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The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1950

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 » a i rv
The Ubyssey
II \ I \
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1050
NO. 15
EVERYTHING ROM PENS TO UMBRELLAS will be put on
the block November 7 in aid of the War Memorial Gym fund.
Lost and found keeper Bill Poole, third year law student is
practically swamped in his office ih the north basement of Brock
Hnll. Students may also submit articles to be auctioned off,
Terry Lynch, chairman of the auction committee said. Donated
articles should be left with the receptionist in the AMS Office.
Saturday
Features
Grid Game
Zany Race
Races with conveyances ranging from horses to baby buggies will feature the Varsity Handicap to be staged by the Kickapoos during the intermission of the Big Four football game next
_ — ^Saturday,
Df ive Starts for
Peace Signatures ~
Student Peace Movement members will set up their table in the
quad today to collect signatures
for the Stockholm Peace Petition,
Club will he permitted to hold
public meeting from today until
November 7 during which time
they may circulate petitions for
signing.
"Signing this petition is the decision that only students as individuals can make,'' said Nonie
Donaldson AMS president when
council gave the go-ahead to the
group Monday.
Every undergraduate society as
well as the Kickapoo Club will
place an entry in the Handicap,
whtek is 4e»tgaed to .boost football enthusiasm at "UBC.
"The Engineers and the Kickapoos will both enter horses," MAD
official Bill Sparling announced,
"but the other societies have not
yet specified their entries."
Jack Short, "Voice of the Races"
who announces all Vancouver
horse races, will deliver a blow-
by-blow description of the half-
hour entertainment.
The Kickapoos will present a
prize to the winning entry.
The game between the Calgary
Mustangs and the Blue Bombers
will be staged at the Varsity stadium in the afternoon.
Labour Scholarships May
Be Undertaken By ISS
UN CLUB MEMBERS SOLVE
MISSINO FLAG MYSTERY
What looked like the mystery of the missing United
Nations Flag turned into a legitimate case of substitution
Thursday.
United Nation Club members were dumbfounded early
Thursday when they arrived at UBC to find that their
flag haa been removed from the flagpole at them north
end of the mall where it had been raised to open U.N. Wedk
Tuesday. ,
The denouement of the mystery came shortly before
noon when it was found1 that the flag had been temporarily
replaced by the national ensign for congregation ceremonies
Wednesday.
Athletic Aid Plan
Nears Completion
Students Make Final Decision
On Ostrom's New Proposal
Plan to aid the ailing athletic .situation at UBC is nearing
completion.
Brock Ostrom, MAD chairman, who is drawing up the plan,
declared Thursday that progress is "right on schedule" and the
plan will be completed well before it is to be presented to
the student body on November 2.       /
 ■   — ■        ■ ♦   Members of the Big Block Club
Frosh Undergrad
were told the basic changes in reorganisation by Stan Clarke, treasurer ot MAD, at a noon hour meet-
tag.
^**^>*h^,i...-■(^^.■wyw.iwH^i   f«oa^ to-4» OTisd -ofl-m^'mnHrirtier*
Report appearing in a downtown
paper to the effect that the Freshman Undergraduate Society "may
be dissolved ln the future" have
been vigorously denied by Don
Marshall, president of the newly-
elected body.
In a letter to The Ubyssey
Thursday, Marshall said that "Under no otrcumfBtances will the
Frosh Undergrad. 3oclety be discontinued now or in the near future."
Marshal alleges that the statement appeared ln The Vancouver
Dally Province, Oct. 2S.
STUDENT LIFE GONE
UBC 'Easy Going Compared
To University Of Hamburg
(Gertrude Stock is an exchange
student at UBC from Hamburg
University. In this article, written exclusively for The Ubyssey,
•he describes the ways of university life in her native Germany.)
By GERTRUDE STOCK
"Tell me, what ls the situation in
Germany?"
I really don't how of ton that
question was put to me since I left
Europe, and how often I have tried
to give a satisfactory answer both
to the person asking and to me,
making lt is as short as possible.
Don't be afraid, I won't start all
over again talking about Immediate
postwar difficulties, about black-
marketing when the single cigarette was |2 worth, about the currency reform when each Oerman
had to start off with exactly 10
DM. I guess you would prefer a
glimpse at our University life, however I have to be careful ln saying
that, because there is no such thing
as University Life at least in Ham-
burs, where I come from. And with
Bigger, Cheaper Meals
Planned For Students
Meal tickets, good in tho UBC caf and at both resident
camps, will go on sale in the bursar's office November 1, Miss
Elizabeth Little, director of the foods and services department
 — "fannounced today.
'Greeks  Delay'
Totem   Progress
Serious delay I" production of
the Totem, student yearbook, is
t'orseeu hy editor Hugh Cameron
unless nnilovgrad (treks make a
better showing at photo studios behind   Hrock   Hall.
To date, only alm^l 20 fraternity
and   sorority   uuderr.rads   have   appeared for their picture
far below expectations.
--*v
'li [ill'Ul
The new move is part of the
policy of the university to provide
bigger meals at cheaper rates for
budget-conscious students, Miss
Little said.
Cor iho price of $17, students
may purchase !U tickets for use
at h'ort a\id Acadia camps. For $l."i
another ticket issue will buy 2a
meals   In   the   caf.
The     department     pointed     out
Ihat in buying the tickets students
will   realize   a   saving   of   20   pet
a number cent.    Tickets    are   primarily   de-
j sigued for use in the evening.
this statement I have jumped exactly ln medias res.
There are "vA present, about 25
Universities ln the Western German Republic and Berlin, all attended by several thousand students, and I would say that even
in small university towns like
Marburg and Tueblngen — not to
speak of Heidelberg which is completely Americanized with blue
jeans and Coca-Cola — the times
of the once typical free student
life of Germany are gone, simply
for one reason that approximately
80 per cent of the students have to
earn their own living, and not being
in the fortunate position — as for
instance — Canadian students —
to get 5 months completely free of
essay and exam worries, they just
cannot afford to spend much time
on all the various kinds of student
activities.
So thoy just drop In for lectures
and hy leaving the building they
leave University behind, take the
train in different directions to their
different jobs and are gone . . . till
they drop in again for a lecture.
There are of course faculty meetings, there are seminar excursions,
there is even a dance once a term,
there are fraternities rising again,
but only a very small minority
takes part, so Hurt you cold not
call that University life as it is
here on the Caippus,
Scholarships For Asia Out,
Money and Materials Slated
' By IRIS SANDERSON
International "labor scholarships" may result from a spark
of UBC initiative which Jcindled a fire at International Student
Service conference last week, f        "      - lsaas
rganiiation ln the new plan
will remain basically the same,
Ostrom declared to the Ubyssey
Thursday, with only minor changes to be made.
Ostrom will present tbe plan to
a  meeting  of  the  UBC  coaching
staff to  detect  any  flaws  in  the
organizing  setup.
STUDENT8 DECIDE
Opinions of the coaches will be
accepted and evaluated, Ostrom
said, but the students are the ones
to decide just what the plan should
include on the final draft.
Under the new setup, every athletic organization now receiving
an MAD budget will be given a
voice in athletic policy of the university Ostrom said.
PULL RESPECT
Problems still to be considered
by Ostrom deal mostly with individual aid to athletes.
Ostrom feels that any plan for
aid to individual athletes must
aim to keep th full respect of the
university as an educational institution.
Five tentative plans have been
drawn up so far to deal with this
situation, Ostrom said.
Any one of them may be adopted for the final draft or a composite
of all of them may be our solution, he said.
But the details of the re-organizing is complete for all practical
purposes. That is one of the most
important phases of the plan. That
is why it took such a long time to
work out, Ostrom concluded.
The UBC "Labor" recommendation, approved by AMS student
council, suggests a plan which may
partly replace the work of International Refugee Organization,
soon  to  bcome  defunct.
Canadian employers with a need
for laborers will guarantee a one-
year job for displaced persons
from Europe. ISS representatives
will appoach the Dominion Government, asking them to pay transportation of the D.P. laborers.
At the end of one year's labor
in Canada, any of these who are
D.P. students may receive scholarships from ISS. The standards will
be placed at a mark half-way be
tween scholastic ability and financial need.
thru Advantages
It is hoped that the one year
Job will give them three distinct
advantages. They will earn money
become oriented to the ways ot
the country, and have the ability
to choose their own university.
Another UBC scholarship' plan,
to give scholarships to students
ln South East Asia, has been revised. Because ot financial responsibilities of the first project, UBC
will send money and material
to that country.
INVOLVES  SUPPLIES
These will include medical and
educational  supplies,  as  well  as
UBC REFUSES
SCHOLARSHIP
TO GERMANY
UBC has been forced to turn
down a one-year scholarship
offered to nny student on tht
eampus by University of Hamburg.
The offer came at ISS eon*
ferenoe last week but was scheduled to start November 1.
Peter deVooght, ISS president
on the tampus, said there waa
not time to ohoose a studant
by than.
'Tween Classes
basis for student projects. Money
will be sent to give students a
financial footing on some constructive plan.
These students, will be required
to raise possibly four times as
much to complete their project.
The important question of ISS
NFCUS amalgamation was left to
a committee who will report back
next year. Meanwhile ISS on this
campus has changed its mind
about the merger.
COUNCIL BACKS DEVOOGHT
Peter deVooght, ISS president,
was backed by Student Council in
his support for the amalgamation.
Since his trip to the conference in
Kingston, Ontario", he has decided
to vote otherwise.
"If NFCUS and ISS amalgamate," he said, "there might be a
tendency to forget students on the
national level. That is the job of
NFCUS today, and I hope they get
a secretariat and work on the national basis for awhile before they
try international services."
U of T Majorette
Abducted by Rivals
TORONTO—(CUP) — Lois Fulton, a University qf Western Ontario drum majorette, was spirited away from London on October
22 by a group of University of
Toronto students. Tltey intended
to hold her Until after the Varsity-Western   Saturday.
The gentelmanly abductors, provided Miss Fulton with a chape-
rone (another Western co-ed abducted with the drum majorette.)
Varsity students planned to give
Western another drum majorette
—a 270 pound U of T co-ed.
Forum Prepares
For Debates With
Speaking Classes
Debating classes sponsored by
Parliamentary Forum In preparation for McOoun Cup debates will
be held Monday and Tuesday at
12:30 p.m. in Arts 105.
Rod .Young, McOoun Cup da-
bato last year and Ron Barrie
this year's president of the club,
wfli %wrtf««fiir'tKbmtyrlTliT'"tfia *
Nov.   10th  trials.
* *       *
FOREGOING   POLICY   of   Red
China will be discussed by the
International Relations Club discussion group at noon Friday ln
the men's club room in Brock Hall.
* *       *
BOTANICAL   GARDEN   Society
will elect officers for the year at
a meeting in Applied Science 102
at 12:30 p.m. Friday.
* *       *
PICTURES "Defensive Football"
and "Football Highlights of 1948"
will be shown in Phys 202 at 12:00
today by UBC football coach *JeMy
Anderson. Anderson will after-
wards discuss what happened at
Linfield College ast Saturday when
Thunderbirds lost to Linfleld 42-0.
* *       *
UN Club will screen films of
UNESCO's work-in Germany today at 12:30 p.m. in the Auditorium. Mrs. E. L. Stephense will comment after the showing. The movies climax UN week, on the campus.
* *       *
Mock Parliament preparation
will be the main Item on the agenda at the CCF metineg in Arts 203,
Monday at 12:30 p.m.
* *       *
Students Interested in forming a
campus German iTlub are asked to
meet in Arts 201, Monday at 12:30
p.m.
Chess Club meets again Friday
at 12:30 p.m. in Eng. 300 Players should bring their own men
and boards.
* *        *
LIBERAL    CLUB    meets    next
Monday in Arts 201 to elect a secretary and discuss club business.
All Liberals are welcome.
IN NOON  HOUR SERIES
Two Lavish Productions
Presented By Ballet Group
One of the most lavish events
to lie presented on the campus
this term will be the appearance
of the Productions Club ballet
Wednesday at noon hour.
This youthful group is under
the direction of Mara McHlrney,
distinguished British dancer and
teacher who is at present residing
in Vancouver.
The two ballets to he presented
nre those which the Llub will pic-
sent at the National Ballet festi
val In Montreal during November.
TJie first is an abstract done to
percussion accompaniment entitled "Theorem A." In it, the. core-
ographer has attempted to give a
modern interpretation of the classical ballet steps and attitudes.
The second ballet is "The Tipsy
Inn"   or   "L'Auherge   Derange,"   a
comedy   piece  set   in   the  south  of; sucli
France. ! will
lish   department   instructor   Mario
l'rizek.
Due to the great expense of
bringing this attraction to the
campus, a charge of 25 cents will
he made. Special events committee officials said ".hat only in
the presentation of attractions
is this that such a charge
ie    made.    The    majority    of
Hoth    ballets    will    feature    the1 events    to   he    presented    will   be
brilliant sets and costumes ot Eng- j without charge. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1950
« m
The Ubyssey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as Second Class Mall, Post Ofllce Dept., Ottawa, Mall Subscriptions—12.00 per yaal'.
Published throughout the universlly year by lhe Student Publications BPftPd pf tfte Alp»»
Mater Society of the University or British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor pf the Unlverflfy.
Offices in Brock Hull, Phone ALma 10'i-i For display advertising phono ALma 88^
JiDliOII IN <IHKb   MV fftOSf
MANAGING EDITOR          HIGH   PUPM*
GENERAL STARf: Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill; Women'*
Editor, Joan Fraser; Sports Editor, Ron Pinchin; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington.
City Editor—DANNY OOLD8MITH
Associate Editor—MYRA OREEN
Lopsided Spending
Classified
When the doors of U£C's gleaming, new
Biological Science building swupg open of*
fioj&lly for the first time yesterday, students
addled a new $936,000, reason for being proud
of; their university.
r Few probably thought of it in these
terms, but that $936,000 represents a sum
that no 10 students on the campus today are
eviir likely to accumulate among then. Such
buildings cost more money than any of us
are able even to visualize in actual dollars.
f5 We think every cent of that money has
been wisely spent. But there is one aspect
of education that he been overlooked far too
often lately, whenever the B.C. government
ha;s doled out appropriations.
;: It was from a motive far more commendable than mere jealousy if a certain large
gtjoup of students felt a slight twinge pf
unrest at the news of the new building's
opening. *j$ fe.f^
•; Since the war, the university has seen
tht rise of expensive new quarters for biolo-
9i physicists and engineers. All are scientists,,puce or practical. All deserve a prominent plape in our educational system and in
:tfht *
our Society.
But that about the humanities? What of
cur future economists, philosophers, linguists,
literary people, psychologists, political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, historians,
and—or must we go on?
We are weary of 'being told that man's
key to the preservation and progress oi civilization. We are tired of being told we must
understanding of his fellow man is the only
penetrate the workings of society and the
people in it.
We are weary because many of those who
are fond of telling us these things are the
same persons responsible for shrugging the
humanities off with inadequate building3
and—more important—insufficient teachers.
We can't help geting a bad taste in our
mouths whenever we hear a politlci'm compare the "backwardness" of the humanities
with the vast progress of thit physical sciences.
Our provincial administrators should
realize that to make progress equally on all
frontiers of learning, we must pay for it, and
we must pay more proportionately than we
are at present.
Let's Have A Circus
Frenchmen, says Coast-Capilano M. P.
ffim^Sinclair, express a great admiration
l|r Canada's stability of government. It is, we
f£ar, the admiration which the fleet-footed
djeer, which is forced to be on the move continually must feel for the wallowing hippopotamus which bask in a mud-hole all day.
Maybe Jimmy Sinclair and his cohorts
thoroughly enjoy basking in the plush seats
<rf the commons chamber but we have a
sneaking suspicion that the people of Canada
are getting a bit bored with their prized
■stability. In France, it is true, governments
cjome and go and sometimes not a great deal
i$ accomplished. In time of crisis the French
government is not the ideal body for swift
and decisive action.
* But France continues to be governed and,
judging by the recovery she has made, France
is well governed. What is more the Frenchman takes a very real and vital interest
in the operation of his government—a virtue
which hardly be ascribed to the fnajority of
Canadians. Maybe the French government is
a three-ring circus, maybe is does gallop
about in opicycles. But three-ring circuses
have an attraction which a group of men
snoring in leather chairs can never hope to
match.
The fact that there are innumerable parlies with innumerable points of view in
France is due mostly to the fact that almost
every Frenchman gives quite a lot of thought
to his political point of view. Somehow they
manage to compromise when the chamber of
deputies gets together and somehow, laboriously but entertainingly, they are able to
formulate a course of action.
We have sneaking suspicion that, in tne
long run, the French democracy works better
than ours. Perhaps Mr. Sinclair might look
into the matter.
Critic On The Hearth
by John Brockingten
* Skeptical eyebrows were elevated when
Mr. Jaques Singer announced the formation
oj Vancouver's second symphony orchestra,
the B.C. Philharmonic. That the situation is
ptrovocativp is without a doubt. The probable
result is even moro interesting fodder for
tji* speculative mind.
• Last summer when the cancellation of
Mr. Singer's contract by the Vancouver Symphony Society was announced, many people
who had enough of both that conductor's
flamboyant theatricalism and his lack of taste
md artistry heaved a sigh of relief and hoped
fpr a new ?nd better order.
! On the other hand, Mr. Singer's ardent
partisans who felt that ho had provided ballast for an orchestra that was rapidly disintegrating tinder the prevailing system of guest
conductors welcomed his continued conduc-
torship. They saw that he had the opportunity
to train and mold a group of musicians into
a unit and recognized his undeniable popular
appeal.
The evidence was strong. Never before
in Vancouver had symphonic music reached
£uch a wide range of backgrounds and tastes.
Through the Sunday afternoon "highbrow''
Series, lhe Wednesday evening "pop" series,
and the children's concerts, symphonic music
.was provided to suit every taste and level of
eppreciation, Surely a noble attempt carried
Jout with a great deal of success.
' But as in every such venture when multiplicity is offered in place of quality the
novelty wwre off and in Mr. Singer's second
season there was a notable decline in en-
•thusiasm, attendance and in box-ol'i'ice receipts.
Feeling that deficits of the size encountered at the end of last season's operations were too much to carry the Symphony
Society compromised with that deficit and
the musician's demands for increased wages
by inaugurating a limited season with a
series of guest conductors. It is interesting
to note that the* prices to be paid these guest
conductors do not amount to anywhere npar
the amount paid to Mr. Singer for each of
his two seasons in residence.
Backed by hordes of housewives who
form, in part, the Symphony Chorus, Mr.
Singer proceeded to organize an orchestra
in direct competition with the existing Vancouver Symphony.
,The advantages of this scheme can be
readily seen. In the first place everybody
since the days of the Roman persecution of
the Christians has loved a good scrap. Interest is engendered by competition.
Secondly, with a shortened season the
musicians of the Vancouver Syn^phpny will
now have a chance to earn inqney enough
for their board and room by playing in both
orchestras. That the personnel of both orchestras must be in essence a duplication can
1)0 readily seen by consulting a census of professional musicians living in Vancouver. There
just aren't enough to fill the chairs in two
full size orchestras.
Thirdly, not only is public interest invigorated by the competitive spirit but also
the calibre of performance rises correspondingly. Both orchestras will ready to outplay
the other. Or rather, all conductors will be
out to provide a better quality of performance.
LOST
BROWN ZIPPER WALLET ON 19
Oct., on University Bus. Finder
please return the papers at least
to Lost & Found.
BACT 201 LAB ROOK; will the
person wbo "wrrpwe* by lab book
from M»c Pl*ry pa Witf. •plwse
return to the Bact. Lata by Friday.
TWO 8ET8 OF PSYCHOLOGY
201 NOTES , n paper folder, faould
fjn4#r Please turn them Into the
Lent # Found or phone DE 0060.
DRAW-STRING -BAG, colored
patch suede. Please phone Sheila
at AL 1683 M.
SflAuRAMS PAP containing WAL-
LjBf arc. if Hut L2. Please turn
into Lost ft Found' or return to
Jill Sayjt AL 3610 L.
CALCUJps, Sherwood ft Taylor.
Phone Don Winter OL 70676 Y.
WANTib
WANTED FOR LOVE or money—
Dr. Crumb's "Lessons in Money
and Banking. Jack Wolfe, CEdar
im.
OOQP Uf3ED PORTABLE TYPEWRITER about NO. Phone Mike
Blngg at AL 0066.
TEXT: "Promenades Lltteraires et
Hlstorlques" by Buggsy at AL
0719 R.
SIX-ROOM HOUSE NEAR UNI-
VERSITY GATES. URGENT. Address replies to Box 10, Publication Board UBC.
ALL TEXTS for English 430, philosophy 910, philosophy 310 and Music 800 are urgently needed by
Jail) at AL 3686L after 6 p.m.
TAANSPOBTATIQN
RjDjms WANTO from vicinity
of Blenheim & 24th. Phone Pete at
OH 6060.
RIDERS WANTED from vicinity of
Oenman ft payle, 8:30s, Mon, to
Sat. Phone Ed at Suite 4, PA
3403.
RIDE WANTED for one corpse,
every morning & evening from ft
to vicinity of Imperial ft Patterson, Burnaby. Gall KC at FA
6786 M.
RIDE WANTED for 6:60s from
18th ft Cambie. Phone Mike at
FA 6629 Y.
RIDE WANTED for 8:30s Mon. to
Fri. from vicinity of 83d ft Knight.
AL 2236 Mi evenings.
ROOM ft IOARO gTC,
ATTENTION MEN STUDENTS:
trailer for rent, in No. 8 Acadia
Trailer Camp. Suit one or two, 610
per month. Phone Mrs. Parker at
AL 0088.
LARGE DOUBLE FURNISHED
Light-housekeeping room with twin
beds, private bathroom, separate
entrance. Everything new. Suitable
(or 2 girls, breakfast optional. 3
blocks from URC gates. AL 0727M.
SUITE FOR 2 GIRLS, 3 rooms with
EVERYTHING furnished. Use of
washing machine. 830 for each
person. 2276 W. 8th, CH 1886.
LARGE BEDROOM with twin beds,
automatic heat, kitchenette. On
10th Ave. bus Une. Phone AL
0963Y.
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM. 1 block
from UBC gates for gentleman
student 4602 W 7th or phone AL
1241R.
LARGE FURNISHED RECREATION ROOM, kitchenette, shower
washroom, close to UBC bus. Suit
couple. AL 1891 L.
COSY BRIGHT RQOM In quiet
hpme with breakfast-close to UBC
bus. AL 1291S L.
TWO ROOM SUITE, garage if do-
sired. Furnished upstairs suite
near 12th & MacDonald; autqnwttc
hot water and oil heat, semi-private adjacent bath; easy chair, electric rangette, etc. 662 per month.
Stflt married couple. Ph. CH 6403.
COMFORTABLE basement rqom
close to UBC gates. $15 for room,
breakfast and lunch optional for
non-drlnklng boy. AL 03B8L.
FOR   SALE
BAKER MICROSCOPE WITH ACCESSORIES, latest model in perfect condition. Phone AL 1841 L.
SINGLE TRAILER at No. 2 Trailer
Camp, Acadln. Complete with hot
plate, heater & mattress. All for
?lt>0 or best offer. See J. Jones at
trailer No. 27.
RADIO, small cabinet type for $20,
orlglriftlly a $40 radio. Phone AL
1399M evenings.
THOR-GLADIRON as new, $75.
Phone Sid at CE 7137.
TUXEDO. Single breasted, size Hi!
in good condition, $15. Also fawn
tweed sports coat, size 36, In Isl
class condition, $7. 2241) York Ave,
or phone CH 9579.
MEETINGS ft NOTICES ETC.
CHEMICAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA, DANCE. Fri., Nov. 3, 8:30
p.m. to 12:30. Refreshments served,
PRE-MEDS, Speaker, Dr. Norton,
"X-Rays in Medicine." in Phys 202
on Fri. noon 27th Oct. There will
be elections for 1st, 2nd, & 4th
year reresentatives.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB general meeting,' Fri. 27th Oct. Arts
104 at 12:30 sharp.
GIRLS INTERESTED IN TRAINING FOR THE SKI TEAM" There
ls a work out on Mon,, 12:30 noon
in HG 4.
TYPING, ESSAYS ft THESES In
iBffMsto ft French (typed accents).
Plwne Mrs. M. Jenkins, MA (Fr.)
it 4610 W 4th, AL 0476 L.
TUITION FOR EARNEST STUDENTS OF M.US1C plus 10 per
cent, for services. PA 1613.
mm
"SHIRTS and CLEANING
1-DAY SERVICE
>/////
UW. 10th At*
CASTLE JEWELERS
hm H- Mill km. (Also at 732 Granville)
Kw OlO1 WmWM by
Billow, fMn, firuen, Rok% Etc.
JSKPBRT WATCH REPAIRS
mem, 10% discount
PQg STUDENTS
Vtw our Xmas lay-away plan. Any
deponit will hold articles until Xmas
ALma 3000
TYPING....
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUSCRIPTS, NOTES, ETC.
MODERATE RATE* — PROMPT SERVICE
MM. A. O. RO0INSON
■UWW.UtbAve. ALma WIS*
Put A Pause For Cohn
On Your Program, Too
JNNUAL
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Coke
4SM
ii
Ask for it either way,.. hlh
trade-marks mean the same thing.
COCA-COLA LTD., VANCOUVER Friday, Qptpber 27, 1950
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
CAMPUS WOMEN
mssnmtmmm-wmmimimmmmmmmmii
late Start Fails
ess
• _•!
ope
TO ?Ef Upw
FemmesTakeOver
Football Field
By JOAN FRASER
Things are really hopping into action this week as the
women on the campus prepare for "Women's Day" Tuesday.
Idea behind the big day is to show that campus women are
behind a change in UBC's athletic policy.
> At a meeting Wednesday, the
girls who are planning the activities discussed some of their Ideas.
Panhells Dodie O'Brian, Phra-
teres's Inabeth Dryburgh and WUS'
Connie Blssett are aranglng teams
for an all-girl football game to be
held Tuesday noon.
Be sure to go to the WUS general meeting today in the auditorium, when these gals will explain
some of the details. The time is
12:30 p.m.
1 hear by the grapevine that
some boys from the Thunderbird
football team will be coaching and
refereeing the game Tuesday. Apparently there will be drum majors (instead of majorettes) and
the plans for the entertainment
are still secret. See you Tuesday
noon in the Stadium at the all-gal
football  game.
* *       *
Models   for   the WUS   Fashion
Show were chosen from a number
of girls who showed tip at the fry-
outs Thursday. I didn't realize how
many gorgeous, girta there were
on the campus. ,
The date for the show has been
changed AGAIN. This time, I'm
promised that the CORRECT date
Is Thursday, Nov. 16, and the time
Will be noon, during the two lunch
period. Money raised will go to
the Women's Residence Fund, and
charge for admission will be 36
cents.
* *        *
The other day the long arm of
the law caught up with me, as thr
JiCJrtP started to crack down op
traffic offenders at UBC. I parked*
the car on the East Mall. Hideoup
crime! I noticed no one else was
parked there, but there were no
"No Parking" signs around, so 1
took advantage of the empty space.
When I came back there was a
blue ticket on the car. I don't think
I've ever felt more guilty.
To make a long story short, lt
was my first offence and I was
only given a warning. From now on,
if I ever get the car again, il
will be parked in a parking lot,
even If I have to walk a mile to
my lecture. (An after thought—1
hope my father doesn't see this—
be hasn't heard about it.)
Moial of the story is: IT COULD
HAPPEN TO YOU. The* RCMP is
on the lookout. Don't say I didn't
warn  you.
Large Corporations
Hinder UN Progress
The great marketing corporations of the world are standing between the success of the United Nations technical assistance program,, Mrs, Dorothy Steeves, former MLA, and prominent B.C. CCF official told students Thursday.
Mrs. Steeves,  was speaking in*-
By JANET JABOUR
For a girl who didn't start school
njitH she was 10 "Just as ap experiment," Felicity pope has come a
long way In W short years.
' Her great grandfather felt children were educated too'young, and
persuaded her mother to experiment with Felicity and the English
school system.'
Six years  later with  good organization and planning, she graduated from matrlc in London.
USES TALENTt
She's making good use of her
talents at UBC, where she ls president of Delta Sigma Pi, women's
honorary sorority, sectary of the
Economics C)nb, and a member of
the International Student Club executive.
After graduating, Felicity attended a finishing school for a
short time, but got bored and
taught drawing for the rest of the
year until she came to Canada.
Three days after she arrived in
Victoria, Felicity started working
in a bank. Since she knew nothing
about Canadian currency she
didn't stay there long.
8ELL8 UNDERWEAR
"It took them six months to
correct all my mistakes," Felicity
said. "After that I sold women's
underwear In Spencer's bargain
basement—quite   an   experience."
The life of a salesgirl didn't ap-
paal to her, so she enrolled at Vic
Collage. To earn board and room,
she looked after three small children in her spare time.
"I didnt get to know a soul at
College,'   she   recalled,   "I   would
go to lectures and get rignt back
home to the children."
WIN* SCHOLARSHIP
That same year Felicity won
the Dominion Provincial Scholarship and the P.E.O. Scholarship
lodh which brought her to UBC
in 1948,
Determined to meet people here
—Fellplty became active in club
work. The first club she joined
was the International Relations
Club, because, as she put lt, "they
offered free membership to foreign
students."
Last year, seeing the duplication
of activities in the four interna
tional clubs, the International Students Club, the International Relations Club, the International
Student's Service, and the U.N.
Club, she organized the International Council.
ATTENDS |89 SEMINAR
Chosen last year as the only
third year girl invited to join the
women's honorary sorority, Felicity was further honored at being
chosen one of the thee delegates
from B.C. to go to the International
Students Seminar in France.
"We had a wonderful time in
Europe," she related, "drank much
wine and discussed everything,
including the differences between
European and North American
girls, a subject which fascinated
European men.''
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Head Mardi Gras
.To-Jean Johnson of Alpha Phi
sorority and John Graham of Zeta
Psi fraternity were elected co-
chairmen of the Mardi Gras committee at a mass Greek Letter Society meeting In the auditorium
Thursday.
Miss Johnson's opponent, Shirley
Finch, of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority led on the first ballot but
was nosed out by Mlas Johnson
on the second count in the preferential  voting.
Graham led all the way over his
opponent, Jack Baruot. president of
the Kickapoo Club and a Laiftbda
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conduction with United Nations
Week, which started at UBC Tuesday.
"First blow a thing to pieces
and then put lt together again—
that'B our modern civilUation,"
she told students.
Asian nations fear that the
Marshall Plan will commit them
politically, Mrs. Steeves .said, and
It.
As long as backward nations do
not turn their weapons on us, who
cares If they, turn towards Communism, fhe told the meeting.
"Unfortunately,' she said, "colored nations reserve the righto to
reproduce, and in order to give
these ever-expanding peoples starvation 'rations, we must increase
the world's food Bupply by 110 per
they  are  therefore suspicious of cent."
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BR
NAVY INTRODUCE PLAN
TO ASSIST  STUDENTS
Lieut. Commander T. Crone, RCN personnel officer,'
will be at UBC Monday to interview graduates in att
faculties who are interested in the new student assistance
scheme of the RCN.
Under the scheme, graduates will be accepted far a
career in the RCN with the rank of sub-lieut. with pay and
allowances until graduation.
Applications will be considered by a preliminary board
to be followed at a later date by a final selection board.
Interview* will be conducted in the UNTD office in the
Armory.
Further information js available at the UNTD office - -
today.
are
Calling %
MILS . SMOOTH . MJISHIM
EATON'S Campus Favourite of the Week
. . . Copy by JOAN
. .. modelled by NANCY Mc DONALD
All set for next weekend's Home
coming Dance is the girl who
owns a smart dress. Just right
for the occasion is this two
piece outfit with flattering
gold-coloured braid trim.
See it and many other
becoming   styles   in
EATON'S  second
floor collection.
veil sheath dress has
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sleeved jacket. Enter,
en and black crepe.
29.60
Dresses—Second Floor
ly-styled mIiogs of
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Shoes—Second Floor
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Jewellery—Main   Floor
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mmsstAm—mmm Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, October 27, 1950
Thunderbird Rowers After
Revenge from Beaver Crew
Daily Workouts,
Enthusiasm Tell
'Different Story'
UBC's Rowing Club will be out
tor revenge when they meet the
Oregon State Beavers Saturday
at Coal Harbor.
In a hotly contested meet during
the thunderbird southern toUr last
spring, race between UBC and
OSC ran neck and neck with the
Beaver crew grabbing number one
honors by a mere foot and a half.
• "Tomorrow should be a different
•toryj however," said Bruce Gar-
vie, assistant coach of the club.
"With a good month of dally workouts under our belts, the crews
look like they are ready for this
one."
POOR  WIATHIR
In aplte of poor weather conditions , turnout* have been very
favorable, Oravie advised. "In
rain, or heavy winds, and ending
up every night in darkness, we've
always had at least 80 faithfuls
on hand," he said.
"Our big problem Is the lack of
equipment," he continued, "as we
know we lose a good oarsman because ot that tact."
First race is scheduled for 2
p.m. Meet brings together Birds'
and Beavers' junior Varsity crews.
HIGH SFORTt
With the exception of one man,
the BC group ls composed of oarsmen who received their first shell
experience Just two weeks ago.
"Here," said Garvie, "OSC has
the advantage, not in enthusiasm
or competitive spirit, but only ln
experience." Rowing is a part of
Intramural activity, as well as being Included as a Physical Education course, at the Beaver university.
Not just an added attraction will
be a race between the Vancouver
Rowing Club and two UBC fresh-
meHMuads.
HflpiR   NOTED
Feature race of the afternoon Is
tentatively scheduled for 3 p.m.,
with the Varsity crews of UBC and
OSC contesting.
Both experience and power are
noted in this university's lineup
with stroke oar Don Robertson,
number seven John Drinnon, number six Denny Creighton, number
three Sam Jackson, and bow oar
John Warren again filling the sliding seats.
, Newcomers Andy Small, Frank
Coftfthorne and Chris Skene cover
the three vacant slots.
TRAINING at Coal Harbor for their "Revenge" meet with the Oregon State College Beavers
are UBC Thunderbird oarsmen. Rowing meet begins at 2 p.m. with three feature races
scheduled. OSC had previously defeated the UBC crew by a foot and a half during a test at
the American college.
TOUGH TEAMS AHEAD ~
Thunderbirds Meet Pacific
Coast, Eastern Swim Teams
"Thunderbird swimmers will definitely be facing teams of the
tough Pacific Coast Conference,
and also some of the Eastern Canadian teams*," said coach Doug
Whittle.
"We have invitations from Are-
gon and two other Pacific coast
teams, while McGill and Toronto
would very much like to swim us
in a telegraph meet."
After watching the watermen
train last week, Whittle expressed
confidence that UBC will once
more have the top team ln the
conference.
"We have three conference
champions and record holders, and
two Canadian Intercollegiate record-men back with us again this
year," he said.
In  addition  there  are  excellent
prospects among the freshmen."
RECORD  HOLDERS
Bob Thistle, captain of the team
holds tha conference backstroke
title, and also the Canadian Intercollegiate record for the 50 yards
freestyle.
Nick Stobbart ls back after tak
ing a year off. In 1948, Nick swam  diving this season.
to  a  new   Intercollegiate   medley
record.
According    to    coach    Whittle,"
there is a good chance that Stobbart will set new' records in the
220 and 440 this year.
Don Thorn, crack varsity diver
and last year's conference champion is rapidly approaching top
form. Team mate Jim Hawthorne,
a returning lettermen, will also be
BEST PROSPECT
Pete Lusztig. conference butter*
fly champion has also reported
for training.
Definitely the best prospect
among the frosh this year ls Gordy
Potter, an all-round swimming and
diving champ who halls from Saskatchewan. It ls expected that
Gordy will double up with Stobbart  in  the  distances.
Grudge Hoop Classic
Goes At Noon Today
Blood will probably flow freely in the Gym today as Frosh
and Soph meet in their ninth grudge basketball classic, in which
Sophs will be out to avenge defeat suffered in 1948.
Last series game saw Sophs ko«-
down  44-33  before  a  fast-moving
Frosh squad. In the past eight
years, each team has won four
games.
Freshmen are coached by Neil
Desaulniers, who led his teammates to victory in 1948 with 15
points, and John Southcott who in
that same game  netted  5.
Team includes Bird forwards
Ron Blssett and Tom O'Brien, Senior A Braves Gary Taylor, Herb
Forward and Hee Frith, and Intermediate   A  Chiefs  Jim   Carter,
Oeorge Seymore, Roy Durante and
Gundy  McLeod.
Don Hudson and Ted Lee coach
the Sophs. Hudson was also outstanding In the 1948 classic, netting 9 points.
Sophs are also made up of Birds.
Braves and Chiefs. They include:
Ralph Bowman, Dennis York, Brian
Upson, Jack Ritchie, Jack Hibberd
and   Dennis   Creighton.
Completing the team will he
Rill McNully. Doug McLeod and
John Russell.
Game  time  is  12:30  p.m.
Intramurals
MENS
Monday Oct. 30, Field House
1 Arts A vs Termites       t
2 Kampus Kids vs Arts B
3 Pharmacy R vs Ridge Ramblers
Tuesday Oct. 31 Field House
1 ATO B vs Sevils
2 Architects vs Dawson Club
3 Ex  Byng  B vs Test-tubers
Wednesday Nov. 1
Co-ed   Volleyball
1 VOC vs Redshirts
".' Eng 1  vs Forestry
Thursday Nov. 2
AMS   meeting   everyone  out.
Friday   Nov.   3   Field   House
1 Anglican Col vs Powell River
2 Phi Kappa Sig vs Comm A
3 Chinese Club vs Teacher Tr.
WOMEN'S
12:30 Monday Gym
1 ArtsA red  vs Arts 3 green
2 Arts .'', blue vs Arts 2 blue
1—1:30
1 Arts 2 red vs Home Ec 1
2 Arts !i red vs Residence red
12:30  Wednesday   Field   House
1 Arts V, yellow vs Residence blue
2 Arts 4 blue vs VOC
3 Newman vs Ilillel
1—1:30
1  Arts 1  yellow vs Aggie
-   Pro   Med vs Nurses
'!  Arts   I   red   vs   Phys   Ed  II
12:30   Friday   Gym
1 Arts  :*  green   vs   Phys   Ed   I
2 Residence   blue  vs   Arts   <1   red
1—1:30
I   Home  Ec blue vs Arts  1  hlue
Arts II bluo vs Arts I yellow
STOCKHOLM APPEAL
WE DEMAND the absolute banning of the atomic
weapon, arm of terror and mass extermination
of populations.
WE DEMAND the establishment of strict international control to ensure the implementation of
this banning measure.
WE CONSIDER that any government which would
be the first to use the atomic weapon against any
country whatsoever would be committing a
crime against humanity and should be dealt with
as a war criminal.
YOU CAN HELP PREVENT WAR
NOW BY SIGNING THIS PETITION
THE STUDENT PEACE MOVEMENT WILL SET
UP A TABLE TODAY IN THE QUAD FROM 12,30
TO 2:30 FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO SIGN THE
PETITION.
RECORDED COURSES
In French, German, Russian, Spanish and other Languages
Lingua phone Institute of Canada
B. C. REPRESENTATIVE
1394 West 59th Ave. KErrisdale 2103-R
tou'u tiND roun iocai
" »ni»tt('mj,it"vi
Vancouver Branch Office — 4112 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CHOWN, LL.B., Branch Manager
SPORT
Sports Editor—RON PINCHIN
Revival Necessary
In Bird-Reds Tilt
UBC Chiefs will be hoping for a revival of last year's
hustle when they meet rugged North Shore next Saturday.
Their    record    to    this    fourth ■
game in the Miller Cup Series bus
shown them to rank third in league
standings. Rowing Club is in first
place with South Burnaby following.
Albert Laithwaite's hopefuls
have tried two and wortfone game
so   far  this  year. '
ADDITIONS
The Birdmen have a potentially
power-packed team, but as coach
Laithwaite remarked, "most team
members are new and tbe squad
just hasn't tightend up enough."
Two new additions, from Victoria, are three-line man Jerry
Main  and  right  wing  John  New
ton who were standouts ln last
Saturday's scoreless draw with
South Burnaby. It wan Newton
who scored a try, only to be nul*
lified by the referee on a technicality.
Powerful scrum man Olsen, also
from Victoria, Injured his ankle
in the first battle of the season
but it is hoped he will be on hand
to assist scrum in the next game,
BIO  WINS
North Shore, winless this season
are an ever-improving group and
should prove to be tough opposition to the yet undeveloped Birds.
Game time is 3 p.m. at Connaugh't
Park.
Variety and Value
in
Simulated Pearls
Choose a 3, 4, 5tor 6 strand necklace, Day and
Night, As you like it and many other styles all for
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Birrs
Jewellers Vancouver,  B.C.
3.95
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impressive victory?"
"Sure—to keep ahead of the other guy use
'Vaseline' Hair Tonic regularly. It beats Dry
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Vaseline HAIRTONIC
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