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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1940

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 BY-ELEOTION
Tomorow—old Pub Offloe
GET   OUT—VOTE
Hbyssfij
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
BY-ELEOTION
Tomorow—old Pub Offloe
OET   OUT—VOTE
VOL. XXXI.
VANOOUVER, B.O., TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1D40
No. 22
Final Totem Sales Campaign
Begins Now; Ends Wed. Week
No More Copies of the 1940 Totem Will
Be Printed Than Ordered; No Additional
Orders Accepted After Wednesday, Jan. 17
by OZZIE DURKIN
At exaotly 12:30 yesterday noon, PST,.the last Totem sales
campaign for this year got under way.
Aooording to Frank Pendleton, Totem Circulation Manager, the next week will be brightened by many Hollywoodlsh
publicity stunts.   The first of these is to be a Pep Meet, details
of whioh will be found elsewhere in*	
thia  laaue.
LIMITED   PRINTING
The current organized salea drive,
like the one before Christmas, is
dealgned to protect the Alma Mater
Society againat the possibility of
loaaea incurred through printing
more copies of the annual than are
ordered.
In previous yeara, this printing by
guesswork haa necessitated the use
of much red ink in the books of our
student treasury. For thia reason,
the 1940 Totem etaff haa received instruction not to print a single copy
of the book unleaa lt has been ordered.
Students have only nine more
daya ln which to order their oopy of
the 1940 Totem. After 0:80 on Wedneaday, January 17, no orders will
be accepted from any one—at any
price.
The pre-holiday subscription drive,
Including the sale of Xmaa gift cer-
tlfloatea, raiaed the hat of ordera to
about 700. It -ia hoped by the staff
that thla figure will be more than
doubled during the next week. More
aales, of course, mean a better book.
READY IN MARCH
The Totem will 'appear on the
oampus March 10. • Students who
have bought previous Issues of the
annual wlU be pleased with the 1940
edition's luxuriously padded cover In
a beautiful  new color combination.
Extra-curricular activities, Including the social life of the unlveralty,
have been given the key-spot in the
book. Formal and candid pictures
of every atudent on the campua have
been included in the large Informal
opening aectlon, and athletics have
not been hidden at the baok among
advertisements.
Another original feature of the
1940 Totem Is the oomplete picture
index, by means of which the pictures of any student may be found
by hla friends—or hla competition
—on a moment's notice.
EIGHT DAY  CAMPAIGN
If you have not yet ordered your
copy of the Totem, do ao immediately. Salesmen will be after you from
now until Wednesday, Jan. 11. You
will save youraelf and the Circulation staff a lot of trouble If you turn
over your Totem dollar Immediately.
And, Incidentally, thla may be the
laat Totem that will be published
for several yeara. The war haa
made publication ao difficult this
year that it may be neoeaaary to
suspend operations "for the duration."
MART KENNEY
OZZIE DURKIN
Radio orcheatra leader of International fame who will play at the
Totem Pep Meet on Thuraday.
U.B.C. Students
Invited To See
C.B.R. Stag Party
Scoop! 100 students from U.B.C.
are invited to attend a regular "Stag
Party" Broadcast Thursday evening
at the CBR Studios in Hotel Vancouver.
Jack Peach of CBR has extended
to the students of U.B.C. an invitation to witness a regular radio program as it is broadcasted by a nationwide  radio corporation.
To the hundreds of students on the
campus who listen to CBR programs,
but who have never had the pleasure
of watching: "behind the scenes," this
invitation will come as a welcome opportunity.
The response to the invitation is
expected to be large. Since the accommodation of the studio is limited,
thoae who wish to attend must submit their names to the Students'
Council office in the Union Building,
not  later  than  Wednesday   at  4  p.m.
The program begins at. 8:30 p.m.,
but for obvious reasons, all visitors
must  be  in   tholr  seats  by 8:15.
If the response exceeds the 100
mark, a similar invitation may be repented. Campus arrangements are
under the direction of the University
Radio Society.
Mammoth Pep Meet
MART KENNEY
PUSHES TOTEM
SALES DRIVE
Mart Kenney, popular Vancouver
orchestra leader will bring his Western Gentlemen to the University
Auditorium, Thursday noon for the
Totem pep meeting, Bill Millerd,
Totem Publicity Manager announced
yesterday.
The  orohestra  which  ranks with
similar   U.S.    musical   groups   will
feature  the  voice of  Georgia  Day.
Ossy   Durkin,   Totem   Editor,   and
Bert Hosklns, bualness manager, will
act as masters of ceremony for the
pep-meet   which   will   boost  Totem
salea.
Mart Kenney may be able to play
outside   the   Vancouver   Hotel   after
January  20.  For  the  past Ave years
this  has  been  Impossible  but  owing
to   an   arrangement   with   the   hotel
management, he may be available for
outside affairs in the near future.
Co-Education
Vital Issue At
Debate Friday
Male and female elements on this
campus lock ln mortal combat over
the question of co-education Friday
noon in Arts 100 as the Parliamentary Forum challenges the Women's
Literary Forum to open debate on
the subject.
Bob Bonner and Emily Fraser.
chosen to lead men's and women's
forces respectively, will open discussion on the vital resolution, "That ln
the interests of better education, coeducation at U.B.C. should be abolished." The men will uphold the
statement and the women ridicule it
as utterly impractical.
Miss Fraser, champion archery
marksman, is president of the Women's Literary Forum. Bonner, prominent Forum member and former inter-high debater, is vice president of
the local C.S.A.
Two other important debaters on
(he Forum's program lor January are
with members of the Vancouver Debiting Leugue. Conscription is one
topic to be discussed between downtown debaters and Varsity men; and
the Junior Board of Trade team and
t lie students discuss Canadian Divorce  Laws.
STOP PRESS
The Brock Memorial opening danoe
will probably bo formal the Council
Committee In charge, comprising
Biddy McNeill, Todd Tremblay, and
HuhU Knblnson announced late last
night. Dress, however, will be optional.
Kdltor, who promlaes a super colossal Totem for 1040 with many new
features.
i
Forum Arranges
Public Speaking
Classes
Meetings to Operate
On Theory of
Mutual Criticism
Sponsoring a new idea ln University circles, the Parliamentary Forum
plans public speaking classes for the
Inexperienced who, so far, have not
had the courage, or opportunity to
learn.
The plan is under the direction of
Mervyn Davis, Treasurer of the Parliamentary Forum, who states that
the experienced speakers from the
Forum  will  coach the new members.
"An organization meeting will be
held Wednesday, January 10, ln Arts
208." Davis said yesterday, "all students desiring to attend these classes
should be present."
Each member will give a short talk
at the meetings, probably once, a
week, and will then be criticized by
the rest of the members.
COACHING HY THE AUDIENCE
These classes will give the timid a
chance to be helped by a sympathetic
group of contemporaries, and experienced speakers. Gradually becoming
used to speaking before a small
crowd, these students, after some
experience will be brought Into the
Parliamentary Forum "big" debates,
and lay the basis for the new membership of experienced speakers.
Classes ln the theory of public
speaking will be given regularly, by
experienced speakers and critics.
The Women's Literary Forum, under the presidency of Emily Fraser,
will co-operate with the Parliamentary Forum in the Formation of these
classes.
C.S.A. Conference
Conference Asks
Amendment Of
B.N.A. Act
Commission Also
Vetoes Canadian
Conscription
Travel weary, but exuberant,
the three U.S.A. delegates returned to the U.B.d. campus this
week. Vnl Bjarnson. Charlie
Nash and Ruth Wilson told the
Ubyssey of their five-day stay at
McDonald College, St. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec and of the toplca the
conference discussed: National Unity, Canada in World Affairs, and Improving and Extending University
Education.
COMMISSIONS
The Conference which was held
from December 27-31, was divided
Into four commissions whioh worked night and day to complete discussion on the topics and make recommendationa to the Conference.
The Commission on National Unity recommended the amendment of
the B.N.A. Act so aa to bring it Into
conformity with Canada's national
needa. They viewed with alarm the
extensive powera of the Dominion
Oovernment in the fixing of prices
and censorship. They recommended
student survey a into agricultural and
industrial problems and urged the
establishment of Frenoh language
schoola when the number of French-
Canadians ln the district warranted
it.
OPPOSE CONSCRIPTION   •
Strong opposition to conscription
waa voiced by the commission on
Canada ln World Affairs. They did
not believe that Canada should send
a large expeditionary force overseas.
They favored an independent foreign
policy, compatible with Canada's legal autonomous position within the
British Commonwealth.
They resolved that the C.S.A. go
on record as being in complete aupport of freedom of speech, press and
aaaembly in the preaent situation.
And that parliament ahould alt at
more frequent Intervals during the
preaent time, that there be no extension of the present government's
term under the guise of "war emergency" and that the war aims of the
government should be clearly outlined to the Canadian people.
CULTURE FOR SCIENCEMEN
The commission on Improving
University Education urged that
science atudenta ahould have Included in their couraea subjects that
would inoreaae their appreciation of
the cultural and aoclal life of the
aoolety tn which they are to live.
The commission also recommended
the elimination of compulsory attendance at lectures at least In the
Anal two years.
Streaalng the fact that educational
opportunltiea should be extended to
all qualified atudenta regardless of
inability  to   pay   the   cost,   the   com-
(Continued on Page 2)
See C.S.A.
W.U.S. Plans Western Rodeo
For Their 1940 Hi-Jinx
Hi-Jinx for 1940 will be a'
wild  and  woolly party.
Co-eds dressed us cowboys,
Indians and possibly is horses,
will riot through the gymnasium
next Thursday evening.
The gym will be decorated as an
old-time saloon, complete with a bar.
However, it is reported that nothing
et longer than Coca-Cola will be dispensed.
WESTERN  ROUNDUP
Hi-Jinx will last from 7 until 10
p.m. Each class will present a skit
with an appropriate western theme,
and then tho girls will turn to dancing and  games.
An orchestra composed of campust
cowgirls, famous for their talented
performances on eomb.i and mouth-
organs, will provide nn si" for :' n ('
dances and will accompany oovboy
fungs, All women student' it ■ u
"Ited  to  tho   party.
NO  MEN,   STRANGER
Although   there   will   be   no   u'Vi-inl
bouncer,    men    students    aro    v. iod
against  gate-crashing,   for  on  TIutm-
day evening Varsity co-eds will be
tough hombrea. According to official
Information, males found at Hi-
Jlnx will be scalped. No details were
given concerning the punishment of
bald   men.
Prizes will be offered by the
Judges, Dean Bollert, Dr. Isabel Mclnnes, and Miss Gertrude Moore, for
the best-dressed, the mast original,
and the most comical costume.
In  charge of the arrangements are
(lie   W.U.S.   Executive,   consisting   of
Biddy McNeill,  Rae  Adamson,  Janet
Fleck,    Dorothy    Hird,    Thelma    Nel-
s-:n,   Ruth  Wilson   and  Bunny  Finch.
The  fust   Hi-Jinx was held early in
i   Hie   Auditorium   of   the   old
1 y buildings. Dr. Mclnnes, the
H'.rn   on     he   staff,   organized
willi  the assistance of Viva
>.' ■esltlei'.     nf   the    Women's
'uuie  .■* .socialion. The pttr-
1   ;t     ure    Ihat   all   women
'"■''■'    I  sit  least, one party.
iys    there   was   little
dinned  on   Page 2)
Hi-e   HI-JINX
Three Students Contest
Vacant Post On Council
Stevenson, Smith and Hutchinson Seek
Treasury Honors; Election Promises Today
Noon, in Aud.; Voting Wed., old Pub Office
As a  result of the stidden resignation   of   Evan   apRoberts,
former A.M.S. treasurer, by-election fever struck the campus with
its full force this week as three candidates signified their intention
of   running   for   the  vacant  post   on*
the Students' Council.
Campaign speeches will be heard
In the Auditorium today at 12:30.
Voting will be ln room 206 of the
Auditorium building, the former publications office, between ten and four
o'clock on Wednesday. As the position
oi the treasurer ls an Important one,
students are urged to consider each
candidate carefully before making
their choice.
NOMINEES
Jack Stevenson, Fred Smith, and
Shellah Hutchinson were the three
nominations left at the new Alma
Mater Offices Monday afternoon before the Ave o'clock deadline. Each of
the three ls well known in student
affairs. *
Stevenson   has   twice   run   for   the
same   position  and  at  present  holds
the   secretaryship   of   the   Commerce
Class and the managerial post on the
(Continued on Page  8)
See  THREE  STUDENTS
COTC Promotes
12 Officers
And 27 Cadets
The U.B.C. Contingent of the CO.
T.C. this week announced the promotions of 12 non-commla3loned officers and 27 cadeta effective January
8, 1040.
At the same time Colonel O. M.
Shrum announced that a further
number of U.B.C. graduates and undergraduates would be accepted for
enrolment during the next few days
to bring the contingent up to Its war
time strength.
Senior Non-commissioned officers
who have had previous experience In
the corps have been advanced' to the
ranks of Regimental Sergeant-major,
Regimental Quartermaster - sergeant,
Company Sergeant-major, and Sergeant.
Several of this year's recruits who
have shown exceptional merit during
practical periods of mutual instruction have been promoted to the rank
of Corporal.
Graduates and undergraduates who
are being accepted for enrolment, will
be allowed to take the praetloal portion of the-training only. Applications
should be made to the C.O.T.C. orderly room, in the Arts Building basement during the week.
Social Problems
Club Launches
Program
The Social Problems Olub. now
divided into a number of groups, each
undertaking a specific problem, begins the second term with a membership of more than a  hundred.
The World Conflict Group, meeting
on Fridays this term, will discuss "the
significance of the developments of
the war."
The Social and Political Philosophy
Group, meeting on ■ Mondays, will
continue to develop the subjects discussed in Philosophy 0. Included in
(he course for this term is a study
of the philosophical backgrounds of
various political theories.
FRESHMEN   GROUP
A group, managed solely by freshmen, is being organized to study democracy in the international, national,
and local spheres.
Every Tuesday, beginning today,
the S.F.C. will present a program of
Carnegie  Record  Recitals.
Tlie Social Action Executive, i.s
working out. a program of practical
activity, including valuable work in
local community centres, first hand
study of labour unions, their aims and
methods, and visits to social institutions Mich as prisons and reform
schools.
S.C.M. Conference
CHINESE MOVE
UNIVERSITIES
TO INTERIOR
DR.  KOO
The epic story of the migration of
Chinese universities from the war
torn populated sections of the oountry to the comparatively safe interior
was graphically described by Dr. T. Z.
Koo, World Y.M.C.A. secretary, when
he addressed S00 Canadian and U.S.
delegates at the S.C.M. conferenoe at
the University of Toronto this Christmas.
"The pacifist doctrine, frequently
held by the Christians of thia land,
Is not possible ta China," the Oriental
youth leader warned.
Other major conference speakers
included Robert Makle, World Student Christian Federation secretary,
D. J. Nlles, youth secretary of tho
World Y.M.C.A. and P. H. Wang,
Madras conferenoe delegate.
Shellah Hutchinson, Ted Scott and
James Melvln formed the U.B.O. delegation  to  the conference.
Social Calendar
For Term Events
Only Tentative
Ueenuse of the uncertainty of
the time of completion of the
Brock building, the social calendar for 1940 cannot be definitely fixed. The whole social program hinges on whether the building is finished ln time to hold the
opening dance on January 20 whloh
is the tentative  date set  for  it.
If the ball cannot be held on this
date, all events except thoae to ba
held during January will have to be
re-shuffled (they have beon shuffled
a few timea already).
Following   ia   the   program   as   it
atanda now:
January—
11—Hi-Jinx.
16—B.   C.     Teacher'a     Federation
Dance.
18—Nurses' Ball.
10—McQown    Cup    Debate,    Hotel
Oeorgla.
20—B rock      Memorial      Opening
Dance.
February—
1—Arta  '42 Class  party.
8—Junior  Prom.
IB—Science  Ball.
21-24—Musical   Society   Production
—"The   Gondoliers."
29—CO-ED BALL.
March—
7—Frosh Class Party.
13-15—Spring  Play.
Photo Editor
Appeals For
Candid Snaps
Among the appointees on the Photography staff of the Totem are:
Archie Byers, Budd Devlin, Paul
Hnnbury, and Jack Momose, whose
names were omitted from the Totem
announcements of last Friday's issue.
Bill Grand repeats his appeal for
pictures that amateur phctographers
have taken on the campus since September. If you have photos of students in tlie caf—in the library—ln
labs—.or any picture which .portrays
campus life, the Totem needs lt.
Please leave the negatives with Bill
Grand, photographic editor, so that
prints may be made from them. The
negatives will be cared for and
promptly returned witli thanks, appreciation, and stuff. Two
THE
UBYSSEY
■SeSBIBE9_..^_HB..BSE9B
Tuesday, January 9, 1940
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by ths Students' Publication Board of tha Alma Mater
Sooiety of tha Untvorslty of British Columbia
Phone   Alma   I6M
Mall Subscriptions, 92.00
ti   106   Auditorium   Building
Oampus Subscriptions, 91.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
John Garrett
SENIOR KDITORS
Tuesday
Arvid   Baokman
Joan Thompson
Mlml Sohoflsld
•PORTS
Lionel Salt
ASSOCIATI. EDITORS
Janet Walkor
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Pat Keatley
Friday
Jaok   Margeson
Ann Jeremy
Arohle Paton
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Doug Watt Duno McTavlsh Austin Frith
O. V. F. KDITOR
Joyos Cooper
UTHRARY KDITOR
Virginia Galloway
ASSISTANT  LITERARY   KDITORS
Edna Wlnram Cornelia Burke
Oarry Armstrong
POT. SHORKTARY
Vsrna MaoKsnsle
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Harry Campbell
CIRCULATION ASSISTANTS
Bob Menohlona Pat Wsbbar
REPORTORIAL STAFF
Cecil Brett, Oil Olark, Buntia Dawson, Wallace Olllssple, Vlo Johnson, Ksn
Xesfe, Jaok MoMlllan, Margaret MoClory, Barbara Moe, Margaret Morris,
Barbara Newman, Harry Rltoble, Hugh Ritchie, Viotor Hopwood, Daniel
Tatroff, Dorothy Tupper, Mary Woodworth, Oordon Filmsr-Bsnnstt,
Hugh Wilson, Pierre Barton
Editorials
EXPANSION OF O.O.T.O.
The U.B.C. Contingent of the Canadian Officers' Training
Corps has at last been able to obtain an Armories for at least part
of their training purposes.
During the last term the members of the Corps have been compelled to make the best of inadequate space in the Arts building
and the new members of the corps were, of course, placed under
a considerable disadvantage in their attempts to master certain
portions of the course.
The Corps has now been given the use of the Stanley Park
Armories for Monday nights, and the Bessborough Armories for
Tuesday nights.
In addition to this encouragement the Corps has been reestablished on a larger and more expansive basis. In consequence
there are several vacancies in the strength of the contingent, and
it will be possible for a certain number of undergraduates of this
university or the graduates of any accredited university to enroll
for the courses to be given during the remainder of this session.
It is a remarkable thing to notice that the present personnel of
the corps is not a compliment to the undergraduate body. There
are at least twice as many graduates as undergraduates.
In contrast to the contingents of the C.O.T.C. at other Canadian universities the U.B.C. contingent is comparatively small.
McGiil boasts a corps of 1,400, and Toronto's unit has as many,
if not more. Even the prairie universities appear to have a heavier
enrollment than that of this university.
* There must, however, be no pressure brought to bear upon
the people who have not joined the corps in order to force them
to enroll. Potential officers should have that spirit which inspires
military service willingly and absolutely voluntarily.
But there might be a difference in the ratio of grads to undergrads were some of the student body to spend a few moments in
serious thought. No rationally intelligent human being would
suggest becoming panic-stricken over the present war, and yet few
would ask us students to ignore our possible responsibilities in a
time of national emergency.
"War is not a pleasant thing, but when our nation is actually
participating in a struggle our choice is to a certain extent narrowed. A citizen's duty is not always to flght, but it is never to
loaf. !
In a certain country which only last year was grimly removing the 'bloody head of Bolshevism,' and which is now in the pro-
-cess of allying itself with the very home of Bolshevism, people are
not permitted by the State to do nothing. Each and every citizen
has a duty to his almost deified Beich.
In Canada there is no compulsion, no restrictions on our freedom of choice. We Canadians have a duty to perform for our
State, and our State is ourselves. Pew will cheat themselves in
ordinary times. Will they rob themselves or their descendants at
a time like the present?
It would not make sense to answer "yes."
NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION
Published for the flrst time today are the new set of regulations prepared by Students' Council for operating the Brock
Memorial Building. They are tentative, and depend upon their
successful functioning.
Students may regard some of the regulations as petty or too
detailed, and others as vague and unnecessary. The object of the
regulations is not to restrict student activities, nor to treat them
as school children, but rather to loy down a general idea of the
■type of treatment which the building should receive from the
students. I
Students in the past have not earned high praise for the manner in which they cared for university buildings, nor have they
•even shown any tendency to co-operate with university authorities
in keeping this campus reasonably clean and respectable.
The regulations from Council are, therefore, a reminder to
students to conduct themselves with dignity and poise. The Brock
Memorial Building will be particularly susceptible to harsh treatment, and has not been designed for 'class room usage.'
Be it therefore resolved that the Brock Memorial Building be
treated with the same affection and respect as are our respective
homes! . . . Caried unanimously.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE  OUR BUDGET  PLAN
Seymour at Dunsmuir
LOOKING BACKWARD
BELOW
THIS
HEAD
By NEMO
Aspiring treasurers, feeling
themselves somewhat competent
to spend either foolishly or wisely the students' money—your
money—will deliver in oratorical deluges their promises to an
enthusiastic audienoe in tha Auditorium at noon today.
BREAK FROM TRADITION
2800 democracy-loving men and
women will flock from hidden labs,
leotures, the library, and the Caf to
demonstrate their keen interest in
student government.
For the flrst time in history they
will forego their Intimate (oh so Intimate) snatches of spicy gossip.
For the flrst time ln history tbey
will arise from lethargy and leave
their Kaf Koffee to overflow the
auditorium for something besides a
mere Pep Meet.
Judicially they wlU analyse the
promises of eaoh candidate. Sympathetically they will applaud
when each oampus politico ceases
speaking. Thoughtfully thoy will
compare the administrative, and
not the athletlo, merits of eaoh
contestant.
EVERYONE CAN VOTE
Tomorrow (at what, no doubt, will
be a novel experience for freshies,
some worldly sophs, and at least 99
per cent of the noble Kaf Sooiety)
the students will oast their ballots
for the ninth tin god.
No doubt tomorrows' eleotion
which will feature the largest turnout in the turbulent history of the
University of British Columbia, will
show that 'college spirit' still does
exist and that the students have
awakened from their lethargy.
YOU   HAVE   A   VOICE   AND   A
VOTE. USE THEM.
*       *       *
When classes resume after
Christmas and those who are
nble to come back do so, the
majority of students can readily
distinguish at least three stereotyped specimens of oollege humanity.
These may be classified as tho connoisseur, the intellectual, and the
martyr.
THE  CONNOISSEUR
He's always done it.
He's doing It now.
He'll always do it.
He comes up to you at this time
of the year wearing a New Year's
smirk and he stretches forth a hairy
paw. He hides his smirk as he opens
his crater-like jaws to emit, "Olad-
tomeetohajo."
He closes his jaws and dresses his
mug with a vague reminiscent smile.
He uses your arm for a pump
handle, squeezes it affectionately,
and then as an afterthought quits
pumping and planks his ponderous
paws in his pockets.
The partial vacuum spreads over
his stolid pan. Finally an inspiration
comes; vast unintelligible sounds
spew forth, "Didyagetdrunkohrist-
masjoe? didyahaveagoodtimejoe?
whatyadoNew Year's Joe ?"
He don't give you time to answer.
Instead he gets yuh Into a corner
and tells you his autobiography—the
dances he went to, the gals he took
OOTTUM TOTEM
Ci St Ai
(Continued from Pago 1)
mission on Extension of University
Eduoatlon, recommended that tho
provlnoes of Quebec, Ontario, Now
Brunswick knd Nova Sootla tako Immediate aotlon In ths matter of Federal Oovernment scholarships.
EDUCATIONAL
IMPROVEMENTS
The commission further strssssd
that the inadequaciss of the present
eduoatlonal system be brought before the Canadian people and that
the need, for educational improvement be demonstrated.
The final resolutions of ths Conferenoe are now being prepared in
booklet form and will reach tha
oampus In ths near future. It is
expected that the delegates will present the reports of their commissions
together with ths findings of the
conferenoe  at that time.
out, the gals he didn't take out, tho
gals he took for a ride.
Yeah! but he never tells you about
the gals that took him for a ride.
He tells you about the drinks he
had—all the hard liquor, the cocktails, the whiskey and sodas, and
those wild, wild parties when everyone but him was under the tables.
He tells you about the morning after
and those headaches.
Yeah! but he never tells you about
those hallucinations. Or those delusions.
And then you try to dodge htm.
Can you do It? Noo-h!
You oan't.
So you got to look Impressed. You
feebly nod your head In oomplete
understanding as the Saga of A
Sophisticate unfolds. You utter a few
unheard worda of praise.
"Whataman!   Whataman!"
Homo sapiens?  Nooh!
Homo sap? Yeah!
THE INTELLECTUAL
Then there's Algernon—he's ths
Intellectual beggar—generally round-
shouldered with a pair of spsos
perched on the tip of his nose.
Algy don't say muoh. He heard
someone—most likely a professor—
say that silenoe is golden, or that
brevity is the soul of wit.
Yeah I So no doubt he oonoluded
that to be silent was to be briafsst
of all. Or maybe he took pa's advioe
—you know—children should be seen
and not heard.
Now you go up to him because you
feel you got to say something. Compliments of the season and all that.
But you're behind the elghtball.
Algy don't smoke. He don't drink.
He don't swear, danoe, pet, or look
at gals.
So all you can ask him is, "How
did you do in your exams, Algernon?" Not that you give a d—n.
Algernon generally smirks, swallows his voioe three or four times
and gits all-a-flustered.
Just tblnk *om*on*'* asking ms
something? Oee!  Oosh!
Someone Is actually talking to me!
Oe'e!  Oosh!
He tells you. He gets real affectionate!
"Let's see now"—two or three
blinks—"I got 140 in Psych 1, 148 In
Chem, and 149 in Math 1, and uh—"
You beat It,
Homo sapiens? Nooh.
Homo sap(iens)? Yeah!
THE   MARTYR
And then there'is the fellow that
makes those New Year's resolutions.
OOTTUM TOTEM
'OCVUteS h*tt tmUed beneath Xanthippe*t "gat attach"
And hid himtelf within a tcreen of fragrant Plcobac.
• Plcobac Is s marvellous aid to scholarly
detachment. It tastes so good that, under Its
soothing protection, such Irritations as nagging
wives (or landladies) fall to penetrate, i'or
Plcobac Is the pick of the Canadian Burley crop
— always a mild, cool, sweet smoke. And Its
price la below the most Xanthlpplan criticism.
HANOV MAL.1MHT POUCH   • IM
>,_._._. "LOK-TOP" TIN   •
alto packed In  Pocket Tint
^^*wm^ ana pectcea  in   recite, nm
Plcobac
It DOES taste flood in • pipe I'
HI-JINX
{Continued from Page 1)
Varsity sooial life.
The girls oame ln costume, sang
college songs, danoed, and amused
tnemselves with various stunts. Dr.
Molnnas remembers some of the caricatures of well-known Varsity figures as being particularly brilliant.
MANY  INNOVATIONS
In later years there have been
many Innovations ln Hi-Jinx. Olass
skits have taken the place of Individual stunts The number of girls attending the party has grown with the
University.
Not more than 200 girls were present at the 1918 HI-Jinx; last year
more than 600 women students attended the party. Tea and cookies
were served as refreshments ln the
early days, but with the rising popularity of Coca-Cola these have been
abolished tn favour of "Cokes."
Quaint sort of guy.
He read somewhere In the history
books about martyrs. And he knows
that a martyr Is someone who rationalises his actions by thinking
that he Is denying himself something.
You know!
I'm siok, see, and I really should be
in bed; but I must get this essay In
on time.
No I oan't go to the show and
adore Robert Taylor 'cause I made a
resolution not to waste time on Hollywood burlesques.
A martyr. Prim and proper.
THREE STUDENTS
ICo_.Hnt.od frees Page 1)
Ice Hockey Olub, He Is a Fourth Year
Commerce student.
Smith Is well-known aa an outstanding lineman on the Thunderbird Football team and has taken a
fairly aotlve part ln student affairs.
He was an unsuccessful oandldate for
the presidency of the Oommeroe Olass
last October, and Is also a fourth year
man.
Shellah Hutchison, U.B.C. delegate
to the 8.O.M. conference in Toronto,
is president of the Canadian Student
Assembly on the campua, and prealdent of the S.CM. She alao is a
fourth year student.
RUSH.'
Just now that word means
frats and sororities. But when
"rush" means good flowers in a
hurry, and still at a reasonable
price, call
FLOWERFONE SBy. 1484
Joe Brown (Arts 'S3) Mgr.
aea Oranvllle Street
The University
of
British Columbia
Last day for payment of Second
Term Fees is
January 15th, 1940
All cheques must be certified and
made payable to The University of
British   Columbia.
Mailing- certified cheques to the
Bursar is recommended.
For regulations governing Fees —
see pages 38-41 inclusive of University
Calendar.
BURSAR,
THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
LATE Fee will be Strictly
enforced after Jan. IStli Tuesday, January 9, 1940
THE     UBYSSEY
Three
CO.T.C
ORDERS
Orders    by   Lieut. - Colonel
G.    M.    Shrum,   M.M.,   Commanding U.B.C. Contingent,
C.O.T.C.
PART ONE
No. 1 JANUARY 4th, 1040,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1.   DUTIES-.
Duties for the week ending January 18, 1040*
Orderly Officer—
2nd Lt. J. L. Hunter.
Next for duty—
Lt. R. F. 8. Robertson.
Orderly Sergeant—
Sgt. Ooodwln, W. H.
Next for duty—
Sgt. Smith, S3. L.
fl.   PARADKB—
1. The Monday-Wednesday group
will parade at the Unlverelty on
Monday, Jan. 8, and Wednesday,
Jan. 10, at 1000 hours.
3. The Tuesday-Thursday group
will parade at the University on
Tuesday, January 9, and Thursday,
Jan. 11. at 1000 hours.
8. Commenolng Mon., Jan. 18, the
Monday-Wednesday group will parade at the Stanley Park Armourlee
Mon., Jan. 18, at 1880 houra, and at
the University, Wed., Jan. If, at 1800
houra.
The Tuesday-Thursday group will
parade at the Beesborough Armour-
tee Tues., Jan. 18, at 1880 hours and
at the University Thurs., Jan. 18, at
1800 hours.
N.B,—Paradee at the Armouries are
at 1880 houra for both groupa.
4. Noon Lectures commenolng
Jan. 8, will be held on Mon., Jan. 8,
Tuee., Jan. 8, Wed., Jan. 10, and Fri.,
Jan. 181 at 1880 houra.
8.   TRAINING—
Training will be continued aa per
syllabus posted.
4.   DRESS—
Those   members   of   the   C.O.T.C.
who have been issued uniforms will
wear them to the Monday and Tueaday parades.
tt.  SHOOTING—
Will all those Interested In miniature range shooting hand In their
names with a list of times available
to R.S.M. Fleishman, In oharge of
Small Arms Training.
W. H. BARTON,
<W. H. Barton) 2nd Lt.
A/Adjutant,
U.B.C. Contingent. C.O.T.C.
•      •      .
Orders    by    Lieut. - Colonel
G.    M.    Shrum,    M.M.,    Commanding U.B.C, Contingent,
C.O.T.C.
PART TWO
No. 1 JANUARY 8, 1880,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1.   STRENGTH INCREASE—
The following men having been
duly attested and sworn are taken
on the strength of the U.B.C. Contingent, C.O.T.C, with effect from
26-8-88.
Regt
No. Rank Name
818 Cadet Griffiths, John Roderick
816 "        Tulk, Alexander Edward
817 "        Dunkln, John James
818 Kirk-Owen, Reginald
819 "        Jones, Howard Fulton
820 "       Harrison,
Kenneth  Burnaby
OBT VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOCIAL
snd
OLUB FUNCTIONS
THB
CLARKE c* STUART
0O. LIMITED
Stationers aad Printers
880 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Dominion*Provincial Youth Training Plan
Rural  Leadership  Courses  Planned
•  •  • •  •  •
Instruction Given On Forestry Project
/fori**"**
A new vista has opened up in
British Columbia's educational
outlook and instructional pioneering is being done on the campus of the University. From all
over the provlnoe young men and
women will soon bo travelling to
Vancouver, for perhaps the flrst
time in their lives, to take part in a
rural leadership oourse sponsored by
the University.
Southbank, Haselmere, Telkwa
and kindred points In the north and
Interior of B.C, are tha homes of
these travellers. During the past
ysar approximately twenty-five Rural Oooupatlonal aohoole have been
held In these ssotlons.
Courses were oonduoted whloh
lasted two or three weeks, but arrangements havs now been completed to hold a muoh longer oouree.
This will be in Vanoouver from January 28 to Maroh 16 on the University oampua.
FORESTRY PROSPECT
The class rooms and dormitories
that will houae these young men and
women are ready for them. They
are on the site of the Point Orey
Forestry Camp and have beeen secured through the co-operation of
the Provinoial Department of Lands.
Blanketa, cots, stoves and oooklng
utensils will be needed, but theee are
available from the Provinoial Department of Labour.
Thia Rural Leadership oourse is
part of the Dominion-Provlnolal
Youth Training programme and the
trainees (as the students might be
called) have a variety of subjects
offered them. These are designed to
be of practical use to all young people who are genuinely interested in
821
822
823
824
820
Johnston, .
Douglas Tanner
Abernethy,
Oordon McKellar
Rayner, Oeorge Joeeph
Samls, Bruoe  Clinton
Pumphrey,
Lionel Franois
826      "        Harvey,  Bruoe  Oraham
a.   EXTRACTS—
Diet. Order No. 408, Canadian Officers' Training Corps—Organisation:
The organisation of the U.B.C.
Contingent, C.O.T.C, as authorised
by O.O. 82 of 1888 is amended as follows, effective 1-10-88:
In   column   "H.Q.   and   8   Pins."
insert  "4".
In   column   "H.Q.   and   2   Pins."
delete  "2".
Authority O.O.  233 dated 6-12-30.
Authorised'   establishment    now
396 all ranks.
3.   STRENGTH  DECREASE—
To be struck off strength as from
8-1-40.
Reg't No. 010 Cadet Potts, Bernard
Donald.
Reg't No. 024 Cadet Dunlop, Oeorge
Reg't No. S97 Cadet Bloor, Oeorge.
4    AMENDMENTS—
Part 2 Orders No. 14 dated 28-11-89,
delete Reg't No. 760 Cadet Fisher,
A. W. and Insert Reg't No. 63, Cadet
Fisher, A. W.
(W. H. Barton) 2nd Lt.
A/Adjutant,
U.B.C.  Contingent. C.O.T.C.
*      *      *
PART TWO
No. 8 8-1-40.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1.   PROMOTIONS—
The Commanding Officer ie pleased to approve tbe following promotions with  effect 8-1-40.
To  be  C-R.S.M.—
C-Sgt.  Swanson, A. L.
To be C-R.Q.M.S.—
C-Cpl. Tuck, M. D.
To be C-C.SJM. «,
Regt
No. Rank Name
417 C-Sgt. Ooodwln,  W.   H.
400 C-Cpl. West, J. O.
430     "       Kersey, W.  O.
339 Cadet Braidwood, W.
To be C-C.Q.M.S.
420 C-Sgt. Smith, E. L.
427 C-Cpl. Cavers, 8. D.
008      "        Jeffries, J. O.
480 Cadet Wilson, R.  A.
To be C-Sgt.
432 C-Cpl. Lamont,  R,  A.
471      "        Semple, R. E.
489 Wiggs, F. R.
070      "        Hood, J. A.
400 Cadet Oardner, J. A.
480     "       Lamont-Havers, R. W.
mmw
UNIVERSITY PEOPLE . . . students
and faculty alike . . . will find a friendly, helpful banking service at Canada's
Oldest Bank.
HEAD OFFICE
MONTREAL,
BANK OF MONTREAL
UTAaUSUO  1817
"A Bank where small Accounts are welcome."
"West Point Orey Branoh:  SASAMAT AND TENTH
rural   problems,   either   agricultural,
eoonomlo or social.
A study of the problems In connection with oltisenshhlp occupies
an Important place, and to aid ln
thla and other fields, the aeelstanoe
of members of the University teaching staff has bsen secured. Other
facilities of the University oampus
will also bs available to tbe etudents.
LIMITED MEMBERSHIPS
Already there have been over fifty
applications. Attendance will be
limited to seventy or eighty. All
the young people will be aeleoted on
their personal merits and leak of
funds will not bar anyone from attendance.
During the eight weeks that the
Youth Training etudente are in session there will be opportunities for
them to meet and exchange ideas
with others on the oampus. Through
praotloe In expreeaing tholr own
thoughta clearly they Should gain
the kind of experlenoe that ia extremely valuable in helping to flt
them for leadership In their communities.
Library Receives Many
Oxford Pamphlets
On World Affairs
Several recently published Oxford
pamphlets on world affairs have been
reoeived by the Library since Christmas. The Hat Inoludes:
The Treaty of Brest-Lltovsk and
Germany's Eastern Policy by John
Wheeler Bennett; AU Right Mr.
Roosevelt, Stephen Leaoook; Tho
Blockade 1814-1818, W. Arnold Foster;
National Socialism and Christianity,
N. Micklem; Can Oermany Stand the
Strain, L. P. Thompson; Who Hitler
Is, Robt. O. K. Ensor; The Refugee
question, J. H. Simpson; Caecho-
Slovakla, R. Blrley; Propaganda in
International Politics, E. H. Can;
Turkey, Greece and the Eastern
Mediterranean, O. F. Hudson; The
Danubian * Basin, O. A. Macartney;
Encirclement, J. L. Brier ley; The
Fourteen Points and the Treaty of
Versailles, O. M. Oathorne-Hardy;
'Living Space' and Population Problems, R. R. Kuczynskl; The British
Empire, H. V. Hodson; Herr Hitler's
Self-disclosure In Mein Kampf, R. O.
K. Ensor; Canada and the United
States Neutrality, B. K. Sandwell.
CANADIAN OFFICERS
TRAINING CORPS
University of British Columbia
Contingent
There are a limited number
of vacancies In the corpa for
registered undergraduates of
this University and for graduates of any accredited Oanadlan University who desire to
take a preliminary course in
practical work preparatory to
enrolling for the regular qualifying oourse of Instruction
which commences next September. All those interested should
register Immediately at O.O.T.O.
Headquarters ln the Arts Building.
482
483 "
62C "
41 Cadet
478 "
487 "
493 "
489 "
491 "
004
611 "
818 "
617 "
008 "
086
60S
622
60.
674 "
704 "
718 "
Oordon, M. J.
Purslow, J. E.
Whalen, J. H.
To be C-Cpl.
Stead, O. W.
Walker, D. L.
Sage, W. D. McN.
Murray,  R.  N.
Wilson, H. R.
Bushell,   N.   F.
Sutton, _C. A. B.
Moore, V. C.
Filteau, J. F.
Jamieson, F.
Lowe, H.  A.
Teagle,  E.  E.
Taylor, P. O.
Madeley,  S.  T.
Osier, K. S.
Cranston, R. B.
Morrison, C. M.
Clyne, J. V.
*WWWWWVWWWWWV%rVfc
MART KENNEY and His Western
Gentlemen , . . available for private
engagements.
HOTEL
VANCOUVER
THIS XMAS BOGEY
The University of British Columbia
la run on a peculiar ayatem—very
peculiar. But It'a a system, and far
be lt from me to question rules that
have been laid down by people paid
to give their entire time and thought
to the task.
However, there are sixty-odd people
that are questioning the university's
right to evlot them after the Xmaa
exams—even though they, the evicted, probably admit that the line must
bo drawn somewhere. And thoae alx-
ty-odd are Juat aa probably cursing
thla and that in a vain attempt to
Justify their own positions ln the eyea
of parents and friends.
ANGLES
There are lota of angles, of course.
There la the university authorities'
aide of the queation. There Is the
student's aide; and, worat of all, there
Is the parent's side. And even the
parents oan't do anything about it.
In the oaae of freshmen, particularly, it seems a bit cruel to stlok to
rules ao closely. A unlveralty deals
with human lives—but at times we
are able to question the way ln whioh
suoh lives are handled. This Is one
of thoae tlmea.
I do not think that a short three
months le sufficient for some of our
younger freahman to adjust themselves to the university requirements
and atmosphere. And ln most oaaea,
their failure at Xmaa Is due to Just
suoh a lack of adjustment as I have
In mind. There are likely many good
high sohool student* who go completely to pieces ln the face of pressure exerted to oomplete an all too
short unlveralty year by the middle
of April.
Some of thoae who were led to the
gate this Xmas may never make another attempt to enter a university.
Or they may never be given another
opportunity by disappointed parents.
And 1 don't think it's always the student's fault.
UPPERCLASSMEN
Let's take a look at what happens
ln the upperclass brackets, particularly ln the Science faoulty. The overworked scienceman takes a worse
beating than any other undergraduate at the university. And he doesn't know why, any more than do hla
sympathetic Arts brothers who thank
heredity or something for an absolute antipathy to test-tubes and
metal lathes.
Sure—there must be rules. Without
then, the university would oeaee to
function aa an organiaed institution.
And the line must be drawn somewhere. But I claim that the line's
drawn in the wrong place.
If a man ia doing so much extracurricular work that he suffers in examinations, why shouldn't he be
warned by someone that hla life's ln
danger? Or la he? I've never heard
of any such warnings being given to
anyone for any reason. Is It not possible for the authorities to keep some
sort of check on the amount of time
a student spends ln activities other
than academic? Perhaps some of the
work done in those other aotlvities
has a lasting value—does anyone take
the trouble to find out?
The line should be drawn before
the exams are written. If a student
is to take a beating on exams, he
should be warned to drop his other
work and study. Or if he carries on
that work, only to be tossed out as
a result, the work he has done outside the classroom should be taken
Into account when Judgment is being
passed upon him by the supreme
powers who hold his fate ln the palm
of their hands.
I still Insist that the university
authorities are too wrapped up In
their own ambition. They don't pay
796      "        Arnold, H. D.
808      "        Paul, A. B.
W. H,  BARTON,
(W. H. Barton) 2nd Lt.
A/Adjutant,
U.B.C.  Contingent,  C.O.T.C.
- lei**********************^ >
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
Tenth and Blanca
«AT THE GATES"
i ',      "Our Servloe Means Happy     < ',
• Motoring"
; i+*,+++***e,***+***+*+*+*m>l >
Reserve
SALISBURY  CAFE
BANQUETS AFTERNOON TEAS
Ifef ^ub^on^^mi ^mpM*vi*m4(
Here You Are Girls!
A Marvellous Permanent
Wave Special
• . . Just for You!
In ths mad rueh at oollege it is a oomf ort to have
a REALLY OOOD permanent. ... A soft, natural-
looking wave that oan be easily transformed from
your favourite oampua "oaaual" into the kind of
nlgh-etyle coiffure you like for "heavy dates"! . . .
This is ths type of permanent we're offering you in
our COLLEGE SPECIAL ... at a thrllllngiy-low
prioe 1
Call SBymour 8181 for an appointment.
—Tbe Beauty Salon, Sixth Floor, at THB BAY
Rules and Regulations for
the Brock Memorial Building
A. SUPERVISION.
1. The Discipline Committee shall
be in oharge of the oonduot of persons In the building at all timee.
2. Subject to tbe approval of the
Board of Governors, a Prootor shall
be appointed and shall be empowered to see that these rules are adhered to and shall report offenders
to the Discipline Committee.
3. All offenders shall be dealt
with by the Discipline Committee
aooording to Artlole XII, Sub-Section 4 of the Code of the Alma Mater
Sooiety.
B. RULES:
1. Luncheons and afternoon tea
shall be served In the dining room.
2. No student shall be permitted
to eat his own lunch In the building.
No refreshments of any nature may
be served in any room other than
the dining room except by speolal
permission of the Students' Counoil.
8. No smoking shall be allowed
In any room but those supplied with
ash-trays.
4. No furniture shall be moved
without the permission of the Discipline   Committee   and    then,    only
under the supervision of the Prootor.
8. All outdoor clothing and umbrellas, etc., muat be left in the cloak
rooms before entering the loungee
and meeting rooms.
6. Ths Brock Memorial Building
shall not be used aa a library.
7. Students shall at all times
treat the building with the utmost
respect.
C.    ALLOCATION   OF   ROOMS i
1, Applications for the use of all
rooms shall be made to the Students'
Council.
2. Application of organisations for
extension of time beyond the regular hours, namely, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
shall be dealt with by th. Students'
Council In co-operation with the
Building  Superintendent.
Election Platform
I would eo-operate to the fullest with the other council members, using to the best of my
ability such knowledge as I possess for the benefit of the Student Body as a whole.
Signed:
J. H. STEVENSON.
• • •
(Editors'a Note) Although there are
two other candidates, Stevenson waa
the only one to bring ln an eleotion
platform to the Ubyssey Office before
5 o'clock deadline.)
OOTTUM TOTEM
enough attention to what the students are attempting to do around
the campus. They do not interest
themselves sufficiently ln a balancing
of work—currlcular and extra-curricular.
There are a lot of us who don't
come out here to become stodgy bookworms. Isn't lt possible that the work
some students are doing outside the
lecture halls Is Just as important to
their future as the dreary, mechanical taking down of notes that have
been identical for years and years?
LUNCHES
DINNERS
Extension Courses
R«-Op«n«d Monday
At Normal School
Extension department courses recommenced at the Vanoouver Normal Sohool Monday night and will
continue throughout the spring term,
It Is announced by Director Oordon
M. Shrum.
Evening lectures irl gardening are
given by Prof. A. F. Barss; modern
English by Mrs. John Creighton;
poultry husbandry by Prof. E. A.
Lloyd, and economics by Prof. O. F.
Drummond. Classes start at 8 pjn.
It is dangerous to be sincere unless you are also stupid.
THB NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branoh
"A general bank business
is transacted and aocounta
of the faoulty and atudenta
of the University of British
Columbia  are   weloomed."
BANKERS  TO  THE
ALMA MATER
SOCIETY
0. R. Myers, Manager
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.i 8 a.m. to 6 pjn.i Saturdays 8 a_n_. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper,
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
XMAS CARDS
NOW   ON
SALE
ftAt4AMMA-VV-^-^-'-^-l^M^->V^V-a_^r^_^^*AV-VV■-^A
m SPORT SUMMARY
VARSITY 3; ROWERS 0
UBEECEES 3; ALL-BLAOKS 12
SPORT SUMMARY
ENGINEERS 16; NAVY 0
SOOOERMEN 2; RICHMOND 2
Four
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1940
Rowing Club Noses Out Varsity 6-3
' *****%* ■ *m-
Campus
Colour
Ry LIONEL SALT
i-l tmrnj^mam m***mfm-*% ****H%*
RANG)  RANG I  RANG!
Baron Munchausen returns I The
Baron reputedly stiffened many years
ago by a stray wing Jing is roaming
the Oampus and stalking his prey.
Already he has struck, and the
whole Journalistic world shudders at
the thought of his renewed attacks
against the men of the Fourth Estate.
Firs victim of this anarchist, and
we reveal this knowing full well that
wc violate Section 4 of High School
Journalists and Blotter Printers Union, was one Pat Slattery, the younger, adjective sllnger for the Vancouver Sun (Hlya, boys I).
GEE WHIZ It
Slattery wrote a dashing story on
"explosion ball", a system of basketball that Van Vliet had pioked up
from his Alma Mater, Oregon. Slat's
Informant was none other than the
Baron himself, cunningly disguised as
Ted Pallas.
It wasn't until days Inter that Pat
found out that the boom-boom system was non-existent, and that the
big guns echoing from the Point Orey
Campus were not Maury's basketmen
but merely the O.O.T.O. biasing away
at errant sea gulls.
By the way, Pallas, suffering from
aouto nervous strain, following an
attack of laughing gas, Is resting
comfortably at home. He waa found
In front of the Bekln's Building with
a copy of the Sun clutched in one
hand, and a toy trench morter in the
other.
I
RESOLVE
TO
START
EACH
DAY
RIGHT
BY
READING
The
News-
Herald
'CANADA'S
FASTEST
GROWING
.NEWSPAPER'.
SOc
PER MONTH
DELIVERED
"Read it
on the Bus**
Harlem, Pacific Lutheran
And Tookes On Hoop
Schedule This Week
There's n purpose behind that gruelling training grind that
Maury Van Vliet is giving his hoop lads. Harlem's come to town,
with all its hi-de-ho and screwball antics, and tho basketmen are
studying their scrip in readiness. Yes, folks, contrary to advance
notices, the Globetrotters, dusky wizards of tho melon ball, will
show their wares before a University audience, Friday noon, at
tho Campus gym.
But there's more, too, for the  Thunderbirds tackle Tooke's
Wednesday night also on the Campus, in their flrst League game
of the new year. Tooke's ore now in second place In the standings
1 ■ and   are  shooting  for  Maple   Leafs,
current pace-setters. Varsity, on the
TED McPHEE
Back from the Injured list comes
Tod MoPhee, valuable flve-elghths
of Coaoh Carey's English Rugby
squad. Injured last year, Ted played a great game against Rowing
Club on Saturday, working well
with  brother Howie.
Soccermen in
Rousing Tie
with Richmond
Fists Fly in 2-2
Draw at Cambie
Varsity teams had "layoff lethargla"
Saturday afternoon, and the soccermen were no exception, barely managing to hold Richmond Farmers to
a 2-2 draw ln a scrapplly fought encounter.
Showing little of the brilliant form
which last month brought them within shouting distance of top spot in
the league, the Hitchensmen, nevertheless, led 1-0 at the breather on
Phil Temoln's grounder, scored on a
pass from Basil Robinson.
CLOSE ONE
After the Interval, the Farmers lost
little time ln equalizing, registering a
splendid goal on a fine combination
play in the first minute. Stew Roach
and Ben Herd got that one back
however, about ten minutes later, the
former getting his head to a high
bouncer ln the goalmouth and nodding lt to Herd who walked It ln
without any trouble,
With fifteen minutes to go, however, the local team drew level again,
when Steele scored on a rebound after a long bombardment of the Varsity net, and so it ended.
SPOT SHOTS  ... It was a chummy  little  affair,   with   the  Richmond
team   showing   pronounced   primitive
instincts on more than one occasion.
Don  McLean  playing his first senior
game in place of the ineligible Dennis
Leong,   made  one  brilliant  save   and
generally Justified  his  inclusion.   .  .   .
The same Mr. McLean, too, on being
tripped   violently   by   a   Farmer   forward, returned the compliment cleverly,   dodged  an  ensuing  roundhouse
right  and  then  beat  a  more  or  less
dignified  retreat  to his citadel, leaving  the  aggressor   to  other  activities.
[ . . . None of the collegians were up to
form,  Temoln on the right wing being   the  only  one   to  show  flashes  of
his real form.  .  .  .  Stew Roach, Basil
Robinson   and   Fred   Sasaki   were   in
poor   physical   condition, while Jack
Rush, while saving the day more than i
once on defence, seemed to have lost
nil   ideas   of   constructive   play,   and
Stu Todd had a bad day.
other hand, find themselves in fourth
place, and don't like it. Consequently they'll be going all out for that
very necessary win.
A LITTLE CHANOE
And then, not content with tangling with two tough teams In the
same week, the hoop men have completed arrangements to entertain the
strong Pacific Lutheran quintette,
who will play the Thunderbirds, Saturday noon on the Campus.
Beoause of the expenses Involved,
there  will  be  a   slight  admission
chargo to the two exhibition tilts.
Students with passes will pay fifteen cents to see Harlem perform,
and ten cents to catch the Paolflo
Lutheran  engagement.
,  Both  gamea  are worth   twice  the
price,   and   students   are    urged   to
rush over as quickly as possible. In
order    that   the    games   may   start
promptly.
The Thunderbirds will be raring
to go for those three tilts this week,
and will be ln tip-top shape for
them. 'Tis rumoured that -Varsity
fans will alao get a sneak preview
of this "explosion ball" business, if
it doesn't explode In the face of a
downtown  scribe.
Actually, the team is ln top-flight
condition, with Joe Pringle leading
the lads. The boys also keep tabs
on bad passes, and fumbles during
their torrid practice sessions, a system which is having a desired effect.
Play this year has been definitely
sloppy, and Van Vliet is determined
to polish the 'Birds passlnp attaok.
BAD STUFF
If Basil Robinson gets around to
It on time, letters will be sent to two
of the Senior A squod declaring
them ineligible for League fixtures.
Both men, Livingstone and Pedlow,
-were flrst string men and -will be
missed.
To plug the gap Van Vllet will
bring up Doug Gross, but will be
unable to use either Art Barton or
Brud Matheson. Both are unable to
make the eligibility standards and
will probably confine their efforts to
the Senior B squad.
Ted Pallas, local Baron Munchausen of the hoopsters, is still indefinite
about his return to the wars. Ted
is torn between his books, and
Maury's dire need for talent.
BADMINTON CLUB
The badminton club will not see
action on Thursday but for the rest
of the term members will be able to
play on Monday and Thursday
nights.
To date, Varsity holds down first
place ln the "B" division and third
place in the "C" division.
The Newman Club will hold Its flrst
first meeting of this term at the home
of Mrs. P. Murphy, 4594 West 9th
Avenue, on January 10, at 8:00 p.m.
All members are requested to be present. The speakers for the evening
will  be  convention  delegates.
OOTTUM  TOTEM
I SPORT CALENDAR
WEDNESDAY
BASKETBALL:   Tooke's   vs.   Varsity,  9:00 p.m.,  at Varsity
FRIDAY
Globetrotters    vs.     Varsity.     12:30
p.m.,   price   15c   with   pass
SATURDAY
Pacific  Lutheran  vs.  Varsity 12:30
p.m.,   price   10c   with   pass
"Penalty Kick
Sinks "Birds
In Close Game
Science wins again I Once again the
Engineers proved to be the high spot
ln the week-end's menu of Bnglish
Rugby as they pulled off the only
University win ln three scheduled
games. And while the Sllpstlokmen
were scuttling Naval Reserves 18-0 at
Lower Brockton, the Varsity fifteen
were being nosed out 6-3 by Rowing
Club on the Oval, and All-Blacks
were taking the count of the Ubeecee
lads 12-3 at the Stadium grounds.
Oil   Oil   OI!
That close Rowing Club victory
over the senior squad was forty minutes of bad 'news to rugger hopefuls
who held high hopes for the boys ln
the Miller Cup race ln this year's
flght. With nobody apparently able
to stop the Meraloma Club, Varsity's
long hold on the traditional silverware seems to be slipping fast.
Saturday's game was one of those
see-saw affairs with either side In
line for the victory, depending on the
breaks of the game. And the breaks
were all against the Thunderbirds.
Time and again they forced the
Clubbers back to put the ball ln
scoring position only to be stopped by
penalties, or the tall booting of Bob
Casement, the Rowers' rangy fullback.
Despite the loss, Varsity played
their best mid-neld game of the
season, bnt lacked the soorlng
punch to oarry this advantage to
a soore. At least three times they
had sorum downs on the Rowers'
ten yard line, and many times the
three line carried the ball within
the twenty only to lose possession
on a bad pass.
McPHEES   SHINE
Howie McPhee was a stand-out for
the Thunderbirds, and provided them
with their only score, crashing
through the entire field to set up the
score for Carrol Chapman who went
over ln the corner, but missed the
convert.
Before the half had ended, however, the Clubbers had tied the count
at 3-3 when Hicks plowed across the
Varsity line, three tacklers clinging
to him. for an unconverted try deep
ln the corner.
The winning margin, a drop kick
on a Varsity penalty, came half way
through the second half. With Referee Lange calling a Varsity interference on a kick, Oracle Fields
calmly dropped the ball between the
posts from about ten yards out, to
give the Rowers three additional
points, and the game 6-3.
RUOOER RAMBLINOS: The
game, although played cleanly, was
hard-fought throughout, and several
of the boys had to be doctored. . . .
Ranjl Mattu was carried off ln the
second half, reportedly stiff for two
hours, from a kick ln the head. . . .
From our seat, lt looked like a defensive measure. . . . The MoPhee
brothers, Howie and Ted, scintillated
for the Thunderbirds, Howie with his
brilliant runs and Ted with some
fancy pass-snaring. . . . Oordon
"Suds" Sutherland, receiving half of
the Rowers, played a bang up game,
being carted from the field, but returning to haul down Howie McPhee
who had two men to beat. . . . Tommy Williams performed creditably ln
Ihe fullback slot for Meralomas Saturday. Varsity could use some of that
shifty running the de-throned "glamour boy" was showing. . . .
LION   TROUBLE
The Ubeecees ran smack Into
Trouble when they were handed a
12-3 pasting by the All-Blacks at the
Stadium. Feature of the game was
swivel-hipped Qarney Smith, a hangover from the Canadian grid wars
who carried his anti-U.B.O. campaign into English rugby, breaking
through for three tries, two ln the
second half. The other West Van
score was obtained by Hank Smith,
also a stand-out for the North Shore
THE   BEST miLK  CHOCOLATE IT1ADE
MURAL
BASKETBALL
Intramural competition will resume
next week and the hectic race for
inter class supremacy will continue,
this time in the ever popular basketball tourney.
An even dozen teams will be battling it out for the hoop championship, and they will all get their first
workout in the gym tomorrow noon.
The noon hour ls reserved for the
class squads and they will practice in
rotation.
In the first game the Frosh will
clash with Sc. '42 on Wednesday, Jan.
17. Here are the other 'first round'
games:
Arts  '42 vs.  So. '41.
Arts '41  vs. So. '43.
Anglican vs. So. '40.
Education vs. Arts '40.
Aggy vs. Commerce.
Maury reports that a Science class
ls preparing a classy scoring chart to
be put up opposite the men's bulletin board in the gym.
Co-Ed Sports
—By Oerry Armstrong
MINOR HOOPLA
Nosed out by a light Weat Vancouver lumber team 32-31 at the Y. W.
C. A. on Thursday night, the Senior
"B" hoop team dropped the leadership of the league to the North Shore
team and dropped to the seoond slot
themselves.
MoMorran's bees were definitely off
color but will be back with a renewed
attack as they meet Ryerson's at the
Ryerson Oym on Friday.
Harvey Rees, who was notable for
his absence last week will provide the
punch the team needs to beat even
the last place club of the league.
It is a tradition in the Community
leagde that the winner of the loop
never wins the playoffs. This ls why
the bees are not perturbed aboi^t
dropping their crucial game to West
Vancouver.
Wanted: hockey players to fill the
holes reputedly left in the team lineup by Xmas exams I
Oirls are aaked to rally round in
preparation for Open House, to be
held late in February. All features of
athletic work will be on display. Oirls
will demonstrate tap dancing and
tumbling among other things. Mixed
teams will show dancing and gym
work. Oirls wishing to take part are
asked to be ln the gym next Monday
ot 11.30 when details will be discussed.
Here's news! Mixed volleyball will
commence Tuesday, January 16th at
noon! Men and women of each class
can be getting organized.
A series of knock-out tournaments
in tenniquoit, ping pong (singles),
and basketball free-shooting will be
held for women starting Monday,
January 10th.
Two volleyball, two badminton
doubles and two ping pong doubles
teama will travel to Bellingham on
Feb. 3rd, for a play-day with Bellingham Normal. Twenty girls will make
the trip, going by car. The program
will also Include swimming in the
tank and a tour of the campus.
ICE HOCKEY
The loe Hockey Club will hold a
praotloe at the Forum tonight,
Tuesday, at 11.00 p.m.
OOLF NOTICE
by  OHM1E  HALL
There will be an important meeting of the golf club today at noon In
Arts 108.    Everybody out.
Murgatroyd
Was a cow more athletic than
Mudderly.
She hopped a picket fence and was
Uddorly
Destroyed.
—Jaok-o-Lantern.
Lions grid team. Doug Wilson saved
the squad from a shut-out, dribbling
the ball across the line to make the
count 12-3.
In the Engineers 15-0 win over the
Naval Reserves, stars of the game
were Ronnie Renshaw, Alf Allen,
Barney Boe, and the other twelve
men. Navy never stood a chance as
tlie Redshirts rolled over th n in
fine   style.
, **!!*•** *i r * w * ^ * w a **
Fraternity and  Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Specialty
DANCE PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOME,'
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CHRISTMAS CARDS
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586 Seymour St."
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After-Theatre Teas Fascinating Teacup Reading
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