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The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1952

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Full Text

 SHMAN
SSUE
YSSEY
FRESHMAN
ISSUE
VOLUME XXXV
■ VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1952
PRICE 5c
No.
AL FOTHERINGHAM
Cuthbert Gunkenhelnier. fresh
from a summer at Kitsilano beach,
etralgbtened his Magee sweater
aid iwatiered into the armouries.
When -tbe girl at the door asked
Im lor (its fees Cuthbert disdain-
tilly tossed her a few crisp huu?
dred dollar WIU which he had
printed tbe night before on tbe
Bjiy'a Handy Printing Press Ms
mother had gtren Him, lor bis birth-
e&r.-i '}■
,The catblor looked suspiciously
■4 th* MUa when alio tew Alonto
BJpyd'i Mooring face where Hiug
George'e countenance usually
•jetted but before sh* could question Ounkenhelmer he was at the
ntat Uble, playing eenle-mlnle-mo
Mbong the colored registration
books.
Cuthbert hiA heard ihat three
tteekeian starved to death going
tfcrough registration last yenr eo
hji finally 'grabbed a book, filled but
•ti tho bleaks and was proceeding
•long nicely unitl he oame to. the
medical oheolcu*.
; • I
"Thli to QIlll/8 phy*ed you have
registered for," spluttered the doctor aa be pulled Cuthbert's T-shirt
beck over hie bead ind ushered bim
oot of the dre*eift| room.
BEAUTIES AND BEASTS
Artists, models and writers will have an opportunity
to display their talents in the Totem, Canada's outstanding
college yearbook.
Required are editors and writers who can produce
'■ dramatic prose, artists who can do line drawings, water
color or poster work, and models who can add a touch of
beauty to the printed page. There li also a vacancy for a
business manager and lor a secretary who hat had some
experience reading defective stories. *
All those interested should see the Totem Editor between 12:00 and 2:00 today or Friday at his office next doot to-
the ladies' rest room in Brock Halt        ,
■■, y '    'i   i • i jy-   ii. 'y ' ' ■ mmmmmmmk
|e treble with this
nniverslty," Cuthbert mattered as
he trudged biwk to the aid Qt the
line-up, "always worrying about
minor details. Won't let yeu In a
course Just beokuae ot a little thing
■till bitter at being cheated out
a- f4*r'iee^f||||^e||Hw^wttl:
lresbettes, Ounk*nUlBW began to push his way around to the
rarlous tablet, stipptng oh tbe
, amaller student* and kicking faoulty members when he bad tbe
chance.
"N6, I'm sorry but you can't
take Hedgecllpplng 101 without
passing Its prerequisite, Toenail-
clipping 100," a grim-Jawed instructor Informed him.
"But I—" Cuthbert began.
'Sorry, you haven't enough
credits to take that either. Besides,
FHngerwevlng 00 Is full tip and
Faperbanging $94 Is restricted to
members of tbe Ubyseey."
"Well could I—"
* ,
"No, you're not old enough to
take that oourse. How would you
like to enroll in Engineering?"
.   ' / •
With a scream of terror, Gunkenhelmer rushes away and stumbles
Into the arms of a COTC officer.
Ht Cfett Tonktd
"Ah, Just what we're looking for,
a  gdardian  of peace,"  says the
army, shoving a rifle Into Cuthbert's trembling fingers.
¥
"Do you know we will pay your
way through university; we will
pay for your tuition, room and
board, and books. We will do your
homework for you, we will get
someone to go to classes for you,
we will even do your thinking tor
you.
"And to top It all off we will
give you a snappy little tank to
take your girl friend out- on Satur?
day nights—all you have to do Is
become a defender of freedom."
Unwinding himself from the ammunition belt which the guardian
of peace had twined about his
adam's apple, Cuthbert, In desperation to get out of the armourlea,
quickly huys a half dozen Totems,
three or four privilege cards, signs
up his whole family and his dog
for cheat X-rays, buys subscriptions to Life. Death, Time, Space,
Fortune, Ladles' Home Journal and
Sunbathing, and rushes out Into the
fresh air.
He collapses outside the door as
two professors walk by with "Only
11 weeks till exams" tattooed on
their foreheads.
prised Engineers
I Underdogs Win Pond Battle
Experience On
leads f o Top Positions
• , You can be the man who makes the headlines! The Ubyssey
has openings for reporters, columnists, sports writers, photographers, assistants to editors, and a stiff cartoonist.
If you have had any experience* ■"',;''^_;":'.•'-"%• . atr. ...
with new wars including having <»uvw ** «*»>^> Straight,
managing Bdltor, Hymle Koshe-
voy, Assistant Msnefing Editor,
Hal Tennant, Pit Kwtley, Ron
Hifgart, Assistant iCIty Editor,
Alex Maoallllvray and Jack Waa-
ssrmsn, who airiearned their first
principles o| fhp titoywey.. Prof,
tear! Birney. noted author and
member of the Bee*, ot English,
was once Biiitor-ln'Chlef.    .
The Ubyssey won't promise yob
a well-paid job on graduation but
it will give you the most Interest
Ing extra-curricular activity on the
campus. The meeting Is at 12:83f
today ln the Pub Ottioe, south
basement, Brock Hall. Both male;
read them occasionally, then come
to the indoctrination meeting «t
the Publications Board offices ln
the north basement of Brock Hall
at 18:80 today.
Membership In the Publications
Board gives you an opportunity to
learn < newspaper writing and editing trom professional newspaiw-
mbc -as well as learning mora
about bur campus and Its activities
than in any other organisation. It
will take no more of your time
than a few hours a week.
Bx-pubsters at the Province Include Brie Niool, Don Btalnsbury,
'Tommy Haslttt, Rowland Gould
(in Korea), Les Armour, Don
Brown, and Doug Heal. The Van-
end females welcome,
 : Jm, J~~
NEW SEkVICES
Three exchange students
from Germany, Japan and
Trieste are studying at UBC
this year under the sponsorship
of the International Students
Service Committee.
This year a new voluntary coun
selling service for the foreign stu
dents has been started. The service directs students to the propei
sources for help on tbe many
problems that arise throughout
tbe academic year.
188 also has plans to establish
exchanges with Mexico, France
and India.
Students coming here on exchange scholarships have their tuition, books, room and board, pocket money and hospital Insurance
paid.
I'BC students on exchange ln
foreign countries are looked after
In the same way by the local ISS
In those countries.
Not only the local organisation
ot ISS but the national and International offices help needy university students throughout the
world In the form of bursaries and
other financial aid.
 ~r- ' '	
NICOL CLASSIC ON
FRIDAY AT NOON
The highlight of Freshmen Week
la the Players' Club production of
the now-classic "Her Scienceman
[.over" hy Eric, Niool which takes
plae Frldny noon In the Auditorium.
The theme of this play is Sex, as
prat Iced by campus sciencemen. It
Is therefore essential that all freshettes attend this important production In order to know their science-
men.
/
Frosh can pick up some of their
evil methods hy picking up your
tickets on Wednesday, Thursday
or Friday In the Quad.
Tuesday night climaxed a hectic
round ot rushing parties for UBC
co-eds when almost ninety girls
pledged their chosen sororities.
Candle-lit ceremonies and serenades by fraternities marked the
evening tor the new pledges, as
they had their first taste of sorority life.
Completed results arc
ALPHA GAMMA DILTA
Sheila   Charters,   Janet   Crafter,
Pat   Croker,   Muriel   Duckworth
Mai-:>anna   Duff, Geraldlne  Legge
Annemr.rle Leuohte, Donna Lever
tdge, Margaret McLane, Owen Set
terfleld,   Judy   Sllttger,   Doroth.*
Stevenson, Ann Sutherland, Nancj
Underbill.
ALPHA DILTA PI
Madelyn Coltls, Diane DrMcoll
Dora Keily, June Kirk, France
Lip trot, Sylvia Meadow*, Donna
mae McCarger, Barbara Nelson
Lenora Shobrook. Wendy Sutton
ALPHA OMICRON PI
An<Ma,rle Catherwood, Marjerj
Clark, Joan Gbugh.
ALPHA PHI     ;
Marilyn Benson, Tfcelum Boor.
Ruth Cairns, Marion Croft, Alls'
'Dlcksoi), Sheila Gillespie, jn;
Huntington, Donna M-uwhinney
Barbara Mercer, Elinor Mlllei
Helen Welsh.
DELTA   PHI   EPSILON
Sarah Hoffman, Mollle Fishman
Jo SaUnovsky, Hannah Sussel.
KAPPA KAPPA OAMMA
Ann   Flnlay,   Helen   Hall,   Joa
Houghland, Helen  Mcel.un.
DELTA OAMMA
Liz Allen, Judy Andersou, Cath.
Baxter,  Peggy Beck,  Val Darlln;
Judy  Foote,  Mary Ann  Jacobwr
Rene   Miles,   Helen   McBey,   Am
Pentland, Joan Rennle, B. J. Robinson,     Margaret    Rogers,    Janle
Shirum.
OAMMA PHI BltA
Rosemary Aldeu, Pe«gy And
reen, Holon Donnally, Norma For
rester, Borbara Jagger. Cath\
Johnson, Sally Lewis, BarHi-j
Manson, at McConvllle, Marllyr
McLallen, l.lz Prentice, Joyce
Rohrer. Kay Sharp, Jackie Traf
ford, Marilyn White, Janle Wright.
Kathryn Salter.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Iris Gold, Morgaret Hlnke, Miry-
len Ivnox, Pat Morrlsette, June
C'npon.
Redshirts and Frosh battled it out yesterday in their traditional tussle at the notorious
UBC lily pond. Here a luckless Frosh is heading for the drink, but he is dragging his
enemy with him. \
s Fall
There will not be many part-
time jobs this fail although 150
students have already received
employment on campus said
Mr. J. F. McLean, University
personnel director.
According to Mr. McLean students have received a variety oi
lobs from dish-washing to swabbing floors as part of the university
"self-help" program.
Over $0 per cent of students who
ipplled for summer Jobs received
employme.it this year although
ffages were somewhat lower.
if anything, employment was
better this year although several
students were left holding the bag
because they didn't accept the jobs
when they were originally offered,'
■aid the personnel director.
Approximately 75 to one hundred
Uudents lost their Jobs because of
he' recent strike but employment
officials claim the student class
vas not too bad.
Placement of graduates was bet
er than usual with Commerce anc'
Engineering leading in job pros-
lects.
Prospects  for graduate  employ-
lent were Interviewed by 71 firms
vith   485  students  listed  for em.
iloyment and 693 positions available.
Registration  for  1953  graduates
'111 take place In October but the
bureau has asked all firms to hole
heir Interviews after Christmas.
*»hs   JgUDAY UST DAY FOR
FRAT. REGISTRATION
All potential fraternity members are urged to report
to the AMS office at the earliest opportunity. Members of
the various fraternities will be on hand to explain the
"rushing" system and answer questions.
They will also introduce students to the fraternity
system.
Registration lasts from* Wednesday, September s: to
Friday, September 26 between the hours of 11.30 and 4:30 p.m.
Registration Drop
In Most Faculties
Nearly 480 fewer students have
registered at UBC this year than
ast, registration officials have an
nounoed. ln the place of last year's
enrollment of 5,518 students, onlv
3,10 students plan ' to* study here
this semester.
The largest, peroeiH-age drop has*
occurred ln the faculty of Agrlcul-
♦'•re where 26 per cent less, 175
instead of 235, are now registered.
Medicine scored the only gain, the
expected Increase from 120 t" 180
■v-.e< fulfilled.
Airforce Co-eds
Rate With Claxton
"One of the best, and certainly one of the most interesting
parades I've had the honor of attending" is what Defense
Minister Brooke Claxton termed the graduation ceremony of
he first contingent of university women to trrain as officers
vith the RCAF.
Fifty co-eds from four Cana*
Han universities climaxed an Intensive tenweek oourse at London,
)ntarlw, July 18, with an impressive graduation parade which In-
luded the 45-piece Ottawa RCAF
land, as well as flights composed
>r NATO trainees and future pilots,
t Station Landon fo rbnslc fain-
ag.
Among the honored guests^at the
tlstory-maklng ceremony were Air
/Ice Marshalls Slemons and Jitmes,
ormer Air Marshall Johnson, and
iany othe rsenlor RCAF officers..
Following the parade, a tea and
>uffet dinner were held for the
radtiates and guests In the Of-
'leers' Mess, University of British
Columbia co-eds wistfully thought
I their parents 3,000 miles away,
md wished they could he on hand i
o sea their daughters proudly,
narchlng In Airforce blue.
I
Bags had been  packed  prior  to
he   parade,  and  soon 'after  good- j
'yes weer said and the girls began \
eaving for stations spread across;
'he dominion from Goose Bay, Lab-!
••ador,   to' Whltehorse.   Y.T.    Fast!
friendships  made during; the  pre-,
cedltyg    weeks    were    broken    as i
Cireeivwood,   F.K.I., Ottawa.  Toronto,   Rivers,   Man..   Saskatoon,   Ed-,
monton,   and   aV'ncotiver   reeclved
their  allotment  of  co-eds   to  continue   advacned   training   for   the
summer.
The girls had been thoroughly
grounded for the positions they
would fill ln supply, administrative,'
and messing branches of the RCAF.
The courses included history and
organisation of the RCAF, cm-rent
events, service writing, airforce
law, leadership, effective spdaking,
service ethics, administrative practices, ground defense, and service
management.
One of the most popular courses
with the co-eds was personnel
weapons, where they learned the
care and use of rifles, pistols, and
Stenn guns (small machine guns).
The curriculum also included many
hours of sports and drill to keep
the trainees In top physical health.
The eight-to-five, five day week
was a rugged change for most,
who were used' to the rather easy
18-hour university week The first
week found the majority of the
trainees full of unusual aches and
pains, and almost overcome with
fatigue. However, proper food,
rest, and exercise soon paid dividends, and after 10 weeks it was
generally agreed that they were In
better condition than ever before.
Director of Basic. Training Squadron Leader R. V. Haines, (formerly
of   VUC)   stated   how   please j   he j
was  with  the  girls'  progress,  and
hinted at enlarged plans for future;
training     of     university     women'
ttnriergrndi.'ntes.
Aggies, Prof.
Pushed Around By Frosh,
Frosh pulled the greatest upset since little David slugged
Goliath When they smeared Engineers yesterday in the annual
Red Sweater Day lilypond battle.
The  (raibinsn. more numerous ^ ,	
and   better organised  than
they
have been in years, were slow to
get underway but as the battle progressed they slowly took command
and ducked practically Engineer in
Sight. ••.;■•'...*
The ^clencetoen. chanting their
familiar t&»«ne«iong, "Godiva,"
marched out of the Engineering
building promptly at 12:30 and captured the first bewildered ti ashman shortly fitter. The unidentified
froah was carried down to the
library pond and ducked amid the
cheers of the spectators.
-Several more froeh received the
same fate before they finally organised and turned on the Engineers. A furious battle raged for 20
minutes in front of tt>e library before help, in the form ot President's
Assistant,' Professor, Oloff Andrew,
arrived for the Engineers.
Professor Andrew tried valiantly
to stop the brawl but succeeded
only in being pushed, shoved and
ignored as the Engineers and
Frosh conttlMad to soak each other.
One brave Engineer, who apparently doesn't care if he passes or
not, liberally sprinkled the prof as
he manned his trusty stirrup pump.
The fight aubslded for a few minutes aa Prof. Andrew delivered a
short address but erupted again in
the vicinity of the lilypond.
i#»i#ei;gee<-
By this time Aggie students had
come to the rescue of the Engineers
and they joined in the attempt to
duck anyone who resembled a first
year Btudent.
Freshettes came in for their
*hare ot the punishment as both
Kngineers and berserk Frosh
sprayed them with stirrup pumps.
Many Frosh, Joining In the spirit of
things, were observed gaily to*sing
each other In the library pond and
the lilypond.
Frosh added insult to Injury
when they used the Engineer's song
as their rallying cry and marched
about looking for dry Engineers.
The red-sweater men appeared
to be more disorganised than in
previous battles and milled about
In small groups, rather than in one
unit.
Frosh showed plenty of enthusiasm, if uttle skill, In their dunking
efforts and will probably improve
today and Friday.
Some students face prosecution '
for their part in the Incident if they
can be Identified, The university
district Fire Marshal informed
AMS secretary Oeorge Duclos that
charges would be laid against ^hose
students who took stirrup tramps
an dfire extinguishers from huts
to aid Iberia the. battle If tho eul«
prits can be traced down.
■y,j«j'*-'-
ips
The Imperial Order Daughters of Hie Empire is offering
twelve scholarships this year for postgraduate studies overseas.
Each of the scholarships is foi*—* —	
the sum of $2,000 a year. I haVe   Pa38ed   the,r   19th   but  not
Nine of the scholarships are of-1thelr 27th birthday In October of
fered to enable students to earyy | |h« y«ftr during' which they first
on studies' in History, or Economics, or Constitutional Government,
or any other subjects "vital to the
interests of the British Empire."
These scholarships are tenable a!
any university in the United Kingdom.
The three remaining scholarships are offered lor studies in
History, Philosophy, English or
French Literature at any University in the British Empire.
Candidates may be men or women, and must be unmarried until
after the tenure of the scholarship.
They must be British born, or
naturalised allies, or naturalized
neutrals, with at least five years'
residence  In  Canada.  They must
hold the scholarship. In the case
of ex-service personnel, the limiting age of 34 may be accepted.
Each candidate must hold a degree from a recognised university
or degnee-granting college ln Canada. '
Application forms may be obtained from the Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty Affairs,
Room 10, Arts Building, University of British Columbia, or from
Mrs. R. S. Sourlay, IODE Educational Secretary for the Province
of British Columbia, 517 Ford
Building, 193 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver 4, B.C. Applications
must be submitted to Mrs. Sourlay
not later than October IS, 1952.
FROSH PROGRAM GIVEN
FOR REMAINDER OF WEEK
TODAY:
11:30- 2:30-CLUB DAY.
12:30—CAIRN CEREMONY, Main Mall.
3:30—NEWMAN CLUB TEA, Clubroom.
3:30—V.C.F. RECEPTION, Brock Hall.
5:00—BIG-LITTLE SISTER SUPPER, Cafe & Brock.
FRIDAY:
10:00- 4:00—FROSH ELECTIONS,
12:30—"HER SCIENCEMAN LOVER", Auditorium.
3:30- 5:30—TEA DANCE, Brock.
SATURDAY:
2:15—WHITWORTH vs. UBC, Stadium.
8:30—FROSH RECEPTION, Armouries.
The fifty co-eds left London with <
Impressions they will never forget.
Whether, they remain  In  tlio  permanent   airforce   or   follow   other
careers after their university j'.rad-,
uatlon, such things as the undent-'
able atmosphere of a Station, the'
reeling   of   kinship   every   time   a
plane   passes  overhead,   tin-   here-
today-gone-tomorrow       philosophy
that Is so much a part of the service,  and  above all,  the splrii   of
'belonging"—thesB things   wll<   i<--
mnin with them all their live-*.
TODAY IS
CLUB DAY
ON THE
ARTS  LAWN
11:30
Armou p, «,-■"(
THE  UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1952
■2S
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 am.-5 p.m.     Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers, ,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated by
The University of BC.
MM
frfr, *% I
SPECIAL RATES FOR STU DENTS
BUY SEASON TICKETS NOW
*
for the fall ahd winter season of the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
a series of 12 Sunday afternoon concerts will
be held at the Orpheum Theatre
IRWIN HOFFMAN—RESIDENT CONDUCTOR
Enthusiastically received In Vancouver last March.  A profile of
the late Serge Koussevltsky
' GUEST CONDUCTORS WILL BE
IGOR STRAVINSKY MAURICfe ABRAVANEL
famous composed-conductor who opens dynamic conductor of the  Utah  Sym-
tbe seaaon Oct. 5 In a program including his own works.
phony. Highly recommended to Vancou-'
ver by Bruno Walter.
GUEST ARTISTS INCLUDE:
VIOLIN One of the greatest artists in thi werld
today.
PIANO Rsturns by popular demand sftsr tenia-
tlonal   success   with   the   orchestra   Iftst
season.
PIANO "Plays with the poise and maturity of a
jnaster."—Time.
VIOLIN Well known In both radio and symphony.
Will play Slberlus Concerto.
PIANO first (Kind prise winner Belfllum  Inter
national  Festival,   Returns here to play
■rahms' Second Plsno Concerto.
PIANO "Ixtraordlnary bravura, remarkable technique, exceptionally fins tone."—New York
Times.
PIANO "A rare blend of virtuosity with profound
musicianship."—Pierre Monteux.
Regular season rate $7.50—To Students $6.00
REDUCED RATES IN OTHER IX) CATIONS FOR BLOC BOOKINGS
  Enquire through UBC Art Gallery or Music Appreciation Club
MMWwsimm ^m*~--- -    -mm
JAN CHERNIAVSKY
Box Office - Kelly's at Seymour and Georgia -
PHONE:
PA. 3351
*  !
Keep your funds safe and convenient
by opening an account in
THE CANADIAN
BANK OF COMMERCE
UNIVERSITY DISTRICT 8RANCH
4473 West 10th Avenue
R. E. McKINNON, Manager
Telephone ALma 3089
PLAM or ACTION
AMS PRESIDENT REPORTS
The following Is a "Plsn of
Aetion" submitted by AMS President Raghblr Basi to Students'
CouneU   for   consideration.—Id-
Iter's Note).
The purpose of this "Plan of
Action'' Is to put before the Students' Council for their consideration the different targets with
recommendations aa to how to
achieve them, that, in tny opinion,
tho Students' Council should strive
to achieve during Hs term of office.
1 As t said in my "Open Letter
to the B.C. Citlsens," a University education is not only
a "privilege" tor a few citlsens
but a necessity for the continued existence of our free
society. Over the past years,
the student financial resources
have been straining and the
result is that an e«ual opportunity to get a University ed-
"' ucation for all our capable
young people Is gottlng less
and less, it is ths responsibility of tbe Students' Counoil to
bring this fact to tbe atten-
- tion,of the public as tell ae
tbe 'government snd the University authorities. It is also
the responsibility ot the Students' Council to find ways
and means to keep ths heightening financial barrier as low
, m possible in order to make
"available a higher education
for all the capable young citlsens. fhe recommendations
ar#:
1 that a National Scholarship
Plan be set up as recommended ln the Massey Report.
2 Clarify, for the administration,
the student attitude snd position towards the recent fee
Increase, with the idea that
the administration may wish
to incorporate this attltudfc In
their programme which wilt
be presented to the Leglsla
ture,   in   order   to   bring   the
•   fee to its original level.
3 Inquire about the procedure
tor applying for a "lower"
itudent rate on the B.C.E.R,,
ito bo followed up by an organized delegation from tho
A.M.S. to see special rates for
the University students ure as
given now to children and high
st-hool students.
4 Inquire about the possibility
of getting a percentage concession or discount to registered
students during tho winter
session from stores ln the
Point Grey district.
6 A survey regarding the Students' Summer Savings and
their financial needs for the
fall session should be conduct-
, . ed by the N.F.C.U.S. to havo
some concrete knowledge of
the subject.
A.M.S. BUDGET
There seems to be a growing
disparity in the A.M.S. budget appropriations, especially between
the L.S.E/ and the W.A.L. At the
lime of budget distribution every
treasurer gropes in the dark und
tries to find candle-light from
precedents, constitutional amendments, etc. There is a need lor reassessment of the value of the different outlets of the A.M.S. Bbdget.
The recommendation ls to set
up an Impartial independent commission to Investigate student participation ln different activities,
their usefulness and advsabillty
from many points of view; and
then make recommendations as to
the distribution ot the A.M.S. budget as a result of their commission's reassessment of the value
of tlio different channels concerned  with tho A.M.S. budget.
HONORARY AWARDS OP
THE A.M.*,
There seems to be some deficiency ln the whole set-up and coordination ot the A.M.8-. Honorary
Awards System.
It Is recommended that a "Commission" be set up to investigate
the *hole honorary award system
under the A.M.S. and make recommendations so that lt will be coordinated, and would cover aU the
fields ot student activity. Also the
recommendations should be as to
the number ot such yearly awards,
to ksep tiie standard at a high
level.
POOD S1RVI0II
Many complaints about the food
Hi the Cafeteria, Fort and Aecdla
Camps, etc., have been voiced.
The quality ot the food served, it
is alleged, Is not satisfactory.
It' is recommended that a committee be set up to investigate tbe
possibility of any Improvements
in the food services on the tiamptts,
SUILOINO   PROORAMMI  •
OP THI A.M.I.
It Is recommended that:
1 A request be made to tbe Uni-
versity Administration for ths
finishing ot ths Gymnasium.
2 Find ways and means to build
Bowling Alleys after the Gymnasium debt is paid oft.
*
3 Start a' fund drive for the
building ot the Swimming
Pool—psrhaps hire a professional campaign director to
carry on the campaign.
4 Make representation to tho
University for the incorporation of the completion of the
Brock Memorial into the building program of the University.
As the range of student at"
tlvitles has already Otttstrlp
ped the existing facilities for
accommodation of student offices, etc., therefore ask the
administration to give it top
priority only next to the Arts
Building.
-Continued ea Psfi 1
Sincere and Best of Wishes for a
Successful and Happy Student Year
MARSHALL - WELLS (B.C.) LTD
573 Carrall Street
Vancouver, B. C.
^^MMMtaMMfeMMMti
m_M
Every Success
ROTARY PS
SERVICE LTD.
4795 Main St.
FIX-IT
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$15.00-Ports Suppl ltd
WE HAVE THE TOOLS -. YOU FINISH THE JOB
REBORING -VALVE GRINDING - PAINTING
U Learn and Save More Than 50%
And You Get the Best Job
Telephone: CHtrry 4818
5th & BURRARD ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Best Wishes To The University
Of British Columbia
HEWER'S HARDWARE
4459 W 10th. Ave
AL 1552
BEST WISHES TO UNIVERSITY
McKINLEY DRIVING SCHOOL
i
Draughting Instruments
from $10.00
T-SQUARES, PROTRACTORS, SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE RULES
' ZIPPER RING BOOKS
Ames Lettering Instruments Complete with Sheets & Index
FOUNTAIN PENS
CLARKE and STUART LTD.
STATIONERS and PRINTERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C.
STUDEBAKER
"All that's New for'52"
J. M. BROWN
MOTOR CO. LTD.
STUDEBAKER DISTRIBUTOR FOR B.C.
1121 W.Georgia MA. 3341
Vancouver, B.C.
€
mm
A 'Chinese restaurant of distinction, located in the heart
of Vancouver's Chinatown, patronised by top flight movie,
Radio and Concert Artists as well as prominent people In
all walks of life, offers you "Chinese Cuisine At Its Best."
*        #   DISTINCTIVE IN ITS ORIGINAL
WATER COLOR MURAL DECOR.
• DISTINCTIVE IN ITS PERFEC-
TION OF CHINESE CULINARY
ART.
• DISTINCTIVE IN ITS HOSPITABLE
FRIENDLY SERVICE.
e   DISTINCTIVE IN ITS SPONSORSHIP OF THE UNIQUE RADIO
PROGRAM   "THE   CALL   OF
CHINA," SUNDAYS, 2 P.M. ON
CJOR - DIAL 600.
Samhc Ye i'i1 ace
MArine 1935 155 E. Pander St.
turn
CRANE
LIMITED
Plumbing and Heating Supplies
e
WISH YOU EVERY SUCCESS
540 Beatty Street
MA. 0511
BEST WISHES
Te The
UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAMOUS PLAYERS
CAN. Corp.
Operating
CAPITOL   •   ORPHEUM   ■   STRAND
CINEMA    -    DOMINION THEATRES THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1052
THE   UBYSSEY
CUu yHJLL ottfuL 9L.
Milk and Milk
Products (Milk, Cream,
Butter, Buttermilk,
and Ice Cream)
arc among the most
essential of foods . . .
SERVE MILK
IN  ALL  FORMS
CREAMLAND
City Wide Delivery
1335 HOWE ST.
MAr. 7371
HANNAY'S
Photo Service
Special Pictures of
Special Occasions
FULL COVERAGE OF
WEDDINGS
GRADUATIONS
BABY ALBUMS
PORTRAITS
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
FRAMING
PHOTO-FINISHING
'• PASSPORTS
Eves, by Appointments
Photography In the Homo or
Studio
Eves., KErr. 2695L
New Chrome Lighting
CHerry 5926
2091 W. Broadway
GRANVILLE
BROS. LTD.
CLEANERS-DYERS
Carl Von Hartcn
Textile Chemist
Established Over. 40 Years
Coll and Deliver
CHerry 3131
1043  WEST  BROADWAY
COMPLIMENTS
and
BEST WISHES
JUixJiiiiL
The House of
Corsages & Flowers
Thar are Different
840 Granville Street
MA. 6388
Medical
Awards
(Undergraduate    awards    in    the
Faculty of Medicine)
The Dr. L. L. Horvath Medical
Scholarships (proficiency ln First
Ye»r):
(a) $150 for highest standing In
First Year: L. W. Elwood
Flather. *
(b) $200 for highest standing In
Anatomy:   Philip  Narod.
(c) $200 for highest staodlng In
Biochemistry:    Peter    John'
/Baerg.
(d) $200 for highest standing In
Anatomy: L. W. Elwood
Flather.
The Dr. H. L. W. Turnbull Memorial Scholarship, $300 (prof id-
encty in pre-cllnlcnl subjects of the
first two years):
Donald Oliver Anderson.
The Horner Prize, »100 (highest
standing In Second Year):
Donald Oliver Anderson.
The    Janet    Hatfield    Medical
Scholarship, $200:
' Kenneth Donnelly,
The Osier Society Scholarship,
$100 (proficiency In Microbiology,
Second Year):
Open Letter To Frosh
AS spokesman for, your Stu*
deatrt' Council it gives me a great
deal of pleasure to welcome you
as new members of the Almn
.Mater Society.
This Society is the most autonomous Student Body in Canada
today, a fact of which we are all
very proud. However, this can
only be continued If you are willing to take an interest in your
Students' activities and Government. With this In mind I will
endeavor to explain your council,
Us members and fuhctloins.
Students' Council Is. composed
of thirteen members who represent all sides gf Student lite.
They are charged with the responsibility of controlling and
leading student activities of all
types. One of the most valuable
functions they can perform and
have seldom been called upon to
do so by a freshman class, is to
help you In any problems you
may have. Remember they are
students just like yourself; they
have to pay tees, attend classes,
and write exams just like you.
PACKARD
and
AUSTiN
SALES & SERVICE
CONSOLIDATED
MOTOR
COMPANY   LTD.
\2'M) West Georgia St.
MArine 6131
Best Wishes
British Ropes
(Canadian Factory Ltd.)
Granville Island    Vancouver, B.C.
Medical Building Garage
Western Canada's Largest Storage  Service
Unexcelled Public Parking
Complete Washing, Repair and
Radio Service
Corner Georgia and Hornby        0A. 5451
BARR
TYPEWRITER CO
615 W.Hastings
MA. 5445
ALL MAKES OF TYPEWRITERS
Sold
Rented
Repaired
Special Rates to Students
"The only difference 1b that they
have n few years of campus experience behind them. They want
to help you so that you will be
prepared to take over when they
leave. Unless they are able to do
this, thelv term in office will not
have been successful.
Here is a list of your Council
members and their jobs:
Raghbir Basi, president.
Jane Banfield, vice-president.
Gerry Duclos, Treasurer,
Ann Willis, secretary.
Bill St. John, P.R.O.
Denny Sllvestrinl, Co-ordlnator
of Activities.
Jean Hood, Women's Athletics.
Gerry Main, Men's Athletics.
Geoff Pringle, chairman of the
Undergraduate Societies.
Kay Stewart, Women's Undergrad Society.
Ann Choma, chairman of Club
Council.
Frank Carroll, Junior representative.
Peggy Andreen, Sophomore
representative.
Joe Schleslnger, Editor of the
Ubyssey.
If you have any problems concerning your extra eurrlcular activities drop In at the AMS office and see any of the above,
they will be more than glad to
help you.
Duruing your years here on the
campus you will heniJ* a great
deal of criticism directed at the
Council. Much of this criticism
will be well founded and constructive. However, a great deal
of lt will be of the other variety.
WhPn you hear crltlCRm ot this
type I would ask you to Btop and
find out the facts. Your Council
members are only human, and
that Is all they claim to be, not
little tin gods as some would
have you believe. They are your
Council, you elected them, so
help them to help you, they cannot do It alone.--BUl St. John,
Public .Relations  Officer.
How Can I Start
An Investment
Programme ?
A
By Planned
Savings Through
Life Insurance*
The basla of an Investment
plan in most cases should be
life insurance. It meets in a
sound und regular way the
reul objectives of investment
—- savings for the futu.e, a
retirement income nnd
money for your family
should anything huppen to
you. What is more, life insurance achieves these ends
economically and without
worry or risk. Discuss with u
Mutual Life of Canada representative a life insurance
investment plan for your
future.
Vancouver Branch Office
402 W. Pender Street    •
Eric V. Chown, LL.B., C.L.U.
Branch Manager
UTUALIIFE
■HHMMMMMMMBi        MMMiMM
iV   CANADA
WELCOME FROSH
We Wish You Every Success and Good Luck
CAMPUS FLORISTS
FASHION FLOWERS
4528 West 10th Avenue
We're ready lo servo you with smartly styled Corsages — Flowers for nil
occasions.
ALMA 3351
President Reports
n Pile a request with the University for the necessity of
building a Men's residence on
the Campus. The corporate life,
which is an essential part of
■any University education, Is
woefully lacking on our Campus, the existing housing facilities In the University being
far from adequate.
INTERNATIONAL ASPECT
OP  CAMPU8  LIFE
1 The work done In the field of
furthering International understanding by the various clubs
and committees on the campus
should get full support of the
Students' Council.
2 We, being Canadians, furthermore being «a«University on the
West coast famous tor Rs
work in international understanding and student autonomy, are ideally situated to conduct educational  ventures' for
* the furtherance of iuternatlon
al understanding.
It Is recommended that the Stu-
Bents' Council should make representation to President MacKenzie
for an early establishment of the
"School of Pacific Relations," with
emphasis on soclo-culttiral aspect
of the subjects taught.
COMBATING STUDENT
APATHY
This Is a very serious and perhaps most difficult and nebulous
aspect of the student life which
demands a great deal of attention
by the Students' Council. We utterly lack what is known as "college
spirit'' at our University and perhaps that is a big factor as to why
our "ball games", L.S.IO. Concerts,
"meetings", etc., and other activities are not as successful as they
should be.
Obviously the problem has got
to be attacked from many sides*.
The recommendations are as follows:
1 Try to build up college spirit
tlH-ough:
a An extensive "froah orientation" programme. This is
where the effort should b?-
gin.
b A strict enforcement of "frosh
discipline". Perhaps the U.S.C.
should look after this part of
the programme.
c Good cheerleaders, and Majorettes must be there to build
, up the "school spirit'' at
games.
(1 The "Kickapoos" should be
asked to gather 'all the talent,
campus and otherwise, and
liuild" a special effort to create
the .school spirit. All possible
backing should be given by the
Council
c University songs should be encouraged to he sung nt all
possible occasions.
2 To combat apathy:
All measures to get an Increased student participation
should be used and the Students' Council should encourage such use.
Plan the whole year\s social
calendar. Publicize lt nicely
and declare special occasions
ns "closed" "nights or noons"
to get the best attendance.
MORE   INTEREST  OF  THE
STUDENTS IN THE  A.M.S.
In the past years there has been
a marked disinterest, -of the gen-
trnl student body in the affairs of
the A.M.S.
The recommendations are:
1 At. least one A.M.S. sponsored
socinl  event  must be  held  in
9   the Session, i.e., preferably in
November, "Prpm" or "A.M.S.
Hall.'
Perhaps the Board of Governors could be the A.M.S.
guests .nt such a function, so
that it could be made to serve
many purposes nnd could do
a nice public relation's job
as well.
The Undergraduate Societies could be asked to fully
cooperate qnd perhaps a floor
show could be requested from
the "Greeks."
2 "A.M.S. Lecture Committee'
which Is highly needed slioulrt
be created. The purpose of
this committee to be to get
at, least one speaker of national or International reputa
tion to come to the campus
and spenk to the students each
year and soppsor such other
speakers who might be visitors
to the city and are desirable
to have on the campus.
This could impart a tremendous public relations job and
by putting the University before the public eye In that
light, should raise the prestige
of the University In the public
mind.
Best Wishes
From
DEAN'S
Fine Foods
Mellow Whip Ice Cream
4489 W. 10th Ave. AL.. 2596
EVf RY SUCCESS...
General Equipment
Limited
#
Power Plant, Heating and Ventilating Equipment,
Ceiling Air Dii'fusers
1230 GrcmvMe St.
PA.5932
■»
Compliments
of
HICK'S TICKET
BUREAU
•     i
»•?!
610 DUNSMUIR
PAcific 6427
Every Success To
The University Students
from
Peterson
Electrical
Construction
Co. Ltd
1255 NAPIER STREET HAstings 3860
VANCOUVER, B. C.
GREETINGS
FROM
City Construction   and Capilano Crushing
COMPANY LIMITED COMPANY LIMITED   ■
FAir. 3202
107 E. Isr. Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
FAir. 4662 The UBYSSEY
ME.V1D13U CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mull by the Po3t Office Dept., QttaWa, Stu-
;dent subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscription f2.oo per year; Single copies five cents. Published throughout the
University year by the Student Publications Bourd of the Almji Mater
Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions exposed
Herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey. and not necessarily
those o* the Alma Mater Society or of the University.
Offices in Hrock Hall For display advertising
Pph&ne ALma 1GM Phone AUnA 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  JOE SCHLBftNaBR
Executive Editor Gerry KIdd       Managing Kditor EUaJef Gorbat
Senior Editor this Issue e ..Sheila!Kearns
City Editor, Myra Green; .News Editor, Barry Drinkwater; Women's
Editor, Klo McNeil; Literary Editor, Pam Steele; CUP Editor, Patsy
Byrne; Editorial Writer*, Dot Auerbach, Vaughan Lyon.
Letters to the Editor should be restricted to 160 word*. The Ubyssey
reserves the right to cut letters and> cannot guarantee to publish all
letters received.
THE   UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1952
5 We're Off Again
«>e ■-«». *^
« _Jfl the past few days freshmen have been deluged ^ith
? adVKK'about what not to do, about things that their predeces-
:: sorslsad never done but they themselves ought to do.
* , TPhe Ubyssey has no intention of joining in this chords of
* wfjrrjrhgs and exhortations. We are perfectly sure that I this
j year's crop of freshmen will leave this campps just as |rus-
•f trffte^and maladjusted as all their predecessors.    ,
I      *wk the same time we are reasonably sure that this year's
f Frosh Class will never regret the day when they first *ur-
rendered that $128 cheque into the Bursar's till.
. ,', Students may bridle against the demands of their mentors, feel frustrated after their semi-annual bouts with mimeo-
' graphed sheets of inquisitoria, and suffer from maladjustment
; yvhen they find themselves at the mercy of a world that puts
(no great value on the exquisitely Gothic lettering of a diplo-
; ma, but they will find that the enjoyment, and in some cases
>■ even, education, they got out of this institution by far outweighs its frustrations.
\
i  > »
Clear The Decks
< .■ • .
•»> We are starting off the year with a clean slate. AU the
, red tape and restrictions which were imposed upon the
;; Publications board because of sins committed in the dim and
; tMstant past are going out the window.
• i *    The job of putting out a newspaper is difficult enough
r without the ballast of regulations so numerous that not even
Students' Council has a complete list of them.
s * ; We intend to operate as any other campus organization
» .Within the limits set by the AMS and the Publication Board
, .constitutions. If Students' Council objects to anything we are
; tfoing, they have the power to amend our constitution.
; * >    What more can they ask?
I-, • '
Wasted Money
'. . Some people will never learn from the experience of their
', .'predecessors.
AMS Treasurer Gerry Duclos was advised by last year's
officers to keep only one girl in addition to the business manager in the AMS office during the summer. The reason for
this was that experience had shown that there was not
. .enough work to keep two girls busy.
»   •   . •
'. , ; Duclos ignored this advice. On his own responsibility and
', .without even consulting the Council Personnel Committee
' (without whose approval he had no right to do anything)
he hired a second girl for the summer months. Result: at least
; ,$500 down the drain.
$500 would mean a lot lo the small clubs whose budgets
• are being slashed by Duclos. It would have been enough to
finance the LSE Special Events series which Duclos now
I claims we cannot afford.
The AMS Treasurer is supposed to save student money,
", riot waste it. We would advise him to get rid of the idea that
' 'the Treasurer alone is free to spend AMS money any way that
' ;he sees fit.
For A New AUS
The way things stand now there will be no special events
' program on the campus this year. The budget of the LSE has
! 'been slashed  to the point  where it cannot undertake the
program.
The only hope seems to be the AUS stepping into the
-breach. They should demand a full share of the money allocated to the Undergraduate Societies. With this they can
• -sponsor an excellent series and give students at least a sample
ol the high priced entertainment going on downtown which
most of u.s cannot afford.
Opposition to this move will inevitably arise. The AUS
lias never sponsored entertainment before and its past record
of achievement in any field is poor. Special Events, however,
; may prove to be a project which will give the AUS a reason
lor existing and its executive something with which lo try and
put some spirit b.'ick in lhe letnargic Artsmen.
Apart   from   other  considerations,   the  Arts  student   is
entitled to get something from the AUS at the expense of the
AMS.   Other undergraduate groups on the campus after all
1 distribute benefits to their members to the tune of 85 cents
per head.
1 ne AiLsinan pays into llie AMS like everyone else but
I'.ei.s nothing in return.
Tne clinching argument i.s of course thai the Special
Kveiits program will, while financed by the AUS, provide
entertainiirjnt for the whole campus regardless of faculty.
The AUS should be given a chance to show what they can
do Campus life i.s not complete without a Special Kvents
program.
Sincere Best Wishes
To The Students Of The University
From The Following Professional And
Business Men And Firms
Ttohteif & tjtatheAon
Roue Holland
frank Rou
Cornett &e*. ttd
m
Orank Srom
bancan Crux
fyorae Reifel
W. (j. Htum'tt
Jack hiamond
(ferden WUmet
*
CSM. Van Woman
Htr. and ttir*.
Ronald fyakant
HickoU Chemical*
CO. LTD.
CM.C William* Co. ttl
Canadian Exploration*
CO.  LTD.
S.C. hUtrict Telegraph
Jack PattUon
Ro** and Herr
Chancellor
Shemood tett
fyerae Cunningham
W. tftark heCeu>
John A* Wick*on
J. £. bixen
Jourex Sakerie*
J. A. Cam/tMt, H.C
Senate? J. W. Jarri*
(jordon Jamil
hal (jrauer
Volneif jfron*
'ertUing Counsel
A. C. Juke*
A J. Hlein
teen tadner
hHacKenpe,  White &
bun*muir ttd*
SENATOR
Stanley UtcHeen
W. if. ftalkin
H. R. toachHillan. CSX.
(jeorae W.  Vorgan
C. (j. Sayne*
hon Crontie
Hon. C.  W. Hamber
Robert JiddeA
flel*on* taunderer*
and forij Cleaner*
Moray Hosiery & Lingerie
University District's Largest Hosiery and Lingerie Shop
4573 W. 10th
AL. 2807
EVERY SUCCESS
Special All Inclusive Escorted, Tours Arranged
, For Students
International Travel Service
HERCULES WARSOL
Three Ways to the Four Corners
TA. 1030
TA. 2826
MA. 4632
Marine Bldg.
Vane, B.C.
•f
EVERY SIKCaS
FOSTERS FINE FURS
DESIGNING
MANUFACTURING
REMODELING
825 Howe St.
MA. 6726
BEST WISHES
DAVID PEPPER
OPTOMETRIST
ALma
4371 W. 10th
WELCOME BACK
DO-NUTS AND COFFEE
After Class — After the Dance
Anytime
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Avenue, Just West of Sasamat AL. 3580
Do-Nuts for Special Functions
Bev. Rhodes
Sporting Equipment
Your Badminton and Grass Hockey Headquarters
588 Richards St.
MArine 1590
Gifts From Castle Jewellers
Watches     by     Elgin,     Bulova
Grtien,   Blue   Ribbon   Diamonds,
Rings, Brooches, Bracelets
Ronson Lighters, Parker 51 Pens
Expert Repairs — Work Guaranteed
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
4560 W. 10th Ave. ALma 2009
Your Community Green Grocer Wishes Sueeess to the
University Students
FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES BROUGHT IN
FOR YOU DAILY
VARSITY PRODUCE
Free Delivery
10th Ave. and Sasamat
AL. 1141
THE WORLD'S FINEST TEAS
SELECTED
IMPORTED
and BLENDED
by
DICKSON IMPORTING CO. LTD.
Vancouver, B.C-
GREETINGS
Quest Metal
Works Ltd.
Russell Food
Equipment Ltd.
X7l   Homer Street,  Vancouver, B.C.
MA. 0241-2
MA. <>:188 ?1   i THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1952
THE   UBYSSEY
3TC&2& New COTC Plan
TO START SOON
The Extension Department is
offering a special course to assist bachelor cooks in problems
•of purchasing and balanced diets,
etc. If you are in need c? any as
sistance with your cooking problems, drop in at the Extension
Dept. as soon as possible.
v\
Council
Vote*
To Aid Matriculants
A new scheme by the Canadian Officers Training Corps
offers senior matriculation student a chance to have their board
and room, fees, books and living out allowance paid in full.
Under thb plan, applied science * Aftcr SI,ulliHU;^7^^tll^nt at-
eUidoiUs, medical students and arta j lemiing une under this plan must
lonour students would get $65 a' sign up with the active army (of
month for hoard and room, and ?30 ' « reasonable time where lie will
•. month spending money iW their \ m-elVe n commanding post willi
■iist two years after senior matri-  «" active group.
iippefii
U    do
This column,  whicli  will
weekly    in    lhe    Ubyssey.
^signed Id keep you in formed* about
activities   of   your   Students'
V'H. It will only deal with the
rotfr Important   matters   brought
Ijel'ore   the   Council.
May I point out at tliU lime Mia!
Ill Council meetings nre open to
l)ii; thoy are held In the Hoard
|ooin every Monday night.
rl The request of the Med lea!
^Undergraduate Society foi- a $5.00
A.M.S. decrease on grounds thai
tlK "V third, and fourth year stti-
deni>^are off campus and unable
to obtain full benefits of the Society was tinned down.
2 The greater part of the evening was spent In drawing up the
plan of nclioi ,for the year. It was
tabled for Uie second time and
should be completed next Monday.
•illation.
In addition, they will receive all
ees, books, instruments and medial and dental care free of charge.
On   a   straight   Arts   pass   course,
the COTC will duplicate the same
remuneration   for  only   two  years
ast senior matriculation.
During the summer months, the
students must attend a COTC
camp, where he will receive $170
yor month plus hoard and room.
An allowance of $H0 per month
will not be 'supplied in the third
year im summer earnings should
he sufficient sponding motfey for
Iho winter months without the
COTC subsidizing it.
During tlio time at university,
any student entering the scheme
will be made a second lieutenant
on completion of two summers and
two Winters in tile COTC. With
an additional summer and winter,
they will receive the rank of full
lieutenant. i *'
11
^      VARSITY THEATRE
i    \ Now Playing
\ GARY COOPER IN
DISTANT DRUMS
In Color by Technicolor
Plus "PRIDE OF MARYLAND"
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS 36c
II
C°'8d Jo&Juojl TLrwa,
We have o^wide selection of college clothes
chosen with you in mind ...
• CROYDON BURBERRY COATS in navy wool, gab-
ardine.
*
• CASHMERE and BOTANY SWEATERS
A wonderful selection to choose from.
• PURE WOOL SKIRTS — Tartans, Worsteds, Gabs
• See (he LANSEA TURTLE NECK SWEATERS
Ularttf *
AL. 2360
WE ARE OPEN UNTIL 6 P.M.
4409 W. 10th Ave.
Congratulations ond Best- Wishes
To oil the Students
Radio Rental and Repair
<14."i.'i West llllli Avenue
ALma 2244
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICING
We Cater To U.B.C Students
U<>y I land, Prop.
2180 Allison Road AL. 0524
Jnsl oil Universitv Blvd.
If the student lias high scholastic standing, the COTC will provide additional education up to n
Ph.D.
Summer training under the COTC
offers, many diversified trades for
the eager recruit. The Armored
Corps meeting every iiitnmw at
Camp Slilio, Manitoba learns the
rudiments of artillery .heavy tank
aitillciy, anil-aircraft and guided
missiles.
Signal Corps, meeting every hiiiii-
nwv at Harryflelfl, Ontario, handles
all army communications including
the designing ami laying of the
communications. The North West
Territories und the Canadian1 Pacific and National Telegraph circuits when out of order are all
carried and maintained hy this
carp. They even supply (liscjockeya
for out-of-the-way communities in
Canada's far north.
ltoyal Canadian Engineers, meeting at Chiliiwack. H.C., instruct and
construct all roads, bridges and
builds all the uir fields for the
U.C.A.I''. They have also constructed the famous Kingston Hypas."
outside of London, England besides
many bridges over die Rhine Hiver
in Occupied Cerniany.
All activities of the Ajmiy, Navy
nnd Air Force aro designed with
the purpose of putting the Infantry
Corp in a striking position of the
enemy. Members of this corp are
possibly the most highly-skilled recruits of the Canadian Army.
With a buying power bigger than
Kalon's. Hudson's Buy and Woodwards combined, the Service Corp
controls and maintains enormous
warehouses that hold practically all
of the army's supplies.
.Applicants for COTC cap apgly
nt thc Armories for service with
the CUC's Contingent of the COTC.
 /- -
AMS To Play
Santa Claus
To Korea Boys
Although Christmas is still
_ 91 days away, students' council
is already considering the idea
of playing Santa Claus to some
of the Canadian troops in
Korea.
Public Relations Ol'ticer Hill SI..
John said that Council felt the boys
wcrii being forgotten and that stu-
tlciits should take part in a drive
lo  raise  Christmas  gifts.
The   2T,L!i   Hrlgade of  tho .Royal
Canadian Army, .stationed in Korea
and .iapuu would receive the gifts.
A letter lias been sent to the
Honorable llrookn Claxton, Minister of National Defense, to see if
hi.-) deparlmeni would pay the ex
pensca involved In sending llie
pa l eels.
Ideas for tlio project include a
pocketbook danee and knitting
competitions  among the  co-eds.
Council also hopes to obtain Ihe
support of organizations on the
campus.
VARSITY OPENING SPECIAL
A Free Ticket to the Varsity Theatre with a purchase of $2.00s
worth ot school supplies
PENS
Complete Selection From $1.00 Up
Waterman's, 93-50 and Up
LOOSELEAF BINDERS   $2.75 nnd up
SPECIAL — LOOSELEAF BINDER, Reg. $5.25
OPENING  SPECIAL    \   $3.79
Key-Tahs, Looseleaf Refills, the new Paper-Mate pens, Ink, Pencils, etc, etc.
POINT GREY PHARMACY
Where the Vanity Crowd Gathera"
4400 West 10th Ave. AL. 0660
TEAM SUPPLIES
SKIING
TENNIS
GOLF
See your Uptown Store with
Downtown Prices
(jeorge Saifce
In The University District
4451 W. 10th AL. 1414
MOVING?
Arrange your long
distance move to any part
of North America
through .. .
PA. 5264
'•ftnlH »•■*"» ""I
Here is an opportunity
you should not miss
The expanding defence programme has
created a demand for, a large number
of officers in the Navy, Army and Air
Force. University undergraduates can
play ah important role in filling this gap.
At the same time yon can benefit greatly under the terms of the recently inaugurated Regular Officer Training
Plan.
Under this plan, the Canadian government offers university students most
generous financial help throughout
their academic careers. The financial
assistance offered students entering
or already attending an accredited
university or Canadian Services College
is coupled with outstanding career opportunities in anysbranch of Canada's
Armed Forces.
Students taking advantage of this plan
are required to serve Canada actively
as officers of the Navy, Army or Air
Force for a minimum of three years as
commissioned officers subsequent to
graduation.
Cgst of tuition fees, board and lodging
amounting to $65.00 per month, stu-
dents' council fees, registration fees,
library fees and students' health fees
will be borne by the Armed Forces. In
addition, undergraduates will be paid
$30.00 per month during their first year
of the scheme,vyill be given full summer
employment at $170.00 per month and
will be entitled to receive reimbursement
for the cost of books and instruments for
each subsidized university year-medical students an amount up to $75.00-
all other faculties an amount up to
$50.00.
Qualifications
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS — Must have
obtained their Senior Matriculation or
equivalent standing and be accepted for
entry into university or Canadian Services
Colleges.
SECOND OR THIRD YEAR STUDENTS-
Applicants must be registered in second or
third year or have fulfilled the requirements for entry into second or third year-
study.
Applicants must have reached thqjr 16th
birthday but not, their 22nd birthday on
January 1, 1953 in the first year of their
eligibility.
Applicants must be single.
Must be medically fit in accordance with
present standards tor Navy, Army or Air
Force.
Fer further particulars apply to the service ol your choice
The following  representatives  are  on  your campus:
NAVY
LT. CMDR. P. THOMAS, RCN (K)
Resident Staff Officer
ARMY      AIR FORCE
MAJOR W. W. MATHERS
Resident Staff Officer
l/L W.  P.  CASEY
Resilient Stuff Officer
mm
BUY YOUR TOTEM TODAY - $3.74 XIiE   UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1952
The
Brunswick-Balke-Collender
Company of Canada Limited
Tho World's Leading Manufacturer Of
Stotihf and Milliard
uiptnetot
947 GRANVILLE ST.
Byrnes Typewriters
"Limited
592 seymour street
PAcific 7942
Just Arrived . ..
Special Students model, plus and equals, degrees and
divisions on keyboard. New Standard models with bonus
Key for Carriage. No extra charge.
PRISJfiBII REPORTS
(Continued from Page 3)
3 Downtown    press    should    hn
kept Infomed of everythlngrtlml
goes on on the Campus* Regular press releases should al»o
go out aU tlre-tltne;-
4 Home-coming, etc, should receive greater publicity and a
apeeial effort to improve the
quality of events should be
made to encourage greater
participation.
5 Strict eligibility rules for
Uiose running for office on the
Students' Council should be
enforced. To prepare the .potential student leaders for
Student Council offices:
a A booklet containing the his
tory   of   the   University,   the
r A.M.S. history and background
of the various A.M.3. projects,
and a presentation of the administration and the gentral
problems of the AJ.M.S. should
be compiled.
b A week's 'administration seminar on student leadership
should be organised with noon-
hour talks fay Deans, Student
OffKOTST Dr. MaceKnait and
other . apptoprlate persons.
This, could al&o -ihdlude semi-
nmrs ami films on leadership
nnd A.M^.-pfpblSons;-.
c Encourage students to attend
their Student Council's meetings.
« There is need for greater coordination of the activities of
the students through the office of the Coordinator of Activities.
*
7 There ls something decidedly
wrong with the present system
of representation on the Students' Council and the, A.M.S.
Constitution. Unsuccessful attempts have been made during
the past years to remedy the
situation/
it ls recommended that this
year again, a five-man committee with a Strong chairman
be appointed to revise * the
whole constitution of the
A.M.S. The committee be
asked to prepare their recommended revision for jvresenta-
tion to the student body as
early us possible during the
first term.
!•_'
#
EVERY SUCCESS
TO THE
University Of British Columbia
Sharp and Thompson
Berwick, Pratt
ARCHITECTS
8 It should bp the endeavour of
T3 the Students' Council to get
„ as'r'many students interested
and working with the Students'
Council's activities and proj-
eots, as -possible. The Counoil
members should act as a liaison between the various
committees or commissions
and the Students' Council with
non-councillors a* chairmen of
the committees.
SPORTS
There are .generally two polntH
of view regarding athletics.
1 Sports  for  the «ake of spectators.
2 Sports for the sake of participants.
"Sports for the sake of participants" is the point of view, that
in my opinion, should form tha
basis of <any athletic policy of an
educational institution like our
University. Besides, at this University, we don't have sufficient
funds available to make the "sports
for the sake of spectators" point
ot view, successful. Of course an
effort should always be present
to make the game sufficiently Interesting for the "spectator's sake"
by putting greater emphasis oi.
trainiuif and practice, This should.
In my opinion, be the principle
which should form the yardstick
to measure the Athletics program
on the CanipiiH by the Student*'
Council.
It Is recommended to set up a
Joint Student-Faculty Cojnniittae
with an impartial chairman to report to the Students' Council the
Athletic: situation ut U.U.C. with
suggestions for Improvements.
This would mean an evaluation of
the functioning of the "Of.trom
Plan" over the past two years
which would be luid before the
student body at the annual meeting of the A.M.S. next March.
Any Student 'Government has
the right to exist only if it serves
the purpose that it should serve.
Today there exists "the challenge"
before the Student Government
that should be met fn order that
its existence may be justified.
It should be apprehended therefore, that In order to meet this
"challenge" adequately It ia highly
important that we confront the
"ch'allenge" from every angle ho
that we may bave a degree of success.
Tendency Is also Increasing In
North American I'niversities I'm
lireuter control over Student At-
lairs "by the Administration. Fortunately, on this Campus, the Student Coveriiiiiient is quite autonomous and is allowed to make its
own decisions, even its own mistakes. Tiie council must act wisely for the good of the whole student body so as to alwnys present
a unified front to the Admlnistra
Hon and to the 'body that it represents, Any open breach will create a lack of support In Uie students with a resultant chaos which
could be drastic for the Student
Government.
Past history shows that successful Student Governments can only
hope to get a "well done'' grudgingly acknowledged by the students!
On the other hand, a poor council
can he branded (often unjustly) in
such a manner as to have dier
results for each member of tho
council,        *
*
It is my sincere hope that the
1952-53 Students' Council will cooperate fully in the pursuit to in!
fill their responsibilities as student councillors in, what we all
consider, the best Interests of the
Student body, and which should
conform with Ihe best Interests ol'
the University and the community.
RAGHBIR  SINGH   BASI,
President
Welcome U£.C. Class of '56
May Success Crown Your Endeavours
An invitation: U.B.C. students and their friends are cordially invited to visit our newly dnlarged and
modernized shop. We provide a complete Floral Service for all occasions'
ii ii Specializing In i'i
CORSAGES-Artistically designed and moderately priced for UBC students
Exclusive Flowers and Gifts — City Delivery
New Owner, Ford Fletcher
Florists to U.B.C. for Many Years
Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere
Point Grey Flower Shop
4429 W. 10th Ave.
Phone: AL. 0660
Best Wishes
THE FLAME
Vancouver's Largest Cabaret Dance Floor
SPECIAL RATES FOR STUDENT BANQUETS
H. MILDETION
1353 West llth Avenue
The Paramount
Music Service Ltd.
at
445 RICHARDS ST., — PA. 5<l40 . PA. 3030
5929 FRASER ST. - ELGIN 4912
608 AGNES ST., NEW WESTMINSTER — N.W. 3442
eru £tudio
Welcomes the 1052 Class. Come in and visit us for all
your photographic needs.
PICTURES OF DISTINCTION
J. C. Rushant
4538 West 10th Ave. ALma 2404
— Pho&e Anytime For Appointments —
frosty Stuxjuui.Jjwm
BOWELL MACLEAN
MOTOR CO. LTD.
Dealers For
CADILLAC     BUICK     PONTIAC
315£urrardSt.
Vancouver, B.C.
^>«^a^a^^ io you.
SPECIALIZING IN PRINTING
for
FRATERNITIES
and
SORORITIES
Gehrke
STATIONERY AND PRINTING CO.
566 Seymour
Vancouver's most popular shopping centre forv{(ne
quality ladies apparel.
SPECIALIZING IN
Vancouver's most diversified collection of coat, suit
ensembles, dress creations and sportswear in imported
British, Scottish and French materials.
524-30 Granville St. TA 1487
VINCENT - VISINI
Dance Studio
GRANT VINCENT — KAYE VISINI
Official Dance Instructors for the U.B.G.
DANCE CLUB
ACROBATIC - TAP - BALLET
National and Ballroom Dancing
518 WEST HASTINGS
PA 883(5
Best Wishes
TO ALL THE
University Students
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 Beach Avenue
Vancouver, H.C,
c€m£ (xSia/lga,
BELL and MITCHELL
Limited
Insurance and Real Estate
641 Richards St. Vancouver, B.C.
MA. 6441
UNIVERSITY BUS FARES
Special Student's Fare with Certificate
On presentation of a University of British
Columbia Identification Card, students may travel
within the University Endowment Lands fare
zone with payment of a 10 for 35c Student's Ticket
or 4c cash. This fare does not permit a transfer.
The Identification Card to be presented is issued
in the Registration Booklet and is the same card
used lor identification at the Library.
Regular Fares
If identification card i.s no) shown the regular
fare will be charged; 5 for 35e Ticket, or 7e cash.
Transfers are issued if requested on payment
ol' regular fare which will be honored at the
Bianca Loop I'or travel on City lines on payment
of an additional 10c cash fare.
Vancouver City transfers are honored on
the UBC. bus at Dlanca Loop on payment of an
addil ional fie cash faro.
S. C. Clectric *#MMHM
„^_
IMP
THtttSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,1952
THB UBYSSEY
MAY SUCCESS
ATTEND YOU
B. W. N. BONE
Chartered Accountant
789 W.Pender St.
TA. 1954
Compliments of
Commodore Cabaret
?Y~A
T
(Se*t Wl*he*
from
ALASKA
PINE 6l  CELLULOSE
LIMITED
602 W. HASTINGS STREET
AUSTIN
ht
Dttdh - D$mmtnthn - thkmy
CALL
$l*dLHL cSjWA..
10th & Alma
CE. 8105
«^BMH^M
Best Wishes and Every Success
CAVE
AND
COMPANY
LIMITED
Scientific Instruments and Chemicals
(1
567 Hornby St.
Vancouver, B.C.
GOOD WISHES TO THE NEW CLASS
Come In . . .
and listen your favorite selections in our Modern Record
Shop.
Thomson & Page Ltd.
291.4 OranviUe South
CH. 5144
The Welding Industries are also Making a Significant
Contribution to the Industrial Progress
In British Columbia
SCOTT - FOSTER LTD.
"Your Welding Sfcipply House"
539 East Hastings Street HA. 0257
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Best Wishes for Your Future Success
Glad to See You Back
from
Nicks Grill
5700 University Blvd.
AL 1679
$haphk 9ndjuAbiM&
dtimtoicf
»- #
Photographers — Artists
Manufacturers of Scan-a-graver Plastic Half-tone Cuts
198 E. Hastings, Vancouver       TA. 6929
Local Boy Penn
New Athletic Boss
One of Vancouver's native sons,
Dick Penn, is UBQ's brand new
athletic director.
Penn replaces former athletic
director Bob Robinett who left
UBC to take a Job as head football
coach   at   the   University  of  Sun
Dick ls a graduate of tho UBC
Fraflclsco.
Phys Ed Department and Is now
(solving his fourth year on the staff
of this Department.
Penn, who Is a young mnn of
twenty-eight summers, haa devoted
approximately ninety per cent of
his life to sports. During his sojourn at Magee High School Dick
wa*» Involved In almost every sport
available.
After serving three years In the
Air F*orce he once more returned
to athletics at UBC.
For two years he played tackle
on the Thunderbird Football squad.
During another two years Dick was
a harried but efficient manager of
UBC's Senior " Basketball Team.
For tlio pnat throe years he has
been directed of Intramural activities.
Wehn questioned on his policy
for the coming year, the new athletic director sal dthat he will continue the plim which was started
by Mr. Uoblnett.
Dick Is not satisfied with the
University's student managerial
system and one of his main aims
will be to knit this Into a weil functioning unit.
This year, tliere aro not one, but
two Penns on tho starf of the Phys
Ed department. Dick's wife, the
former Miss Marjorlo Miller ls a
dancing instructor.
SPORTSWRITERS NEEDED
TO COVER UBC GAMES
Judging by the mayhem and the assorted blood and
guts strewn on the grass around the lilypond, there are a
reasonable number of frosh on the campus who are interested in sport (if you call ducking Engineers a sport.
Since these hypothetical freshmen wish to live dangerously we would like to spread the gospel to all these
creatures to drop around to the Ubyssey sports office.
This plush-lined residence is located in the north basement of Brock Hall. Here in the hallowed halls of bull-
slinging you can learn to smoke marijuana, leer at females,
sneer at everything in general and you might even pick up
a few clues about sportswriting.
You meet the most inteiesting lunkheads on the campus
at the pub office and a little of their intellectual sophistication may rub off on you.
We get in lots of trouble, we have a few parties
(spelled brawls) during the year and we have a helluva
good time.
Come on down and we will issue you your own personally engraved hole ln the head.
HYGRADE
The Favorite Supply House Foi*
t •
Radio Servicemen, Amateurs and
Experimenters
• •m-
Here they may choose from Vancouver Largest
Assortment of Radio Parts and Equipment
Hy grade Radio Ltd.
971 Richard. SI.
TA. 1421
Best Wishes
*
Mayor Hume
I      »
Best Wishes to the U.B.C. From
J. R. WILLIAMS and SON
Assaying and Ore Testing
Metallurgical Work Exclusively
580 Nelson St.
MA. 9821
Soccer Opens Sun.
UBC's two soccer teams, the
"Birds" und the "Chiefs" will practice this afternoon on tlio upper
field opposite tho Biology building.
Many of last years players have
returned but as far as couch
l,uckett Is concerned all positions
aro open to those win prove their
worth.
Thero will also be an Important
meet ins for all those who are interested in playing soccer at 12:30
Friday in Arts 108. Bring your
timetables.
Tho Chiefs are schoduled to open
the season this Sunday afternoon
at West Memorial Park. They will
meet tho Sons of Norway at 2:30.
NEW CAR REGS.
All students with cars who are
planning to take in the big football
game on Saturday afternoon may
find a little trouble trying to park
in front of the Stadium or anywhere along the East Mall.
New parking regulations forbid
parking In the vicinity of the stadium.
Instead, students are roi|Uireil to
park in tho parking lot outside of
the New (lym or in the lot between
the Weatbrook building and the
lliology building.
Se*t Wi*he*
Canadian Forest Products
LIMITED
999 W. Pender St.
Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 7341
ATTENTION  ENGINEERS
WE ARE SPECIALISTS IN ...
Supply and repair of instruments of all makes for Engineering,
Surveying, Marine and Aviation.
THE FINEST ...
SWISS DRAWING INSTRUMENTS AND SETS,
GERMAN SLIDE RULES AND SCALES.
ARISTO
PLASTIC SLIDE RULES
No.   89 — The preferred rule in general engineering.
No. 967 — Universal rule for natural and engineering
sciences.
No. 968 — Polyphase duplex with trigonometric side con*
taining T, ST, DF, CF, CIF, CI, C, D, P, S. Exponential side containing LL01, LL02, LL43, A, B,
L, K, C, LL3, LL2, LL1.
Prices from $6.00 to $13.00.
KERN
DRAUGHTING SETS AND INSTRUMENTS
Instruments made from the finest Swiss steel and ranging
from moderately priced sets of student quality to professional
sets of all sizes. Priced below those of interior quality.
Equipment for all students and professional engineers
Suppliers of scientific instruments for all uses.
FREDERICK GOERTZ LIMITED
1170 Robson St.
Vancouver, B.C. 8
THE   UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1052
Warmest Good Wishes
To  The   New  Term
from
Vancouver's Oldest and Largest Company,
Specializing in Oil-Fired Heating for Homes.
aiUvite Cr.jCtd.
Birds Ready For
Opener Saturday
4-
OEORQIA
510 WEST GEORGIA PA 4371
Free Customer Parking Next Door
Compliments Of
University Transfer
4217 W. Uth Aye
AL. 1005
OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND
BEST WISHES
litky OhynAbiiynq
• -*•
Original Creations in Hats That are
Different
2B06 GranvUle St.
CH. 2433
A Hearty Welcome
To The Class 01 '56
May Success Attend You ALL
-" ■ «
Owl Drug
Co. Ltd.
Your Friendly Rexall Druggist
4421 W. 10th
AL. 1002
KEY-TAB
PUNCHED EXERCISE BOOKS
To fit Standard 11x8Vs> Loose Leaf Covers or
Zipper  Cases
5 - fiO-page Books of fine Writing Paper   to a package
KEY-TAB
Each book tabbed in a different position for handy
reference.
Book is to be removed  from  Binder and  used  flat
on desk.
When tilled may be filed away for Exam Reference.
Available in Plain, Narrow or Wide Ruling
Smith, Davidson and Wright
Limited
Vancouver — Victoria — Calgary — Edmonton
Manufacturers of KEYSTONE Brand
School and University Supplies
TWEEN CLASSES
AMS Cards
For Filmsoc
Showing
AMS cards must be presented to
ticket sellers Kllmsoc performances
hetore n student will be admitted
tills H0UBO11,
Only Faculty and students are
allowed* to attend the performances
and they must be identified us belonging to the University.
First showing by Filmsoc this
year will be the Perfect Woman
starring Patricia Roc with Stanley
llolloway and Nigel Patrick, on
September 30 ln the Auditorium.
* *       *
There will be a rehearsal of the
University Ban a at 12:30 Friday in
the Band Hut.
* *      *
The University Art Gallery, lo-
en ted ln the basement of. the library, Is displaying a show of
Western American lithographs representing work by some of the
best known contemporary American artists. The exhibition continues until October 4.
There will be a Raided tour of
the show during a noon hour next
week by Gordon Smith, well known
Vancouver artist and instructor in
lithography at the Vancouver
School of Art.    -
* *       *
The UUC Ski team will hold an
organizational meeting In Arts 104
on Tuesday, September 30 ait 12:30.
All those Interested are asked to
be present.
* *       *
A tea party for foreign students
nnd visiting professors will be
given at the Faculty Culb October
5 under the sponsorship of the International Houee Committee.
* ' *       *
EXECUTIVES
To club and Undergraduate Kxec-
TOUGH WITWORTH PIRATES
TO PROVIDE OPPOSITION
UBC Thunderbirds held their first scrimmage over the
weekend, and as a result of this inter-squad game, coaches
chose the 25 players who will start against Whitworth this
Saturday.
Coaches Jelly Andersen and Dick Mitchell were favourably
impressed by the performance of the 31 players who attended
Dick   Mitchell,  who  Is  the  lino*
ccieh this year, did not feel that
this  season's  numerous  "Imports"
would make up [or the loss ol' last
year's veterans.
"We are strong ln the backfield,"
staled Mitchell, "but there are it
few weak spots lnthe Une."
The squad has retained a goodly
number of last year's stars, and
students will recognize such<names
as George Poll, hnlf-back with Bob
Hin;'march, and Al fiszie, ends.
Gordle Flemons will be the start-
Ing nr.'eirter-back on Saturday.
Flemons was out last season with
an arm Injury, but coaches predict great things for the lanky,
dark-haired play-maker.
Flemons replaces Cal Murtfhy,
who Is now playing Canadian Football with CYO of the Vancouver
Blt{   Four   junior   football   league.
Six former UBC Thut}derWrds
are playing for the newly-formed
CYO sqund. Most of these players
are not returning to the university
this year,
JlfUL
Sports
Bill Hutchinson - Editor
utlves: Names and pjione numbers
of all club and undergrad societies
executives are needed Immediately.
Please turn in rifcmes and phone
numbers for your organization as
soon as possible to AMS office.
* *       *
'Ph© Student Uberal Club warmly urges all Its true friends and
supporters to turn out on Club Day,
to-day, and join our organization.
This will be our crucial year, and
now is the time for all good men
to come to the aid of their party.
* *       *
As part ot a program to expand
the sale of books, the University
book store will open in two weeks
time a small room behind the post-
office for the sale of books under
$1.10.
The Birds Face -
Date
September 27
October 4
October 11
October 18
October 24 (n)
November 1
November 8
November 15
Opponent Place
East. Wash. College UBC
College of Puget Sound UBC
West. Wash. College bellingham
Pacific Luthern College UBC
Whitworth College Cheney
Central Wash.. College UBC
West. Wash. College UBC
Whitman College (ten.) Parkland
Stars such as Leo Sweeney, Otf,
and Lou Murphy, and' Pete Greg-
the season's initial scrimmage,
year, are now bolstering the CYO
ory who played for the 'Birds lasl
squad.
Al Ezzle played one game for the
'Bird-stealing €Y(> team, but has
now decided definitely to play for
the University.
EzzJe was reluctant to play for
UBC this soason, because of a
technicality concerning his "Big
Block" letter.
Coach Anderson wait worried
about the lack of player material
In the guard position until big Dan
luzosky turned out definitely for
Monday's practice. Lazofcky played
for the 'BlrdB two seasons ago.
Over 31 players turned out for
the weekend scrimmages, and although only 2'> will be dressed on
Saturday, the six additional men
will not be dropped from the squad.
Eaid Athletic Director Dick
Penn, "We are dressing 25 men
on Saturday, but that, does not
mean that these 25 players will be
used In every other game throughout the Benson. We will most cer
tainly give the other boys u chance
to play.
4 The .UBC coaching staff has no
definite idea about Whltworth's
playliig strength.
Explained   Dick   IMtchell,   "The
Whltwoirth squad are an unknown
quantity   as   far  as   we  are   con
cerned, a« they have a new head
(ioacM   this   year."
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PAcific 5321
m LIFE OFCANADA
Best Wishes
PUMP SUPPLY and
EQUIPMENT Co. Ltd
136 East Cordova Street
Photographic Surveys
(Western) Ltd.
AIR SURVEY ENGINEERS
Lyle G. Trorey, P. Eng., Norman E. McConnell, P. Eng.
Vancouver International Airport
KE. 7800
COLLINS
and
COLLINS
Chartered Accountants
470 Granville St.
MA. 0564
V
EATON'
To keep you 'Singin' in the Rain," happy in the classroom . . .
here's an outfit with but a single thought: to make you the
smartest girl pn the campus this Fall. Let the thunder gods roar
or old Sol shipe, you'll be ready with this ensemble from
EATON'S . . . priced to pamper your clothes allowance.
AH-Weather Coat with Hat
Worsted repp in two-tone pencil stripe pattern.
Black velvet trim. Blue, grey, rust. Sizes 10 to 16.
Each 38.00
Matching Single
Breasted Suit
Two-tone pencil stripe pattern in
blue, grey or rust. Worsted repp.
Black velvet trim. Sizes 10 to 16.
Each 39.00
EATON'S Suits and Coats-
Second Floor
Red Accessaries Ta Add Calaur
Leather Over Shoulder Bag—
Roomy style with gold coloured
fastener. Each 9.95
Cotton Short Gloves—Sizes 6y2
and 7. Pair 2.98
Chiffon-Like Neck Square-
Each 980
Umbrellas From New York—10-
rib with Acetate cover, snakeskin
handle. Each                        9.93
EATON'S Handbags, Gloves,
Neckwear, Umbrellas—
Main Floor
V

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