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The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1960

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 UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIM.
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,   1960
No.  30
Russians  draw full  house
Discuss education;
give Sputnik to UBC
By SUSANNE CLARKE
More than 1,000 students jammed Brock lounge Wednesday
to hear a panel discussion by four Russian students concluding
their NFCUS-sponsored tour of Canada. >
The quartet, which has been
Photo by Cliff Arrowamith.
FOUR RUSSIAN STUDENTS flank UBC  NFCUS chairman John Madden  (centre) of panel discussion  in  Brock  lounge Wednesday noon.  About 1,000 students heard the speakers.
—-— ■■ ■   '     -" ' — ! ; ; ^?-	
EUS president held 20 hours;
well fed and liquidated'
Atomic scare
A new club has been formed
on the campus. The Nuclear Disarmament Club hopes to create
an awareness among students of
the implications involved in the
atomic arms race.
Formation of the organization
followed a student debate last
week in which the majority of
an audience of about 100 students voted against continuing
the tests.
Aims of .the club, which have
yet to be approved by. the University Clubs Committee and the
Alma Mater Society are:
• to secure the abolition of
nuclear arms testing everywhere.
• t ostop manufacture of nuclear arms and their distribution  to additional countries.
• to secure a permanent and
workable method of preventing the use of nuclear arms.
• to secure the abolition of
the stockpiles of nuclear weapons.
• to oppose the possession or
maintenance of nuclear weapons by the armed services of
a nation upon Canadian soil
within Canadian waters and
airspace.
The 34 founding members elected an executive of: Mike Au-
dain, president; Lorenne Gordon, vice-president; Jill Adams,
secretary; Alex Rebmann-Huber,
treasurer; Bob Roberts, PRO;
Terry Sankey, member-at-large.
By JERRY PIRIE
Bob Noble, EUS president,
was returned safe and sound
Thursday morning to the Engineering building after a 20-hour
ordeal in the hands of the Associated Womens Students.
Noble was trapped Wednesday
in Brock by the AWS as a publicity stunt for their food drive.
The following is Noble's account of the kidnapping:
"Garry Tappey and myself
went to the Brock to sign a
cheque for the crippled children.
Eight nurses grabbed me with a
net and ropes and dragged me
to a car; blindfolded me and
drove all ov^r town in circles
crossing me up.
"We finally ended up in a pub
on the North Shore where we
drank beer for five hours.
"They took me to the Central
City Mission for the night, then
picked me up in the morning
and brought me back to the Engineering building."
Noble, shaken and hungry
after  20  hours   of  terror,   was
New UBC fellowships
worth 3000 dollars
Aluminum Laboratories
Limited have announced the establishment of new fellowships
at UBC.
All fellowships are tenable
for one year and renewable by
the university. The annual value
is approximately $3000, of
which $1000 goes to the Faculty
in which the fellowship is held.
The remainder covers tuition
fees and a cash grant of up to
$1600 to the fellow,
somewhat   "browned  off"   with
his fellow Engineers for the way
in which they abandoned him.
The Engineers in their newsletter stater Noblels ransom of
300 cans of food was a pittance
and would be increased to 600
cans if the AWS would keep
Noble.. The, newsletter also announced the elections for a new
EUS president.
This is AWS president Fran
Snodgrass' report:
"In conjunction with the AWS
canned food drive, Bob Noble
was kidnapped and ransom set
at 300 cans of food. He was spirited away under lock, key and
fishnet by an enthusiastic bevy
of beautiful nurses, who volunteered to look after this aspect
of the food drive.
WELL SUPPLIED
Noble was well supplied with
food and drink during the afternoon and then spent the night
at the Central City Mission. He
was returned, to the campjus at
8:15 this morning—hungry.
He was piped from the bookstore to the Engineering building by a member of NUS, and
escorted by his kidnappers. No
attempt was made to retaliate
and a pledge of 600 cans of food
by Friday was gratefully accepted by Thunder and other AMS
members."
The drive is in response to an
urgent need for non-perishable
foods by the Central City Mission.
For those of you who wish to
contribute but keep forgetting to
bring something from home,
AWS will sell cans of soup at
cost price in the Brock, Thursday and Friday at noon. Receptacles for cans are found in each
faculty building and in Brock.
in Canada for about three
weeks, spoke on Russian higher
education and answered Written
questions from the audience.
In the USSR, anyone who can
demonstrate a certain level of
academic knowledge by passing
a written examination receive^
all his higher education free of
charge, the Russians said.
Attendance is compulsory at
all classes, which take up about
36 hours of the week. When library and study time is included, however, a Soviet student's day is stretched to at
least 15 hours.
"This does not mean our students do not have time for recreation,"   one   delegate    commented.
SPUTNIK PRESENTED
Following the discussion, UBC
—NFCUS president John Madden was presented with a miniature sputnik "as a symbol of Soviet schooling's superiority," a
slide film on the Soviet union,
two records, and an photo album
Moscow.
Previously the students had
said that, although they were
not yet prepared to give a definite answer, their system of
education was" probably better."
The female member of the
panel said that in Canada she
had met far more males than fern a 1 es attending university,
while at home there were at
least  equal  numbers^
"Our females participate very
actively on scientific research
at the undergraduate level," she
said.   She   added   that   women
were also very active in sp6r*ts
and had equal opportunities' to,
work with men.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
In the Soviet Union there are
student and social organizations
very similar to ours, except, of
course, for the Young Communist League. The audience Was
told that groups exist for people
interested in singing, chorus,
dancing, sports and cinema.
Student government at universities in the USSR has some
control over such things as admission of students, distribution
of housing in the residences,
awarding of scholarships. The
academic curriculum and quality of teaching is also discussed
by student leaders.
Another purpose of Soviet student government is "to contribute tj> friendship and understanding "between the young
people of different countries."
WANT FOREIGN STUDENTS
There are now about 13,1900
foreign students studying" at
Russian universities, and one
delegate expressed his hope that
the number would increase as
the years go by.
Regarding life   at   Canadian
(Continued on Page 3)
See RUSSIAN  STUDENTS
Float fund up 100
The Finance Committee has
given a grant of $100 toward
expenses of a Grey Cup float.
This grant brings to $200
the available resources of the
Grey Cup Float Committee.
AWS GIRLS WENT a-fishing Tuesday morning and netted the
above catch, one Robert Noble, president of the Engineering
Undergrad Society. He was returned to the engineers early
Wednesday after they pledged 600 cans of food to the AWS
canned food .drive.
Miiuccfm npctuuL Zocmu
/ Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thu$sday/-November 24, 1960
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
"University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports), 14 tEditor-inChief). 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
f News -Editor Denis   Stanley
Features Editor   .......   Ed Lavalle
f Photography Editor Byron Hender
Senior Editor ■  . ..   Ann Pickard
■Sports Editor Mike Hunter
r Critics Editor Dave Bromige
P CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
' Layout: Clarence Buhr
STAFF: Susanne Clarke, Jerry Pirie, Christine Chester,
Fran Snodgrass, Coleman Romalis, Nico Snoek,
Sharon McKinnon, George Railton, Kitty Watt.
SPORTS: Bert MacKinnon, Chris Fahrni, Judy Sewell,
Dieter Urban, Norm Christie.
\H TURKEY
Academic Freedom
Turkish students, supported by many of their professors, led the revolt against the misrule of Mr. Menderes.
■ Now the new Government, which they helped to bring to
. power has moved against the universities; some 150 professors have just been dismissed by the National Unity
Committee. No convincing explanation has been offered;
the obvious one is that the Committee wants to show the
_ universities who holds the power, so that, they shall not get
. any over-ambitious notions about how the country should
be governed.
People at the universities started off predisposed in
favour of their-new rulers. But as General Gufsel's Gov-
- errunent comes to show an ever-increasing resemblance   to
- that of Mr. Menderes it may be beginning to evoke the
" same response from them. Students of law, for instance,
• may understandably be disturbed about the trials that are
going on in Yassiada.
There were in fact, student demonstrations in Istanbul
• just over a week.ago (not for any particularly good cause);
the martial law commander of the city gave a warning that
if the students came out again they would be expelled
from the city and their teachers punished. Now the dis-
j missals will put students and lecturers all the more firmly
on the other side of the barricades. Already the heads of
three universities have resigned.
"Ttie National Unity Committee prides itself on the restoration of freedom of the psess. (How long will it last?)
But academic freedom is quite as important. It is alleged
that the 150 were not doing their job properly. Even if that
were true it would still be better to let them stay for as
long as their universities tolerated them than to interfere
on grounds which can command no acadmic authority. One
of the limitations of the rule of an army (especially an army
that has dismissed some five thousand of its own officers)
, is that this argument probably seeems quite incomprehensible to its leaders. Manchester Guardian Weekly
WotldlUefugee Year
Those who pontributed to World Refugee Year funds
may like to, know of a report presented to- the United
iNations General Assembly by the Secretary-General, giving an account of the sums raised in various countries and
of what has so far been paid out. From 97 countries there
came in all abouj; $80 millions, about $27 millions from
•governments, the rest from voluntary sources.
The United Kingdom made the largest contribution
(som© $21 millions) with the United States next in order;
foit Norwegians and; New Zealanders gave the most per
head of ^he j»pulation. Nearly a tenth of the whole was
given in kind—for instance, in wheat from Canada.
Of the sums so far allotted, the largest ($23 millions)
has gone to aid refugees tinder the mandate of the UN
High Commissioner for Refugees—that is, the 32,000 who
were living in camps in Europe when the year began, and
who, it is hoped, will now all be either integrated into the
countries in which they originally took refuge or settled
elsewhere. Some four thousand of these were people handicapped in some way which' barred them from acceptance
as immigrants; during this year, immigration rules have
been liberalized to let them in. Nearly $8 millions have
gone to help the Arab refugees in Palestine; over $5 millions to refugees from Algeria now in Tunisia or Morocco;
over $4 millions to Chinese in Hongkong; and nearly $15
millions to "other refugees", some in Europe but not within the High Commissioner's field, others in Asia. More than
$20 millions has not yet been allotted. WRY has been a
memorable instance of human solidarity, and will not be
forgotten. Manchester  Guardian Weekly
Letters To
The Editor
Placebo, Anyone?
Editor, |
The Ubyssey, '
£,
Dear Sir:
The latest campus caper
making "charity" to the suffering a barrel of fun illustrates
the essential character of such
charity, that of a farce. Those
who cry out for bread are offered crumbs of cake by a cute
coed or if they prefer substance there is the Mission offering pie in the sky washed
down with a bowl of soup.
Make sure there wll be an eter.
nal need for "charity" by making it a placebo creating the
illusion that something has
been done.
' How else can we pay off our
debt of social responsibility at
such a cheap price without
dirtying our hands? Who will
benefit from a few cans of food
sent to the Mission; a fraction
of the destitute to be kept miserably alive to starve another
day? Or will it be those who
can use this huckstering in the
future as prosperous professional fund raisers for charities, a field hitherto reserved
for the dabblings of bored
"upper class" females? Who is
more responsible for the perpetuation of this manifestation
of ethical and intellectual
bankruptcy than the business
Babbits and our academic public relations men, ecclesiasti-
cals protecting the status quo
from the heresy of those outraged by our chronic social
diseases, when the body of society has spreading, rotting,
malignant sores and is given a
sugar pill to cure the cancer?
Robert Horn,
Postgradute.
Pax Nobiscum
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear' Sir:
What each student of UBC
heeds is a CELL; warm, with
lots of SKY-LIGHT, and SILENCE. Each student should
be assigned a cell at the beginning of his school career (frat
houses, the Brock, faculty
clubs and other unoccupied
spaces could be used if necessary). Each Cell should be
equipped with a bed (to save
travel time) and space for
books, and a wallhanger for
jugs or some sort of musical
instrument which (the walls
being thick and soundproof)
could be practised as a massage for the well-muscled mind.
Each student should be given
a summer and a winter robe
with a water-tight cowl and
big sleeves for carrying lunch
in. Faculty should have to eat
supper but not breakfast with
the students. If everyone lived
in a beehive skyscraper by the
sea, vast plains of UBC lands
otherwise occupied by cars and
towtrucks could be put to"iise
(i.e. a new theatre, a cozy cafeteria, music building, etc., etc.)
I, for one, am sick of drinking at the knowledge troughs
in the library with the nose-
blowing, chair-scraping, paper-
rattling, yacking herd; also I
like to hum when I study.
Sincerely,
M.G., Arts III
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By MALCOLM SCOTT
Monday night's 5 p.m. Council meeting got off to its
usual prompt start at 5:20 p.m. and managed to grind
through the minutes by 6.
At this point the Council adjourned to the South Brock
Dining Room for dinner. This sumptuous repast (cinnamon
buns, stew and ugh, rhubarb pie) was bravely faced by our
determined blue-blazered trenchermen.
On reconvening at 7, the council heard a comprehensive
report on Open House by Pete Meekison, chairman of the
Open House Committee, (who was obviously suffering from
acute gastric distress and other related after effects from
the rhubarb pie). He reported that Open House expects
to bring over 100,000 visitors to the campus.
Mr. Meekison was followed by a lively session on the
Bureaucrat's Bible during which President Edgar remarked
that it would contain "all sorts of guff". On being told the
Bible's probable length, P.R.O. Daniels exclaimed, "A
hundred pages! We'll never get anybody to read the
wretched thing."
The business had gone so speedily up to this point
that we all had hopes for an early adojurnment. These
hopes vanished like a puff of smoke with the appearance of
a UCC motion concerning Ubyssey 'Tween Classes notices.
Your reporter (The UCC Treasurer) found himself in
the unenviable position of being in opposition to his editor.
Several of his remarks rapidly earned his editor's ire and
led one Councillor to tell him, "You have stepped on the
editorial freedom of the Ubyssey." Your reporter failed,
however, to detect an audible squish.
(Editor's Note; By FORCING The Ubyssey to print
notices in a foreign language, Student Council would be
infringing on the freedom of the Editor-in-Chief to decide
what shall be printed, and in what form. This is a freedom
that Student Council has traditionally recognized.)
Even after this shattering experience your reporter
still had fond hopes of a speedy meeting. This misconception was soon dispelled by the appearance of that hy-
hydraheaded monster USAC, (University Student Activities
Committee.
Mr. Roy Barnett gave the council his views on the US
AC question. Council then spent an hour on this question,
all to no avail. No decisions were made and no conclusions
were reached. There were, however, some very enlightening
remarks.
Russ Brink stated that as soon as USAC had been set
up there was "a realization on our part that something was
wrong." He explained that he thought USAC would undoubtedly do a good job but not the job that had to be
done, i.e. it could not relieve the administrative load of the
council. To my mind, Mr. Brink aptly summed up the
whole matter in his further comment, "We goofed!"
In your reporter's opinion the Haskin's commission's
investigation was in the wrong areas to start with and
as a result USAC can serve no useful purpose. Ross
Craigie argued that USAC should be dissolved as by keeping it going council was "just building up a lot of false
hopes."
Following the USAC discussion there was a further intense high level discussion, i.e. argument, over the merits of
the current   conference craze. As   usual   no decision was
made.
* *        *
It is reported that the Sopron students have something
brewing for the visiting Russians—probably a second revolution.
A heated discussion over the repeated rewording of
a discipline committee motion led one Councillor to accuse
the rest of "running off at the mouth."
* * *
Eric Ricker suggested the Director of Student Activities, whose present title is considered a threat to student
autonomy, be retitled ADVISOR TO THE PRESIDENT
ON STUDENT AFFAIRS
The University Jazz Society
presents
direct from the
BLACK HAWK in SAN FRANCISCO
THE JEAN HOFFMAN
TRIO
"One of America's Leading Female Jazz Pianists"
FRIDAY - Nov. 25 - 12:30 - Auditorium
Non-Members   -   35c Thursday, Novembe 24,   1960
THE      U B Y S S E Y
Page 3
Dr. Jamieson !
non-committal
on new party
A UBC economist Monday
fold the CCF Club that it is
impossible to predict the prospects of the proposed New
Party.
Speaking to a packed house in
Bu. 203, Dr. Stuart Jamieson. of
the Economics Department,
itemized the reasons for organized labor in Canada now deciding to go into politics. He
said these included a growing
fear of depression and unemployment, growing U.S. domination of our culture and economy,
and a fear of repressive legislation.
U.S. DOMINATION
Jamieson said that the Gordon
Commission revealed that more
than fifty percent of all Canadian industries are partially or
wholly American owned.
"This is becoming a source of
growing concern in Canada,"
said Jamieson, and noted that it
could possibly work in favor of
the New Party. "The old parties
would have difficulty doing anything concrete about these problems," he said.
Asked if he thought "in all
sincerity" it would be a good
thing to have a Labor government running the country,
Jamieson replied," In terms of
maximum economic growth it
would not be good; in terms of
developing a national consciousness and culture, it would be a
good thing."
From Page 1
Russian Students
universities, the point was
raised that scientific equipment
here was inadequately used because very few students receive
oncpurgagement to do undergraduate scientific research.
In the USSR full use of scientific equipment is made, with
both graduate and undergraduate students doing research.
"Look Round in Apathy
—this one is different
KEN HODKINSON
UBC student Ken Hodkinson's
first play, "Look Round in
Apathy", is Frederic Wood Theatre's next production.
Hodkinson describes his play
as "a satirical tragi-comedy
about the demise of our whole
western society, a kind of epilogue to "Spengler's "Decline of
The West."
Hodkinson, now in Fourth
Year Arts, plans to attend the
Yale School of Drama to study
play writing. He recently finished a full length play tentatively titled "Comfort Me With
Apples." '
YMCA presents
folk singers
An Evening of Folk Singing
with some of Vancouver's leading Folk Singers will be held
Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Central YMCA Auditorium — 955
Burrard  Street.
The High Riggers, Folk Masters, Roy Hull, Vera McKenzie,
Barry Friedman, and Rod Smith
will be among the many folk
singers taking part in the program.
Proceeds will go to YMCA
World Service.
As new, coral ice chiffon
cocktail dress and red wool
cocktail dress. Size 14. Best
offers. Yu 8-3900.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 191
5 or
More
CLASSIFIED
RIDE WANTED: from Boundary Rd. — Kings way area.
Starting Mon., phone Terry,
HE 1-8505.
RIDE WANTED: from South
Burnaby (Vicinity of Marine
Drive and Gilly Ave.) to campus. Please call Francis Lajar.
HE 1-7619, after 8:30 p.m.
WANTED: ride from Davie and
Denman for 8:30 or 9 Mon.
to Fri. Call MU 4-6001.
WANTED: ride from 25th and
McDonald Mon-Fri.—8:30 OR
9:30. Phone John, RE 1-5971.
FOUND: 2 months ago, still not
claimed — girls bracelet .CA
4-9780. Mon., Tues., Thurs.,
—Evenings.   Sun.—Day.
FOR SALE: '51 Prefect in excellent condition—heater and
defroster. Phone WA 2-7146,
ask for Judy.
LOST: 1 pair glasses in maroon
case with rubber band, Nov.
15 in chem. 300, finder please
contact Sanford Clare at CA
4-9943.
I'VE been waiting for my psych
100 book outside room 126,
arts building, since 11:30,
Tuesday.   Please phone again.
FOR SALE: '51 Austin $60 —
through test — owner unable
to afford running it — phone
RE 8-1891 Tues., Thurs., Fri
evenings after 6 p.m.
RUSSIAN
200:
wanted
used
Russian
200
grammar
text
(Gronika
) call
Walt at
CA 4-
6093
FOUND — NOV. 21: corner of
10th and Tolmie, L.P. record
titled "Arabic and Druse Music" — Phone CA 4-5564.
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
ELVIRA'S
Palma de Mafiorca
For an original Christmas
gift, remember the Spanish
and European touch. See our
wide selection of imported
leather goods.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
Morning Coals
While and Blue Coals
Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00: discount lo
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE LTD.
623 Howe    MU 3-2457
"Look Round in Apathy" will
run from November 25 to December 3. Also on the bill is
"Jacques" by the controversial
playwright Ionesco.
An added attraction, for opening night will be a panel discussion on "Playwrighting today: where is it leading us?"
Speakers will be A. M. Friedson,
English Dept., Robert Patchell,
CBC, and Mrs. Joan Lowndes,
well known critic and broadcaster.
DEATH OF A
SALESMAN
NOVEMBER 29
CorNette
Beauty Salon
Personality Styling & Culling
• Coloring     • Perm. Waving
• Manicuring
• Beauty Consultants
Miss Barbara  -  Miss Elenore
Miss Jeri
4532 West 10th Ave.
CA 4-7440
We Specialize in Long Hair
Try
BEAUTY CLINIC
By Zsa Zsa
4395 West 10th
CA 4-1231
STUDENTS!
Try our Daily Special for a
New Dining Pleasure!
We Cater to Students at
STUDENT RATES
D e a n's
4544 W. 10th
Open until 11:30
VOLKSWAGEN OWNERS!
We have over 250 satisfied V-W owners patronizing our
station. Qualified V-W mechanics make expert repairs and
service a specialty.
Why not give us a try!
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
10th Ave & Discovery CA 4-0828
FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY
'PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
... Brahadi's smoking
"tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
^ Brahadi's is available
at select tobacco stores.
53C for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxes included
THE PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO. OF CANADA
Hamilton,  Ontario
HAS MANAGEMENT POSITIONS OPEN IN
• INDUSTRIAL   ENGINEERING •   PRODUCTION •   DEVELOPMENT
• ENGINEERING     •  PRODUCT RESEARCH        •  TECHNICAL PACKAGING
FOR GRADUATES AND POSTGRADUATES IN
ENGINEERING AND HONOUR SCIENCE COURSES
r . , . _~_~-j
COMPANY   REPRESENTATIVES
will be present for
campus interviews
January 9, 10, 11, 12
J
L
PERSONAL   INTERVIEWS
may be arranged
through the
University  Placement   Office
J
There are also summer employment opportunities for men from the 1962 Engineering
and Science classes. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 24, 1960
Tween Classes
California choir today
SPECIAL EVENTS —
Presents THE GOLDiEN GATE
CHOIR  from  California, today
noon, in the auditorium.
*        *        *
LIBERAL CLUB —
Jim   Scott,   National   Liberal
Organizer, speaks noon today, in
Brock Lounge.
CCF CLUB —
Robert Strachan, MLA, leader
of the Opposition, Friday noon,
Brock Lounge.
JAZZSOC —
The Jean Hoffman Trio, direct from San Francisco, Fri.
noon in the auditorium. Non-
members 25c.
V •*• •*•
CARRIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASS'N —
Dr. Rawle Farley, PhD (Oxford)- speaks on "West Indian
Federal Prospects Re-examined"
today noon, in Bu. 203.
PHYSICS SOCIETY —
Guest lecturer on Plasma
Physics 201, noon.
9A & Sf.
BIOLOGY CLUB —
Mr. Paul Joslin speaks on
"Animal Geography of the
Queen Charlotte Islands" Friday
noon in, Bio. Sci. 2321.
•jl *ji Sp
UN CLUB —
United Nations Emergency
Forces, Speaker John Grant today noon, Bu. 102.
■*• •*• V
SCM —
Panel discussion — "South
Africa — In or Out of the Commonwealth?": Friday noon, Bu.
100.  AH welcome.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP —
"An International's View of
Christianity", Bu. 106, Friday
noon.
# *        *
PHILOSOPHY CLUB —
Lecturer in Bu. 225, Monday
noon.
* *        *
EAST ASIA SOCIETY —     _
Party this Saturday, 8 o'clock
at  476 North Nanaimo  (Robert
Twata) B.Y.O.B.
Jazzsoc presents
Jean Hoffman trio
The University Jazz Society
is sponsoring this Friday noon
in the auditorium, a concert by
"one of America's most ,out-
standing female jazz pianists,"
Miss Jean Hoffman.
The Jean Hoffman Trio,
which has just completed a very
successful engagement at the
BlackHawk and Jazz Workshop
in San Francisco, is being
brought to UBC through the cooperation of the management of
the Cellar where they will be
featured this weekend.
According to "Down Beat"
this is one of the most versatile,
thoroughly enjoyable groups to
crash the jazz barrier in some
time and the noted jazz critic
Ralph J. Gleason describes Miss.
Hoffman as " . > . one of the
best night club musicians that I
have ever encountered."
Members of Jazz Soc will be
admitted : free and o t hers
charged the nominal fee of
thirty-five cents.
1h Sfawfetdt well equipped
tW MEDICINE...
The student well equipped to treat
himself against the chill of Penury
builds up his resistance by making     MY HANM
regular deposits in a B of M
Savings Account.
_P
Bank of Monthjeax
{^amtadcM *?&*& S<ut6£o* Student*
Your Campus branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KERRY, MANAGER
Tevie's
GREY CUP PARTY
Why be cold and wet.
Enjoy the game inside.
Get your tickets   now.
25c 25c
Watch For
Musical Opening
4496 N.W. Marine Drive
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 WEST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
EATON'S
EACH
the THOROUGHBRED
... a Trotter you'll bless this fall and winter as you travel
to and from classes. So lovely and warm and styled in a
soft Suedine for the new look of luxury! The new look in
length, too—at the new stopping place,  three quarters  of the
way! You'll love the roomy, deep-set pockets with flaps . . .
the ORLON, pile interlining and trim on collar and reverse,
and smart double-breasted effect.
Well-made . . . well-finished—a thoroughbred throughout,
designed for seasons of wear. Choose from Teal, Tan and
Rust. Sizes 8 to 16.

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