UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 15, 1960

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124794.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124794.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124794-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124794-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124794-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124794-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124794-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124794-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124794-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124794.ris

Full Text

 V)1
I        NOV 1* i960   f.
UBYSSEY
GET
ANTI FREEZE
Voi. XLIII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER  15,  1960
No. 26
Dogpatch Dolls
Bag Boys At Drag
SADIE HAWKINS DAY produced some pretty cool people. That
fellow in the middle is keeping his head warm and that's all
while his bushy buddy is all warmth, whiskers and vegetable
corsage. Leave her alone fellas! And stop staring!
Soviet Students Visit
Campus End Of Month
OTTAWA (CUP)—Friendly ties between Soviet and Can
adian students  should  not  be hindered by  a  divergence  of
political opinions stated Alexi Golubev, leader of the Soviet
student delegation touring Canada.
Golubev told student leaders,
educators and government officials at a banquet that there is a
desire among Soviet youth leaders to establish the strongest possible relations between the two
countries.
"We think you are aware of
the peaceful co-existence by
which the Soviet government
and the students abide, and it is
Court Says
Pupil Pays
At a closed session of Student
Council Court last week the
student accused of throwing
rocks at a Busters' tow truck
pleaded guilty and was fined $5.
He was charged with conduct
unbecoming a student.
It was pointed out at the
court meeting that this was a
token sentence in view of his
plea of guilty and his expressed
awareness that his conduct was
unbecoming and damaging to
the reputation of UBC.
A recommendation was made
that further infractions of this
nature be dealt with in a more
stringent manner by imposing
maximum  sentence.
Council vice-president, John
Goodwin, said Busters' is not on
the incentive system. It takes
orders from the university traffic patrol to tow away cars, he
said.
"Busters' can be eliminated if
all students park legally," he
said. "Only about 5 per cent of
the students who own cars jam
up the system."
our policy to share   this  practice", he said.
Prior to the banquet the four
member delegation visited Carleton and Ottawa Universities
from Halifax to Vancouver.
Besides 34-year-old Golubev
who is a member of the USSR
Student' Council, and a graduate of the Moscow Pedagocial
Institute, the delegation includes: Boris Ponomarev, 33,
vice-secretary of the Youth Organization Committee; Alia Tsutsarova, 25, of the Khrakov Medical Institute; and Emmaouil
Equizarov, 30, a post-graduate
at the Moscow Foreign Language
Institute, who is the interpreter
for the group. Miss Tsutsarova
is the only woman in the delegation.
"We don't want to impose our
type of Communism; this will be
settled by the people themselves
in their own countries; for now
the main problem is peace", he
said.
Every country has its shortcomings he said, "but we have
not come here to look for these
as arguments against Capitalism.
When we return we shall tell
our students of the life here and
of the moods and aspirations of
the Canadian students".
During the afternoon the delegation describecl the Soviet system of higher education to an
attentive audience of 200 students at Carleton University and
later took part in a seminar at
Ottawa University. Last night
Golubev said his delegation was
extremely peased with the reception so far.
The Soviet students will visit
UBC at the end of November.
Mardi Gras
Preparing
Somebody stole the theme
box for the Mardis Gras this
year.
So the committee took it
upon themselves to pick a
theme.
The theme chosen was "Mardis Gras goes to Broadway."
The committee has not decided what it will do about the
prizes offered for the contest
winners.
Now the Committee has started to get things rolling. They are
sending out a plea for dancers
and singers.
John Tolmie, PRO for Mardis
Gras, said, "Anyone with any
potential' at all is welcome to
try out. Experience is not necessary."
Girls who would like to try
out are asked to come to Brock
Hall Music Room this afternoon
or tomorrow between 2:30 and
4:30.
Boys are asked to t u r n up
Thursday between 2:30 and 4:30
but if they can't make it, they
can come Wednesday with the
girls.
"We want the girls to wear
leotards or shorts for professional reasons only," stated John
Tolmie.
This year Mardis Gras will
fall on January 19-20-21. The
dress rehearsal will be Thursday
Jan. 19 and performances will
be on Friday and Saturday
nights.
Proceeds from the event will
go to the Children's Foundation
Fund.
By EDWARD HORNE
An enthusiastic sell-out crowd of 350 couples attended the
Dogpatch Drag last Friday in TJrock Hall.
Leading   attraction   was   the
was
Dogpatch Trio from Fort Camp,
who were, according to an eyewitness, "not bad at all." They
sang "Oh Dear, What Can The
Matter Be, Seven Little Ladies
Locked in the Lavatory." They
led a sing-song of songs made
famous by the Kingston Trio.
The best corsage was made by
Jan Owen. She created a vegetable face from a carrot, red
pepper, and a cucumber.
Best dressed young man was
a Slobovian who gave his name
as Don Robertson. But there is
a rumour that he was actually
Eric Ricker.
Best dressed Daisy Mae was
Virginia Hamilton. Best dressed
Li'l Abner was Rick Kern.
Another highlight was the unscheduled appearance of a trio
from the Intellectual Stunt Committee, looking for free publicty
for their first general meeting.
AMS vice-president John
Goodwin praised the dance as
"one of the best this university
has ever put on."
"The students who attended
caught the spirit of the whole
thing. Their costumes were good.
The girls came out with some
very original vegetable corsages."
iSomeone else commented,
"for a non-alcoholic function,
this was a smash."
President
MacKenzie
Goes East
UBC President Dr. N. A. M.
MacKenzie, left Vancouver Monday for ten days of meetings and
speaking engagements in eastern
Canada and the United States.
The president's first stop is
New York where he will attend
meetings of the Carnegie Endowment for the Advancement of
Teaching. He is the only Canadian trustee on that body.
Friday the president w i 11
speak to the Canadian Society
of New York in the Biltmore
Hotel on the subject "Can Canada survive as an autonomous
and separate entity and nation?"
On November 21 President
MacKenzie will fly to Ottawa for
meetings of the Canada Council
and to speak to UBC graduates
arid the librarians' proup of the
Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada.
He returns to Vancouver November 24.
BARE-FOOTED, bare-shouldered, bare-legged and almost
bare . . . Well, she's cute anyway. The Sadie Hawkin's
dance Thursday produced lots
of Dogpatch Daisy Maes like
her.
Shower Droppeth;
Leaping Stoppeth
Frog-type weather last Thursday prevented a frog-type activity between the Engineers and
the Education girls.
A leapfrog was planned between the two as a prelude to
the Sadie Hawkins Dance Thursday night. Webbed feet were still
packed away though and the
event was postponed along with
the Tug o' War.
Never let it be said that a
little rain bothers Vancouverites
however. Showing amazing foresight, Sadie activities still carried on in Brock Hall and Buchanan, where froshettes gave free
shoe shines to male students.
In Brock, fellows could buy
manicure from the Pan Hellenic
girls for a penny while Physical
Education girls gave back rubs
in Memorial Gym.
Four Scholarships
Awarded To UBC
Four students attending UBC
have been awarded $500-a-year
Union Carbide Canada Limited
scholarships it was announced
today by company president A.
A. Camming.
Three of this year's UBC
scholarships are renewals while
the other is a new award. Students receiving ther are: Ronald
M. Lees, George S. Pond, R. Gait
Arthur, all of Vancouver, and
Michael C. Healey, of Alert Bay.
The awards will continue for
the remainder of the student's
academic career and are part of
the company's over-all educa-
tional assistance program.
This year Union Carbide will
award 60 scholarships to Canadian university students for a
total of $30,000 plus four $1,500-
a-year pos t-graduate research
fellowships, two at the University of Toronto and two at McGill University, Montreal. The
19 universities participating in
the company's program are responsible for its administration
and the selection of the students.
Application for the awards is
made directly to the universities.
Union Carbide began its edu-
ational assistance program in
1954 and since that time has assisted over 200 students. Funds
expended now total nearly half-
a-million dollars, including capital grants to university building
funds. Page  2 	
THS UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater bociety,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those oi the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editof-inChief), 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor    Roger McAfee
-I News Editor Denis   Stanley
Features Editor    ......    Ed Lavalle
i Photography Editor Byron Hender
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
» Critics Editor Dave Bromige
p CUP Editor     Bob Hendrickson
Layout: Blame Fred Jones
STAFF- Bill Scott, Jerry Pirie, Coleman Romalis, Clarence Buhr, Edward Home, (who just got heck for editorializing), George Railton, Sharon McKinnon. Dick Arkley
Maureen Covell.
FEATURES DEPARTMENT: Diane Greenall, Assistant,
Sandra Scott, Ruth Robertson, Frank Findenigg, Dave
Taylor, Lee Dobbs and Derek Allan.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   15,   1960
Time For Action
This is a year of tremendous importance for student
government on this campus. The issues with which this
year's Student Council must deal will be of lasting significance.
It is important that this Council weigh the issues carefully before acting. But it is also important that they come
to a decision and take    firm action.
Procrastination will allow important student problems
to drag on for another year unsolved. And the longer it
takes to find a solution to these problems, the more acute
they grow; and, hence, they grow more difficult to solve.
The present Student Council has the heavy jresponsi-
bility of attempting to solve a good many of the key problems in student affairs on this campus. And if it should
shirk this responsibility, it will leave a legacy of even more
pressing woes for its successor.
The major issue is fundamental. It is the problem of
updating student government. Council must decide what
must be done to revamp the very, system of government
of which they are a part.
Humors have been flying about that the new student
assembly (USAC) may not be able ta do the job. The
'fundamental problem USAC faces is this: it is trying to
decide upon a course of action which in>the final analysis
must be decided upon by the elected representatives of the
students. And this before it is presented to the students
-themselves.
The first term is nearly over, and* Council has made
little effort to solve this difficult and basic problem. It is
time for action.
There are other vital issues that should be tackled
without delay. One of these is the problem of a new student
union building. (Both the union building and the new form
of student government were to be ready this fall for presentation to the student body in the form of a referendum.)
After much haggling, Council finally gave the Student
Union Building Committee the go ahead to push for a student activities complex (union building, winter sports
arena, food services) on the site of D parking lot.
This was a little late. It will be another year now before student approval can be obtained from the students for
such a project and actual construction started.
Another issue vital-to the future of student government
is the question of the newly created position of Director
of Student Activities.
Council expressed strong disapproval of the name of
this new position -when it was first created, and vowed that
they would try to have it changed.
As far as we can ascertain, nothing has been done
along this line. Something should be done.
The very existence of such a title constitutes a danger
to student autonomy—the student autonomy that so many
Councillors profess to revere.
Like so many of the other issues, this has been neglected due to the pressure of administrative duties.
, But this must not be so. If we are to have vigorous and
effective student government, the rule must be swift action
when called  for.
Letters To
The Editor
What of AIF?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
Last week, the Advisory
Committee of the Parliamentary Council voted to exclude
the AIF after it was already a
member, from participation in
Parliamentary Council for one
year.
The ammendment that the
Advisory -Committee claims
substantiates their judgment in
this matter is invalid. Can anyone feel that this committee
has practiced integrity by denying the letter of their own
constitution and wilfully misinterpreting it?
Suppose the Conservatives,
CCF and Liberals in Ottawa
passed an act to the effect that
the only parties which could
run candidates for Parliament
would be those groups whose
program had been approved
by the aforementioned parties.
How could an individual party
"approve" the program of another party? It seems that a
small group of "vested interests" have the superior judgment to dictate the political
ideas from which the intelligentsia of the student body
must choose . . .
The Allied Integrity Front
is temporarily abstaining from
Parliamentary Council under
protest. However, the AIF will
continue to participate in campus politics and actively campaign for further support of
its  policies.
Respectfully  yours,
CB. Olink,
P.R.O.. A.I.F.
LITTLE MAN ONLCAMPUS
Editor,
The   Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
The- Parliamentary Council
Advisory Committee is gratified to note the intention of
the Allied Integrity Front to
participate in campus politics,
even though it will not take
part in the activities of the
Council. This was the intention
of the Committee when it deferred AIF's membership application for  one year.
The Committee feels that the
AIF should provide a record of
serious campus political participation before it is allowed
to run for seats in Model Parliament.
The AIF proposes to sponsor
a series of speakers on campus,
just as other political party
clubs do, and say that they
have no intention of undermining or making a mockery of
Model Parliament. If they are
able to show evidence of this
during the year they will have
a very strong case to present
to the Advisory Committee of
nex1( year's Parliamentary
Council.
The AIF charges that no party can "approve" the program
of another party, implying that
a majority of the Advisory
Committee must agree with the
philosophy and platform of
the AIF before it will be admitted. This is not so.
The Communist Party Club
is a full voting member of the
Council in spite of the fact
that the disagreement between
it and the rest of the,mem!bers
is  mutual  and extensive.
Respectfully  yours,
Derek Aljten,
Parlianjfentary   Council p^rTo.
.-.2UL W6 CANT PROMOTE TH' WHOLE fACULTY-eETME ALI«T OP
THE TEACHgKS WHO OWM A WWe, HAVE A L.AKSE FAMILY AND
CANl'T AFFORD TO MOVE AWAY/''
JABBBRWOCKY
By DEREK ALLEN
Something really strange is happening to this campus.
Our lawns are being stolen from us.
Not that lawns are at their best now anyway, being
wet, muddy and fenced off, but pretty soon they will be
gone. All that will be left will be ugly little gardens and
cement  patios.
The patios are progressing fastest. After they made their
first inroads around the Buchanan Building they began to
spread, just as a dangerous cancer spreads, chewing up
everything in their way. Much of the library lawn went
under concrete during the summer, and even more is
being ripped up right now. Little men on bulldozers muck
about with great gusto destroying not only the rustic green
beauty but also the peace and quiet that are supposed to
dominate that great stone edifice. Meanwhile students
changing classes detour over a littlevwooden catwalk.
*        *        *
Now this isn't so bad as I would make it out to be,
there is a genuine need for this mess. The path between
Buchanan and Library is inadequate for the traffic between
those buildings and rushing students get the habit of making detours across the lawn. Pretty soon they get an ankle
in the mud for their trouble, and this does nothing to improve tempers; however, this problem will not disappear
with a wider pathway, which is Buildings and Grounds'
solution. This is the wrong approach: what B. and G. should
have done was install an electrified barbwire fence such
as farmers use to contain their herds.
However, there is no such genuine need over by the
Buchanan Building. This was the original inspiration of the
patio craze and is already amply supplied with cement and
brick. This does not discourage the muckers a bit—the
lawn between the side patio and the Women's Gymnasium
has been the latest to disappear under the caterpillar treads
of the white and blue noisemakers. Presumably the workmen will not be satisfied until they have burdened that
once free ground with a heavy layer of concrete and brick.
This is not the only effort B. and G. is making to beautify our campus. They have another project underway that
is as insidious without being nearly so practical, and it
consists of planting neat, geometrical designs of plants in
areas where they either have failed to put down concrete,
or have built up little garden boxes. The plants are small
and unimpressive to begin with, but the mechanical layout
employed makes the final effect repulsive to the point of
nausea. If they were naturally placed so that we could
ignore them, it would not be so bad, but as it is—ugh!
This column suggested long; ago that AMS President
Dave Edgar should lead a campaign to circumvent Buster's
by ridinsr a bicycle to school. . . Apparently things just sort
of died there. The other day, however, Dave came up and
volunteered tol ride a bike if I could get one for him. He
said nothing about leading a campaign, but the example may
be worth something.
Jf any of you out there has a snare bike kicking about
the basement, call around and see me. Dave will probably
give out about the tiirie the snows! start coming down, but
until then it would be nice to see him mobile. Tuesday,  November,   15,   1960
-    HIROS H IMA    -
Editor's Ncie—How many of us attended a
service in memory of our fallen dead on Friday?
How many of us even paused to think of them and
lhe things for  which they died?
But let us thing for a while of the primary
purpose for which many gave their lives in the
second great war, "the war to end all wars/'
Yes, this is why they so willingly sacrificed
their lives; because they hoped that this would
be the war to end all wars.
And when we are called upon lo keep faith
with those who died, it is this task wiih which we
are entrusted; to ensure that World War II should
indeed be the last great war.
A nuclear war would bring devastating results. From the city of Hiroshima, through a book
of the same name, we are able to see first hand
the extent of the damage caused by the exploding
of a nuclear bomb.
Everything fell, and Miss Sasaki lost consciousness. The ceiling dropped suddenly and the wooden
floor abov.e collapsed in splinters and the people up
there came down and the roof above them gave way.
but principally and first of all, the bookcases right
behind her swooped forward and the contents threw
her down with her left leg horribly twisted and breaking underneath her. There in the~ tin factory in the
first moment of the atomic age a human being was
crushed.
. . . hundreds and hundreds were fleeing, and
every one of them seemed to be hurt in some way.
The eyebrows of some were burned off and skin hung
from their faces and hand.s Others, because of pain,
held their arms up as if carrying something in both
hands. Some were voii.-iting as they walked. Many
were naked or in shreds of clothing. On some undressed bodies, the burns had made patterns of undershirt straps and suspenders and, on the skin of some
women, the shapes of flowers they had had on their
kimonos.
. . . Under many houses, people screamed for
help, but no or.e helped; in general,' survivors that
day assisted only their relatives or immediate neighbours for they could not comprehend a wider circle
oi misery.
. . . Thinking there was just one soldier, he approached with the water. When he had penetrated
the bushes, he saw there were about 20 men, and
(.hey were all in exactly the same nightmarish state;
their faces were wholly burned, their eyesockets were
hollow, the fluid from their melted eyes had run down
their cheeks.
DESTRUCTIVE POWER
. . . They also knew th. t theoretically one (bomb)
ten times as powerful—or twenty could be developed.
They estimated that, even with the primitive bomb
used at Hiroshima, it would require a shelter of concrete fifty ' inches thick to protect a human being
entirely irom radiation sickness.
. . . the houses on the outskirts of the city, standing but decrepit, with broken windows and dishevelled
tiles; and then, quite suddenly, the beginning of the
four square miles of reddish-brown scar where nearly
everything had been buffeted down and burned; range
on range of collapsed city blocks, with here and there
a crude sign erected on a pile of ashes and tiles ("Sister, where are you?" or "All safe and we live at
Toyosaka").
RADIATION SICKNESS
. . . she had suffered no cuts or burns at all,
though she had been rather nauseated'all through the
week . . But in the next three or four days, her hair
kept falling out of its own accord, until she was quite
bald.
. . . they were coming down With the strange
disease which came later to be known as radiation
sickness. . . so many people were suddenly feeling
sick nearly a month after the atomic bomb was
dropped . .
. . . and, as if nature were protecting man against
his own ingenuity, the reproductive processes were
affected for a time; men became sterile, women had
miscarriages, menstruation stopped.
. . . twentyfive per cent had died of direct burns
from the bomb, about fifty per cent from other
injuries, and about twenty per cent as a result of
radiation effects.
... It killed ninetyfive per cent of the people
within a half mile of the center ... '
The crux of the matter is whether total war in
is present form is jusifiable, even- when- is serves a
just purpose. Does it not have material and spiritual
evil as • its consequences which far exceed whatever
good might result? When will our moralists give us a
clear answer to this question?
_xc-erpts from the book "Hiroshima''
bv John Hersey, published by Alfred
A. Knopf Inc., and originally appeared in "The New Yorker." Copyright   1946   by   John   Hersey.
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
U( R T P
A limited number of vacancies    are    available   in   the
University Reserve Training
Plan to First Year Applied
Science students
For   further    information
about     pay,    commission
and   employment   contact
F/L J. BINCH
The RCAF Support Officer
at the UBC Armouries
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:    -    ■
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
-    9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by   .    .    .
THE UNIVERSITY OF BX.
COMPLETE STOCK
of
DOVER SCIENCE
PAPERBACKS
AT
OWL BOOKS
CA 4-1841 4560 WEST 10th
OPEN FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M.
Dependable Repair
Service
and
Shoes of Quality
are a  specialty
at
Sasamat Shoes
44G3 W. 10th A«e<
CA 4-10H
On Thursday, Friday and Saturday
at 8:30 p.m.
Players Club presents the most powerful
play ever to be seen at UBC
FLIES
n
by Jean Paul Sartre
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT AMS
AT A SPECIAL STUDENT RATE OF 50c
the MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   15,   1960
* INTERNATIONAL  PAGE *
Edited by: FRANK FINDENIGG
A LOOK AT RUSSIA
Editor's Note: The following article was written by Ed Pennington, a N.F.C.U.S. exchange student and past president
of McMasters  University.
I visited the Soviet Union,
Poland and Czechoslovakia
in the company of sixteen
other Canadian students from
Toronto, Montreal a£id Edmonton, on a six-weeks' tour
sponsored by the National
Federation of Canadian University Students.
"Led by Mr. John Greer
Nicholson, assistant professor,
Russian language, with the
Slavic and East European studies department of the University of Montreal and head of
the Russian section of the International Service of the CBC
in Montreal, the tour members were intent upon observing, objectively, the way of
life'behind the Iron Curtain.
' Our" mtrOduction"• to the
tJSSR and its people took
place on a Soviet train between Helsinki, Finland, and
Leningrad, when our Canadian tour participants became
engaged in an enthusiastic
parley with a friendly, voluble delegation of Russian
engineers  and lawyers.
In this first experience of
conversation with Soviet citizens we found 'the Russians
were extremely interested in
our visit. They ' were intelligent and showed no reticence
in embroiling us in a detailed
cross-fire of political and economic questions, centering
around the recent U-2 incident.
The U-2 provided the spark
for most conversations within
the USSR, whether we were
conversing with professional
men of science and education
or with young students who
approached us on the streets
of Leningrad and Moscow.
They were surprisingly eager
to discuss differences between
East and West:
Friday
Traditional Jazz
Saturday, Nov. 19th
Claire Klyne
Fothes Headrich
Question Mark
Coffee House
(3484 W. Broadway
Our Canadian group had
been well prepared for discussions with Soviet people by
a shipboard seminar on "differences between a Marxist
economic and social system
and Canadian society," and
by intensive reading of books
on Eastern Europe.
The Russian engineers were
initially surprised when we
pointed out to them that Canada was the second largest
country in the world, territorially, after the USSR. It
took several minutes of excited word-play, map-drawing
and the proof provided by
"Quick Canadian Facts," to
convince them of our claim.
A-lawyer was interested to
know of Canada's dependence
oh the United States. Another
was eager to learn what people in Canada thought of the
Soviet Union.
When one girl replied she
knew of no one who had visited the USSR, the Russian insisted that all the information
and impressions expressed by
tourists after visits to Russia
were "lies, all lies." He was
adamant.
These men expressed considerably more intelligent
opinions than the ordinary
people on the streets of Leningrad and Moscow, who apparently had accepted the
words of "Pravda" and "Iz-
vestia" without question and
regarded the U-2 affair as indicative of the USA's extreme
bad will. Incapable of any individual thinking, the only
original word probably not
used by "Pravda" was that
of a young girl, a foreign
language student, who regarded the whole incident as
"impudent." So much for the
power of positive  thinking.
Editor's Note: Today, the
Ubyssey is introducing a new
page. Each Tuesday, news
stories from foreign universities or articles written by exchange students and travellers
will be presented. It is designed io give the average student
a glimpse at events in various
parts of the world.
FRANK FINDENIGG
Chinese
System
Expands
"China believes itself to be
the miaster race and definitely
thinks of eventual world domination" Dr. S. Chandrasek-
har, Director of the Indian Institute for Population Studies
told a McGill audience last
week.
He began his speech on
"The Problems of an Increasing Population in Communist
China" by stating that large
populations only constitute a
problem when resources are
not adequate to minimal population needs.
"In 1955, a tremendous famine led to an ideological debate as to whether family
planning should be adopted.
Chinese were told that moral
Comrades should restrict themselves to  three  children.
"Two weeks later, this policy was abruptly and completely reversed; Comrades
were told to have six, seven
or more children and that citizens in a Communist state
should be first and last producers,   not   consumers.
"The result has been that
China now has a net annual
population increase of 22 million per year — the equivalent
of a new Canada and Ceylon
every year.
Journey To Japan
FIRST  YEAR
STUDENTS
A CAREER IN ACCOUNTING
You can start your career next summer and obtain
a Bachelor of Commerce degree while qualifying for
membership in the Institute of Chartered Accountants
of B.C.
You are  invited to  get more  information   on this
program at a
MEETING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23
12:35 p.m. in Buchanan 205
THE INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Financially, few students
can afford to go abroad and I
am grateful to W.U.S. for the
opportunity it has given me
to spend a year in Japan at
Keio University, Tokyo.
The school year in Japan
starts in April with two vacations, spring and summer, during the year. The summer holiday was over and the second
term had begun when I arrived in Tokyo last August.
The students were overwhelmingly   hospitable   and   before
the first few weeks were over
I found myself being invited
to a good many functions. I
was also asked to write articles for f h r e e university
papers, to teach English conversation! groups.
Nominally the scholarship
is offered by W.U.S. of Japan
in liaison with Keio University. In reality the scholarship
is sponsored by a Keio student
group known as the Institute
o f International Relations.
This group provides the funds
for the scholarship and is
generally responsible for the
exchange student during his
stay in Japan.
The purpose in promoting
the exchange of students is to
help create better relationships with other universities
as well as better international
understanding on its own campus. Consequently they tend
to think of the exchange student as some sort of cultural
ambassador or ambassadress.
Most of the activities of this
club on the campus tend to
center around the exchange
students (there were two last
year; one from Stanford and
one from U.B.C.) because
there are only a dozen or so
foreign students on the campus and because students who
attend the university on their
own means do not feel obligated to attend this club's functions.
Part of the fund for this
club comes from a body synonymous to the Alma Mater
Society here. Unlike WUS on
this campus the Institute of
International Relations maintains a lot of publicity among
the students in order to raise
the rest of the funds. Having
the exchange students write in
the university papers is one
method. Another is to have
the exchange student go from
class   to   class   giving   short
speeches. The financial needs
of the club as well as the a-
mount of money paid to the
exchange students are publicized by the person who introduces the exchange students
to the class.
In conclusion, there were
many advantages in having
the club sponsoring me take
active interest in inviting me
to all its activities and school
events, whatever their purpose were for doing   so.
Eiko Mimoto
GRADUATE
WITH
FASHION
HONOURS
in perfectly mat   1 n     i     km      <
lambswool class n '■ *     *'
GLENAYR
"      Tea with the Dean? A date with a
quarterback? Your wonderful Kitten
ensemble is always high style.
"Geelong" lambswool, identical in
yarn and colour, as perfectly matched
as your cultured pearls . . . exclusive
with Kitten.
Full-fashioned, hand-finished pullover
contrast-ribbed collar and panel,
3/t sleeves . . . sizes 34-40 . . . $10.95
. perfectly matched slim skirt, sizes 8-20
. . . $17.95 ... in a brilliant burst of
Autumn colours, exciting as a last
minute touchdown.
, Without this label \$ffitiL%$\ it i* ».*t a genuine KITTEN Tuesday,  November,  15,  1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   5
Apathy Kills
Photograph
Exhibition
. It was announced Thursday
that the First Annual Brock
Hall open Photography Exhibition would not be held due to
lack of entries.
Norman Pearson, who was in
charge of the Exhibition, stated
the decision not to hold it was a
disappointment as the entries
submitted were of good quality.
Only four persons submitted entries they were: Lloyd Spence,
Ed TV; Larry Wong, Arts II;
Wiliam Sturrock, Grad St.; and
Mr. J. C. Giles, Physics Dept.
Pearson felt that general lack
of interest and pressure of other
activities were responsible for
the Exhibitions failure. He
hoped the Ben Hill Tout Exhibition next Spring would be met
with greater interest.
Scholarships
UBC students seeking Commonwealth, scholarships now
have 45 more chances. The
Government of India has just
announced the offer to students for post-graduate study
in that country.
Application forms for these
scholarships can be obtained
from the Canadian Universities Foundation, 77 Metcalfe
Street, Ottawa. The deadline
is November 30.
CUP CAPERS
By BOB HENDRICKSON
SWEDISH DANCERS in their native costumes step around the
floor at the International House Ball's "Swedish Rhapsody"
held   last  Thursday.
Fraternity Debate
Wednesday Noon
In Brock Lounge
The perennial debate between
anti and pro fraternity forces
is taking place Wednesday, at
noon in Brock Lounge.
The topic for debate is: "Resolved that the Greek Letter Societies are necessary on Campus." Whether they are or not
will be decided by four able debaters, two of them McGoun
Cup debaters.
If you are in favour of having
the cobwebs enmeshing frats
cleared, or have any views on
the matter, your participation
will be appreciated, said a
spokesman for the Debating
Union.
In former years frats have
taken this debate hands down.
Question: What would happen if
everyone drove a pink car?
Answer: We  would be  a  pink
car-nation.
Quebec Editor Warned
For Attack On Clergy
Jacques Guay, editor of Le
Quartier Latin at the University
of Montreal received a motion
of blame from his students' council for publishing a letter which
attacked the clergy's attitude towards education.
Dr. Jules Poupard, a doctor at
the St. Charles Borromes Hospital in Montreal, spoketo the
council for three-quarters of an
hour calling for a condemnation
of the editor of the paper on the
grounds that articles in it were
dangerous to the Catholic faith.
Editor Guay said he asked Dr.
Poupard if he was circulating
a petition, but the doctor denied it. However Guay said that
the doctor was asking people to
sign one.
To the charge that he had published the letter and a cartoon in
a space "normally reserved for
the editorial" Guay told the
council that he had printed the
letter on the editorial page "simply to solve a problem of layout
and with no malice aforethought."
The article in question was a
long letter reflecting on the attitude of the clergy towards edu
cation. It considered the issue of
Le Carabin, and the case of the
student in the Montreal normal
school who was expelled recently for eating meat on Friday.
The cartoon depicts Mgr. Gar-
neau of Laval — with a hole in
his head — practising chopping
off students' heads by decapitating scarecrows.
The rabble rouser rides again.
Hi rabble.
The Mount Allison student
council have received an application form from the Mount Allison Ladies requesting consideration of a beer concession for
Allison Hall, the women's residence. The ladies maintain this
would be "in keeping with mod-
dern progress."
A resolution of the UBC Debating Union "Resolved: That
the UBC auditorium cafeteria
should be licensed to sell wine
and beer" was defeated. Need
I comment further?
From the ears (esoteric what!)
of the Dalhousie Gazette: Some
people have tact, others tell the
truth.
* * *
The University of New Brunswick Rocket Club is planning
a 20,000 foot vertical test shot
of a rocket. They plan to be the
first university to put a satellite
into orbit. And what happened
to  our illegal rocket club?
* * *
I see the Manitoban, U of M's
student newspaper, that they are
very optimistic about winning
the McGoun Cup debating trophy
which was won last year by
UBC.
UBC debators, beware! U of
M are holding their trials in the
Manitoba Provincal Police
Court. Any team who would go
that far is going to be tough to
beat.
* * *
More from the ears of the Dalhousie Gazette. (Still wondering
what they are?) Art, like morality consists of drawing a line
somewhere.
* *  *
After four years absence McGill University will compete in
the Inter-University Drama Festival at the University of Western  Ontario.
UNITED AIR LINES
Accepting  applications for stewardesses to  be trained
in Spring and Summer classes.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Single
Age 20 through 26
Height 5'2" to 5'8"
Weight in proportion
High School graduate
Some university preferred
Must be personable, attractive, capable of dealing with the
public. Some public contact work experience beneficial
INTERVIEWER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS AT GEORGIA
HOTEL FROM 11:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M.
No Appointment necessary
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 vVEST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
McGill will present "The People Are Not With Us," by Jim
Rother. Seems like they have
built up a persecution complex
in their absence.
* *  *
Wandering a little from my
territory and on a little more *
serious note, I spyed in the University of Washington Daily, a
lingerie advertisement showing
the high plane on which the
American constitution and the
concept of democracy is kept
Advertisement scene shows Actors: boy and co-ed.
Dialogue as follows.
Boy: Election Day! What a
glorious affirmation of democracy!
I trust every female citizen
will exercise her constitutional
right to ... .
Co-ed: a double-skirted 3-tier
nylon petticoat with yards'ri
'yards'n'yards ef 3-inch lace.
Scene closes with co-ed still in:
ecstacy over the workings of
democracy so that she. ean,get
a petticoat.
Comment: Ugh!!!!
* *  *
The Gateway reports that
"Flopperoee," a headline heralding the resounding flop of the
Stan Kenton band at the University of Edmonton was due to
student apathy. Seems to me that
every time something fails because the students just don't
like it, it's labeled apathy.
* *. *
A second though on the above
item.Stan Kenton was reported
to have said he had been successful on other Canadian campuses, especially UBC. He's
right, you know.
As you may know, he cancelled out of the Homecoming
Dance to make way for the
Gateway Singers which were a
sellout. I guess you could call
this   reflected success.
FILMSOC       PRESENTS
NINOTCHKA
starring
GRETA GARBO
A COMEDY OF MARXIST NON-MARXIST ROMANCE
AUDITORIUM
.
TODAY
3:30 AND 8 P.M.
35c
'PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
... Brahadi's smoking
^tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
Brahadi's is available
at select tobacco stores.
53* for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxes Included Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   15,   1960
'Birds Scare Unbeaten Bearcats
AAcCallum, Defence Star
Against Bowl-Bound Cats
By MIKE SONE
MCULLOCH   STADIUM,   SALEM,   Oregon.—Willamette
University Bearcats defeated the inspired UBC Thunderbirds
33-17 Saturday before a local Homecoming crowd of 4,000.
It was the eighth straight win
for the Bearcats, who are bidding for an invitation to "the
NAIA Holiday Bowl game in
Florida.
The Birds' stubborn defence,
however, fought the powerful
'Gats to a standstill and the issue was in doubt until Willamette's Little All-American halfback Stan Solomon, scored the
clinching T.D. with only five
minutes left in the game. The
Bearcats were holding on to a
slim 20-17 lead at that time.
Willamette opened the scoring
at the 9:40 mark of tbe first
quarter on a 72-yard march, as
half Jim McCaffery skirted left
end for the major. Hawaiian
star Solomon kicked the extra
point with his bare foot.
The Birds, as soon as they
gained possession of the ball,
racked up big gains through
gaping holes in the Cats' line.
With Jim Olafson and Pete
Black carrying, they advanced
to the Willamette 21, where the
attack stalled. End Dave Barker
t&en split the uprights with a
39-yard boot to put UBC on the
scoreboard.
. At 12:43 of the second quarter, Solomon capped a 37-yard
march with the first of three
touchdowns. Quarterback Tommy Lee, a fellow Hawaiian, converted to make it 14-3. Seven
minutes later, Solomon again
<went around right end on a
brilliant 38-yard run to put Willamette ahead 20-3.
The Bearcats' short-kickoff
strategy failed as Turpin fell on
the ball for the Birds. Quarterback Stan Knight pitched two
strikes to Wayne Osborne to
the Cats' 14. A Q.B. sneak took
the ball to the 9. Then Willamette broke through and nailed
Knight at the 25 for a 16 yard
loss.
On the 4th down, with only 50
seconds to the half, Jim Olafson
rolled out to the right on a
double reverse, and threw to
Tommy Andrews in the end-
zone. Andrews outfought three
Willamette defenders for a sensational teedee. Barker converted to make the score 20-10 at the
half.
The stout UBC defence, led by
"ONE OF
THE
YEARS
BEST!"
JEAN-PAUL SARTRE'S adaptation
Of ARTHUR MILLER'S
n
CRociBLl:
starring SIMONE SIGNORET
YVES MONTAND
MYLENE DEMONGEOT
STARTS TUESDAY
VARSITY
loth»! THIMBU CA 4-3730
Bruce McCaUum, came out with
a vengeance in the second half,
holding the powerful Bearcats
without a single first down for
the first 21 minutes.
Late in the game, with the
score still 20-17, Bird Ray Wick-
land recovered another Bearcat
iumble on the UBC 31. Knight's
attempted pitch-out was then
intercepted by. Cat, John King,
who ran the ball to the UBC 20.
Again, the Bird defence contained the Cats but on the 4th
down, Tommy Lee completed a
desperation pass to Lee Weaver
on the UBC 1. Solomon went
over but the convert run was
no good. Bearcats led 26-17 with
only five minutes left in the
game.
In the dying seconds, Tommy
Lee completed a 25-yard pass to
end Lee Weaver for the final
touchdown, making the score
33-17.
Soccer' Birds
Win On Tour
UBC's Thunderbird soccer
team held its own on their California visit this weekend, downing Stanford 10-3 Friday and
subduing California 4-3.
The Birds' playing coach, Roy
Nosella, had a field day, scoring eight goals in the two games.
Five of these hit the opposing
net in the Stanford match, the
other three were vital in the
Berkeley game.
In Friday's game the local
boys 'worked ahead for a comfortable 8-2 half-time lead, and
then setttled back for a good
defensive game.
Other UBC soccer men to get
get past Stanford's goalie were
Ron Cross, Pat O'Brian, Richie
Higgins and  Ed Wasylik.
In the Berkeley game, UBC
was forced- to come from behind twice to come out of the
struggle on top.
Early in the second half, JSTo-
sella's third goal of the game
put his squad out front 3-2.
Berkeley's big last quarter
drive failed to upset the score.
HERE'S MUD IN YOUR . . . SHOES!
AN UNIDENTIFIED Royal Roads runner slogs through the Stadium mud during Saturday's Pacific Northwest Cross-country
Championships. Vancouver Olympic Club won it, with Washington State second, and UBC third. Geoff Eales was UBC's
top man, finishing behind Idaho's Tom O'Riordan and VOC's
Paul Hendon.
Varsity Hockey
Takes Top Spot
The UBC Varsity grasshockey
squad gained undisputed possession of first place in the B.C.
Grasshockey League's first division Saturday by whipping Vancouver 5-1 at UBC.
The Birds, enjoying another
highly successful season, were
in command all the  way.
In other action, UBC Blues
and UBC Golds battled to a 3-3
draw.
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
Oarsmen
Oust
Oregon
UBC crews stroked easily to
a double victory in a weekend
meet with Oregon State College,
at Corvallis, Ore.
The Varsity boat fell behind
at the gun, but maintained a
slow steady stroke, coming
ahead to win by a length ana
a quarter. The JV boat rowed
smoothly, steadily increasing
its lead, until at the wire, there
was an interval of seven lengths
between the two shells.
The crews had to slug against
lhe current as the course on the
swift Willamette is an upstream
one. Oregon has tried to minimize the time error by creating
a "calculated 2000 metre"
course, in actuality about 1800
metres.
Our Varsity crew ran it in
6:17, Oregon in 6:22. The JV's
itnpushed, made the time of 6:21
and Oregon JV's were way back
at 6:47.
Since this is the first year
of rowing for many of the crew,
the fellows were jubilant in victory, to the point of everyone
getting stoned, even though it
was not Oregon's Homecoming
after all.
Rowing in the Varsity boat
were, starting at the bow, Trev
Wilson, Herb Challier, Marty
Gifford, Don McMath, Mike
Dey, Tom Gray, Paul McKinnon,
stroke Roy Mcintosh and cox,
Frank Chow.
The JV shell contained Andy
Thom, Daryl Sturdy, Jim Mc-
Feely, Dale Checko, Brian Leonard, George Dogterom, Malcolm
McAvity, stroke Bob Stubfos and
Ashley Lucky at cox.
SOCCER
UBC Jayvees soccer squad
defeated Vic University 4-1 in
an exhibition at Victoria. Don
Ely, Brian James and Bob Johnstone got UBC's goals.
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-0928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
that most of our customers are referred to us by other
customers — or that a large proportion are professional
men.
We believe that there is a future as well as a now in our
business, and for this reason the hi-fi beginner is our most
important customer.
Yes, frankly, we respect the intelligence and budget requirements of student customers because we know that our
future depends on the confidence we inspire in the young
music lover who will be the profesisonal man of tomorrow.
With this in mind we offer a 10% discount to university
students on fine records, tapes and all hi fi components.
Hi Fi Sales Ltd., Canada's most complete High Fidelity Centre
hi fi sales
LTD.
2714 W. BROADWAY
RE 3-8716 Tuesday, November, 15, 1960
FOR THE BIRDS
By MIKE HUNTER
This weekend, the last for the football team, provided some
of the most interesting news of the 1960 football season.
The east-west college football final is deiiniteiy "on," the
University of Manitoba has been given the ultimatum to play
football or withdraw from the WCIAU, and the Birds played their
best game of the year against one of the top small college teams
in the U.S.
Frank Gnup's gridders came up with a sparkling performance
against the Willamette Bearcats. The Oregon team is expected to
be offered a berth in the Holidsy Bowl game in December. The
Birds held them to a 33-17 victory. That's amazing enough.
AMAZING HAWAIIAN FEETS
But hold on. It seems the Willamette team roster holds five
Hawaiians. One, former Little-All-American Stan Solomon, kicks
converts and field goals with only his socks on.
Sensational, you say. Unfortuately for Solomon, team-mate
Tommy Lee (another 50th stater) kicks placements with his bare
feel! And with three other Hawaiians on the defensive platoon,
they call their defensive signals in Polynesi.n.
This great column-type material has me drooling. But they
rub it in with reports of a fantastic stadium which includes a
glassed-in press box, with typewriters, teletypes, and coffee and
doughnuts.
I am still suffering from my lsst venture into the damp, cold
sardine box suspended from two pillars in the UBC Stadium. It
has the not-so-enviable distinction of being the only press-box
air-conditioned in the middle of winter. And it is the only instance
of UBC being involved in a college draught.
As for the coffee and doughnuts, it is impossible to secure
even a cold hot dog after 1:00 Saturday afternoons at UBC.
INCIDENTAL INTELLIGENCE
You might be interested to know that the student population
of Willamette University is about 2000. You might be interested to
know that over 4000 turned out for the UBC game—the Homecoming game. Admission to the modern concrete stadium is $1.80.
And the .gamQ, program, sold for a quarter, is an eight-page
replica of the kind you get at the B.C. Lions games.
And,needless to say, the quality of football is about as high
as anywhere in,the United States. And our Birds held them to a
20-17 le^d for 55 minutes of exciting football.
•' 'Whitworth College, in the Evergreen League, is also rated
in the top four west of the Mississippi. And there are many more
Northwest schools not far behind.
,Yet UBC two years ago decided to pull out of the Evergreen
League and try to make a go of the WCIAU.
Now, the Birds didn't clean up in the Canadian League. Not
by a long shot. They were sideswiped twice fcy the Alberta Golden
Bears, and more than that by the old budget.
I am all for giving the new Canadian League a chance. Maybe
it will be a success in five or ten years.. Maybe. But there is a
league a bus ride away which the years have proven to be consistently successful.
With coffee and doughnut^ in the press box, I am tempted . . .
Page 7
*
*
GOOD MORNING to everyone, especially to burglar's sons
who are following in their father's fingerprints.
PLASTI-SEAL  KITS — JUST ARRIVED
Two si2es 79c and 35c
FACULTY SWEATERS — EDUCATION,
ARTS, AGRICULTURE
TEN CARAT GOLD UNIVERSITY RINGS,
MUGS, UMBRELLAS, FACULTY
JEWELLERY,  LADIES NYLONS
AND NEW LINE OF POGO BOOKS
4- -Owned and Operated by the Alma-Mater Society
SPORTS SHORTS
Sally Honored By AAU
Sally McCaUum, a standout track athlete at UBC, has been
awarded the Fred Tees Memorial Trophy as Canada's outstanding track and field athlete attending,   a university.
The award was made by the ,	
Amateur Athletic Union of Can-1 and outstickhandled the Varsity
ROY NOSELLA
. . . Thunderbird soccer playing coach led UBC to two wins
in California this weekend by
scoring eight of UBC's 14
goals. Birds beat Stanford
10-3 and California 4-3
ROY BIANCO
. . . Footb.all co-captain and
star fullback gave outstanding
performance in last game in
UBC uniform.
ada, Miss McCaUum holds the
Canadian record for the 80-
metre hurdles with an 11:2
second mark.
* *  *
THUNDERETTES  LOSE
The Senior A Thunderette
Basketball team was defeated
this weekend in two exhibition
games against Kelowna. They
dropped the first game 39-28.
Saturday night they were
edged 36-34. Although the Kelowna Bears are classed as a
Senior B team, they remain in
the Senior B classification because there is no other Senior
A competition in the Okanagan.
The Kelowna team has been
invited to the Thunderette Invitational tournament in February
so that UBC will have a chance
to retaliate.
* *  *
GRASSHOCKEY
The PNW Grasshockey Conference, held this weekend at
UBC broke Varsity's record of
no defeats in 5 years. They
played four games against the
Universities of Washington, Oregon, Victoria and Washington
State College, outclassing the
American teams by scores of
5-0, 7-1, and 1-0 respectively,
but against the tea and crumpet
gals from Victoria, it was another story.
The Vic College squad outran,
Team 3-0 to win the tourney unofficially.
* *  *
BRAVE   BASKETBALL
Braves beat Kerrisdale 80-62
in Junior Men's action Wednesday. John Cook got 18 points
for UBC.
* *  *
RUGBY
UBC teams went undefeated
last weekend, the top three
teams winning, the Frosh teams
gaining draws.
Thunderbirds came from behind to defeat Rowing Club 8-5
on Neal Henderson's field goal.
Henderson also converted
Jon Phillip's try.
Braves beat Barbarians 9-6,
PE whipped Meraloma Seconds
9-3, Frosh "A" tied 9-9 with
North Shore and Frosh "B"
drew  0-0   with   the Wanderers.
* *  *
VOC
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bio. Sci. 2000
* *  *
INTRAMURALS
Bowling singles: Jeppeson,
Eng.; Brown, Beta; Bobbit, Fiji;
McLanty, Phi Kappa; Moon,
Pharmacy.
Cross-country: Forestry, 60;
VOC, 78; Ramblers, 85; Engineers, 109; Frosh, 134; Alpha
Delta, 141; PE, 145; Aggies, 184;
USCA, 186; Fiji, 194.
CHECK INTO THESE CAREER OPENINGS FOR
YOUNG
GRADUATES
AT ALCAN!
Aluminum Company of Canada, Limited is looking for university
graduates who seek careers where they can look forward to further
developing their technical and administrative skills.
This major metal producing and fabricating company has openings
for metallurgical and chemical engineers, graduates in mechanical,
industrial and electrical engineering, as well as young men holding
degrees in arts, commerce or law.
Alcan engages in the development of products and processes both
for itself and its customers, is identified with aluminum's rise as a
many-purpose metal with rapidly expanding uses and markets.
Research facilities are among the finest in the world.
This is the "growth situation" you may be looking for; a chance
to make full use of your knowledge and potential, combined with
attractive salary scales and working conditions, plus generous
employees benefits. Company literature is available at your university placement office or upon request. Please write to:
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD.
Personnel  Department,
P.O. Box 6090, Montreal 3, P.Q.
\
ALCAN Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November  15,   1960
Many Below
Subsistent
Conditions
"One   third  of North Ameri-
" cans are living below subsistent
conditions,"    stated   Dr.   Cohn,
speaking  Monday on "Socialist
Class and Class Movement."
This lower class of society has
always existed. It is viewed irrationally by man, for today's
classes are usually based upon
wealth, power, prestige and
race. Although this gap is inevitable, the welfare state has
helped ameliorate it. The search
for equality must be everybody's
concern.
Marx's ideology concerning
class struggle is not the main
social movement today. Today
the emphasis rests on the sociological approach to class.
Nobody goes to bed hungry
ijecause he is too lazy; rather
it is more lifcely that society
is ignoring this particular class.
Who belongs to this class? It
usually consists of the racial
minority, the unemployed and
the aged.
In a short question period, it
was asked how many people of
the lower class go to universities. The chances of going to a
university are very slim, for
most university students come
from middle and upper income
brackets.
SEGREGATION AT
ISC MEETING
The Intellectual Stunt Committee will enforce segregation
at its Membership Meeting at
12:30 today in Buchanan 106.
ISC said that female applicants, though welcome, would
sit in a section closed to male
applicants.
ISC's parliamentary procedure is that all speakers must
stand on their left foot while
holding their right foot in their
left hand. This ensures brevity.
ISC urges all fun loving UBC
types to come and hear the aims
Beauty Clinic
by
ZsA-ZsA
We know the ART
of Beautifying You!
OUR
• HAIR CUTTING
• European HAIRSTYLING
• PERMANENT WAVING
• COLOURING
• SCALP TREATMENTS
• FACIALS
WILL THRILL YOU!
Are you ready for a change?
4395 W. 10th AVENUE
For appointment:
Phone CA 4-1231
'TWEEN CLASSES
"NINOTCHKA" FEATURES GARBO
CLASSIFIED
FILMSOC
Comedy "Ninotchka" in Auditorium today, 3:30 and 8 p.m.
* *  *
PLAYERS  CLUB
-Need more members to sell
tickets for "The Flies." Girls
needed to usher.
* *  *
APRS
Mr. Clark speaking on "Flying Saucers, Fact or Fiction,"
noon today, Bu. 224.
* *  *
COMMONWEALTH CLUB
Panel discussion "The Future
of Democracy in India." Dr.
Mathur, Trade Commissioner
for India in Vancouver. Noon
today in Bu. 102.
* *  *
SAM
"The Shop Steward" and
"Motion Study in Action," noon
today  in Bu.   1221.
* *  *
PRE-MED  SOC
Lecture by Dr. Williams on
"New Horizons in Medicine,"
tomorrow noon in Wes. 100.
* *  *
LIBERAL CLUB
Discussion group on "Liberalism"   tomorrow   in  Bu.   220   at
noon.
* * *
JAZZSOC
Lecture noon today in Bu.
202.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Devotional meeting noon tomorrow in Bu. 2202.
* *  *
CHORAL SOC
-Sopranos needed. See Harold
Ball tomorrow 6 p.m. in Ph. 202.
* *  *
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Debate: "Religion is a Hindrance in Achieving World
Unity." Lunch room Thursday
noon.
* *  *
EAST ASIA SOC
Dr. Lyman speaks on "The
Social Structure of Chinatown,"
tomorrow noon in Bu. 204.
* *  *
CHINESE VARIETY
General meeting tomorrow in
Bu. 203.
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
RE 8-6311
November 14-15-16
Max   Reinhart's   Stage
Spectacle
"THE MIRACLE"-Color
Carrol  Baker
Vittorio   Gassman
plus suspense in . . .
"S.O.S. PACIFIC"
Richard  Attenborough
Pier   Angeli
News
ONE COMPLETE  SHOW 7:30
November 17-18-19
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
Fine Comedy Drama
"A TOUCH OF LARCENY"
James  Mason
George Saunders
Vera Miles
plus
"AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER"
Color
Gary Grant — Deborah  Kerr
Cartoon
Starts Monday
Richard   Powell's  Powerful
Novel
"THE YOUNG
PHILADELPHIANS"
at Potters
NO CHARGE FOR CREDIT
by
ROLEX
The worlds first and still
finest waterproof automatic watches. Rugged for
work or sport — lastest
styles for modern taste.
From 47.50.
POTTER'S
695 GRANVILLE ST.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coals
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE LTD.
623 Howe    MU 3-2457
CARIBBEAN   STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Discussion: "The (Immediate
abolition  of  Colonialism—Is   It
Realistic?"   Thursday.
Golden Gate Choir
Sings  Next Thursday
A little of the sunny south
will brighten UBC next Thursday when the Golden Gate Chapel Choir presents a concert in
the Auditorium ranging from
Negro spirituals to classics.
The choir appears in the Audi-
troium Nov. 24 at 12:30 p.m. and
at the Kingcrest Baptist Church
at 8 p.m. Admission is free.
WOULD the  person   who   took
the    wrong   men's   umbrella
from the  College Library on
l     Thursday around 4:00  please
nhone  CA 4-3605.
"For Everything in '
Drugs and
School Supplies"
University
Pharmacy
5754 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
NOW
P L A Y I NG
Academy Award Winners
July Holliday — William Holden with Broderick Crawford   in
"BORN YESTERDAY"
showing at 8:50
If it hurts to laugh, please do not come.
Sal   Mineo  —   Terry  Moore  —   Gary   Crosby
in   "PRIVATE   AFFAIR"
showing at  7 and   10:30
Hollywood Theatre
3123 WEST BROADWAY
WOULD the person who took
the wrong coat from the Coffee Shop Thursday, please
call Ray, AL 5-0261. I have
your coat.
WOULD the person who picked
up the wrong car coat after
Math 300 last week please
contact Bill, at CA 4-0867. I
have your coat.
ONE furnished room with view
and kitchen facilities for girl.
Ride to classes. Phone CA
4-4948.
WILL the person who picked
up my dark brown wallet after the Psychology 100, Section 1, midterm on Monday at.
8:30, please phone Phyllis at
CA 4-1287.
LOST—Wrist watch, Ben-rus
with Fixo-Flex expansion
bracelet. Lost in gym Wed.
night. Finder please return to
Lost and Found or Bob Cannon, Okanagan House.
STILL available—Good student
accommodaation for two or
three girls or boys. Private^
washroom, kitchen and spacious rooms, $35 each. Call Mr.
Buhler, CA 4-0687.
BEACH-FRONT furnished bachelor quarters, suit one gent,
$65. 2525 Point Grey Road.
RE  8-6498.
HELP wanted—Student girl to
run switchboard in AMS office, 12:30 to 1:30, Mon. to
Fri. Those interested please
see Mr. Pearson in AMS office.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 191
5 or
More
IBM has a genuine interest
in what you have to offer
'\#»     e£.*»*:& •»>■
... and, IBM vnau also have much to offer you.
If you are graduating in Arts, Commerce or
Engineering, you can put your university training to practical use at IBM, working with the
world's most advanced computers. And you can
grow in knowledge through the company's extensive engineering and research laboratories.
The work at IBM is interesting, challenging and
well paid. Advancement can be rapid, because
of the company's ever expanding business.
If you would like to know what IBM has to
offer, write for our booklet' 'A Career with IBM".
A Complimentary copy
will be forwarded upon request.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED
444-7th AvenueWest, Calgary, Alberta
Western District Manager—W. Dinsdale
IBM

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124794/manifest

Comment

Related Items