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The Ubyssey Dec 2, 1938

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Full Text

 SIR
FREDERICK BANTING
MONDAY NOON
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
OPERA-—'' OTELLO *'
SATURDAY 11 A.M.
Tf,
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, J)F.CEM HUI.  2,   lf>:58
No. 2
BROCK UNION BUILDING  GRANT TO BE  MADE
RHODES  SCHOLAR
JACK DAVIS
SK F. BANTING
TO SPEAK HERE
CO-DISCOVERER OF
INSULIN
Sir Frederick Banting, co-discoverer of insulin, will speak ln Arts 100,
at 12.30 on Monday, December S. The
address ls sponsored by the Monro
Pre-Mtd Club, but anyone, either of
the faculty or student body ls invited
to attend.
CHAIRMAN  OF
RESEARCH   COMMITTEE.
Dr. Banting ls chairman of the
Associated Committee of Medical Research of the National Research
Council at Ottawa. This special committee was formed ln February 1938,
after a conference held ln Ottawa, at
which the University of British Columbia was represented by Dr. C. E.
Dolman. The purpose of the committee ls to discover what types and
opportunities for medical research,
there are ln medical and other Institutions ln Canada.
Dr. Banting ls surveying universities and other organizations represented on the committee, with a view
to possible allotments for medical
research.
Recently, Dr. Banting has been
conducting research In the Banting
Institute on cancer, silicosis, and
asphyxia. He is a graduate of the
University of Western Ontario, and
Is at present a professor of medical
research at the University of Toronto.
Before coming here, he will be
conducted by Dr. Dolman through
the provincial laboratories, and other,
divisions of the Provincial Board of
Health. Dr. Banting has expressed a
wish to see especially all those interested in medicine.
STUDENTS' NUMBERS
ARE NOW AVAILABLE
Are you looking for the address of
that blonde you met last night? Or
are you looking for tbe phone number of that big handsome footballer
for the Co-ed? Then the Alma Mater
Office holds just what you want, In
the shape of the newly-issued STUDENT DIRECTORY.
POCKET  SIZK
This neat little green book, vest-
pocket size, is the product of much
earnest labor on the part of editor
Helen Hann and her three energetic
assistants.
It has ln it the names, addresses
and phone-numbets of all the  students In the University, and In the
back  is a list of the presidents of
the campus clubs.
Trot    right    up    the    stairs    to    the
A.M.S. office and get youra now. The
coat  ia one dime.
JACK DAVIS
WINS RHODES
SCHOLARSHIP
PROMINENT IN U.
AFFAIRS   .
B. C.
Jack Davis was selected from a
large number of applicants Wednesday night to be the 1939 Rhodes
Scholar from U.B.C. The official announcement was made on the campua by the Lieutenant-Governor,
Hon.  Eric W.  Hamber.
Varsity students will unanimously
hall thia choice, for Jack has earned
the respect and admiration of faculty and students alike during his college career here. As a scholar, a
leader, an athlete, and a man he
more than Mils the requirements of
Cecil   Rhodes.
Although he has played an Important part In student activities,
Jack Davis Is no less distinguished
in his acaremlc lite. He was the
winner of a matriculation scholarship and has shared fsr the Jast two
years In the Swan Memorial Bursary. Throughout his four years he
has consistently maintained first
class averages.
PRESIDENT OF M.U.S.
During his first two years here,
Jack waa active on the Science class
executive. He was for two years
the president of S.M.U.S. and during
the last year has been a member of
Students' Council as president of
M.U.S.
"Spud" Davis wears a Big Block,
won for serving on the U.B.C. Canadian Championship basketball team
of 1937. In addition he has been
actively engaged in intra-mural
sports all through his four years at
Varsity.
SINCERITY
Not the leaat of Jack's achievements here has been the fact that
he has worked his own way
through Varsity. His sincerity
and genuine interest in his comrades have made him popular with
all types of students. In appearance he le the answer to a co-ed's
prayer: "tall, dark and handsome."
Hia bearing 'Is dignified and he
will without doubt command respect for himself and U.B.C. while
at Oxford. Jack's home town Is
Kamloops, where hla parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Fred. Davla, reside. In
his fifth year of chemical engineering, he Is affiliated with Sigma
Phi Delta fraternity.
Intellect plus Industry plus personality equals Jack Davis, Rhodes
Scholar.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
WORKING ON OPERA
With but one week of rehearsals
remaining before the Christmas vacation, work on the Musical Society's
production, "Serenade," goes smoothly on. Having- a satisfactory knowledge of the First Act behind them,
members of the ensemble are now
busy  studying Act.  Two.
SMOOTH  SONGS
Vlcltors  to  an  ensemble   rehearsal   recently   were   delighted   with
the variety of catchy, smooth and
sad songs the opera contains.  Although    typical    Herbert    waltzes
predominate, there are many light
and stirring tunes, Including "I'm
A  Duke,"  "Woman,  Lovely  Woman", and others.
Added  colour  and   fascination  will
be given the show this year by "The
Fandango"—a lively and picturesque
dance   in   which   the   whole   chorus
takes   part.
Announcement is expected soon to
the effect that ensemble rehearsals
will take place during the Christmas holidays, probably in some
down-town  hail.
Success!
The smiling gentleman below
Is Carson McGuire, who Is
Justly proud of the success of
the Union Building Campaign.
He is shown here inspecting
the tentative plans of the new
building.
GOVERNORS' DECISION
ENDS LONG CAMPAIGN
COUNCILLORS
DISAGREE ON
"0PENH0USE"
MAJORITY     FAVOR     IT
AS   ANNUAL.   INSTITUTION
This year's "Open House" will be
held some time during Education
Week. No definite plans have been
made as yet, but Student's Council
ls holding a meeting at noon today,
to decide on some of the more important details.
OPEN HOUSE CHAIRMAN.
A  chairman   will   be   appointed   by
Student's Council,  to take charge of,
and  organize,   the  "Open  House."
There  has   been   some   difference
of   opinion    In    Council,    as    some
members   feel   that   "Open   House"
should not be held more than once
every  two or three years,
Carson McGuire, A.M.S. president, expressed his opinion on the
matter in the following words: "I
feel that the "Open House" should
be the Unlverstiy's annual contribution to the "Education Weef.t."
It need not be entirely new each
year, but should show any new developments as they come along.
OPEN   FOR   ONE   DAY.
"Open House" should be the type
of exhibition at which people would
be encouraged to Investigate one
phase of the University each year.
People have not the time to do more
than that at each "Open House", and
the University does not have the
time to be "open" more than one
day.
Evan ap Roberts felt that the
"Open House" is being held too often, saying: "I believe that 'Open
House' should be held only once
every other year or so, because it
takes up a great deal of time which
should be devoted to studies, and
because there are not enough new
things happening on the Campus
to provide a really original 'Open
House' each year."
TREASURER'S   OPINION.
Bob Smith, treasurer, mentioned
that the committee In charge last
year suggested that "Open House"
should not be an annual affair, and
that by holding It every two or three
(Continued on Page Two)
See OPEN  HOUSE
NO FREEDOM
OF SPEECH IN
PRAIRIE   CITY
SASKATCHEWAN   PROF.
CONDEMNED  FOR
VIEWS
In an address to the Young Communist League on the subject -'Youth
and World Affairs", Dr. C. A. King,
professor of English at the University of Saskatchewan, suggesled that
the present government of Great
Britain would go to war for only two
reasons: to maintain the British Empire, or to prevent the spread of socialism in Europe; and he did not
consider either cause worth fighting
for.
DISMISSAL   DEMANDED.
When this speech appeared in
the newspaper under the heading
"Should Not Fight For British
Empire", the Moose Jaw branch of
the Canadian Legion demanded Dr.
King's immediate dismissal and the
Saskatoon Star-Phoenix received a
flood of letters both condemning
and approving what had been said
by Dr. King.
NOT   ANTI-BRITISH.
Dr. King published a statement
pointing out that his view was
neither Anti-British nor unpatriotic
but he still continued to be condemned and criticized all over the
province. However lie had a few supporters who gave him as much aid as
they could.
SPEECH  CANCELLED.
During the summer tlie talk died
down but was renewed after a speech
Dr. King made on the subject "Patriotism." This time there was no
public attack on him and no' one
knew that anything was happening
until Dr. King cancelled a speech,
that he was to have made the next
day, because of the criticism and
bad feeling created. The Saskatoon
League for Peace and Democracy
passed a resolution calling the Board
of Governors of the University to
preserve freedom of speech for the
members of the faculty. The Sheaf
came to his aid in o front page editorial.
Since then, Dr. King lias made no
public speech and until tlie Board of
Governors Issue a statement guaranteeing Dr. King's right to express
his views on world affairs In public
without fear of dismissal, suspicion
will  naturally   fall  on   them..
Construction of New Union
Building to Start in Spring
By JACK MAIR
After live years ol' money raising and three years of vigorous
(■ain]))ii«niii«-.   in   which   n   student   union   lmil«linn- seemed  to  be  n
vision of the distant  future,  the   Brock   Memorial   lTnion  liuilding
is to become u  veiilitv  nt  last.
ASK PERMISSION
At the meeting of the Hoard of (iovcruors last Mondny night
it was announced that the Hoard lias asked for the consent of the
l.ieiitenant-liovernor-in-('ouncil to make tlie contribution of $25,-
1)01) to the  Building fund.
Although the grant is contingent upon permission from
the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council to change the University
budget, this step In regarded as merely a formality.
The grant Is to be puld in ten'
yearly Installments of $2,500 each and
is intended to cover a loan made by
the Brock Memorial Committee for
the immediate construction of the
Union   Building.
The building will cost approximately $75,000 and Is to be a "Class
B" construction, that ls, reinforced
concrete outside and wood inaide. It
can fe faced with stone at any time.
LOCATED  ON   EAST MALL
Work will begin on the building
in the spring and It will be completed by the fall. The building is to be
located on the East Mall between
the gymnasium and the stadium. It
had been announced that the Oovernment will pave the East Mall and
extend it through to Marine Drive,
at an estimated cost of $40,000, making the Mall the main entrance to
(tie   campus.
In   tl   statement     Issued     by     the
l'l-rmunent    Memorial    Committee
the finance* were listed as follows:
Bonds in hands of Trustees         $33,000.00
Balance   ln  Dunk            1,406.20
Women's Committee (collected  and  pledged)   . .       1,600.00
Faculty Association
(pledged)   	
1,560.00
15,000.00
Student Bond Issue   ....
Estimated    cost   of   con
necting    services,    pos
sibly    to    be    provided
by   the   Board   of   Gov-
4,000.00
Hoard of Governors'
Grant    	
95,00000
g_o.eoo.go
Carson   McGulre   expressed    the
hope  that   the  Provincial  Government   might   put   up  $40,000   thus
obviating the necessity of the bond
Issue.    If,   however,   the   Issue   Is
made,  It  will  be  paid   out  of  the
A.M.S. building fund which draws
$3.00  from   the  annual   A.M.S.  fee,
and  by  benefit dances  held  In the
new   building.
Some   of   the   pledged   money   has
not been collected, but arrangements
are   now   being   made   to  call  it  in.
$10,000 has been earmarked for
furnishing the building although this
money may be replaced by the proceeds of the first few dances held In
the   Union   building.
Union Building to Include
Dance Floor, Assembly Hall
The I'niversity Architect is now working on the plans for the
Brock Memorial I'nion Building, as submitted by the sub-committee of the  Brock  Memorial  Committee.
The plans, as submitted, oall for a two story, semi-permanent
building-, to be erected on the East Mall, north of the Stadium, and
facing- the Gymnasium.
TO BEGIN IN THE SPRING
It is expected that the foundations will be started next spring.
In  order  to  provide  a  suitable  ap--
proach to the new building, the East
Mall will be finished at a cost of
$40,000. next year. It will be extended to meet Marine Drive, and
will become the main approach to
the   University.
One half of each floor will be devoted  to  women's activities,  while
the other half will be reserved for
the  men.
DANCE   FLOOR
The central part of the first floor
will be used for a large assembly
hall, to be used for meetings. The
corresponding part of the second
floor will be used aa a dance floor,
which will be lurge enough to hold
about 250 couples.
OFFICERS IN
THE   BASEMENT
The   C.O.T.C.   will   have   the   great
est part of the basement, according
to the present plans, with space for
several rooms and possibly a rifle
lange.
The only room decided upon as
yet for the first floor, excepting the
assembly hall, is a Students' Council
Office.
J..SE.   AND
UNDERGRAD  ROOMS
On  the  second  floor,  besides the
dance   hall,   lt   is   plunned   to   have
rooms    for     the     W.A.A.,    W.U.S.,
M.A.A.,   L.S.E.,   and   M.U.S.
There   will   also   be   rooms   for   the
treasurer  and   president  of  AM.S.
In   connection   with    the    danoe
floor there will be a dining and tea
room,  ii  kitchen and a confectionary.
SCHUBERT SYMPHONY
AT THURSDAY NOON
Next Thursday at noon the last
two movements of the immense
Symphony in C Major by Franz
Schubert, which was begun yesterday in Alts 100, will bring the 1938
Carnegie Orchestral Recital series to
a close. Those who would be hearing
for the first time this complex work
al the December concert of the Vancouver Symphony Society will find
this   preview   of   great "assistance.
BIG BLOCK FEMMES
SWELL BROCK FUND
An   increase   of   $40   to   the   Brock
Memorial   Union   Building   Fund,   ls
the   gift   of   the   Women's   Big   Block
Club.
WHAT,  NO  POKER?
Tlie money was raised from a tea
and bridge, held at the home of
Betty Fleck, on November 4. There
were about twenty tables in play.
Women undergrads and grads attended.
President of the Women's Big
Block Club is Betty Fleck, and Secretary   is   Pauline   Scott. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2, 3938
THE  UBYSSEY
(•sued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Sooiety of the University of British Columbia.
Office t 306 Auditorium Building
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jaok Mair
Phone Point Orey $06
Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
Friday
Robert Xing
SPORTS  STAFF
Editor; Orme Dier
Advertising Offloe
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone:  SEYMOUR 4484
AU advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Oo.
Editorials
CARBON MoOUIRE
It is not premature, wo hope, to congratulate President (.'arson
McCJuire on his success in the matter of the Brock Memorial Union
Building. Although he wob assisted by several members of his
council, we feel that the credit should go to Carson himself.
Since the beginning of the fall term Carson was determined
that the building should be constructed sometime this year. But
his enthusiasm did not blind him to the fact that a great deal of
effort had to be put forth before the problem of finances could be
solved.
With the same insight ond patience that he exhibited in the
preparation of his brief on time-tables for the Summer Campaign
Committee, he considered the means by which he could increase
the Building fund. First he discovered that a simple reapportioning of the three dollar building fee would raise the student loun
to $15,000. Then he turned his efforts to the discovery of the
exact amount of money available for the building. After several
weeks he found that a sum of approximately $53,000 could be
materialized.
Approximately $25,000 more was needed to put up the first
unit of the building they desired. Carson has apparently presented the students' case to the Governors in such a way as to gain
their approval for they have signified their desire to make the
necessary grant. When councils for many years back have made
unsuccessful attempts to construct the building it reflects very
favorably on a presidert who went ahead and realized his goal.
on the air...
. . . by w.i.e.
CAROL SERVICE.
The last program of this term will
be presented over CJOR tonight at
8.1S. Highlights of the broadcast will
be a carol service presented by the
Musical Society octette: Phyllis Bart-
lett, Margaret Haggart, Lois Campbell, Daphne Allen, Doug. Ford, Pat
Downey, Prank Patch and Lewis
Freeman.
Program of carols will consist of,
"First Nowell," "Silent Night,"
"Carol Sweetly Carol" and four
other well known Chnitmas songs.
COLLEGE  DRAMA.
There will be the dramatic presentation entitled "Non-Essentials" and
Is the experience of a bacteriologist
at college. This Item is directed by
Rod Polsaon who has assumed the
duties of dramatic director on Varsity Time.
During   the   past   two   weeks   the
broadcasting staff has been auditioning and classifying voices. These classifications are kept on record for facilitation of future dramas and other
radio work.
EQUIPMENT.
Wednesday    afternoon    two    new
'mikes', one velocity and the other,
unidirectional  as  well as, R.  C.  A.
High   Fidelity   equipment,   was   Installed  In  the  Broadcasting  Studio
in the Aggie building by the C.B.C.
The equipment ls so arranged that
lt can be made into a portable outfit
and broadcasts will be possible from
any point on the campus. For those
students  who   were   present   at  the
Dominion  broadcast of Varsity Time
in    the    auditorium    last   year,    the
equipment  which   was  used  on   that
occasion Is the same set that is now
being Installed in the campus tstudio.
The   instruments   used   during   the
past year were loaned by CJOR.
VANDALISM REARS
ITS UGLY HEAD IN
PEP CLUB ROOM
Vandalism has apeared on the
Campus, this time in the Pep Club
room. The look of the large cupboard
has been broken, and the door ripped off. The paint In the cuboard,
used for posters and notices, was
partly used up and split, and the
paint brushes were left tn a mess,
uncleaned.
The members of the club feel that
they oan't leave anything ln their
room safely now. For the past three
weeks, there have been traces of
poker sessions found. Whoever use
the room generally leave lt In a mess,
with cigarette butts, ashes, and old
matches scattered around.
Ken Shaw, president of the Pep
Club, declared Wednesday that a
club room in the Union Building is
absolutely necessary for the proper
functioning of his society. "Other
societies like the Players' Club," he
said, "have a lot more room now, and
• MIM«tttMI*IHIMHimM(Htl*f*tM-t*flMHHH«(tttMMIttlMHH<
H.  JESSIE  HOW.  B.A.
Public Stenographer
44B1 Weat 10th Ave.
■ssays sad Tkasss Tjrpstf
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DEAN BUCHANAN TO
SPEAK AT INSTITUTE
Dr. Daniel Buchanan, Dean of
Arts of the University of British Columbia, will be the speaker at the
Vancouver Institute on Saturday
evening. His aubject will be "Frontiers of Education." The lecture will
be held ln Room 100 of the Arts
Building, University of British Columbia. The chair will be taken at
8.15 by the Institute's President. Mr.
John Ridington.
TRANSPORTATION   FACILITIES.
The B.C. Electric Railway provides
buses at Sasamat Street, which go
directly( to the University and wait
there until the close of the lecture.
Institute lectures are free to the public.
yet   they  are   not  University  service
clubs."
NOT ENOUGH ROOM
Members feel that the work of the
Pep Club is being hampered by the
lack of necessary room in which to
work, and since this latest incident,
are hoping that they will be moved
from their preaent cramped quar
ters.
LOST
A Twentieth Century Poetry. Needed urgently. Apply Is.. B. Long. Women's  Arts   Letter  Rack.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. the Bus Depot
MIHHItl!Hm*IHMMIIHHIIMMMHHI*IIHIMIH*H**l!t*HtmHH
HERE
AND
THERE
<*(lll(IHI*HHIIIIIIItlltllllllMlHI*IHIIIHIMlMllllMIH*ltlHin
By J. D.  MACFARLANE
The   furore   created   at   the   U.   of
Saskatchewan  by  the  special  armistice issue of the Sheaf, and the subsequent   "resignation"   of   the   editor,
Mr.  Mower,   and  his  assistant,   Fred
McNeil,   has    been    given    plenty  of
space in many Canadian newspapers.
Says   the    Regina    Leader   Post:
"StudenU     objected     to     editorial
comment   and  special   features of
the     Remembrance     Day     edition
which  stresses  the  futility of  war,
and In one place at least, the men
who enlisted In 1914-18 were called
'dupes'."
The Toronto Olobe and Mail have
asked .for special statements from
Mr. Mower which, as printed, are
similar to those printed In the Ubyssey.
Newspapers in North Battleford
asked for editorial comment on the
situation by telegram, while a Vancouver newspaper wired for further
details.
The Regina Leader-Post and the
Saskatoon Star-Phoenix have carried
detailed accounts of the progress of
the uproar at the Saskatchewan university.
The Regina Daily Star carried
news stories and commenta In an
editorial "To Some a Holy Day,"
"That boys could so outrageously
violate all decent ability to appreciate those efforts of their elders which
enable them to be so free," and
again, "No doubt many people will
believe they are entitled to nurse
their sacred memories on this day
undisturbed by the mockery of silly
young asses parading in a lion's
skin."
In our opinion the forced resignations of Mr. Mowers and Mr. McNeil
as effected by the Students Representative Council at Saskatchewan
were not suppression of free speech
but a very necessary curbing of Irresponsible youths who lack the fundamental decencies of an Intelligent
human being.
Granted  that war Is wrong, and
a horror, we would like to ask what
Mr.   Mowers  thinks  he  is  going  to
gain   by   sitting   on   his   haunches
like   Ohandi.   as   he  suggests   as  a
remedy    for    war,    I    suppose    we
should  sit  here  and  peacefully  resist  an  invading  war  machine  out
of control  happy in  the 'knowledge
that we still own our heartbeat, at
least.
Any  man  who  allows  those  under
his authority to malign the dead  by
calling them dupes. *>tc., has no right
to a responsible position in any college.
Mowers thinks that the Oreat War
was  fought  In  vain:   "What do they
MASS EDUCATION
SUBJECT OF DEBATE
Len Martin and Dave Lesser of
the Junior Board of Trade defeated
Alex McDonald and Harold Rome
of-the Parliamentary Forum In a debate held In the Home OU Auditorium last Monday evening.
STANDARDIZATION
Speaking to the resolution "That
Mass Production ln Bducation Ib to
be Deplored" Martin contended that
when education was sacrificed to
factory methods it shows a trend towards standardization.
In reply Alex McDonald stated
that human beings cannot be classified as commodities for they still
retain their individual personalities.
MISDIRECTED EFFORT?
"The students are exposed to an
education that does  not take,"  re
marked Dave Lesser when attacking  the  eduoatlon system.  He  believed that the students suffer from
a "misdirected effort."
"Mass   ignorance   in   politics   and
economics show  that  the  only  solution is an educated public," claimed
Harold   Rome.   He   maintained   that
present  methods are   not  to  be  deplored when a student can get "scientific    facts,    artistic    appreciation
and   aesthetic   appeal   from   a   tooth
paste   ad.   tn   a   current   magaslne."
know of freedom who omy  freedom
know."
It has been said that the laat war
was a war to save democracy. Well,
we still have It; and If there aren't
too  many  like  Mr. Mowers  In the
world, we will continue  to possess
It. The faot that the last war didn't end  war Isn't  the fault of the
war, but the fault of the subsequent
treaties and  the economic  lack  of
balance In the world today.
No doubt war offends the  laws of
Moses  and  Christ;   but  so  does  the
wilful killing and torturing of Jews,
a program which might be followed
out on any people  who become the
object of hatred of a mad dictatorial
power.
We could go on for hours pointing
out errors to Mr. Mowers and his
colleague, but we think it enough to
say that a "man" will at least defend
himself and those things he stands
for.
HOT CLUB.
From the daily newspapers we
learn that we have Jitterbugs on
our fair campus. As far as we have
been able to see, externally, the
only Jitterbugs on this campus are
pixlllated  lecturers.
However,  we  learn  from   reliable
sources that some young gentlemen
on this campus are determined "to
swing It", despite the fact that they
have   agreed   with   Council   not   to
Introduce   such   eyewash   In   return
for their constitution which makes
them a legalised campus elub.
At   a -recent   meeting   ot   the   club
Owen   Sheffield   delivered   the   edict
of  'no  swing'  from  Council.  Whereupon   our   good   friend   By   Straight,
chairman, arose to inform those as-
"Whol- your hurry?"
'Everybody'* aiking fer Sweet Cap*!'
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"Th* pure*, form in whieh tobacco can be tmoked."
t
"Lot me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Frank" Floke
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
34-Hour Emergency Service. Complete Repair Facilities.
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. QREY U
irnim
iiiiiiiiiiiniiii
tlllllfMHlllllllMMMMf •"■■•"■
Gifts  That  Carry Happy Memories  Down  Through
The Years
Fraternity and Sorority Jeweller*
Rings    --    Pins    --    Brooches    -    Separate Crests
Contacts, etc.
SILVERSMITHS DID 1/ O DIAMOND
GOLDSMITHS D I l\ iX O MERCHANTS
OFFICIAL FRATERNITY JEWELLERS
/..WV.'..'^^^
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: • a-m. to S p.m.) Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leat Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
XMAS CARDS
NOW  ON
SALE
$250-In Prizes
The members of the student body are cordially invited to
submit advertisements featuring the Ford V-8, for use in college
newspapers during  1939.
A portfolio containing representative examples of previous
advertising to show you in a broad way the type of material
that is acceptable and usable is available in the publications office.
There are no limitations on subject, except that the phrase
"Ford V-8" must appear somewhere in the illustration or
caption. Idea is more important than art, but other things
being equal, good drawings will, of course, be given preference.
It may be helpful, but it is not necessary, to secure from the
nearest Ford dealer, literature listing the principal features of
the 1939 Ford V-8. For obvious reasons, no advertisement
which mentions or directly disparages any other car can be
considered.
Drawings should be sized to scale to 8 inches by 10 inches.
They may be made in line, wash, air-brush, or any other technique suitable for black-and-white reproduction on newspaper
stock. You may submit as many advertisements as you please,
but each should be plainly labeled on the hack with your name,
address, university and class. More than one name may be listed
in case of collaboration. Wrap your advertisement carefully
and mail it to
N. W. Ayer & Son of Canada, Ltd.
80 Richmond Street, W.,
Toronto, Ontario.
Attention of Ross W. Booth,
by or before January  1,  1939.
Ten Canadian Universities have been sent this invitation.
Five advertisements will be selected from the entries received.
For each of the best five advertisements selected, this agency
will pay $5 0. All five become the property of the Ford Motor
Company of Canada, Limited. Reproduction will include the
name and class of the author-artist; i.e., Joe Smith, McGiil '42.
Unsuccessful drawings will be returned to your publication
office.
This invitation is not a contest or selling scheme. It is a
sincere attempt to secure original, amusing college advertising,
for which commercial prices will be paid.
Read   the   requirements  carefully   .   .   .   and   good   luck!
sembled that despite the fact that
appearances would be maintained
tor the time being, still the club was
what ls known ->n American campuses as a "hot club", whloh we take
to indicate exactly what they agreed
with Council not to promulgate.
We won't criticize swing and such
things here, although their appearance on this campus ls eminently
undesirable, but we would like to
suggest that Council do something
to prevent itself from being bamboozled I
*      *      #
TO THE  LADIES.
A note to the ladiea who don't
take Psych. 1. Prof. Irving, speaking on Intuition the other day, remarked that both Insects and women share In this faoulty. "A woman never knows the origin of her
Ideas and feelings, and thus calls
them Intuitions . . . something
marvellous and mysterious . . . like
any  savage," he declared.
OPEN HOUSE
(ConUuuod from Page One)
years, greater popularity would be
aroused. He stated also that the $200
granted by the Board of Governors
last year, for "Open House" expenses,
was not felt to be sufficient.
Jack Davis, men's undergrad member, stated: "I feel that 'Open House'
ls very opportune this year, because
of the fact that the University is in
a position where we must try to get
favorable opinion." He felt that the
"Open House" would be an excellent
means by which to obtain this "favourable public opinion."
iltHIIIIHItttltHIIIIIIHt(ltttlltllHHttll«)HHmitH, Kill* Ittttltlt.
THIRD   CONCERT
Season  1938-8.
Vancouver
Symphony Society
Walter Herbert
Guest Conductor front
Vienna)
Orpheum  -Theatre
Sunday,  Deo.  11, 3 p.m.
Tickets gflo to $11.00 at
M. A. KeUy Co.
609 Granville St.    -    Trin. 168$
Book. Seats Now
i(ttl(l«ltttMlltlM«tltlt(lll(*ttll*l«*l**ltM(mitMH|||||M"M|,Mt||<
LAB.   BOOK   LOST
Ure and Harris Chemistry Lab.
book lost on the campus. Finder
please return to D. L. Swan or the
Pub. Office.
NOTICE
Colonel Nelson Spencer wtll address a meeting In the Union College
Chapel on the subject "Europe and
the Crisis as I Saw It" Friday afternoon at 4 p.m. All students are invited.
HOME GAS
You can buy no better
fuel for your car than
HOME GAS—No better lubricant than
HOME OIL—And both
these products create
employment for 1300
British Columbians.
HOME OIL
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The   Independent   100%
B. C.  Company Friday, December 2, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
MR. WHEELER
MAGICIAN &
BUSINESS MAN
ENTERTAINER WAS IN
VAUDEVILLE
The curtain rang down at Saturday's Pep Meet cutting off applauding students from an Immaculate
gentleman who briskly commenced to
pack up gaudy-coloured paraphernalia in his big black box.
ON THE ROAD.
Mr. Wheeler Indulges ln black magic only as a hobby now. He got the
"bug" as a boy when he watched The
Oreat Powell perform in a small town
In the wilds of B.C. Practice brought
the perfection needed for vaudeville,
and as a young man he went on the
road, achieving his ambition to see
New York and the glamour cities.
There he met suoh celebrities aa
Thurston, Blaokstone, even Fatty
Arbuokle, and the dean of them aU
—Houdlni. Finally he settled in
buslnesa In Vanoouver, but still retains an Interest In his farmer profession, sees all the magicians that
come to town.
SMALL OIRL AUDIENCES
HARD TO PLEASE.
Questioned on audience reaction,
Mr. Wheeler said that small girls
were by far the most difficult to
please. "They're too inquisitive," he
said, "they'll sneak up for a peek
when you're not looking."
Interesting addenda on Mr.
Wheeler Include the faot that he's
not a bit superstitious, that he has
a Chinese magician In Pekln for a
pen pal, that his favourite music
Is "The Sorcerer's Apprentice," that
he has an Australian uncle, also a
magician, living In the land of rabbits, that his hobby Is trlok photography, and that he has to take
his front gate Into the basement on
Hallowe'en Just like anyone else.
Congenial home for 3 Students]
good table, hot water, moderate
rates. Apply to Ubyssey office.
HEWER'S
_._ HARDWARE
4400 West  10th Ave.
Phone Elliot 1582
«
Christmas Is Just Around
The Corner
Why Oo Farther?
REMINGTON RAND
DRY SHAVERS
from
$13.50
That's one of our hundreds of
Oood Buys
APPOINTMENTS FOR
SUMMER SESSION
The appointments to the staff of
thte U.B.O. summer session for 1939
were announced by President L. S.
Kllnck after a board of governors
meeting on Monday night. They will
include eight well known visiting
professors and twenty-one from the
U.B.C. under the direction of Prof.
Lemuel Robertson.
Following are the appointments:
Botany, Dr. A. H. Hutchinson, Dr.
Frank Dickson and Prof. John Davidson; U.B.C. Chemistry, Dr. R. H.
Clark, Dr. William Ure; U.B.C. Classics, Prof. Lemuel Robertson; U.B.C.
Economics and Commerce, Prof. O.
F. Drummond; U.B.C. Eduoatlon, Dr.
W. O. Black; U.B.O., Dr. H. E. Smith,
University ot Alberta.
English. Prof. F. O. C. Wood, UJB.O.
and Dr. Edward Chapman, University of Utah. Geology and Geography,
Dr. Gordon Davis, U.B.C, and Dr.
Eric   H.  Faigle,  Syracuse   University.
History, Prof. F. H. Soward and Dr.
Sylvia Thrupp, U.B.C. Mathematics,
Dr. Ralph Hull and Prof. F. J. Brand,
U.B.C, and Dr. R. L. Jeffery, Aoadla
University, and Dr. F. C. Leonard,
chairman of the department of astronomy at University of California
at Los Angeles.
Modern languages. Dr. D. O. Evans,
Dr. Joyce Hallamore, Dr. Deborah A.
K. Alsh and Dr. Joan Dangelser, all
of U.B.C. Philosophy and psychology,
Dr. J. A. Irving, U.B.C; Or. Wlbur
Long, Dr. Frank Davis, University ot
California at Los Angeles; Prof. J.
A. Sharrard, University of Saskatchewan.
Physics, Dr. O. E. Anderson and
Dr. A. M. Crooker, U.B.C.
SATURDAY OPERA TO
BE VERDI'S "0TELL0"
The second Saturday matinee performance of the Metropolitan Opera
Association will be Gluseppi Verdi's
most ambitious opera, "Otello", the
first act of whloh will be reproduced
ln the auditorium by direct line with
CBR's Sea Island receiver at 10.88.
This Is the next to last stage work
of Verdi, written after he had renounced his earlier attitude toward
the Wagnerian drama and had spent
considerable time studying the Wagner scores. Lawrence Tibbett will
supply his famous Interpretation of
the canny Iago, with Oiovannl Mar-
tlnelll as the Moor.
ALPHA  DELTA  PI
NITE ON ICE WILL
BE EXAM ANTIDOTE
It's Alpha Delta Pi Nite at the
Forum on Monday, December 19,
from 8 to 11
Tlokets are 78c, aAd may be obtained from any member. There
will be a special program of a professional hookey game, and a figure
skating exhibition. This wUI be followed by refreshments and private
skating.
It's the perfect antidote for the
exams, and besides, it's all In aid of
the Brock  Memorial  Building Fund.
EX VICTORIA COLLEGE STUDENTS
There will be no Varsity Ball in Victoria this year.
The College is holding a CHRISTMAS DANCE at the
Royal Victoria Yacht Club, on Monday, December 19.
Dancing   from   9   until   I.   Admission   $1.00  per   couple.
Refreshments. lien  Acres'  Orchestra
U.B.C. ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
"Where The Gang Meets"
LUNCH 25c
DINNER 35o
IIIIMIIIIIMIIttlMIIMMMttllMMtMIMMIIMIMIIMMMMMIIIttMIMIMIIMMtnt   IMIIItMIIMMMI***ttllII*tllltM*MIMItltttlll*lllt*tll«ttlM
Pioneer Laundry & Dry Cleaners
Seymour 8334
A complete Laundry und Dry Cleaning Service
Licensed Sanltone Dry Cleaner
•««l,,*l(l„MII,IIIH,«ll,IMI(*((l«t«(*«*((tlll(lll«ttl*,(lllt*(,((ltll,ll«ll*,l**(ll(****ll*(«*(*(**l****(*(((«((**((***(****MI*(*IM«******«l((***»*
HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for
After Theatre
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DAN0E8...
formal or informal.
SEY. 8748
SHOPPING
with
MARY ANN
There is one gift that all women like, and in numerous quantities
. . . that little gift is, hankies . . . white ones, plain ones, lace-edged
ones . . . navy . . . pastel colored . . . every kind that every type of
femininity could desire. . . These dainty gifts are single or boxed in
harmonizing groups ... at Mrs. Paton's Lingerie Shop, 279) Granville
Street. . . .
Said a freshette reporter in a pitiful little voice, as she handed in
a story to the editor, "Please, may I go to my lecture now?"
Starting from the exquisite midget handkerchief, thev graduate
to the larger kerchief size . . . applique . . . handwork with superimposed designs in white, of cherry blossoms, water lilies . . . among a
host of other attractive designs . . . gossamer fine linen hankies appeal
to the tea hostess, or Sunday 'at home' type, chiffon and dance hankies
for all co-ed friends, . . . for the sorrority sister or special friend linen
squares wth dainty lace edges and delicate corner patterns in blue.
Just to prove our point that hankies are always a desired gift ... we
asked a friend what they would like for Christmas and they said "One
of Mrs. Paton's gorgeous hankies". . .
ti        ti        ti
Every Christmas season co-eds look forward to their wardrobe
renewal, and when making an inventory this year don't forget the
smart woollen frock which is so suitable for lectures and general
campus wear. Not only is it smart but it is warm, too . . . and in the
seasonal colors, which lead all style parades. . . . Lora Lee Dress Shop,
2814 Granville Street, have a varied selection of these frocks ... in
rust and raspberry tones. . . .
One particularly smart dress features the outseam pleats, and
short puffed sleeves ... a round white collar gives it that demure
naivete . . . gold buttons from the neck to the waist, and wide patent
black belt from the adornments . . . tricky diamond pockets . . . and
at a price which fits any co-ed's allowance. . . .
There is a little story about two Phrateres pins . . . one is reposing
on the lapel of a Fourth Year Forestry student . . . while the other,
rests, not on the label, not on the waistcoat . . . but on the shirt of a
Musical Society member immediately over the "Hollow organ for
circulation"  (see dictionary).
Other suggestions for gifts, which Lora Lee specializes in are, zip-
pered gold sequin evening bags, hosiery, silhouette and a novelty purse
size case for evening mishaps . . . containing scissors, needles, pins and
carigated colored threads, and numerous other useful gadgets ... all
encased in this one little needle-point covered folder. .  . .
ti       d       ti
An Alpha Phi has been trying for a whole week to be introduced
to the leading man in "J00th Performance . . . but hasn't succeeded
yet. . . . She thinks he is "so fascinating." . . .
tt      ti      n
Here is the opportunity all co-eds have been waiting for ....
Raeson's Mezzanine Floor, 644 Granville Street, are having a special
sale of footwear, formerly $7.9! and over, will be at the one price,
$1.95. . . . We have been viewing the platform soled slippers with
longing eyes, imagine the comfort you would have, dancing on New
Year's Eve, at Junior Prom, Co-ed Ball, and a host of other social highlights . . . every pair of slippers and high-gore pumps has that distinctive air and smartness that makes every ensemble, perfect. . . .
A Phi Delt, the morning after the Theta party, spent the before-
noon hours trying to find out which Theta was the proud possessor
of his ring. . .  .
Sportswear for golf and other athletic activities are among the
fashion designs, suede, mudguard features, zippers, ties and straps . . .
glamorous evening slippers in contrasting tones and daintily jewelled,
afternoon slippers, rubberized footwear for rainy sessions, all at 644
Granville Street, on thf Mezzanine floor of Raeson's. . . .
(j       ei       Ut
Going skiing after the exams? Then you'll want clothing that
is both classy and cosy. . . . Fred Holmes has a new line of ski togs
that for comfort and style can't be equalled . . . shirts in smart tartans that are warm and zippered. . . . Slacks that the like of which
you've never seen. . . . Ask especially to see the Gabardine slacks tailored in the continental style in the new-Teal blue. . . . They are light
but waterproof. . . . You'll need a jacket . . . For men they have
Slalom jackets in the Fairway cloth and for ladies smart Jigger jackets
in a lovely Moritz red. . . .
And ladies if you want to be ultra ultra get one of the new ski
handkerchiefs ... an accessory that will wipe snow from your eyes
and lend zest to your costume . . . and of course a gayly colored pair
of Tyrolean braces will make you look as thought fresh from St.
Moritz. . . . Remember, all these lovely things are available at Fred
Holmes at 2841 Granville Street. . . .
H      ti      ti
Midst last minute packing and while finishing exams students
will have no time to go hunting and scouring all over town for suitable gifts that fit their purse and are appropriate ... so we recommend Phoebe, 71) Dunsmuir St. , , , Not only has she the most exclusive of gift ideas, but will wrap them in gift paper all ready to
hang on the Xmas tree . . . tea rose dance sets slips, gowns and pyjamas
in all dainty shades including white and sky blue ... in satin and
brocaded silk. ...
Romance is prevalent on the campus, and is budding among the
Phi Delts. ... It appears that one of their football players is taking
quite an interest in the petite blond freshette sister of one of his fraternity brothers. . . . Together they walk, they talk, they lunch, they
sup, they study, they play . . in fact they are interested in one another.
Think of the delight your friends wilt have opening the gifts you
have given them . . . handmade imported lingerie from the Orient at
71) Dunsmuir St. ar<! reasonably priced and make welcome gifts . . .
For the young girl in her teens may we suggest a tailored slip for
everyday wear and one with lace trim for special events . . . gowns
which are suitable for every age as well as Phoebe's sheer stockings
and fabric gloves. . . .
ti      ti      a
When one's love is absent . . . what to do? . . . here is one answer
... at all hours of the day one may find a certain council woman whose
"I'll-love-you-forever" lad is not on the campus this year sitting in
the caf apparently discussing bacteriology with a Beta. . . .
MARY ANN
DIRECTOR TO SPEAK
AT FILM SOCIETY
Mr. Jaffa, the technicolor director
for such shows ma "Men with Wings"
and the coming "Gone With the
Wind," will speak to an intimate
group of Film Society members either
Monday or Tuesday noon. Those who
would like to attend please get in
touch with Dick Jarvis. Further information will be posted on the Film
Society Board in the Quad Monday
morning.
SANTA CLAUS AT
S.C.M. XMAS PARTY
As an antidote to the potent Xmas
Xams, the S.C.M. offers a Christmas
Party to be held Saturday night, Dec.
17. in the spacious ballroom of the
Kingsway Bar-B-Q, 3068 Kingsway
Ave.
Danolng, drollery, and delectable
delicacies are some of the features
of this outstanding fete whioh will
swing into action at 8.30 p.m. and
keep on swinging till the midnight
hour.
NOVEL PRODUCTION
FEATURED AT LYRIC
Boasting a cast that looks like a
"Who's Who" of the Vancouver entertainment world, "A Foot light Frolic" produced by Oordon Rowntree
gets under way in the Lyric Theatre
ut  8.00 p.m.  Sunday,  Dec.   11.
The ahow promisee to be one of
the   best  entertainment   values   of
the  year and  features Mart Kenny and hla Western Gentlemen, W.
C. Shelly, Beth Lockhart—for-mer
ly  of  goth  Century   Fox—a  novel
band       leadera musical quia with
Earle Hill, Doug Raymond, Trevor
Paige,  Leo  Smuntan,    Ole   Olson,
Stan Patton, Len Chamberlain, and
Sandy de Sannls, and many other
outstanding aots.
The   proceeds   are   In   aid   of   the
Vanoouver   Sun   Santa   Claus   Fund.
Tickets,   which   may  be  obtained   at
the  Lydlc   box  office,   are  28  and   80
centB.    The show ls being put on for
one night only—Sunday, Dec. 11th at
9.00 p.m., in the Lyric Theatre.
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2187.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Speoialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
See Seymour St.
HOSPITAL HOLIDAY
FOR  STAGE  HAND
One student will spend exam,
time ln Ward D of the General
Hospital convalescing. The patient
Is Roy Jaokson, Seoond Year Arts-
man who was operated on Saturday evening.
STAGE HAND.
Jaokson, Players' Club member,
was working on the stage on Saturday morning and suffered severe
strain, following whioh he was removed  to the hospital.
After a three weeks oonvalesoenoe
In Room 108, Roy will journey to
his home In Creston for Christmas.
HELP WANTED
Solicitors, Canvassers
For  Xmaa  Poultry  Specialties
Liberal   Commissions
Bay. 9131-X Bay. 3-.78-L
IMM*M«MMIIMMMMMMMH«IHHIHtMIH,IIIH,MIIIIII««IH,ll,H{J
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT TKE GATES"
"OUR SERVICE MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING"
• ••It HMMIimtOM IHIHII II HI |	
THE  PROF.
ASKED ELMER
for the name of his tailor.
Whispered It In his right ear!
(It's enormous, but he oan't
help that). Elmer's no meanle.
Elmer told him. We'll toll you.
Elmer got his clothes from us.
They're custom tailored, cut to
measure. That's why they fit so
well.
BOND
CLOTHESSHOP
157    WEII     M A » TI M & «
OPP  PROVINCE   DLDG. ANNUAL MALL RACE TODAY NOON ALL OUI
WATOH THUNDERBIRDS
STADIUM
SATURDAY
tfPORT
SPORTS  STAFF
EDITOR: Orme Dier.
ASSOCIATES:  Myrne Nevison.
Basil Robinson.
REPORTERS:   Lionel Salt.
Jim Harmer.
Ormle Hall.
Austin Frith.
Dave Morrow.
Grantland  Rlee.
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 2, 1938
MAURY MEN RALLEY to DOWN ADANAC BASKETEERS
G
RIDIRON
LEANINGS
I. e.
NICA OO KEEDS.
The last whistle has blown on the
Canadian grid team at Varsity this
year, with nothing left to the Sunday
quarterbacks but orchid-giving and
bouquet tossing. Flowers are the order of the day for the whole Varsity
team; they played the best football
ever to grace the campus and but for
a screwy set-up might have captured
the Big Four Championship. As it
was they won back the Hardy Cup
and the Western Intercollegiate title
in four straight victories.
In eleven games this season the
boys dropped only their last game to
the North Shore Lions. Maury Van
Vliet and Neil Watson deserve lots ol
credit for the way in which they developed the team Into a winning
combination. Watson, an acquisition
this year, was a great help to Van
Vllet in shaping up the powerful line
that made big holes for the backfleld.
ALL HEROES.
The forward wall was one of the
most potent factors ln the Varsity
grid machine. Such notables as Freddie Smith, Carson McOulre and Hank
Stradlottl were veritable powerhouses.
The loss of prexy McOulre will leave
a big gap in the front trenches that
will be hard to fill. This was Carson's last season with Alma Mater
and as captain, and middle, he played his heart out every game .
Stradlottl hit like an armoured
truck and did valuable work ln
blocking kicks. Smith, about the
flghtenist man on the squad, broke
up more than his share of line plays
and passes. At end positions were
starry Johnny Pearson, Hunk Henderson, Dick Dowrle. Pearson, was
the regular booter, and despite a leg
Injury ln mid-season was ln there
booming them with the best. Hunk
Henderson, valuable pass receiver
and heavy tackier, was lost to the
squad ln the last couple of games
and Dowrle plugged the gap admirably.
HEROES ALL.
In the backfleld, where most of the
credit usually finds its way, was a
gold mine of talent and power. A
standout for his reliability was big
Aub Oray. relief booter, and expert
line plunger. Given a knot hole, Aub
could barge his way through for long
and consistent gains. Also a valuable
OET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
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FRATERNITIES
SOOIAL
and
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE & STUART
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Stationers and Printers
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VANCOUVER, B.C.
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HOCKEYBOYS
LOSE FIRST
ENGAGEMENT
Joek Walmsley'* Thunderbirds of
the Ice rink skated out against their
flrst opponents of the season in the
local senior amateur puck loop last
Tuesday, and when  the final bell
clanged  the- students  were  on   the
short end of a 3-1  score with the
strong Dutnont outfit.
After   a   rather   shaky   start,   the
Blue  and   Oold   Icemen   took  control
of things about half way through the
game, and from then on carried the
play   to   their   heavier   more   experienced  Dumonts.  Only  lack  of   finish
and some smart saves by the opposition  netmlnder kept  the  Varsity attackers  from tying up the battle.
With only one practice ln two
weeks behind them, the U.B.C. outnt
showed lack of condition and polish
throughout. Jim Harmer turned ln
80 minutes of outstanding defensive
work for the losers.
Marcel   Gulguet   scored   the   only
Varsity   counter   midway    through
the second canto, as he plct'.ed off.
a bouncing rebound and slapped it
past  Dumont's  Delmonlcs.
STRIKE  ONE!
Jack Moxon broke through only to
oe stopped by the goalie, and numerous other Varsity chances were
muffed by hurried shooting and poor
passing. But the old college umph
was in there all the time, and the
students served notice that they will
be far from the weak-sisters of the
league once they get ln shape and
get a few much-needed practices under their collective belts.
Jack McArthur and the two Oul-
guets looked impressive with their
strong skating, while Maury Lambert
turned ln some smart fore-checking
and Don Colwell shed a lot of rubber
in the Varsity cage.
BRUDDER BRUD
ground gainer was Freshman Graham Finlay, rangy and speedy plunger. Evan ap Roberts proved himself
to be the original Iron man.
Not content with long gains through
the line, and points through converts
and field goals, Apple took over the
quarterback position when Farina
was forced out of the game. Another
Freshman with promise and power
was Fred Joplln, blocking back who
was turned into a line plunger in
mid-season.
Focal point for attention from
the stands though was the valuable
and starry work of Tommy Williams, Varsity's ghost of the grid-
Iron. Tommy was the man who
provided the scoring spark to the
team and carried the pigskin on
two plays out of three.
CONORATS,  COACHES.
The inevitable summing up of the
team shows nothing but praise due
to the players and the coach, and
Oil Martin, super manager. We offer
them a toast to the Varsity Thunderbirds, Western Intercollegiate champions.
Exclusive Camera PORTRAITS
At Popular  Prices
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at   the   Spanish   GrUI
Second Half Drive Gives
Students Smart 43-37 Win
Coming from behind a third period rally that doubled the
score in ten minutes, Varsity's basketeers took over second placo
in the Inter-City loop Wednesday night in the campus gym by
downing the youthful New Westminster Adanacs by a 43-27
margin.
I Fucing a 16-14 deficit at half time,
the blue and gold squad trooped on
the floor after the breather with Are
und determination, and led by six
quick markers from the hand of By
Straight, the Men of Maury took
command of the game and won going
away. *
ADANAC   ANTICS
Ken Matheson, who scored ten
markers for the visitors,. gave a
brilliant display In the first quarter
and the purple and yellow team
went out tn front of a disorganized
student  squad,
A scintillating attack that laid the
emphasis on passing gave .the students complete control of the play In
the last part of the game, and but
for a lot of foul shots missed, might
have taken a bigger margin of victory.
SNIPERS  ALL
Rann Matthison played his usual
outstanding game and copped the
scoring honors for the Varsity outfit by picking off no. less than ten
markers. Brud Matheson and long
Alex Lucas followed close behind
with eight points each.
By Straight did his part with six
snappy markers, while Frank Turner
continued on down the comeback
trail by swishing the twine for five
nice   points.
Don Livingston played a bang up
game at centre for most of the game.
and stocky Ted Pallas came out of
the stacks over at the library long
enough to put In some good work at
guard.
TEAMS
Adunucs: Fraser, Wright, McLel-
land, Scott. Douglas, Smith, King,
McDonald,   Matheson,   Carter.
Varsity: Straight, Matthison. Matheson, Pallas, Lucas, Miller, Livingston, Oross. Turner, Alexander,
Johnson.
DIER
Lanky Mr. Matheson turned In a
bang-up performance against his
hometown boys the Adanacs In the
Varsity gym Wednesday when the
students 'won  43-37.
i))l*)l*tlilii*iil**IHt*tlH*H(iim*<
IHHIIItlMHIt
CO-ED SPORTS
By MVRNE NEVISON
milttlM.IIMIIIHIIIHHMII.II.IIIH.I.IIItHIHIHIIIIIIMIHfllll.H
BASKETBALL.
Three more defeats were chalked
up for the luckless basketball girls
tills week with Cloverleafs and Cunninghams providing the opposition
for the Senior "A" team while Westerns, last year's champs, took the
B's" ln their stride.
Leading 9-2 after a flrst quarter
scoring splurge in the Cloverleaf
game, the collegians faded out of the
picture till the last five minutes
when again they realized baskets are
a necessity in winning games. Ruth
Wilson, who played a steady game on
defence all evening, led a gallant coed rally in the dying minutes which
was only cut short by the final whistle with the score 28-23.
MORE  BASKETBALL.
Ruth topped the Varsity scorers
with 12 points and was backed up
nobly by Fay Burnham, Alice Kjos,
Adle Collins, with 3, 4, and 4 each.
The loss of Lois McEwen and Nancy
Martin, two regulars to 'ol Man 'Flu
left a big hole  In the co-ed's play.
Cunninghams, famous as the one
team the Blue and Oold quintet has
defeated this year, got their revenge
Wednesday by taking the co-eds 38-
23. Jumping into an early lead the
store girls were never headed though
once Varsity came within one point
of tying  up the  game.
Ruth Wilson again was the outstanding player of the floor, and after hor exit via the foul route Varsity
collapsed  completely.
Paced by Margaret Weldon and
Mae McQueen, tlie Senior B's lost out
by a mere 26-17 to -Westerns—not at
all bad really.
SORHV  TOM!
Due to a reportorlal inaccuracy, it
was stated in last week's issue that
starry Tommy Williams would not
play for Varsity grid team in the
final game. We wish to apologize' for
this statement and for. all aspersions
cast on the training methods of our
hero.
—VE  SPORTS  ED.
897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
ICE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY,  Arts  '31
JACK PARKER,  Arts  '30
RUGGERMEN PLAY
Varsity's rugger siege-guns open
Are on two fronts Saturday. The
"Tenderblrds," erstwhile Thunderbirds, will attempt to regain a portion of their lost prestige by opposing Orads at the Stadium in the second half of a double header program.
The "Oas House Oang," the U.B.C.
team to you, will travel to New Westminster to meet the Royals.
Varsity lineup: Teagle: Leggat,
Tremblay, Robertson and Bird:
McPhee and Lang: Robson, McLaughlin, Harrison, Davies, Mc-
Cammon: Harmer, Mattu and Finlay.
U.B.C. lineup: Hoskins: Hall,
Maokie, Stokvls and Smith: Richards and Robinson: Taylor, Jenkins, Wallace, Billings, Pyle, Urquhart, Wilson and Lane.
All U.B.C. players are reminded
that there will be automobile transportation direct from outside the
North door of the Caf at  1.30 p.m.
LOST
Will the person who took Dowry—
"Money and Banking" from A.P. 204
Tuesday morning, please return to
H. Tucker or Mr. Home's office.
Lambeth Walk
Contest
Friday, December 2nd
Valuable Prizes
BATTLE OF MUSIC
between
De   Santls   and   Trevor   Page
to  determine  most  popular
orchestra
Saturday, December 3rd
Regular Suturday Admission
^llllllllllltlttlllllll,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!,,,,,),,,!,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!,!,!,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,!,!,!!!!!!!
SPORT VIEWPOINTS
Basil Robinson
ri(ll(t(llllllllll)lll««l(IIIIMIIIIIIIIII(«IMI(tlll(ll(t(MllltlMlltllllMIIIIIII(llllll(IIM(lll(lltltMIIIIIIIII(llt(lllllll**((*l*llllllllltllltl
As you probably realize by this time, the soccer team was the only
Varsity sport organization to come close to distinguishing Itself over the
last weekend, and perhaps on that account, this column should be more
In the form nf a funeral notice than anything else. But somehow, we have
a hunch that an obituary would be the wrong thing at this time.
■ Because to start In with rugger, It wouldn't be at all surprising if things
were to boom within a very short time.
MOORE  TO   RETURN
Vic Moore, who starred with the Victoria Rep fifteen last year before
he came to Ihe palaces of Intellect, is the main reason for this burst of
optimism. Vic, as you should know, Is a very effective hooker, and was
one of the main reasons for the high-flying qualities of the Thunderbirds
at the start of the current season. For over a month now Mr. Moore has
been on the injured list with a badly-swollen thigh muscle which became
so aggravating that lt Anally had to be drained, ^ut on Wednesday, he
gladdened Coach Carey's heart, and a lot of other hearts besides, when he
presented himself at the weekly practice for a light workout. Another
week, now, and the former Crimson Tlder will be back tn the centre of
scrum, and so, If things really start to hum, don't say we didn't warn you.
STANFORD AT STADIUM
The next big toad in the collegians' English Rugby puddle is the Stadium battle with Stanford University to be staged on Boxing Day, Dec. 30 to
some. By that time, there ts a strong possibility of more rugger talent
being available. Oerry Mason, 190-1 b second row bruiser, will probably
have his broken finger sealed and healed, while Wll Colledge, who scintillated ln the Thunderbird backfleld at the beginning of the season before
a knee Injury forced him to the sidelines, may be persuaded to turn out.
The end of U.B.C.'s most successful grid season In years may spell
advantage  to  the  ruggermen too.
Freshman Graham Flnlay's Inclusion ln the pack for Saturday's game
with the Orads ls the first Indication of what Maury Van Vliet's proteges
may mean to Coach A. B. Carey. Williams, Joplln, Mclvor, Freddy Smith
and Aub Qruy also have English Rugby experience that might be used to
good advantage.
Perhaps the most satisfying news of the year ts the naming of Jaok
"Spud" Davis as B.C.'s Rhodes Scholar. Member of the 1037 championship
basketball team, and President of MU.S., quite apart from hla brilliant Academic record. Jack, or "Spud," as he ls known to those who are privileged
to know him well. Is recognized for his efficient organization powers and
universally liked and respected for his quiet, unassuming disposition. A
brilliant student, a grand sportsman, and worthy successor to Dave Carey,
last year's winner.
75c and
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$1.0()rf.
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R I T C H I E ' S  .   . .   840 GRANVILLE
BE COLLEGIATE—Smoke a Pipe . . .
Peterson's Reg. $8.00—SPECIAL «1.79
WORLD WIDE NEWS    o^liu.
Across from the Commodore
PON'T *U€SS
Have your home lighting oheoked with
a light meter. One of our Homo Lighting advisers will be glad to assist you
in planning lighting for the greatest
eye oomfort, safety and attractiveness.
Phone for the Girl with the Sight-Saving
Kit. B.C. Electric, Seymour 5151.
!_ a Pt-lt

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