finder please call Bill \
Holt, KE 8326. As he's desper-!
ate.
WANTED - - Ride for two girls
from vicinity 20th and Macdonald to 8:30 classes and returning 5:30. Phone BA. 1982s
LOST — Alpha Delt Fraternity pin. Please contact Sb.ri
Hecker at Glenburn 3729R.
7^tth£on$1^r domjmim
FRIDAYS OPEN 'TIL 9
INCORPORATED  2*">   MAY   1670
OPEN DAILY 9 TO 5:30
PHONE PAcific 6211
fti viuh leave
b ML bade or !
. . . ond a Savings Account at
Thc Bank of Montreal*'is the way
to guarantee yourself that
secure feeling ...
♦The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed.
MEKLE C. KIR'JY, Manager
Your Campus Lrancli in the Administration Build>'g
Be   in  style  for
the  slopes
v/ith   glamorous
"Pedigree"
Fine Poplin Ski Jacket
14.95
You're lovely while skiing in this fashionable functional "Olympic" style ski jacket.
Raglan sleeved, hood with contrasting
lining, zips on ami oi'l. Knitted collar and
cuffs piolecl against wind and snow. Full
zipper Iron! 1o top of snug knit collar.
Detail stripes on arms. Water repellent
jacket in green black, blue black,
red black,
black.'while.
Others, 6.95 io $35.
Trim Wool Ski Slacks
See how the slimming, slim toper ol those
slacks  flatters   you.     All  slacks  perfectly
styled   for   free   action.     Elastic   gripping
waistband keeps slacks neat.
In black and navy. CA ff
Sizes 10 to  18. W&fJi
Ski Corner, HBC's Second Floor
* Miss  Teen  Shop
Everything for the Skier!
Ski Boots, Ski Togs, Equipment
at HBC.  Use your credit. Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957    ^
fo/10,  S&uUiiij^  JhJwuyh. .. *
DEADLINE
December
NFCUS LIFE PLAN
Exclusive to University Students at this UNMATCHED low cost.
HQOGOfcrorly   35
OO
PER
YEAR
$5,000/"<w/y$1750
PER
YEAR
Underwritten and giiarart'eed  by Canadian Premier Life  Insurance  Co»n,anyi-a Canadian Company with federal charter, licensed in all provinces
of Canada, from coa^.-to-cca-t and backed financially by insurance interests with assets exceeding $3:10 millions.
Particulars of NFCUS Life Plan
THE PLAN—Ordinary Life with special low-rate term
insurance for first 10 years or to age 35, whichever
is the shorter period.
AMOUNT OF INSURANCE—Minimum, $5,000. Maximum—no arbitrary limij, individual consideration.
THE PREMIUM—$3.50 per $1,000 annually during
the term period; Ordinary Lffb rate thereafter, Ordinary Life rates are included and guaranteed in the
NFCUS LIFE Plan Policy.
ELIGIBILITY—All students at the University of
British Columbia who are members of the UBC Alma
Mater Society are eligible for NFCUS LIFE Insurance.
EFFECTIVE DATE OF INSURANCE—Insurance
under each policy takes effect immediatelv uoon the
issue of the policy by the Company, whether the first
premium has been paid or not.
TOTAL DISABILITY BENEFIT—If totally disabled
your protection is continued in force without further
payment of premiums. If still disabled when term
period expires, your protection is automatically continued in torce on the Ordinary Life plan for the same
amount of insurance with all premiums on the new
plan waived until death or earlier recovery.
PRIOR CONVERSION OPTION—While the plan
automatically becomes Ordinary Life at the end of the
term period, there is an optidn for prior conversion to
Ordinary Life at guaranteed rates without further evidence of insurability. Also, conversion to any Limited
Payment Life, Endowment or Pension plan may be
arranged.
CONVERSION AGE—NFCUS Life Plan policies may
be converted at the attained age at the date of conversion or at the age as of the original date of issue
of the policy, in which case credit, will be given ior
ALL premiums paid in addition to the conversion
credit of $2.50 per $1,000 (see below.)
REDUCTION IN FIRST YEAR PREMIUM ON
•CHANGE OR CONVERSION—A reduction of $2.50
per $1,000 of insurance will be allowed fro i: the first
premium payable upon the change to Orcinnry Life
at the end of the term period, or upon cot.vrv.ion of
your NFCUS LIFE policy to any plan at any time.
For example, if converted at age 25 to $10,000 Ordinary Life the first year premium would be $125.40 reduced by $25.00 leaving a net amount payable of
$100.40.
ADDITIONAL COVERAGE FOR ACCIDENTAL
DEATH—Policies may include an Accidental Death
Provision at an extra premium of $1.25 per $1,000,
GENEROUS SETTLEMENT OPTIONS—The NFCUS
LIFE Plan contains attractive settlement options
whereby the insured at maturity, or the beneficiary,
may elect to take the proceeds of the policy in a variety
of instalments or on a life annuity basis guaranteed
for either 10 years or 20 years but payable in any
event for life.
RIGHT TO ASSIGN—You have the right to assign
your NFCUS LIFE policy. This is valuable as an assistance in obtaining loans (for example, for educational purposes) as in this way the lender may be given a
guarantee of payment in the event of premature death.
GRACE PERIOD—A period of 30 days of grace is allowed for the payment of any premium including the
first.
NON-PARTICIPATING—The NFCUS LIFE Plan is
non-participating during the term period, however, at
conversion, you may select either a participating or
non-participating permanent plan.
AVIATION COVERAGE—Death occurring as a result
of air flight is covered except where you are the pilot
or member of the crew.
NO WAR CLAUSE—There is no restriction as to the
peyment of death benefits U death occurs as a result
of war, declared or undeclared, except as outlined
for air flight.
For further information, contact:-
MR. SIDNEY K. COLE, C.L.U.,
Branch Manager,
Canadian Premier Life Insurance Company,
202-779 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone EXpress 2924.
EVERY STUDENT NEEDS LIFE INSURANCE!!
BECAUSE you need to begin your program NOW—the students who enters his life career with
a financial independence program ALREADY STARTED will, other things equal, achieve financial
independence sooner — and on a higher ultimate level. NFCUS LIFE provides this "starter" at a
price you can afford.
BECAUSE you need to insure the investment in your education — to protect those who have protected you. Every year, through death by accident or natural causes, there are students who will
never return. If someone has sacrificed to help you through University, be sure they are not left
with expenses and loans to pay.
BECAUSE only thus can you protect your "inturabiltiy" Insurance bought now guarantees your
right to permanent insurance for    life    regardless of changes in your health.
•     WHY THE NFCUS PLAN IS YOUR FIRST CHOICE
Remarkable savings achieved by NFCUS mass buying power — an advantage gained for University
students through their association together in NFCUS.
Tailored for University students and available exclusively through affiliation with NFCUS.
The group principle brings equal protection to NFCUS students of all ages — up to 35! Non-Canadian students are also eligible if attending Canadian Universities.
A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY
Your affiliation in NFCUS makes it possible for you to own $5,000, $10,000, $25,000 or EVEN
MORE life insurance on your own exclusive pia n covering you during your years at University
and several years therafter if necessary, at an exceedingly low rate, — then, when you are working
in your chosen field (or practicing your profession) and are financially established, you begin to
pay the premium for permanent Ordinary Life insurance — also at guaranteed low rates.
SPECIAL ENROLLMENT OFFER TO 1st YEAR STUDENTS ONLY
First year students may enroll on the attached short Form "A" aplicatio.i for up to $10,000
NFCUS LIFE Insurance until December 31, 19 57. Thereafter complete medical evidence of
insurability will be required. A medical examination is not generally required during the
eiiroumetu  period   however   tiie  Company   reserves the right io decline any application.
TO ENROL   .    .    .
Complete the application printed below, clip and  mail before December 31,  1957.
On amounts un tn $10,000, a medical examination is not generally required.
NOTE: This application is on newsprint. Use blue or black ink for photographing. If ink runs,
pleas* us* ball point, but all information must be clearly legibil*. Thank you.
PLEASE   PRINT
ALL
INFORMATION
TO THE FORM "A
Canadian Premier Life Insurance Company
Natural   Gas- Building,   Winnipeg   2,   Manitoba
APPLICATION For INSURANCE on Th* NFCUS LIFE PLAN
Id   Vcur  Term  <>r  'IVrm   of   Ak<"  H*>,   nPtyvM   birthday,   whichever   is   the
.shorter  period,   wit li   ordinary  Life   thereafter,   i waiver  of  premiums  included,)    (prior    conversion    option    ncluded.)
II
(1) APPLICANT   	
First Name
(2) PERMANENT ADDRESS: STREET
Middle Name
Last Name
   City.  Prov-	
Family home—where mail may be sent if necessary)
(3) PRESENT ADDRESS: STREET  City Prov..	
(4) PLEASE MAIL PREMIUM NOTICES TO: PERM ADDRESS fj or PRESENT ADDRESS □
(5) DATE of BIRTH     (6) MALE       [J (7) MARITAL       (8) WEIGHT INS.
day   month   year       FEMALE  []        STATUS   (9) HEIGHT...FT....INS.
(10* ARE YOU NOW IN AND DO YOU USUALLY HAVE GOOD HEALTH? Yes □   No Q If "No"
give details in Section 11.
(11)   FOR ANY ILLNESS REQUIRING MEDICAL ATTENTION GIVE DATE, NATURE OF ILLN
ESS, DURATION AND NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF MEDICAL ATTENDANTS or HOSPITAL
(12) (a) Have you flown or do you intend to flv other than as a fare-paying passenger on a schedul
ed airline? Yes |~l   No n If "yes" explain in "c."
(b) Have you ever applied for insurance without receiving a policy or the exact kind and
amount applied for or have you ever been offered a "rated" policy? Yes [H   NoQ If "yes"
explain in "c."
(c) Explanation     	
(13) Are you a member of a student organization affiliated with NFCUS? Yes []   No[]
University Faculty       	
(14) Date FIRST entered university or college affiliated with NFCUS.
(If studies interrupted, give date of first entering) (15) Year of expected graduation..-
(16) AMOUNT   OF   INSURANCE
H   $ 5,000       @  $17.50     (1?) NAME of BENEFICIARY 	
j"]   $10,000       @    35.00 (All Names in Full—Example, Mftry Jane Doe, not Mrs. Jane Doe)
[j   $25,000                  <JLt87"5° (18) RELATIONSHIP OF BENEFICIARY TO
$_...(!<) $.1.51) per M» APPLICANT (Wife, Mother, etc.) 	
Accidental Death provision <1»> l enclose payment for first year's premium ____□    —check
@ $1.25 per M $  Please issue Policy and bill me, 30 days to pay ..Q    —whifh
Plus
It is understood and agreed that the foregoing statements and answers are complete, true and correctly recorded.
I hereby apply to the Canadian Premier Life Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Canada, for insurance as described above and agree to pay prem iums at the rate shown.
DATE   19  	
Signature  of Applicant
Did you complete all NINETEEN sections?      Pleas* be surel
THIS ENROLLMENT OFFER FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS EXPIRES DECEMBER 31, 1957
Students other than first year students may also complete Form "A," and full instructions will be
forwarded from the Company. Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
CampuAfieat
By AL FORREST
Jingle Bells.   Jingle Bells.
Well, here it is November
again and Christmas is almost
over for another year. The
downtown merchants are planning to move to ban Christmas
sales before the first of September. One merchant's Christmas
sales have been so successful
that he is,thinking of expanding
his store by renting a nearby
church for the whole month of
December, and there's a nice
chair for Santa to sit on — in
the pulpit.
BRIGHTER SIDE
But Christmas has its brighter
side. A man once said, "I am
the light of the world," we ctle-
brate this by getting lit,
Everyone is so friendly at
Christmas. The friendly grocer,
the friendly toy merchant, the
friendly loan salesman. But
Christmas doesn't have to cost
a lot of money. My old friend
Harry hasn't spent a dime on
Christmas for the last five years.
Harry will be six next week.
At Christmas, it is better to
give than to receive. Ties! I
like the ties that light up and
say, "I love you" or "Kiss me
quick". Last year a friend sent
me a tie that said "Where's my
dollar?'' Damn Eskimos. It
Winnipeg had come through on
Saturday, I could have sent him
the tie back!
PRACTICAL GIFT
A practical gift for a friend
who has a car is to give him a
gallon of gas — then the car can
get tanked, too.
People say Christmas is becoming too commercialized.
Merchants make too much :
profit. I
Well, I don't know, but one [
store last year was decorated in j
the traditional red and green— \
and guess what they used for ]
green.  „
This is the time of year when ;
people start writing letters.
Having run out of Christmas
cards. I received a funny card
last year, it read "Merry Christmas Lucy" I don't know how
they sot ray name wrong; and
they got my address wrong, too. !
SANTA CLAUS
Santa Claus is going out of
fashion with these modern kids.
I asked one five-year-old what
Santa was .uoing to bring her for
Christmas and she said: ;
"Huh! Santa Claus is for
squares  and  chidren."
I though! lhat was very very
funny. I told her lhal. "Thai's
very funny," 1 said. 1 put it t'i
her: '   '
"If \ou are not a child, who
is?"
"Oh, little Jimmy i.s just a
child."  she told  me.
"Jimmy." I shrieked. "He's
older than  you arm"
"Yes. but girls grow up much
quicker than boys. Dr. Spock
j.ays so."
As  I  stood   by  in   amazement
She ran off with her girl friend.
Last   thing   I  heard   as  she   ran
off down Ihe street was her call >
to her girl friend:
"And what i.s Elvis Presley
bringing vou for Christmas""     i
REGULAR
The last regular edition
of The Ubyssey came, put
last Friday.
CCF Could . . .
(Continued from Page 5)
members who ran last in the last
election.
Reiger said that the provincial government should live up
to its financial responsibilities to
UBC.
"This is a very good time In
light of the present unemployment, to speed up Its capital
grant program."
Regier said that he felt that
"the head of a university should
not have to go on bended knees
to business heads in Vancouver
and New York for money fori
matching grants."
Olivier's version is today in
the Auditorium, 3.30, 6.00
and 8.45.
Jobs Scarce
At Christmas
"There will not be enough
jobs to go around," said Job
Placement Service head Shearing, when interviewed today.
The reason more students do
not get placed is that their late
exams keep them occupied until
mosts of the business rush is
over, stated Mr. Shearing.
The majority of the jobs are
with the post office delivering
and sorting mail. Few other
openings are expected.
TOTEM SHOES
JUST ARRIVED   .   .   .
More White Bucks, Men'i
Deter! Boot* and  Casuals.
Opposite Safeway Parking
4550 W. 10th' AL 2540
1
FilmSoc Presents
Tuesday, December 3 at
12:30
"The Knockout"
Chaplin and Arbuckle
Crashing Through
//
a
Keystone Cops
The Conrad Centenary Lectui«e
originally'slated for the auditorium,
will now be in Physics 200.
Tuesday  Featurje 3:30,  6:00,  8:45
"HAMLET"
Your Key to English 200
Choose
your
own success
with
CANADIAN
ALLIS-CHALMERS
>\
i '!, J J . •; i i j *.
WHICHEVER way Canada's industrial future shapes up, it
looks as though Allis-Chalmers will be an important part of it.
And this is where you come in.
A thorough and complete programme of training and promotion awaits the engineering graduate (electrical or mechanical) at
Canadian Allis-Chalmers. Excellent pay and conditions are supplied
during this training period, and the programme opens the door to
positions of great opportunity as sales engineers, application specialists
and district managers with this, one of the world's foremost suppliers
of industrial processing and electrical equipment.
The diversification of the company's products means that thc
student, after initial post-graduate training, can specialize in any of
a number of fields. With plants at Lachine, Que., and St. Thomas,
Ont., employing about 1,000 personnel, Canadian Allis-Chalmers
is currently supplying each year many millions of dollars worth of
equipment to customers across the country. The company's market is
as wide as all industry. Its future is the future of all Canada.
•
It can be your future, too. Aud the first step touard tt uould be to
urite for further information to:
Peter Maclntyre
i Manager, Industrial Relafiont
Canadian Allis-Chalmers Lid.
Lachine, P.Q. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
'Tween Classes
(Continued from Page 1)
NEWMAN CLUB Mass every
Wednesday in Club House at
4.35 p.m. All Catholics are invited. Masses to be held at the
same time Dec. 11 and 18.
**T* **V *f*
MUSIC CIRCLE presents Pur-
cell's "The Masque of Timon of
Athens" Wednesday noon in
Brock Music Room.
**V        *t>        **r
W.U.S Student  Wives Club
presents a talk and demonstra
tion on "Christmas Wrapping"
Wednesday evening at 7.30 in
Mildred Brock Room. All wives
are welcome.
V X *T*
BIOLOGY CLUB presents Mr
Allen Brooks giving an illustrated talk on "Some Aspects of
Wildlife and Vegetation in East
Africa" Wednesday at 8 p.m. in
Wesbrook 100.
rp -rf* *T
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Organization testimony meeting on
Wednesday at noon in Phy. 200.
All are welcome.
PRE-MED SOCIETY presents
full-length film 'of the CBS production "Out of Darkness", a
survey of modern Psychiatry. It
is directed by Karl Menningcr
and narrated by Orson Welles.
Wednesday noon in Wesbrook
100.
•f *r *r
THURSDAY
SPORTS CAR CLUB general-
meeting in Engineering 201 at
noon Thursday. Bob Gerrard
will speak on the properties of
oil additives — two Indianapolis
500 films will be shown.
1958
Postgraduates, Graduates and Undergraduates in
Engineering, Science and  Mathematics
THE NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL -
invites your application for a
CAREER, TERM OR SUMMER POSITION
Modern  well-equipped  laboratories  at  Ottawa,  Saskatoon
and Halifax.
On the job training vvith outstanding engineers and scientists.
Competitive starting salaries.
Excellent opportunities for advancement.
Many employee benefits.
Information and application forms may be obtained
in your Placement Office
PHILSOSOPHY CLUB presents a recorded talk by Prof. J.
Wisdom of Cambridge University of "Free Will." HM-2 at
noon Thursday. Dr. Stroll will
be present to answer any questions arising.
*r        *v        •!*
FRIDAY
ALL-PHI  meeting  in  FG-100
on Friday at noon.
**r        *r        *f*
SUNDAY
UNITARIAN    CLUB    — An
informal discussion and social
evening will be held on Sunday
evening at 8.30 at 4666 West
3rd Avenue.
OWN
A   BRAND   NEW
REMINGTON
TYPEWRITER
$1
per   'r JL    week
THE COLLEGE SHOP
40   YEARS Of SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
°p«'^'o  /STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. ITD*
TElEPHONt      PACIFIC   OI7I
1035 Seymour Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
Student
Failures
Probed
TORONTO, (CUP).—Why do
people who are capable of obtaining a university degree fail
in the attempt?
This is the question Dean
James Gibson has been probing
for the last few weeks'for his
topic: "Preparation For University" presented at the Ontario
Association for Curriculum Development last week in Toronto.
"There are three quite obvious
reasons why people fail at university," the Dean stated.
DON'T WORK HARD ENOUGH
."For one thing, students just
don't work hard enough and
apply themselves."
"Secondly, students who have
lots of ability haven't progressed
fast enough. They ought to
have some accelerated program,
or their full ability isn't used."
"Finally, students frequently
have many skills outside academic? studies, but they are pressed
into university because their
theory is that they ought to attend college.
Dean Gibson also pointed out
the necessity for university
teachers.
ENROLLMENT MUST BE CUT
If universities cannot get the
required six or eight percent of
the best people for university
teaching, one or two steps would
result:
(1) Universities would adopt
the drastic policy of indifferent
teaching, or
(2) University enrollment must
be cut down .by some sort of
selective process. "This may
have to come anyway," said the
Dean, "but it will come with
reluctance on our part."
ooooooooeoooooooooooooooeoooooooooooooooo»909ooooott039ooaaoaaoB90ooooooooca *\
V
Imperial Oil Limited
Producing     Manufacturing   Chemical Products       Marketing
(Production and
Exploration)
(Refining)
(Petro Chemical)
(Sales, Merchandizing and
Operations)
Pipe Line
(Transportation and
Supply)
For Post Graduates, Graduates and Undergraduates from the following courses:
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL ENGINEERING
MINING ENGINEERING
ECONOMICS
COMMERCE
CHEMISTRY
HONOURS CHEMISTRY
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
HONOURS  MATHS,   and   PHYSICS
HONOURS GEOLOGY
GEOLOGY
Representatives from the above Departments will conduct campus interviews
on January 9th and 10th
Persona! interviews may be arranged during the visit by making an appointment through
PERSONNEL OFFICE:  Hut M7' West Mall
'jt<xcc6<ice&\i>aGG&yvs&s&&?&
I Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 13
What a night—
hmm, I feel good
in these oh so
sheer Baby Dolls
from Finn's.
I'm set for
the day
in my Jantzen
Campus 3-holer,
my Ivy League
Tie and my
Forsyth Shirt,
all from Finn's.
WHATEVER
THE TIME OF DAY
YOUR EVERY CLOTHING NEED
CAN BE FOUND AT
I'm real casual
in
Slim Jims
by Jonathon
of California
and my
Kitten.
Oh such problems
—how do I
choose between
my
Jonathon Logan
party dress and
my
Algo Beauty—
both from Finn's.
Men
keep warm
from the winds
of the Mall
in a
Croydon
Campus
Car Coat.
JUST ASK ANYONE WHO KNOWS US
The suit for me is
the Botany 500
from Finn's—
I'll wow her
tonight.
or better still
Com in and $s& Joh QfouAAoltf
FI1S
the fashion store for campus wear
with three stores to serve you
Feel gay
in a
Miss   Sun   Valley
Flare Skirt
and
Crinoline.
Now trade dad
the keys for his
car for the
plaid house-coat
you bought him
at Finn's—
he's set for the
evening and so
are you.
REMEMBER. . .
FINN'S WILL DONATE TO THE U.B.C.
DEVELOPMENT FUND
9%    OF THE PURCHASE PRICE OF
Fellas, let Finn's
tough, crease-
resistant slacks .
hold you up
after a hard day
of labs.
ANY
Now show
mother how
grateful you are
by  helping her
into the
dressing gown
you got  her at
Finn's.
PURCHASE MADE BY A
U.B.C. STUDENT AT ANY ONE
OF THEIR 3 STORES
UNTIL DECEMBER 25
Co-eds,
change to Finn's
lounging   pyjamas
for casual living
as mother
slaves over the
stove.
Men,
let   your
Townline
sport  shirt
from Finn's
dignify you
beyond the call of
"dishes to be
washed". Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
+>■■***>. a <
P* Jfcj*   „ **>
Chiefs Win 13-6
Over Meralomas
HUSTLING UBC FEMALES edge Victoria 2 to 1 by showing top grasshockey form as in
above picture. ,   —photo by Jim Barton
UBC  Edges Victoriaites
2-1 In Girls' Grass Hockey
MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU
AND BOWLING WINNERS TOO
' Results of the eliminations held Thursday for UBC's
entries in the Women's Canadian Intercollegiate Telegraphic Bowling meet have been posted.
First, Doreen Fraser, 175; Bonnie Duncanson, 172;
Gl Plato, 172'; Mo Thompson, 170; Joan Thomson, 169;
Carol Miller, 155; Liz Boyd, 148; Denis Richardson, 142;
Barb Hart, 138 and Jean Waldie, 134.
These ten finalists will bowl on Thursday. The top
five scorers will be sent to Alberta.
What Makes Bop Corn Bop?
Topping corn curtains water. When the water gets hot enough,
the kernel explodes. Result: popcorn.
We're not passing this information along as a public
service. Actually we're up to the same old game.
Vou see, popcorn makes most people thirsty.
Fortunately, when most people get thirsty
they hanker for the good tast- of Coca-Cola.
Wouldn't 11011 like some popcorn right now?
C'inon now, wouldn't you?
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
A oaSi for    Cj'k"" is a call for "CocmCola". Both trade-marks
identify trie m«n refreshing  bevorugo—the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
The UBC women's grass hockey team defeated Victoria College 2-1 in a close game on
Saturday afternoon on the women's field.
The two teams, evenly matched, will play a return game some
time in January, when UBC
wilWravel to Victoria.
Em. Gavin scored both goals
for UBC, while Sally Timmis
scored Victoria College's lone
goal.
WotkttA.
PINGPONG — Intramural
final result, winner Alpha Gamma No. 5, Gail Turland and Lorna Allen.
BASKETBALL — Intramural
girls' rules semi-finals today
with PE-AP at 12.35 and GPB -
Phrateres 1 at 12.55. Finals on
Thursday at 12.40.
By PETER IRVINE
UBC Chiefs moved into second place in the Miller Cup
standings on Saturday by way
of a 13-6 win over the* Meralomas,
The»Mi?raloma club took a
short lived lead at the 15-minule
mark of the first half when fullback Henderson booted a 25-yd.
goal from an offside penalty.
UBC countered 19 minutes later
on a try by wing forward Mike
Chambers.
TIGHT SCRUM
From a tight scrum on the
Meraloma 25, the ball was heeled quickly and -flashed out to
Paddy Sloan running on the
blind side. The nimble centre
cut in towards the posts and
slipped it to Chambers who had
come up quickly in support. The
big forward then crashed over
from the 10 with three, defenders on his back. Hooker Stu
Smith made no mistake on the
convert.
Ten minutes into the second
half, the Chiefs increased their
lead to 10-3. A fine forward
rush forced the Meralomas into
some frenzied passing in the
backfield.
FLEET WINGER
Fleet winger Dave Howard
seized the opportunity and
flashed in to intercept on the
'Lomas 25. He easily outdistanced the defenders and made
the touchdown between the
posts.    Smith again converted.
Henderson put his team back
into the game seven minutes
later on a 15-yard penalty kick.
SPLIT THE UPRIGHTS
Gerry McGavin, in what was
probably his best kick of the
season, put the game on ice a
lew minutes from the final
whistle. The large forward
split the uprights from 40 yards
out at a sharp angle.
BIGGEST RUGBY UPSET
UBC Braves were upset 8-6 by
the Ex-Brits in what the down
town papers called the "biggest
English rugby upset of recent
years."
Ron Longstaffe and Doug
Muir put their team ahead 6-3
in the first half, but a converted
try in the final minutes by the
Brit squad gave them the win.
UBC Tomahawks tied the
dangerous Trojans 8-all, while
the Redskins were shut out by
Rowing Club 2nds 9-0.
Badminton
Goes Good
The UBC Badminton team did
well in the Vancouver and District Badminton Tournament
which was held Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
at the Lawn Tennis Club.
DEFEATED IN FINALS
In the ladies' open singles,
Char Warren was defeated in
the finals.
Eain Lamont pulled off the
biggest upset of the tournament
when ne defeated the eighth
ranking Canadian player to
reach the semi-finals. Lamont
was defeated by Bert Fergus in
the semis, of the men's open.
Char Warren and Joselyn
Pease reached the semi-finals in
the women's open doubles.
In the men's doubles, Lamont
and Wayne Morgan were defeated in the quarter finals.
LOST IN FINALS
Les Trabert lost in the finals
of the B singles. The B mixed
doubles saw a UBC team of Joan
Van Akeren and Gordie Walms-
ley win. Art Yeske and Gwen-
dy Lamont reached the semifinals.
Peter Godfrey and Walmsley
lost out in the semi-finals of the
B men's doubles.
In C mixed doubles, .Shakespeare and Black were runners-
up.
H.
KAYE BOOKS
SPECIALTIES
• Soft covered classics
• Out of  print editions
• Always   interested   in
used text books
857 Howe St.
MA. 4723
Wuuej
Don't be fooled by appearances. Good
Time Charlie missed his last payment,
so both car and smile are due to fade
away. How different had this madcap
boy set aside a few bucks in a Royal
Bank Savings Account. Car, smile and
girl might still be his. Take heed and
open your Savings Account today.
THE ROYAL BANK OP CANADA
There's a handy branch of the Royal nearby Tuesday, December 3, 1957
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Birds Finished 2nd
In Totem Tourney
KJZJ
f*i
*•*
SANTA BRINGS ONLY HALF,
A SCHEDULE TO UBC BIRDS
UBC Thunderbirds will only play half sf schedule in
the Evergreen Conference next year.
They will play the second half the following year. The
1958 sdhedule includes games with CPS, Central and
Western Washington.
No reason was given for the schedule change announced Monday night. UBC will.try to fill out the schedule by playing teams not in the Evergreen Conference.
UBC Duo Claim
New Relay Record
Two UBC track stars attempted to set a new ten mile
relay record, competing against times already made by athletes
and recorded in the Track and Fields News and Shorts Illustrated magazines.
Jack Burnett and Jim Moore $-
beat the record of 48 mins. and
NOTICE
Local   officials   are   awaiting
word from the magazines before
18 sec. — for the race  run by (the record can become official,
two men over a distance of ten
miles.     The   distance   must   be
completed   by  the two  in  some
manner.    Burnett    and    Moore
ran  twenty    alternate    quarter I     VOLLEYBALL — Intramural
miles to complete the course in   finals on Friday    at    12.45 be-
44.40 min. | tween Acadia 1 and Alphi Phi.
Jlues get win
UBC Blues won a thrilling,
well-played game, 39-37 against
first place Eilers on Thursday
night at' Sir Winston Church-
chill.
PACE WAS FAST
The pace of the game was
fast right from the starting
whistle, when B'ues went ahead
by six points before Eilers finally scored.
In  the second  quarter  Blues
fell behind and remained there
until the final quarter, but at no
time were the teams separated
by more than six points.
JONES WAS STANDOUT
Cynthia Jones was a standout
for both teams with 17 points,
nine of which were scored in the
first five minutes of play.
•#•••••••••••••••••
• ««*t««t«at*«**«**«***«**«.. ••••••
u
1958
Travel by chartered motor roach and sre the best of I'.urope
at a minimum of expense consistent with emntort on an All
Student Tour especiufly planned for University Students. You
will cross the Atlantic by new liners of the Cunard Line and stay
at small, well chosen, often delightful hotels typical of the
country. You will travel in a small party of 20 to 2o on an
itinerary that is hard to heat, under the guidance of 1'rol'. Gordon
Tracy, Head of German Department, Victoria College, University
of Hritish Columbia.
Itinerary: sail June a RMS SAXOSIA from Montreal
for Southampton. Motor loar around Britain int hiding
Devon and Cornwall, Cntswolds, Shakespeare Country,
V.ntiUsh lakes, Sent/and, and haelc to London via
Ymk anil the Eysl Coast. Holland, Cologne, the
Rhine, Switzerland; Austria ineludin** Sahlmn:. and
I lenna; I '■nice, I'limMiee, Hill Tonus, Rome, Rieiera,
Ireneh Alps, faris      ''■>' days  -ilJ',7
Or, if vou prefer a self-drive car, we sugcest mu nra'.ini/c miir
own  p.irlv  of friends,  travel  your own  route and  let   the  1   IC
■are of .ill lhc details.
Half the fun is planum::, but carlv planum-; means
a more sueeemlul hohd.iv !
lakt
UNIVERSITY
TRAVEL
CLUB    1.1 D .
IMG
president: G. H. LUCAS
57 Bloor St. W., Toronto, WAInut 4-9J91
ROYAL
CANADIAN
AIR FORCE
UNIVERSITY RESERVE
TRAINING PLAN
has openings in the Technical
and Non-Technical lists
(male)
You are enrolled as a
Flight Cadet in the Reserve
Force — receive 16 days
pay during the university
term — and have a potential
of 22 weeks additional paid
employment during summer
vacation months.
Take advantage of this opportunity now, while ynu
are still attending university.
For full information on requirements, pay and other
benefits . . .
See Your
R.C.A.F.
Resident Staff
Ficer
Local rd  in  (ho
I'BC ARMOURIES
UBC BLUE PENNY LOWE takes a jump shot in a practice
game Tuesday against UBC Golds. Blues won a surprise
victory Thursday against Eilers B — final score 39-37.
—photo by Alar. Groves
Fi Delts Top Mens Sports
MEN'S  TEAM  STANDING
Intramural standings at the
end of the first term are: —and
includes swimming, golf and
cross-country.
1. Phi Delta Theta, 56; 2, Fiji,
54; 3, Forestry, 54; 4, Beta, 46;
5, Engineers, 36; 6, D.U., 36.
In Intramural Touch Football
the playoffs will be held after
the Christmas break.
Playoffs in the Intramural
Volleyball will start this Friday,
December 6.
tc carry a child's voice...
SSTW
 ■■■■■■■■ am. f     «   '•;
... or move the bottom of a lake
At Lachine, Que., Northern Electric manufactures telephone
coil wire which is as thin as a human hair...
At the same plant, Northern recently completed a mammoth
custom-Built power cable with a diameter of just under
six inches. This cable—.one of the largest of its kind ever
produced—is supplying electric power to two gigantic
10,000 h.p. dredges now operating at Steep Rock Lake.
These two contrasting achievements in manufacturing are
dramatic proof of the versatility of the Northern Electric
Company. In addition to manufacture-3 electrical wire and
cable, and communications equipment and systems, Northern
Electric also distribute approximate'/ 100,000 electrical
products which stem from more than 1,000 separate
manufacturers.
There are interesting careers—and a coi'.'nua/ need for University
Graduates—at the Northern Electric Cor.miany limited. A letter or
postcard to the College Relations Department, Box 6124, Montreal,
will bring full information concerning these oppoitunities.
Morthertt Electric
SERVES   YOU   BEST
tti-'-i Page 16
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, December 3, 1957
Inco Research helps Canada grow
This scale model of an orebody at Inco's
Creighton Mine is made of layers of coloured
sand and gravel. The dark layer near the bottom
represents the higher grade ore; above are layers
of lower grade ore and waste rock containing
little or no ore. By shifting the flow of these
r
sands, Inco was able to study and adapt an
unusual method of low cost mining to this ore,
making its recovery economical.
Through |HCOReSe9lch lower grade
ores are mined economically
At Creighton Mine near Sudbury a large body
of lower grade ore was known to exist. It
promised to be an important source of nickel
and copper—if it could be mined economically. But how to get this ore out at a cost
low enough to be commercially practical?
Intensive study went into the problem.
Underground tests were made. Observing
that the earth above the mined-out ore-
bodies had begun to settle, Inco mining
engineers suggested the possibility of
mining the lower grade ore by induced
settling. Ore would be cut away from the
underside of the orebody. As the support
for the ore and rock above wits removed,
the mass would begin to settle causing the
ore to break up so that it could be drawn
off and recovered. The idea sounded good.
Scale models were built to determine how
the ore could be drawn off from below without getting the waste rock above the ore. Then
the method was tried in the mine. The results
were so promising that regular mining operations were begun. Today, Creighton Mine is
producing 12,000 tons of this lower grade
ore daily. And Inco' Research did it!
INCO SCHOLARSHIPS
Available For High School Graduates
To help capable and deserving high school and
preparatory school graduates get a university
education, Inco has established 100 four-year
scholarships in Canadian colleges and universities. Twenty-five scholarships have been
awarded for the academic year 1957-1958 and
twenty-five will be awarded for each succeeding
year so that all 100 scholarships will be in
effect by September, 1960. For complete
information, write for free brochure on THE
INCO SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMME.
A
THE    INTERNATIONAL    NICKEL   COMPANY   OF   CANADA,    LIMITED
S9     YONGI      STRUT,    TORONTO
Producer of Inco Nickel, Nickel Alloys; ORC Brand Copper, Tellurium, Selenium and Platinum, Palladium and other Precious Metals; Cobalt and Iron Ore.

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