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The Ubyssey Feb 8, 1923

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume V.
-y 	
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEB. 8, 1923
No.  14
BLUEBIRDS        PLAYERS HIGH JINKS
EMERGE THE      PUNCH AND COSTUMES
CHAMPIONS       PEPPY ACTS INGENIOUS
Varsity Loses Intermediate Playoff Series by Total of
14 to 3.
Arts Men's Annual Smoker Consoles Those Not Invited
To High Jinks.
The second game of the play-offs
between Varsitv and Bluebirds for the
intermediate championship, ended in
a win for the Birds by the score ot
4—1. Total goals scored in the S'?
lies decide the championship, and the
Bluebirds thus emerge champions by
the cne-sided total of 14—3.
Varsity   Press   Hard.
Varsity pressed hard from the face-
off, and but for the able goal tending
of the Birds' net minder would have
boosted their score on many occasions. However the Birds played i
steady game and quickly retaliated,
with a number of pretty three-man
rushes. Davis opened the scoring af
ter breaking up a Varsity rush. Morgan for Varsity played well and was
very effective when on the ice.
Bluebirds  Have  Edge.
In the second period, end to end
rushes were prominent, but the Bluebirds had the edge all the way and
Morrow scored on a pass from Davis.
loose and the Birds got another goal.
Stordly was tested often with shots
Third  Period.
The third period was a repetition of
the second, with the Varsity defence
inclined to leave their checks go un-
watched. Newmarch broke up a Bluebird rush and skating down the ice
passed to McPherson. who scored Varsity's lone goal. Davis again scored
for the Birds, and the game ended
with Varsity trying to penetrate the
opposing defence.
The   Teams.
Varsity:—Stoodly, Colton, New-
march, Demidoff, McCutcheon, McPherson.    Subs:    Morgan, Lipsey.
Bluebirds:—Campbell, Clarke, Anderson, Davis, Gage. Barkwell. Subs;
Morrow,  Murphy, Johnson.
The Week's Events
Thursday, Feb. 8.—Vancouver Institute Lecture. "Folk Lore," Miss M.
L. Bollert. Men's Lit. Inter-class
Debate, Arts '24 vs. Agriculture,
Auditorium 8  p.m.
Friday, Feb. 9.—Women's Basketball,
Japanese Gymnasium; Varsity vs.
Bank of Commerce .
Saturday, Feb. 10.—Soccer; Semi-
Final; Mainland Cup. Varsity vs.
St. Andrews. Basketball; Normal
Gym, Varsity vs. Y. M.  C. A.
Tuesday, Feb. 13.—1st Year Physics
Classroom, Noon; Engineering Discussion Club, "Prospecting"; Science
Dance, Lester Court, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 14.—Geology Building, 12:25; Talks on Choice of a
Profession; Major Wilkin on "Railway  Engineering."
Thursday, Feb. 15.—Vancouver Institute Lecture; B. C. Chamber of
Mines. "The Evolution of Gold Mining in the Cariboo"; Dr. W. L-.
Uglow.
M. ROSING
GIVES HIS
THEORIES
Auditorium Crowded When Noted
Russian Expounds Views on
Interpretative Art.
Vladimar Rosing, realist, idealist,
and artist, won the hearts of the students who were fortunate enough to
attend the meeting held under the
auspices of the Musical Society last
week.
Addressing the students on the common plane of devotion to art, the
speaker sketched the work of the
Russian realistic school of vocal music of which he is such an ardent disciple. Mr. Rosing argued that without coloring the tone of the voice
through the realization of the poetic
idea contained in the words of the
song, vivid interpretation was impossible. 'If the music is intended to
picture the ugly as well as the beautiful, the voice of the singer must
bring this meaning out of song," said
Mr. Rosing.
The distinguished visitor very graciously illustrated his remarks with a
selection, entitled "The Soul of Russia." The silent appreciation which
followed his last note, before the final
burst of applause, was an indication
of the singer's power of controlling
and coloring the emotions of his audience.
Women   Enjoy   Their   Exclusive
Masquerade  in  Time-
Honored Style.
By taking the judge's eye at the
Arts Mens' Smoker last Friday, Professor Angus won for Arts '26 the
blindfold boxing tournament. The
bout was made necessary by the
judges being unable to come to a
decision in the match between Ledingham of '26 and Schell of '25. The
judges then decided to settle the affair for themselves with Doctor Sedgwick as judge. Mr. Angus proved a
better list swinger than Mr. Logan, ]
look the eye of the ladies present,
and also that of Dr. Sedgwick, with
the result that the Frosh.  triumphed.
The smoker was a huge success.
Dancers, Japanese wrestlers, a magician, a jazz band, and vaudeville turns
all added to the enjoyment of the
evening. Gordon Hyslop swung a
nasty bamboo against his Oriental opponent, but Hashimura took it all and
came back for more, with the result I
that the match was called a draw. ;
Apples, cider (?), Imperial mixture,
Players and poker passed the time between events.
SENIORS
ARE GIVEN
RECEPTION
Dean and Mrs. Coleman Entertain
Fourth Year Arts at Delightful Party.
The "most highest" ever held took
place in the University Auditorium
last Friday  night.
Gay rustics, court ladies, dainty
dolls, hoboes, clowns, Egyptian princesses, Dutch girls, cavaliers and cowboys were only a few of the numerous personages to be seen.
In the way of entertainment each
year offered a "skit." The "Freshettes" presented a well practiced
scene from "Alice in Wonderland,"
which'was much appreciated by their
audience.
The "Sophs" performed with pick
and axe many ghastly operations upon
members of their year—it was not at
all surprising that, at the end of the
"skit," one of the patients should
"kick the bucket"!
The honour of Arts '23 was upheld
by Miss Mary Bulmer and Miss
Dorothy Walsh. .Miss Walsh, in approved professorial manner introduced Miss Bulmer who in a delightful
impersonation of Vachel Lindsay,
achieved a marked success; and as a
poet almost equals the celebrity himself. It is difficult to believe that
the poem recited by Miss Bulmer was
of her own composition—
The Juniors, however, received the
laurels. A great many members took
part in their presentation, and in this
respect, Arts '24 surpassed the others
as  a "Class"  skit.
The performance took the form of
a Vaudeville show—songs, dances, a
ventriloquist act and an orchestra
were part of the programme.
A Grand March around the Auditorium gave Miss Mclnnes and Miss
Bollert a chance to judge the costumes.
The prize for the most artistic and
dainty costume went to Miss MacDonald, as an old-fashioned girl, while
Miss Walsh with a monocle and dress
suit complete, carried off the "gentleman's"  prize.
As the funniest man and the funniest woman, the awards went to Miss
Jeanette Weinberg, as "Charlie Chaplin" and Miss Eve Eveleigh as a Bowery Girl.
Following refreshments, the rest
of the evening was spent in dancing.
The hilarious party broke up at midnight.
One of the smartest and most en-
| joyable society events of the college
year was the Reception held on Monday night in the auditorium by Dean
and Mrs. Coleman in honour of tbe
Graduating Class, Arts '23.
The decoration scheme was carried
out on a simple but dignified plan—
the college colours, being the predominant   note.
Dean and Mrs. Coleman and Mrs.
Klinck received the guests, who included the members of the Faculty,
their wives, and the members of Arts
'23.
The grand march led by Mrs. Coleman and Mr. Claude Campbell, President of '23, and Mrs. Klinck and Dean
Coleman, was followed by a delightful dance.
An unusually appetizing supper was
served in the Cafeteria where the
guests in their gay caps of Blue and
Gold made a cheery scene.
At midnight, with a hearty skyrocket for their kind host and hostess,
the merry-makers reluctantlv denart-
ed.
SCHEDULE FOR McKECHNIE CUP
RUGBY
Sat., Feb. 10—Vancouver vs. Victoria
at  Victoria.
Sat., Feb. 24—Varsity vs. Vancouver at Vancouver.
Sat., March 10—Varsity vs. Nanaimo
at Vancouver.
March 17—Varsity vs. Victoria at
Vancouver.
VARSITY
DEFEATS
ADANACS
Quintettes Show Up Well Against
Adanacs, But Lose to
Native  Sons.
Varsity basketball quintettes successfully withstood a strong assault at
the Normal gym floor last Saturday
night, when U. B. C. won two out of
the three league games played. The
Intermediate A team and the Senior
ladies were both successful in defeating Adanac teams from Westminster,
while the Varsity Senior A aggregation were forced to accept a 22—15
defeat at the hands of the Native Sons,
after a very stubbornly contested
game.
Senior   Ladies'   Game.
The Senior Ladies' game between
Varsity and the New Westminster Adanacs was close all the way through,
with both sides serving up a good
brand of combination. It was anybody's game right to the last, Varsity
snatching a win by more steady playing around the basket. The half-time
score was 7—6 in favor of Varsity.
The final score found Varsity leading
16—12.
The Team: Isobel Russell, Helen
Tatlow, Gladys Weld, Isobel McKinnon, Doris Lee.
(Continued on Page 2.) THE    UBYSSEY
February Sth, 19
THE VARSITY CLOTHES SHOP
The T'niijue Spring Styles
of
Fashion  Craft
Good Clot lies for -Men
Are   you   ready   for   your
Inspection
Thos. Foster & Co.
LIMITED
514   Granville   St.
ONE   STORE    ONLY
$2.45
EACH
We are showing a dandy
bunch of new Spring Hats at
this price. They are the biggest
values we have been able to
show in years. Step in and look
them over.
□
Turpin Bros., Ltd.
Men's   Outfitters
629   Granville St.
DRESSMAKING-
MISS   SIMPSON
LEE   BUILDNG
Broadway   and  Main
Phone Fairmont 3699-B
ED. DA MOTTA
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather St.
/DISTINCTIVE
Engraved Calling Cards
Dance Invitations
Programmes
Place Cards
*2
J. W. Gehrke Co.
LTD.
Engravers, Printers, Society Stationers
661 SEYMOUR STREET
(Adjoining Hudson's Bay)
"Dominance through Exclusivenesa"
Suggestions for Running the
Mile Relay
( Ily  an  "Observer.")
Some would-be athletes who have
never done much running before often wonder how to go about it when
called upon to defend tlie honor of
their class in the relay. It is impossible to lay down definite rules on
how to train for the mile, because each
man differs, and even the best authorities do not agree on training. Hence
the writer does not wish to appear
dogmatic in his views, which are based largely on personal experience and
the  experiences of others.
Condition   Essential.
The first thing to do is to get into
shape. Condition is one of the biggest factors in running the mile or
any other race. You should not
smoke: if you are a heavy smoker,
however, you cannot cut cigarettes
out right away, as it is too much of a
shock to the system. Reduce the
quantity gradually. You should train,
eat and sleep REGULARLY. As
George Goulding said the other day,
every man requires eight hours' sleep
any time, particularly when training.
With regard to diet, eat what you
feel like, with one or two exceptions.
Avoid eating too much sweet stuff,
and eat solid rather than sloppy foods.
Don't eat any PASTRY. Diet is not
as important as most trainers make
out. Systematic training is the big
factor.
OUR
IMPERIAL BRAND
SILK HOSE
are positively unparalleled value, and with hose
playing such an important
part in the season's new
fashions, "Imperial" hose
should he in very big demand. They are made ol
a superfine quality pure
thread silk. The toes and
heels (where the wear
comes most) are specially
reinforced, and they come
in white and black, and
all wanted shades, with
hemmed or ribbed tops.
Made expressly for the
Hudson's Bay Company,
and are the most remarkable hose value on the
market, at. per pair....$2.00
Hudson's Bay
Company
PRELIMINARIES OF
SWIMMING MEET
The Inter-class Swimming meet held
last Friday afternoon at Chalmers
Tank was a huge success and judging
from the class spirit displayed proved
a worthy addition to the list of sports
for the Governor's Cup. Each class
brought out a lot of swimmers and
would-be swimmers and some good
races were witnessed. Une linal
event was staged, namely, the plunge,
which was won by A Stewartson of
Arts '2(i, after two pretty plunges
which carried him .each time to the
end of the tank. Alan Hunter. Arts
'23 and Fred Newcombe, Agriculture,
were second and third respectively.
The preliminaries of four other races
were staged, the number of classes
entering making three heats to each
race absolutely necessary. The results of the  preliminaries  were: —
50 yds., free style—First heat, F.
Penwill, Arts '25; second heat, B. McDonald. Arts '26; third heat. A. McVittie,  Science  '23.
50 yds., Back stroke—First heat, B.
McDonald, Arts '26; second heat.
Cyril Jones, Science '23; third heat,
V.  Xewcombe, Agriculture.
50 yds., breast stroke—First heat,
Cyril Jones, Science '23; second heat,
H. Purdy, Science '26; third heat, H.
Cantelon, Arts '24.
Relay—First heat, Science '23; second heat. Arts '25; third heat, Arts
'26.
THE   FINALS
The finals in the various events will
take place tomorrow at Chalmers
Tank. All swimmers must be on
hand at five o'clock in order that the
meet may start promptly.
VARSITY VS. ADANACS.
(Continued from Page 1.)
Intermediates Win.
Playing an excellent brand of basketball at all stages of the game, the
Varsity Intermediate A quintette were
able to outscore the league-leading Adanacs to the tune of 34—22. This is
the first game the Adanacs have lost
this season, and the win boosts Varsity's chances of copping the gonfalon. The game was featured by
Varsity's excellent combination play,
with Heileman Arkley starring for the
Blue and Gold. Arkley played a
good game throughout and was in
practically every play. Henderson
also showed well for Varsity and got
the jump continually. The half-time
score was 14—12 in favor of Varsity.
After the interval, Varsity pulled away
and rapidly boosted their score, finally emerging winners  34—22.
The Team: H. Arkley and S. Arkley, Henderson, McKay and Gill.
Varsity  vs.   Native  Sons.
The last game of the evening
brought together the Varsity Senior
A team and the fast-stepping Native
Sons, runners-up in the race for honors. The game started fast, and the
Natives getting away to a good start
soon ran the score up to 10—4 before
Varsity got going. However Varsity
came back strong and holding the
Natives scoreless, drew up to 10—10.
Half-time came witli the score unchanged.
After half-time Varsity went into
the lead, but failed to hold it. The
Natives used substitutes to good effect, putting Johnson and Tat Boyes
in for Falconer, and Hunter. These
changes seemed to revive the Sons,
and they rapidly climbed into the lead,
finishing on the long end of a 22—15
score.
The Teams: Varsity—Currie and
Lewis, Carlisle, Bickell, Penwill;
spare, Bassett.
Native Sons—Cruikshanks, Falconer, and Tat Boyes, Cam Stewart, Hunter, McAdam and Johnson.
Students  Loose  Leaf Books
and Supplies
Drawing  Sets,   etc.
e$»
THE VANCOUVER
STATIONERS, LTD.
Booksellers,   Stationers   and
Printers
Sey. 5119 683 Granville St
□
PURDYS
Headquarters
Chocolates
Ice  Cream
Fountain
Drinks
Light   Lunch
Afternoon Teas
A   Specialty
a
Vancouver's Young Men's
Store
33rd Anniversary
Sale
Young Mens  Suits and
Overcoats   at   greatly   reduced  prices.
Tuxedo  Coats   and  Suits
in all Sizes
Clubb & Stewart
Ltd.
623 Granville St.
309 Hastings St. W.
THE GREAT WEST
Life Insurance Co.
Hemd Office, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Policy No.  P 31366 Arte 30
Amount $1000.00 - Premium $31.70
Plan—20 Payment Life With
Quinquennial Profits
C«»h Diridends—
Sth  Year   $25.00
10th Year _  43.85
15th  Year    55.00
Accumulation of Dividends
at 6 per cent...  $158.40
Profits required at end of
the 15th year to convert
to a paid-up Policy  115.00
640 HASTINGS ST. WEST
Vancouver Branch Office Febblaet 8th. 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster
Limited
TWO   STORES
Society   Brand   Clothes
Shop
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville
Fit-Reform   Wardrobe
345 Hastings Street, West
Clothes for Young Men and Men
Who  Stay  Young
After You Graduate
Remember
THE
Mutual Life of Canada
Est    1869
Strictly Canadian
Purely Mutual
Annual Dividends
Reducing Premiums.
For Full Information Apply
WILLIAM J, TWISS
Manager
402 Pender St.  West
Vancouver, B. C.
Get a
VARSITY PENNANT
For  the
FOOTBALL    MATCHES
"We have them in stock
SHAW & McCILL, LTD.
SPORTING GOODS
658  Robson   St.
8ervlce   Bldg.,   4   Doors   East   of
Granville St
We're Going
Anyhow - -
A lot of folks knock the
idea of moving this store
to 1020 Granville Street
but we would like some
good head to show us how
a shop can pay from $600
to $700 rent and sell sports
stuff at fair fees.
We know we can at 1020
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor. Robson and Granrille
Streets
SPORT NEWS
G§0
Rise of Soccer to Position
of Major Sport at U.B.C.
When that sandy-headed Hash, Pinky
Morrison, was with the Mine and (!old.
and tlie Varsity hockey team won ihe
Senior Championship of the province.
thc:o was some talk ot" making hockey
a major sport at the I'niversity. The
suggestion wits discounted, for it was
found that Varsity could not field a
strong team two years in succession.
With association football, however, the
case is different. In two years the
Varsity Soccer Team has risen from
the Second Division to the First, and
bids fair to bring the Varsity the .Mainland Cup. The team stands second in
the league, with a game in hand, and
is one of the most popular teams, according to sport writers, on ine mainland.
Strong Team Next Year.
Next season the Blue and Gold will
field an exceptionally strong line-up.
Mosher will play goal. In emergencies Sanborn, now playing for Sapperton. may be called upon to guard the
nets, and Sanborn certainly has First
Division ability. Baker and Wilkinson
will till in the back division, while
Phillips. Buckley and Cant will play
half. Lundie, Emery and Jackson will
play on the forward line. "Scotty"
Dean may also be attending classes,
and in that case will be utilized. It
will therefore be seen that the team
next year will be anything but weak,
and will only have one position to be
filled.
Two   Major   Sports.
Sceptics have said that a university
the size of that of British Columbia
can not support two major sports.
With co-operation between the leaders
of the two different branches this
should not be impossible. Both games
enjoy tremendous popularity, and both
teams would be ably supported by the
student body. Especially is the Varsity team suppotted by outsiders who
rate it as one of the cleanest and most
sportsmanlike teams in the First Division.
hast year the team played twenty-
five strenuous games, and will play
well over twenty before the season
closes. Certainly if hard work is to
be taken as any criterion, the Soccer
men  deserve  their big  block  letters.
An   Inter-collegiate   Field.
Inter-collegiate competition could
be easily arranged. Colleges in the
east that do not play English Rugby,
play Soccer, and in that case the followers of the round ball game would
be treated to many interesting meetings, when the east and the west tangled.
In view of these circumstances the
time is undoubtedly ripe for Soccer
to come into its own at Varsity, and
the many friends of the game will
be pleased to hear of the reward that
it undoubtedly deserves.
McKechnie Cup Rugby
The continuance of hard frost has
played havoc with rugby schedules.
Already two Varsity fixtures, games
which should have been played here j
with Nanaimo and Victoria, have had
to. be postponed. Two matches between other teams in the series have
suffered the same fate with the result.
that the season will be considerably
prolonged.
Varsity First
Varsity   still   leads   the   field    with
five victories and no defeats..  Vancouver, however has lost only to the college   team   and,   having   piled   up   big !
scores against their other opponents,
are full of enthusiasm.   The last game ,
between   these   two   teams,   as   it   is j
scarcely    necessary to    remind those \
who saw it, seemed  well qualified  to
furnish "the thrill that comes once in
a lifetime,'' but unless all indications
are at fault the match fixed for Feb.
24th, may well surpass it in interest.
Another win against Vancouver makes
the   McKechnie   cup   practically   safe
for    Vars.ty,    rrithcr  of    these  two
teams having had, up to the present,
any  very  gi.\it  difficulty is  defeating
their oppo."
Toughest  Struggle  Ahead       	
George Gross is still out of the line-j
up but all the other members of the
team, as far as is known, will be
available. Vancouver will probably
have the services of George Thom
who was unable to play in the last
match. The Varsity team is sufficiently established to make it possible to
say, without danger to its morale,
that the winning of this match will
call for an effort possibly exceeding
any that they have yet put forth. It
is fairly safe to predict, however, that
the team which has been equal ro
every call made upon it for several
years past will not fail to give of its
best on this occasion.
Interclass Boxing
Preparations for the inter-class bo.t
ing contests are proceeding apace.
.Much interest is being shown and a
busy search for talent is going on.
One class has even found it necessary to hold eliminations to solve the
difficult problems of selection. Eaoi
class may enter 8 contestants. Entries
close on Feb. 9. There is no question
but that boxing is gaining in popularity in the college and with the corresponding strengthening of its organization, it will shortly figure much
more prominently among the University sports,
BASKETBALL  SHOTS.
The Varsity Senior A aggregation
of hoop artists are scheduled to meet
the league-leading Y. SI. C. A. quintette next Saturday, at the Normal
gym. This game should prove a thriller and a good crowd is expected to
cheer on the squad. The Senior A
team are also arranging a game for
next Monday, when they will take on
the ex-Normals at the Normal gym.
The game was scheduled for Tuesday
night, but as this conflicts with the
Science dance the game will most likely be played on  .Monday.
COMING   INTERCLASS  EVENTS
February 9th—Finals Inter-class swim- i
ming. '
February    15th—Preliminaries,    Interclass Boxing. i
February 28th—Relay Race.
March    7th—Eliminations    for    Track
Sleet.
March   13th—Finals.   Inter-Class   Boxing.
March  14th—Track  Meet.
Rugby—Series     will     be     announced \
when    weather    conditions    permit
play.
Soccer—The soccer schedule will commence  immediately  after  Rugby  is
finished.
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and  Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and    Bicycle
Dealer
829  Pender St. W.
Hosiery for
Present Wear
Xovelly Ribbed Hose of
line quality Motility wool.
light grey, navy and beaver shades; ail sizes at
$1.50  pair.
Full-fashioned Silk and
Wool Hose, light weight,
with embroidered clox;
navy, brown and beaver.
tit $3.25 a  pair.
575   Granville   St.
SEYMOUR    3540
<m> <?Qo cms CrQv) cQb (t&cfQo
^    "v"    «v"    ■<?    «v»    «9»    -Q'
printing
Invitations
Dance   Programs
School Annuals
Magazines
Lionel Ward & Co. Ltd.
PRINTERS
Phone Sey.  195
318 Homer St.     :     Vancouver, B.C.
BROADWAY TAXI
D.   A.   RITCHIE
Res. Bay. 2884-Y
Fair. 2762 2558 Heather St. THE    UBYSSEY
February 13th.  1923
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued   every   Thursday   by   the   Publications
Hoard  of the  University of   British  Columbia.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising
Manager,
-f-
KDITORIAL   STAFF:
I'ditor-in-Chief H.  M.  Cassidy
Senior   Editor A.   G.   Bruun
Associate  Editors Miss  P.  I.   Mackav
C. C. Upshall
Eric.   W.   Jackson
leature    Editor Cliff    Howling
Literary  Editor Miss  Lucy   Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Helen Turpin
Sporting  Editor H.  B.  Cantelon
Chief Reporter A. A. Drennan
Feature Writers J.  C.  Nelson
REPORTORIAL   STAFF:
R. A. McLachlan,    Eve   Eveleigh,        K.   Schell,
Jean   Faulkner,  Grace  Mope
L.     Buckley,    H.     B.     Goult, H. E. F. Clark
A. Hugo Ray.
BUSINESS   STAFF:
Business  Manager  C.  S.   Evans
Assist.   Business   Manager G.   F.   Hagelstein
Advertising Manager R.  E. Walker
Circulation   Manager   F.   J.   Brand
Business Assistants  H. O. Arkley
J. Schaffer
J. Bridges
J.   Keenan
Editor  for  the   Week  Miss P. I. Mackay
THE NECESSITY FOR A
GRADUATE MANAGER
A small amount ot inquiry by any
student will reveal the fact, indicated
in last week's "Ubyssey," that certain
executive positions have become, or
are rapidly becoming, too onerous for
a student to fill in conjunction with
his studies. The continued expansion
of the University, both in size and importance, will emphasize the necessity
for a solution to this situation. The
problem has arisen; much of our future depends on the solution.
Student government is one of the
principles on which the University is
built. It is endangered. In order to
retain real student government, and
not a mere semblance of it, the responsible students must be relieved,
as far as possible, of the routine work
of their offices. During the campaign
the marshal had to interview numerous business men and officials; many
hours are occupied in the allotment of
rooms to University organizations;
■other mechanical details fill much
time; in short, students have not only
to initiate their policies, but execute
them.
We need a graduate manager, who
will be a salaried official, in intimate
contact with student activities, and
directly responsible to the Students
Council. His duties would consist
largely in carrying on the routine
work of student organizations. This
plan has been tried and found satisfactory in other institutions where
student government is in effect. It
reduces routine to a minimum so that
students may devote more thought to
the work of guidance and control.
A SUGGESTION FOR RELIEF OF
THE UPPER YEARS
Once more the season of Inter-Class
Debates is here, with its attendant
strain on the debaters and their assistants, and the time is ripe for offering some criticism of the system
now in vogue. At present we have all
years competing on equal footing with
one another. From the standpoint of
available talent, the objection to this
is that the Seniors and Juniors, the
remnants of once large classes which
have undergone the purging process
of three or four years of exams, have
to supply the same number of debaters   as   the   Second   and   First   years.
There is also to be considered the
demands made upon the time of the
debaters. As conditions are, the same
demand is made upon those in their
final and Junior years, as is made
upon the more lightly burdened Sophomores and Freshmen.
Again, as the junior years usually
are eliminated in the preliminaries—
and this is no reflection on their ability—there is a tendency for their supporters to lose interest in the remainder of the debates. As a result of
this lack of interest the beneficient
effect of attending, hearing, and
criticising the subsequent debates is
lost.
Could not a series of debates be
held among the Sophomores and
Freshmen themselves, thus giving
them the necessary experience to develop a high standard of debating and
an opportunity to encourage talent?
MORE   PROGRESS.
The suggestions for the first Vocational Conference for Women came
appropriately from the educational
centre of the province, the University.
Undoubtedly it is evidence to the unconvinced that the University recognizes and accepts its responsible part
in directing the careers of its students.
The enthusiasm with which these
short vocational lectures were received by all members of the community
is a tribute to the foresight of the
President of the W. IT. S. The movement has come from the women, but
the excellence of its motive and the
satisfactoriness of its results, in attendance numbers, should carry it far.
BALLADE   OF   WASTED   SARCASM.
—An easy parry, and I essayed
A thrust in quarte, and the aim was
true;
Yet,  soon  as  the  savage  attack  was
made,
The   steel    into   myriad   fragments
flew,
Completely   shattered—and   then   I
knew
I had broken the law of the duelling
trade:
"Never assault, whatever you do,
Solid bone with a rapier blade!"
And   yet   I   ought   not   to   have   been
dismayed;
From a theoretical point of view,
It   was   not   mere   clumsiness;    I   dis-
j played
I     All the skill I had learnt from you
'     (Quite   respectable,   entre   nous),
; But this was the maxim I disobeyed:
j     "You   cannot   penetrate   (take   my
I cue)
1 Solid bone with a rapier blade!"
: Though   1   lost   the   fight,  I   was   well
' repaid,
I     For in my consciousness this thing
j grew
I Clearer   and   clearer,   and   since   has
i stayed
'     Me   often   from   fighting   opponents
1 who
I     Belong to that most detestable crew,
- People   whom  no   one   can   ever   persuade    .    .    .
Leave them alone, for you'll never
get through
Solid bone with a rapier blade!"
L'ENVOI.
O prince, 'tis folly for me to pursue
The metaphor thus, but I am afraid
You really cannot do anything to
Solid  bone  with a rapier blade.
NANCY  LEE.
. —      -i
By the  Way
Whether morality is a matter of
class of not, Dean Coleman is now
quite convinced that manners are.
The intellectual element was particularly strong at Dean and Mrs. Cole-
mans' reception Monday evening. All
of the graduating class, in Arts was
there—and the Faculty.
The vision splendid of our new offices at Point Grey wins its due measure of enthusiasm, even if it is reminiscent of "The Thrush in February."
The editorial board wishes to extend its thanks to the unique person
who used the telephone on Friday and
left a nickel to pay for it.
CONGREGATIONAL   ADDRESS
Dr. Walter Murray, president of
Saskatchewan University since 1908,
will give the Congregational address
this year. Dr. Murray has been interested in U. B. C. before, for he
was a member of the Site Commission
that chose the University site at Point
Grey in 1910.
Have  Your Eyes  Tes ted
by our Graduated  Optician
All Testing, Grinding and Fitting
Glasses  are  Backed  by  the
Allan  Guarantee  of Absolute  Satisfaction.
0. B. ALLAN, LTD.
THB HOUSE OF DIAMONDS
480-486 aranville St. at Pender
STATEMENTS   WILL   BE   REFUTED
Mr. Percy Barr will address a meeting of the Surrey Ratepayers' Central
Executive on February 21, at Clover-
dale. Mr. Barr will refute the recent
exaggerated statements of the Member of the Delta. As Mr. Patterson
will in all probability be present, this
meeting ought to prove interesting.
/•took   for  the   Biff  Red  Arrow
This is your
Invitation
to visit our new clothing store.
Acquaint    yourself    with    the
things  that are new for spring
in Men's Wearing Apparel.
Remember the  new Adrress
J.n.Harvey, Ltd.
125-127  Hastings St. West
y Look  for  the  Big1  Be*  Arrow,
•J
See the
Doctor of Pens
Fountain   Pen     and   Eyersharp
Pencil   Service   Station
Complete    line   of   Dennison's
Merchandise and Crepe  Paper
Students'  Loose  Leaf  Books
Drawing   Instruments,   Etc.
Mitchell-Foley, Ltd.
Printers  and  Stationers
Sey.  1085      129  Hastings St. W.
PHOTOGRAPHY
The kind of Portraits that you
and your friends will appreciate.
We make them at most reasonable prices.
Broadway Studio
BROADWAY   AND   MAIN
Phone   Fairmont  3831
N.B.—Save   25%.   by   letting   us
do   your   films.
ESTELLA   M.  TULLY
Teacher of  Piano
225   LEE   BLDG.
Corner  Broadway  and   Main
Phone   Fairmont  3699-L
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery,
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served also
Afternoon Tea.    -       J*
Phone Fair. 377
Cor.  10th and Heather St.
DR. H. WOOD
Dentist
215  LEE  BLDG.
Corner  Main  and  Broadway
Phone   Fairmont  1581
Discount to  University  Students
Scmmenz
556   GRANVM.LE   ST.
Our Spring Suit Display is complete in every
respect and invites your
inspection. February 8th, 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
cbcibofractic
A   Safe  and   aane  Way   to  Health
OB.    OilLANT
408 Carter Cotton Bldg-.
Seymour   8790
Branch   Office   at    Jubilee
Member  B.   C.   Chiropractic  Ass'n.
BROADWAY
THEATRE
Main and Broadway
Now Playing
Thursday.  Friday,   Saturday, Feb.  1. 2, 3
John Barryir.ore
Sherlock   Holmes
Founded  in   Sir   Conaii
Doyle's Stories	
Coming—Feb. .8,  9,  10:
"Oliver Twist"
With -Jackie Coogan
Study Supplies
Loose Leaf Covers
Keystone i^oose Leaf Covers and fillers are among the
most convenient .appliances
made.
They come in a variety of
shapes and sizes to meet the
needs of every class of work.
If you are behind the Made
In . C. .Movement uemand
Keystone   Supplies.
Smith, Davidson k Wright
Manufacturers  of School  Supplies
Vancouver      ...     Victoria
Evans & Hastings
, Better    Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students   would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St.    Phone Sey. 189
Mt.    Pleasant    Methodist    Church.
Tenth Ave. and Ontario St.
Pastor—REV.   O.   M.   SANFORD
Good    Music.       Sermons    for    the
present     day.       Hearty    welcome.
Young    People's    Organization    of
most   attractive   type.
Religion    includes    Education.
Education    includes    Religion.
CUSICK
700 BROADWAY
Makes a specialty of home-made
candy and afternoon tea,
This column is maintained for the use
ot: students and others who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
All     contributions     must   be     written
legibly, in  ink,  on one side of the paper
only.    They  must   not  exceed  two  hund-
', red   words   in   length,   and   must   reach
I this   office   not   later   than  noon  Monday,
in   order   to   appear   In   the   issue   of  the
! following   Thursday.
STUDENT   LOANS.
Editor    Ubyssey,
I Dear   Sir:—
1 would like to secure space in your
paper tu put forth a criticism of the
method adopted by the Board of Governors in  granting student loans.
It seems to he the policy of this body
to   use,   as   a   basis   for   the   granting   of
i loans, the academic standing of the applicant    without   taking    the   trouble   to
' enquire into the real need of the student for the money. An example may
illustrate my point. A student who is
entirely sell-supporting found himself in
a position where he would be unable to
continue his studies, two months betore
graduating, unless he could secure tiuaa-
cial assistance. He applied tor .1 student loan of one hundred dollars but because of the fact that he was carrying
;i supplemental was granted only twenty-
live dollars by the Board of Governors—
a sum entirely insufficient for his needs.
Another student, living at home and
paying     no   board   but     having  a     clean
i academic sheet, was granted one hundred dollars. Twenty-five dollars would
have been sufficient to satisfy the needs
of the latter student and he could have
finished the term without securing any
outside assistance. Is it fair that a
student with a good standing be loaned
money on which to have a good time
while' a student with a supplemental be
forced to leave college because of short-
i age of money?
This. sir. is a matter of no small importance, and I hope that some constructive action will result from this criticism. Yours   truly,
"J<'( >It FAIR PI.AY."
"THE    COUNTER-CHECK
QUARRELSOME"
Editor   "Ubyssey."
Dear   Sir:
As a woman student at this University, and as a member of the senior
year. 1 feel that it is my duty to make
a reply to the outrageous and presumptions letter signed by "ltodolph," in last
week's edition of the "Ubyssey." That
a man should be allowed to insult a
woman is unpardonable—hut that his
views on the matter should be expressed
in the college paper is grossly unjust.
"Rodolph," as he smirkingly styles
himself, is but one too many of his
kind, predominating our college halls
today.
We have level-headed men in this University—men who are not of the species
of "cake-eaters." Isn't it time that they
exert their influence and endeavor to
(juell that obnoxious pest—the "lounge-
li/.ardV
I feel that I am voicing the sentiments of the entire women's student
body when I say that to be "second
choice" to a man of "Rodolph's" type—
is   not  in   any  way   desirable.
"Rodolph"—the very name—need anv
more   lie  said?"
R.  Y.
AMATEUR  PIANIST CLUB
Several musical students have or- j
ganized an Amateur Pianist Club with ;
a limited  membership of fifteen. \
The aim of the society is to afford j
an opportunity tor pleasurable inter-1
change of ideas on music. It will!
meet every three weeks at the homes i
of  various  members.
All interested are requested to hand
in applications by Friday morning,
Feb. !i. The executive is: President,
Miss Greta Mather, Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Magdalene Aske, Advisory
Board, Miss Jean Teller and Mr.
Southon.
LAST DAY OF VOCATIONAL
LECTURES INTERESTING
Thursday undoubtedly proved to be
the most successful day of the Vocational Conference, when Dr. S. D.
Scott, Miss H. G. Stewart and .Miss
A. B. Jameson respectively addressed
the U. B. C. on "Journalism," "Library
Work" and "Teaching" as professions
for women.
Dr. Scott in speaking of Journalism
stated: "It is true Journalism and
newspaper work open wide their doors
to women who have a capacity for
writing and love the work; there is
absolutely no branch of activity from
which they are barred."
He emphasized strongly the advantages to be gained by first entering a newspaper office before attending a School of Journalism.
Speaking of Library Work as a !
Vocation, Miss Stewart, after considering the wide influence which the
library exerts in a community, said:
"Any person desiring to take up
library work as a profession must first
have an adequate knowledge of the
mechanical part. This training re-
auires a university education, then a
year at a Library School. Library
training calls for two things, first a
knowledge of technique, and secondly,
sound scholarship.
"Teaching as a profession" was Miss
Jameson's subject, she strongly advised anyone, intending to adopt teaching as a profession, to take up either
the Commercial subjects or those subjects dealing with Home Economics.
These courses present two fields in
teaching which so far have not been
over-crowded.
SCIENCE  DANCE  RUMOURS
Dear Dora:
Cheer and Greetings! The Science
Dance takes place next Tuesday at
Lester's. I hear there is going to be
lots of Dancing, except for time off
for grub. The way the Aggies worked their rendezvous was rather good,
this time the color of your programme
string will tell your partner where
to find you. Simple colors, namely
RED, WHITE, BLUE and GOLD have
been chosen, so tell evedybody to
make sure they know these before
Tuesday: then when they get them, to
try and watch their color. A qualified
optician will be in attendance for
those  in   doubt.
Yours in anticipation,
BEAVER.
SCIENCE   DANCE.
The annual dance given by the Faculty of Science will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 13th.
The committee in charge consists
of "Fin" Findlay, "Len" Stacey and
Roy   McLaren.
Acting as patronesses will be Mrs.
Klink, Mrs. Brock, Mrs. Davidson, Mrs.
Matheson, and Mrs. Turnbull.
The Science men are working hard
to make this dance outshine all previous  affairs.
GOLD   MEDAL  WON
Another gold medal for speed and
accuracy in typewriting awarded this
week to a student of the B. C. Commercial and Secretarial Schools. The
Schools that get results. Papers
graded in New York City.
Are you Reading
The Sportsman?
Now on Sale—10c a Copy
1
The livest weekly on
general topics in Western
Canada.
High-class writers giving
high-class opinions on the
things every thinker is interested  in.
You do not have to be
concerned with football
competitions to appreciate
The Sportsman
Get this week's copy-—
you'll be glad to cultivate
the habit.
The Sportsman
'' Franks—Fearless—Fair''
THE
GLARKE&STUART
Co., Ltd.
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers—
Educational Stationery.
Students Note Books in
Genuine Leather and Tex-
hide Bindings—
Drawing Instruments and
Materials.
2?
550 Seymour St.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TAKE HER IN A  OAR
DRIVE YOURSELF
Brandon Auto Livery
Cor.  Georgia and   Richards  SU.
Sey. 4777
Day and  Night  Service
VALENTINE TEA
A Valentine Tea will be held at the
home of Miss McGuire 2720 Yukon St.,
(Cor. Yukon and 11th Ave.) on Saturday, Feb. IT, from 4 to 6. Excellent
Musical  programme.
A   silver   collection   in   aid   of   the
S. C. M.    Every girl of the University
is  cordially  invited.     Come  and  have
an  enjoyable  social  afternoon and ar
i tlie same time help a worthy cause.
(Eanadtatt f&xtrttBtmt Hntorattn
69-73 FAIRFIELD BUILDING
445 Granville Street Vancouver, B.C.
Special Coaching for University Examinations
Mathematics, Latin, Greek, French, Spanish, Physics,
Chemistry etc. THE    UBYSSEY
February   Sth,   1923
GET ACQUAINTED
WITH OUR CLEANING
AND PRESSING
DEPARTMENT
Special Acquaintence
Society Rate   —   Club Rate
[tj
These  Hates  Issued  Only by
The
Parisienne Dry
CLEANERS AND DYERS
571 Broadway West
Phone Fair. 5223
Travellers
Sample Suits
ALl, the Infest Styles
for Young; .Men. On sale
;it prices less than wholesale.
$18.75 to $31.50
D. K. BOOK
LIMITED
137 KMttiaffs St. West
(Opposite   Pro vino*)
EXTRACTS FROM "LE JARDIN D'
EPICURE" OF ANATOLE FRANCE.
|      Ignorance  is a necessary condition,
■ not of happiness merely, but of exist-
I ence itself.    If we knew all, we could
; not   endure   live   another   hour.     The
j feelings   that   make   life   sweet   or   at
| least tolerable to us. are born of a de-
, ception  and  feed  on  illusions.
!      If a man.  possessing,  like God.  the
; truth, the truth sole and entire, should
let it  fall  from  his  hands,  the  world
would be annihilated at a  stroke and
the   universe  would  wilt  away  like  a
shadow.     Divine   truth,    like    a    last
judgment, would reduce it to powder.
* *    *
The comic is immediately pathetic
when it is human. Does not Don
Quixote sometimes make you weep?
For my part 1 take delight in certain
books of a serene and smiling desola-
, tion. like that incomparable Don
Quixote or like Candide. which, properly  understood,  are   manuals  of  in-
• diligence   and   pity,   bibles   of   benevo-
' lence.
* *    *
It   is   a   famous   piece   of   nonsense,
| that "know thyself' of Greek philosophy. We shall never know ourselves
nor anyone else. To create the world
is less impossible than to understand
it. Hegel had some suspicion of this.
It may be that our intelligence may
serve   some   day   to   fabricate   a   uni-
I verse.      To   conceive   of   this   one   —
! never!
i
I      WIFE    OF    DEAN    ENTERTAINS
Mrs. Coleman entertained the woir.-
! en of the S. C. M. at the tea hour last.
! Saturday  at  her  home  in  Kerrisdale.
j The hostess charmed her guests with
a number of vocal selections and gave
an interesting account of the Women's
Christian College of Japan.
WHALING    DESCRIBED.
I At a meeting of the Engineering
Discussion Club, on Tuesday noon, T.
Berry, Sc. '23, spoke on the whaling-
industry, describing some of the stations on the coast, and gave a graphic
account of the various incidents of a
whale hunt.
The
Literary Corner
THE FAIRIES
I 'Tis said that in some sylvan glade
|     Where    glancing    sunbeams    linger
! long.
; The  woodland  sprites  still  laugh and
play
i     And fill their fairy halls with song.
i There where the trees tire panoplies
And silken rugs have emerald sheen.
| With flowery tapestries around,
|      Enthroned  sits  the  fairy  queen.
i
j Once on a sunny day in spring,
The  elfin  court   1   chanced   to  find:
Alas—the  fairies  tied   in   fright.
And  left me not  a  trace behind.
< 'ont ritiuLinns for the l.itcriiry Supplement, which wit] tic issued next month
.should he in the hands ot the l,itei,u\
Editor. Miss l.ucy Ingram, hy itutli 1
Both verse and p'l'ose cont liluitions will
be received. The latter should not < \-
ceed   seven   hundred   words   in   length.
U. B. C. CREDITED WITH
ANOTHER  PUBLICATION
Dr. T.  H.  Boggs, head  of  the  Economics   department,   is   the   recipient !
of many congratulations upon the success of his recently published volume,
"The  International  Trade  Balance  in j
Theory  and  in   Practice.''     The   book |
presents an extensive analysis of the j
external trade and financial relations j
of  Great   Britain   .the   United   States, !
Canada, India, Australia, New Zealand ;
and  South  Africa,  and  is  being used j
as a text by the class in Economics 6. I
Dr. Ashton, author of the well re- \
ceived work on Madame de Lafayette, j
has edited a volume of this interest- j
ing Frenchwoman's letters which is
now ready for the press. These letters were hitherto unpublished and a I
great deal of earnest research was |
necessary in order to establish their I
chronology. Dr. Ashton's previous j
book surprised savants in Paris, and ;
it is expected that his new effort will I
meet with the same reception.
The fact that the work of these men
has   called   forth  international   recog- ;
nition reflects greatly to the credit of !
the University of British Columbia as
an educational  institution. '
BEFORE   THE    NEXT    DANCE
Have    Your   Suit
Cleaned
and
Pressed
by
WM.  TEMPLETON
101
Broadway  E„
West of
Main
Fairmont
1666-R
ANNUAL   NOTICE.
The  Annual   Staff  Requtsts:—
1. That all class write-ups and pictures be handed in by the end of this
week. Feb. 10. An 'Annual' basket
will be placed in the Publication Office.
2. That, with the exception of the
Player's Club, Intercollegiate Debates,
and Sports, the write-ups of all
societies be in by Feb. IT.
3. That those students who have
not yet returned their proofs to
Hacking's do so at once. After Feb.
10, the photographer will be asked to
use his own discretion in this matter.
4. That students desiring extra
copies of the 'Annual' for friends,
sign the list on the main notice board.
The price of extra copies will be
$2.2"..
(5) That those with 'bright ideas'
give the staff the benefit of them.
New   Debates   Manager ,
.\lr. Hodgson, Arts '24, has resigned
his position as Debates Manager, owing to the pressure of his present
work as a member of the team that
will take part in the international debate with the University of California.
Mr. J. S. Burton, Arts '24, has been
appointed Debates . Manager for the
rest of the term.
The  New  Spring  Samples
are  here
:{()()   Beautiful   Patterns  to
Select From
PRICES   FROM
$30.00 to $50.00
To Order
LTD.
655   GRANVILLE   ST.
FLOOR    SPACE    FOR    STUDENT
OFFICES
"How much room do you want for
your student offices in the new buildings at Point Grey?" This, if not the
wording, was the gist of an enquiry
directed to the Student's Council by
President Klinck on Monday. President Ab. Richards immediately got
busy and transmitted the content of
the request to the subsidiary organizations of the Alma Mater Society. Department heads were uncertain as to
how much room they should ask for.
but all were agreed that there must
be far more accommodation than there
is at present, and drew up plans accordingly.
The estimated l.oor space requirements of all departments of the University will be sent to the Government
Department which has the construction plans in hand and will be used
as a guide by the architects.
SCIENCE.
On Wednesday afternoon preliminary tryouts were held, under the auspices of the Engineering Discussion
Club; for those to represent Science
in  the inter-class  debates.
Science '24, '25 and '26 were represented, the subject being "Resolved
that France was justified in occupying the Ruhr Area." The contestants
spoke in pairs, each speaker being allowed  10 minutes.
The judges, Dr. Hebb, M. Lighthall
and Mr. Wilkinson gave the decision
in favor of Bramston-Cook and Charn-
ley  of  Science   '24.
On February 1st Science '23 and
Science '24 held a "Combination
Party" at Willow Hall, all being there
except "Zip." The dance was successful enough to be continued for
the extra half-hour or so—Nuff Sed.
WILLOW    HALL
8C6    Seventeenth    Avenue    West
One  Block  West  of Heather St.
Have you seen this new hall
for dancing and private parties?
We have accommodation for
two hundred dancers. It is like
a big "chateau' witli beautiful
lounge room and open tire place,
card room, spiing floor for dancing, tancy lighting effects, ladies'
and gents' dressing rooms, with
fully   equipped   kitchen.
It is for rent to clubs and
private parties tit $l."i.()0 per
night up to 12 p.m. One dollar
per hour after.
F.   S.   LOCKETT,   Proprietor
Phone   Fair.   77   or   Fair.   2885-R
rENUS
PENCILS
%/nc largest selling Qualify
penal in the world
FOR the student or prof., the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Ave.
New York
Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
Venus Everpointed
Mechanical Pencitj
It's   Time   You   Had   Yours
Taken
Your   Photograph,   a   really
good one, by
F. L. Hacking
Leigh-Spencer   Building
553 Granville Street
LANGTRY
:: The Tailor ::
Suits $25.00 up,  to Measure
Overcoats, $25.00 up
318 Hastings St., W.
Union Label
Indoor and Outdoor
Athletic Equipment
Everything for
every sport, including su caters,
jerseys, shoes, etc.
Catalogue sent on request
of canada. ltd.
. -42*1  Hastings St. w February 8th,' 1923
THE    UBYSSEY
MUCK-A MUCK
A   NEW   PLACE  TO   EAT
Good meals served from 7:15
a.m.   to   10:30   p.m.
Sundays from  9  a.m.
University   Boys   welcome.
A full line of confectionery,
soft  drinks.
Matches FRKK with smokes.
LEONARD'S
1469  BROADWAY  WEST
(Just Off Granville)
(Eljanttrlppr
Vancouver's Best Cafe
and
Confectionery
Chocolates, 75c per lb.
774 GRANVILLE ST.
Orpheum
Coming' Wed.  Evening',   Feb.  14th,
1923.
Four Rights   and  Three  Matinees
JESSIE BUSLEY & CO.
"BATTY"
A  Terrible   Result  of the  Mystery
Play by Harrv Wagstaff Gribble
Direction  of  May  Tully	
STEPPE   &  O'NEAL
THE   BRICKLAYERS "
Presented'by Leonard Gautier
EDWIN   O-EOR&E
"A   Comedy   ot_Brrors"
DOUGAL   &   LEARY
" \  Joyful  Combination  of  Songs"
Music  and   Smiles"   	
JOSEPHINE AMOROS
"That French  Girl"
Assisted by Edna Mally
FORD DANCERS
UNIVERSITY   OF
MANITOBA
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
The above fellowship, of
the annual value of $1,500.00,
tenable at the University of
Manitoba, in any branch of
pure or applied science, open
to graduates of any Canadian
University, will be filled for
1923 about May 1st. Applications should be in the hands
of the Registrar of Manitoba
University. Winnipeg, Manitoba, by 9pril 1st. Further
particulars on application.
Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg,  Manitoba.
POLICY:     Pure  and  sweet.
WEATHER:     Sloppy,   with   eastern
zephyrs.
Uncle Josh's Column
T. B.—My dear boy, because six
girls have refused to go to the Science
Dance with you is no reason why you
should not ask the seventh. Uncle
Josh, upon several occasions, has asked as many as fifteen and then gone
stag. Stick to it T. II., sooner or
later you may strike a girl who won't
mind going with you.
*    •    •
R. C.  D. S.—Yes Dears, Uncle Josh
is   of   your   opinion   that   Mr.   Budfield
cares a great deal for the name of a
certain   eastern   university.
*    *    *
Doubtful Dora.—Xo, Dora, it's a bad
policy to keep two fellows on the
serious string at the same time. No
woman can serve two men; either she
will love the one and get the other,
or else she will like them both and
get neither.
*    *    •
H. P.—Why certainly Uncle Josh
will tell you how he makes his Peanut Butter sandwiches. First of all
you take a slice of bread and butter
it with plain butter. Then you take
some more butter and butter another
one. Then you spread Peanut Butter
on the first one you buttered. Then
you spread some more Peanut Butter
on the second one you buttered. Then
you put the two buttered slices together, butter to butter. That's all,
Dear,   really.
*        *        *
Jilted Jack—Be sensible, if you
want to regain her affections start
up a flirtation with some other girl;
don't let her know that you think
she's the only Cinder in the Ash-can.
* *    *
Coogy.—Now, now, Coogy don't be
sentimental: if he's a better dancer
than the old fellow, and if he's more
popular than the old fellow, and if he
has a bigger car than the old fellow,
and if he falls for you, why throw
the old fellow down. Uncle Josh used
to throw lots of fellows down when
he was in the ring.
S. O. S.—The most effective way
that Uncle Josh knows of removing
ink spots from a silk dress is to put
sulphuric  acid on  them.
• *      m
Bashful Aggie.—That's right, my
boy, don't be afraid to ask Uncle Josh
anything. When you take a girl to
a dance you're supposed to dance the
first dance with her, the Supper
Waltz, and the Home Waltz. After
that you're supposed to start for home
with her. After that you're the doctor.
Smoke Rings.
First Frosh: "How come your
Mamma let you go to the Arts Smoker."
Second Frosh: "Oh I told her that
some of the Profs, were going to be
there so she said she guessed it'd be
all right then. (We wonder what
Challenger's Mamma would think.)
If the Arts Smoker was anything
like High Jinks, it was no place for
a Theolog.
MUCK JOTS
Val  Gwyther:     "Say,  Freshman,  do
you know who I am?"
Freshman:     "No.     Don't   you?"
In   the   Reading   Room.
"Did you notice that Freshette that
just  went  out."
"Do you mean the one with the pale
blue sweater, silk stockings with roses
about three inches apart, sport shoes,
bobbed hair and ?
"Yes."
"Not particularly."
Prof. Hutchinson: "Jackson will
you please define skeleton."
Jackson: "A skeleton is a being
with its outside off and its inside out."
Modern Mary.
Mary had a little lamb—
That day has passed away.
No lamb could follow at  the pace,
That Mary sets today.
Miss (?) (to orchestra) "Will you
play 'Hot Lips.' "
Hughie: "We hav'nt enough instruments to make it sound well."
Miss (?) "But it only needs two
anyway."
I V' \ J*' ** r'1^
A Weary   Chase.
From a recent essay—"Pursued by
the relentless hunter the panting stag
sprang from cliff to cliff. At last it
could go no further. Before it yawned the chasm and behind the hunter."
Did you get the second question in
algebra?"
"No."
"How far were you from the right
answer?"
"Six seats."
Flaps and Chaps.
Gather kisses while you may,
Time bring only sorrow.
For the flappers who flap so free today.
Are the chaperones of tomorrow.
—Pitt Panther.
Prof. "WThat makes the tower of
Pisa lean?"
Stud. "I don't know or I'd take
some myself."
I
Poor Doc.
beat   Doc.   Sedgewick
"Well,
today."
"How's   that?"
"Passed him on the hill
up
Frosh:    "Were   you   ever   pinched
for going too fast?"
Soph:    "No, but I've been slapped.
"Take it from me," said the cynical
soph, "there are two kinds of women
you  can't trust.    Those  with bobbed
hair and those without it.
Latest   Style   Novelties  in
Ladies  Footwear
$4.85
Clapp Shoe Store
Cor.   7th   Ave.   and   Main   St.
FOK
Tasty Lunches
Afternoon Tea
and
Confectionery
TRY
MRS. FERRIERS LUNCH ROOM
"Down  by tlie  Car"
767 Broadway West
Spencer's Surveyor
Boot Holds the
Record for
Endurance
Our Surveyor Boot is made
of black box calf, specially
tanned to ensure catisfaction
under heavy wear; full double oak tanned soles; Goodyear welt sewn, heavy leather insoles, solid boxings and
counters, strongly sewn
seams in uppers. These are
some of the special features
of this boot. An extra wide
last insures comfort for men
who need wide fittings.
Spencer's guarantee of satisfaction backs every pair;
all sizes from 6 to 11.
Selling   $8.95
«|»
David Spencer
Ltd. r?
8
THE    UBYSSEY
February 8th, 192*
ANGELL ENGRAVING CO.!
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and Heather St.
W.  H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phone Fair. 840
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Exercise Books
Looseleaf Covers
and  Refills
Waterman's Pens
Eversharp Pencils
-DANCING-
Every Wednesday and Saturday
evenings, 9 o'clock.
ALEXANDRA
H   DANCING ACADEMY   H
Oor.  Robson  and Hornby
The Alexandra Orchestra, featuring the Sousa Phone, always
In attendance.
NEW   SPRING
STYLES and   FABRICS
HAVE   ARRIVED
ONE
$97-00       To"
PRICK £i I MEASURE
We invite you to inspect our
values. Our suits are made to
your measure, and tailored to
fit. in any style you may choose.
lip-Top Tailors
301  Hasting* Street Wott
Vancouver,  B. C.
Opposite Hamilton Street
Ptlent:   Fairmont  3.
T. J. Kearney & Co
Jtunrral lirrrtora
Private Ambulance Service
!••   Broadway   W. VANCOUVER
Was Hamlet of  Denmark Mad ?
APROPOS OF THEATRE NIGHT.
Well, we're not quite sure, but we
have a sneaking hunch that he wasn't
half as mad as the band of merry
rogues who on February 22 will present to the startled gaze of Vancouver
patrons of the drama ("A" as broad as
possible) one of the most unique interpretations of Shakespeare's immortal ("mor" as Ma in sheep) character
ever seen on local boards.
Scotty Rushbury, in collaboration
with Jock Ijundie. is overhauling
Shakespeare's effort that it may be in
harmony with the times. The connecting rods have developed a rattle
and the carburetor is away out of adjustment, but when Scotty has finished with it there is little doubt but
that the old piece will be hardly recognizable.
Of one thing the modern playwrights
are certain. Hamlet wasn't half mad
enough, but the ghost certainly was
cookoo. Any man who would run
around the battlements of his father's
castle in the cool crisp air of the evening with nothing on but his nightshirt, was far from being in possession of all his faculties.
At any rate, it is probable that this
performance will mark an epoch in
the history of the theatre.
The   cast?     That's   a   secret   for   a
while yet, but you never can tell, can
you,  Bernard, old  dog?
The hardy sons of toil from Braemar are already grooming up some of
the best livestock at the Point, while
the slaves of the slide-rule promise
something altogether out of the ordinary in the history of Vancouver.
Sperry has been working diligently
all year trying to separate the bass
from the very base, and after many
sleepless nights he has at last succeeded in collecting a group of students who are capable of opening
their mouths without producing unpleasant sounds. They will probably
charm the remainder of the audience
with a few well-chosen selections from
the  body of the hall!
Brick's getting all limbered up for
the occasion, and has undertaken to
give one of the most startling demonstrations of contortion seen on the
Orpheum stage for many seasons. He
may or may not be able to get himself untangled, but here again you
never can, etc.   Time alone will tell.
Tickets for Theatre Night are on
sale this week. Don't rush. He who
hesitates is not only lost, but lacks as
well a certain discrimination in choice
of entertainment usually found in University students.
ARTS  23 GIVEN DECISION
IN FIRST DEBATE
The first gun was fired in the interclass debates last Wednesday, when
the debaters of Arts '23 met the Freshmen on the question: "Resolved that
the French were justified in the occupation of the Ruhr valley." Harry
Cassidy and Norman Robertson argued for the negative, while William
Murphy and 1-ouis Smith upheld the
honor of the Freshmen in the affirmative. The sounder arguments and
sager counsel of the Seniors,. however, prevailed and a defeat was recorded for the less experienced Freshmen.
Second   Round  Tonight.
The second debate of the series will
take place tonight, when Arts '24 will
meet the "Aggies." The subject for
debate is: "Resolved that the Canadian Government's immigration policy
is in the best interests of the Dominion." Harold Cantelon and Lloyd
Wheeler of Arts '24 will debate the
negative, while the "Aggies," represented by Zoond and Hope, will argue
for the affirmative. This debate promises to be especially interesting and
a large attendance is expected.
FROM A CONVERSATION
WITH PRESIDENT KLINCK
Sir Henry Newbolt, M.A., D. Litt,
and Sir Michael E. Sadlier, K.C.S.I.,
C.B., 1,1.D. are to tour Canada this
Spring to inaugurate the National
Lectureship Scheme recently adopted
by the National Council of Education
in Canada.
Sir Henry Newbolt, author, poet and
educationist, was chairman of the
special committee created by the British Board of Education which recently
issued its report on the teaching of
English, which is said to be a remarkable contribution to the cause of
education. Sir Henry's first lecture
was given in St. John, a few days ago,
and was very favorably received.
Sir Michael E. Sadlier is vice-chancellor of the University of Leeds, and
one of the Greatest Educationists of
the English-speaking world.
Sir Henry will probably lecture here
sometime in March, but the date and
subject of his lecture has not been
announced, as yet.
Sir Michael Sadlier has not yet
reached Canada so he will probably
arrive here at an even later date.
Every large educational centre in
Canada will be included in their itenerary.
Opportunity For Students To Show-
International Fellowship
We read a great deal about student
relief in Europe and Russia. The
question is often asked why students
of these countries should be helped.
Many of them have lost their homes
through war, famine, and pestilence,
and are struggling to gain an education. Without trained leaders there
is no hope for Russia and Central
Europe. From the present generation
of students must come the doctors,
engineers, teachers, and agriculturists which the countries so desperately need.
The European Student Relief from
the beginning has based Its work on
the belief that international co-operation is possible and that international
fellowship would follow co-operation.
There is no doubt that when students
the world over are brought to realize
that   national   boundaries   should   not
limit their vision when considering
international problems, the sooner
will we arrive at a solution of the
petty and selfish quarrels wh;ch are
tending Europe today.
One way of helping and fostering
this international fellowship is by
coming to the assistance of students
who are endeavoring to obtain an education. They cannot help but love and
appreciate that country which sends
them relief whether it be in the form
of money or food. The fundamental
principle has been to render assistance to all in need regardless of race,
creed or political views. Where
funds are inadequate preference is
given to senior years. Funds arc not
doled out in charity allowances but
are used for the development of cooperative schemes which will in time
make the student self-supporting.
All Overcoats
Reduced as
Follows:
$25.00, now       $16.65
$29.50, now  $19.75
$34.50, now       $23.00
$37.50, now  $25.00
»
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LIMITED
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BOYS !
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LTD.
Florists,  Nurserymen and
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TWO STORES:
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This   shirt   represents   the
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Two   Specialty   Shops
for  Men   and   the   Young   Fellows:
411-474   Granville   St.
Wilbur G. Grant
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TEACHER  OF  PIANO
Organist  and  Choirmaster
First Baptist Church
Studio:      2213    Granville    Street
Phone Bayview 3140 S
LIONEL WARD  81 COMPANY,   LTD.. PRINTERS.

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