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The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1924

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Full Text

 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  NOVEMBER 6th, 1924
No. 6
McKECHNIE CUP RUGBY
l^AME FOR THANKSGIVING
Varsity and Vancouver Rep. to Clash at Brockton Point Oval.
Biggest Game Yet—Monday Afterncon.
Varsity ruggers will defend the Mc-
Kechnie_CjirvJtfonday, when the stars
of tneMiller Cup teams meet Vancouver's representative fifteen in the
opening game of the provincial series.
Varsity supporters at the game will
see one of the best displays of team
work ever shown at the Brockton
Point oval, according to the Rugby
Club officials who say that, although
the collegians will not have an easy
time, they expect to have the long end
of the score.
Vancouver has not had the McKechnie Cup since Varsity entered the
series and the city team has been
whipped into shape early this year to
give the men a greater opportunity
for team play. Vancouver_supporters
are confident that the Rep~squad will
carry the cup off this season and large
numbers are expected to be out Monday to support the team.
The Rugby Club has made arrange
ments to have the Pep Band on hand
and the grandstand will be treated to
the finest music that the Heinz Fifty-
seven has been able to produce. The
team men say they expect a hard
fight and need the support of the whole
student body as well as that of the
band.
Arts '28 has responded to the call
for support and that class will go to
the match in a group following a parade under the leadership of the class
marshal.
The full team will not be picked to
represent Varsity until after Saturday's game when the two Miller Cup
teams meet one another. Although
the collegians hope they will have no
men injured in this game, they are
determined that the best team shall
win and have stated that they will
give the Miller Cup fans a fine exhibition Saturday even at a risk of
injuring some of their McKechnie men.
VARSITY WINS BY
LENDID MARGIN
Team Covers
Itself With Glory.
Varsity Juniors figured in a comedy
on Saturday, and so capably performed their roles' that the Player's Club
ought to be extending a few invitations.
For 90 minutes Varsity and__Cirrjst
Church waded about in the waves of
Woodland Park, during which time
the ball was returned to centre twelve
times. To enumerate, four of the
goals were registered during the first
half when the College team worked
hard; seven followed in the second,
when they were presumably resting
on their oars. After the score stood
6-0, Kinhy Stuart decide he'd have
more fun chasing the ball than stopping it, and watched a long bouncing
shot trickle over, on perhaps the only
direct shot at his citadel during the
entire game. Then Varsity proceeded
to pile on another five, and to miss
chances enough to lose them half a
dozen games. Gaudin and Spillsberry
each netted four, Stevenson got 2, and
Black one. The half backs did some
great stunts to try to break into the
fun, and even Smith had his chance
to share the goal, but he missed his
penalty kick. Dave Taylor was particularly to the fore as a candidate
for goals, but poor luck kept him out.
The victory should go a long way to
raise Varsity's status, especially since
they fielded more or less a scratch
team while the Churchmen were out
with their strongest line-up this season.
Line-up—Stewart, Smith and Fuller-
ton, Cunningham, Howarth and Taylor, McKinnon, Jaudin, Stevenson,
Spillsberry and Black.
GREAT GAMES
yyON SATURDAY
Miller Cup Men Must Win to
Stay" InTRunning
It is to be hoped that the approaching McKechnie Cup game will not
make students overlook the important Miller Cup tussles scheduled for
Saturday afternoon. These fixtures
will give everybody a chance to size
up the Varsity players, for every McKechnie Cup man will be playing. The
Varsity team plays Wanderers at 2.30
and U. B. C. encounters thg~ league
leading Rowing Club in the second
game. The Varsity bunch have so far
failed to chalk up a victory, and it is
absolutely necessary for them to defeat their opponents this Saturday to
remain in the running. Wanderers
have a fast, tricky bacK line, and the
University three-quarters, who are
practically the McKechnie Cup backs,
will have to go all out to hold them.
However, they are confident of victory.
The second game is expected, by
keen critics of rugby, to be one of the
tit-bits of the season. So far the Rowing Club fifteen have not lost a match,
and at present lead the league by two
full games. They are at top strength
and expect to add another win to
their unbroken string of victories this
Saturday. The U. B. C. team, containing most of tlie senior forwards,
is admitted to be the team to retain
the Miller Cup for the University. So
far they have won one game and lost
one, and to be real contenders for
titular honors they must stop the onward march of Rowing Club- Admittedly they have a~sTFveriT task ahead
of them, and they will need all tne
noise and rooters they can possibly
get. If the Rube Band turns out with
half the college, U. B. C. can't possibly lose, so take the hint, everybody.
INTERESTING
DEBATE AT
MEETING
Women's Lit. Uncovers Some
ExcellenriVtaterial at
fnter-class Contest    )
The Women's Literary Society
staged a lively debate on Wednesday
last, when the women of Arts '27 and
'28 debated for the first point towards
the shield. The subject was "Resolved that the Recent Soviet Treaty was
in the best interests of England." Miss
Ross, Dr. Walker and Mr. Sage kindly
consented to act $ jiiftges.
Miss Kathleen 'Baird, leader for the
affirmative, opened the debate. She
spoke well and presented each of her
points clearly. Miss Baird laid chief
stress on the rebuilding of world trade
and the advantage the treaty would
be to England, by supplying her with
raw materials from Russia and by giving her a market in that country, thus
aiding to solve the unemployment
question   in   England. „   The   speaker Vf\
then summed up her
concluding paragr.
points
c!?La W'
Miss N$m Hadgkiss,fleader for the
negative first enumerated the points
she and her colleague would develop,
and then proceeded to work out her
own part in the debate. She stressed
the Liberal's condemnation of the
treaty, and maintained that, as the
document was improperly described
as a treaty, this false pretense would
lead to misunderstanding in the future.
Miss Hadgkiss stated that, the agreement was a non-commital farce not
representative of the people, and was
fostering the Soviet policy which, she
maintained, is unchristian, unintellee-
tual, and, reactionary. *^
The1 riext speaker was Miss Jean
Tolmie\ who argued against ""ffiuPfact
fffaT~England would be contaminated
by association with the present Russian government. The speaker then
presented some very firm arguments
in favor of the treaty, emphasizing its
advantages towards world peace. Having enumerated her points as she had
discussed them, the speaker then gave
place to Miss Fugler, the second Speaker for the negative. jy\     I'j '■ *
Miss Fugler maintained that the
Russians would be better able to
spread propaganda in England if the
treaty were accepted, and that England would be lowering her prestige
by concluding an agreement with a/
government such as that in power in
Russia to-day.
Miss Baird then gave a five minute
rebuttal, in which she carefully refuted most of the points laid down by
the negative.
The judges were unanimous in giving their decision in favor of the affirmative. Mr. Sage gave an interesting criticism of the speakers, adding
that he hoped to hear the two debators
from '28 matching their wits with
an Oxford Women's team, which might
be touring the country sometime in
the future.
After the meeting, refreshments
were served.
PEP MEETING
TO BE HELD
^FRIDAY
Noise Makers to Rouse Great
Enthusiasm For Saturday
And Monday
"They take their hats off to the
Artsmen's Undergrad," quoth Bert
Smith last week. He was lucky to
escape with his life for no sooner had
he spoken than Art Laing and Brit
Brock, the big men of Agriculture and
Science, leaped upon him and threatened to make him apologize. That is
how this idea of Friday's pep meeting started.
The argument will be settled tomorrow noon in the auditorium. It
promises to be hot and furious while
it las.ts and since each faculty is sure
that it is the best that the college has
seen the fight may take some time.
By common agreement the Aggies
will be allowed to entertain the other
faculties unless they attempt to make
fools of the Artsmen who this year
have organizsd to hold their own
against all comers. Science men say
they are just as good as they ever
were if not better but both the Aggies
and the Gowns call Science weak.
They will see, on Friday noon.
The Aggie programme to be presented for the whole university will
be rivalled only by the appearance of
the notorious, if not famous, Brick
McLeod, yell king supreme, who is
determined to put snap into all the
yells. Songs will be sung or howled
down at the discretion of the masses
of students and freshmen while the
co-eds will look with pride and amazement upon their shieks or latest crushes when the faculty yells are bellowed out.
(Continued on Page 2)
Annual Dance Given
By Players' Club
Hallowe'en Decorations Add
to Success of Party
One of the most delightful of Varsity
social events was held last Friday
night, in the form of the annual Players' Club Reception. New members
were formally received into the Club,
and old members renewed their connection with it. As for the decorations, well—gone was the influence of
stern professors and awe-inspiring
gown-flaunting seniors, and till the
mystic hour of twelve, the duties of
Hallowe'en reigned supreme. In addition, a graceful fountain, surrounded by waving palms, rose mysteriously from the centre of the room. Even
the cafeteria was transformed. During
the evening Miss Joan Meredith and
Miss Milla Alahan danced in costume,
"The Pumpkin Dance." Much credit
for the total success of the affair is
certainly due to the hard-working committees, who ably assisted the executive of the Club.
J* ^ <
THE   UBYSSEY
November 6th, 1924
An excellent assortment in
our Sporting Goods Dept.,
4th Floor.     Best values in
the city.
LADIES' AUTO.—Very popu-
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Per pair
— v ery popu-
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MEN'S AUTO. —A splendid
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Special, per pair    u)T»vU
BOYS' and GIRLS' SPECIAL
HOCKEY SKATES.    Per pair
$2.25 & $1.50
We also carry
SKATING SHOES
for all feet.
David Spencer
Limited
MEN'S LIT. HOLDS
REGULAR MEETING
'he Men's Lit. held its first regular
meeting last Thursday. The question
discussed was whether or not a metropolitan area should be established in
Vancouver and its suburbs. The turnout was very poor and the quality of
the subject-matter of the various
speeches was not much better. This
was due in part, perhaps, to insufficient notice. But, unless all those who
are interested in public-speaking attend, and not only attend but come
with at least some information on the
subject under consideration, the meetings can never be a success. Moreover, the men should remember that
unless one has already taken part in
discussions at the Men's Lit he will
not be eligible for position on the
teams participating in outside debates.
All those, especially the men in the
first two years, who are interested in
debating and public-speaking should
attend.
SPORT NOTES
Varsity's grass hockey team made
a name for itself this year by stepping
right out and holding the Vancouver-
ites to a draw. This is the kind of
stuff everybody likes to see. Every
effort should be made to encourage
minor sports. But it seems that a
team has to win a game or do better
than was expected of them before any
notice is taken of it.
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
Ihe Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nova Scotia
The rugby men are going to have
a big day next Saturday, and also on
Thanksgiving day. It is hard on
on the McKechnie men that they will
have to play a Miller cup game two
days before playing Vancouver. However it will be all the more credit to
them if they win. Varsity must have
lots of rooters at that game.
/There are some games, especially
in the minor sports, that reporters of
this paper can't be at, hence officials
of the different clubs should try and
get in touch with the reporters, or the
Sport editor if they want to get a
story in, and they should do it on
Monday instead of waiting until all
space is taken. All contributions will
be welcomed by the Sport Editor who
is anxious to boost the minor sports
as much as possible.
CHECK-BACK
OVERCOATS
Regular values to $30.00 in this exceptional group
of over 500 Big, Roomy Overcoats, tailored from
finest imported Check-back Tweeds in Fawn,
Green, Blue, Grey, Brown or fancy mixtures.
Venetian quilted quarter linings, patch pockets,
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Your  unrestricted  choice
this week at   -
$22.00
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49  HASTINGS  STREET,  EAST
FEARSOME BEASTS
x TRAPPED ON HIKE
An unexpected game hunt featured
the last hike of the Outdoor's Club.
Six members received a shock when
they arrived at their cabin. They
found two wild animals glaring at them
from the interior.
"For the love of Mike," exclaimed
Jack, showing a sudden desire to return home  for lunch.
"My kingdom for a gun," murmured little Walt.
"Huh," grunted Dobson. "What's
the use of that? Let's force them out."
Then the excitement commenced.
Various methods for expelling the unwelcome intruders were tried, but not
very enthusiastically, it must be admitted. Finally, however, more by good
luck than by good management, the
uninvited guests were trapped—in a
jam tin. They were two inoffensive
and harmless mice. One was cremated
via the chimney and the other was
stabbbed by Dobson. Thus ended the
great game hunt.
Although all this sounds foolish, it
is the only way of the Outdoor's Club
to remind other members or anybody
that the roof MUST be on next Saturday. The ridge and shakes have yet
to be put on before the snow puts an
end to operations. The more members,
the less work for all concerned. So
turn out and lend a hand.
Pep Meeting to be
, Held Friday Noon
) (Continued from Page 1)
Arts had a one-sided meeting last
week at which only a few Aggies were
present. This was due to fact that
the judging teams of Agriculture were
away at Portland. The Aggies say
that they will show the world who has
the pep. Science men are still burning
under the blow they received when
Charlie Mottley's crew ridiculed their
now notorious Engineer Yell. They
have something up the legs of their
overalls which will likely break at the
meeting.
The pep meetings are arranged
especially to create interest for the
games the following Saturday and this
week it will be also to create interest
for the Monday game.
All students are asked to learn the
words of the new college song that
will be used on any occasion when the
songsters get together at the University affairs. Those in charge of the
songs and yells are anxious to have
other songs sent in at once, that a
brand new set of songs and yells can
be arranged.
Be sure to learn the words of the
song, is the order sent out by Yell
King, Brick McLeod.
"In those dear old college days,
In those dear old college days,
Free from sorrow, care and strife,
The happiest moments of my life,
You can hear those banjos ring,
You can hear those voices sing
"And here we have U. B. C."
Kitsilano, Capilano, Siwash, Squaw,
In those dear old college days."
/\
AT THE  STRAND
Betty Balfour has been called "Brit!
ain's Queen of Happiness." With a
"nom de plume" like that anyone would
be incited to superhuman efforts to
please and when Miss Balfour is incited something happens—witness
"Squibs" Honeymoon now showing at
the Strand. The added features are
usually good and include "Felix, the
Cat."   A good evening's entertainment.
"Single Wives" featuring Milton Sills
and Coreen Griffiths is the Strand attraction for next week.
Seek ye the truth ?
Then Read This !
We, the J. W. GEHRKE
Co., Ltd., are the only
people designing, engraving, embossing and printing
a full range of Autograph
and Private Christmas
Cards in British Columbia.
We created a pay-roll for
the Province when we
commenced manufacturing
fourteen years ago.
We guarantee that no
better cards are produced
on the continent. Our
prices are lower.
Keep ALL your money in
B. C. while you are here.
GEHRKE'S at
651 SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAMS
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B.C. Public Stenographers
  FOR 	
ACCURACY AND INTELLIGENT WORK
115 Bank of Nova Scotia Building
Phone, Sey. 2696 602 Hastings St., W.
Science Seniors      /
Stage *-Smoker
(In spite of the kind permission of
the  Students'  Council)
Time—Nov. 3rd, 8 p.m.—Nov. 4th,
3 a.m.
Place—The Notorious O'Brien Hall,
B. C.
Participants—A score and ten members and ex-members of our militant
brotherhood, also four profs, all present in body and "spirits."
Act I.—"Trial" of one of our regular guys who was accused of an unheard-of crime—the crime of attending a C. E. 19 lecture on October 27,
1924. The jury declared the prisoner
guilty—thereby ruining a "perfect"
reputation.    ...
Act II.—Refreshments—each treating his own self.
Act III.—The last but not the least,
in fact the foremost. Consisted of a
few sociable and profitable games.
Conclusion—Very considerable attention was paid to the nine o'clock
lecture on Novermber 4, 1924, by the
.    .    .    .    room walls.
Rugby!     Rugby!     Rugby!
See   You  at the  Game
Monday, 2.45.   Brockton Point
Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep. November 6th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
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Pennants
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any color or design, at specially
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SKATES        SKATING BOOTS
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]   SPORT NEWS
SENIOR SOCCER
MEN DEFEATED
Westminster United Run Up
Large Score
Varsity's first soccer team went
down to defeat before the clever Westminster UnitecL eleven at Con Jones
ParKTjfPSaturday in a game featured
by close checking and numerous injuries. For the first half and until
well on in the second there was no
score, but the final count, sad to tell,
was 4-1 in favor of the Royals.
Play opened with Westminster attacking. The grassy field, which was
bad enough to start with, became a
mud puddle before the end. It was
extremely difficult to control the ball
this being one of the reasons why no
score resulted in the first half. The
Varsity half-back line, Buckley, Phillips and Ledingham, played their
usual good fighting game, sticking
right on to the outside men and checking like fiends. Rarely did they allow
the forwards to break away and when
they did Baker and Crute were always there. Roy King, Varsity's
youthful custodian, turned aside some
hard shots in this period and made a
big hit with the crowd. Auchinvoile
on the forward line played hard, but
the opposing centre half seemed to
have him bottled.
After the oranges, play continued
for a time much the same as in the
first half. Gradually Westminster took
control, Phillips, who had been laid
out in the first half, finding the going
pretty stiff. Emery and -Cameron
broke away twice but the opposing defense was too strong, Smith proving a
tower of strength at back and Max
Shiles clearing what shots he had to
stop. It was well on in this period
when Referee Cowan gave a penalty
against Baker.. Minto converted on a
hard drive which King all but stopped.
This reverse seemed to dampen TJ.
B. C.'s ardor, for five minutes later
Gain put Westminster two up with a
hard shot from close in. Varsity,
working on the theory that they now
had everything to win and nothing to
lose, threw all hands on the attack.
Crute and Baker played up while Phillips, who had been painfully injured,
gamely played back. Their efforts
were rewarded when Bobby Jackson
who played well throughout, scored on
a cross from Crute. Varsity continued
their desperate rush but while the
backs were striving for a goal Minto
and Blair tallied for Westminster, the
final count being 4-1. King had no
chance on either shot.
The score is absolutely no indication
of play. Auchinvoile and Jackson had
hard luck with their shots and Emery,
Phillips and Jackson were all injured.
By their sheer grit, fighting spirit,
and gentlemanly play, Varsity more
than ever endeared themselves to Vancouver soccer fans and will be heard
from before the season is over. The
line-up: King, Crute and Baker, Buckley, Phillips and Ledingham, Cameron,
Butler, Auchinvoile, Jackson and
Emery.
Our sturdy males are not lounge
lizards—no indeed, they're balcony
warmers.
Rugby!     Rugby!    Rugby!
See  You  at the  Game
Monday, 2.45.   Brockton Point
Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep.
B. C. CRICKETERS
^DEFEAT VARSITY
Grass Hockey Game Is Closely
Contested
Bad weather conditions and a heavy
field failed to dampen the ardor of
grass hockey enthusiasts on Saturday
when the B. C. Cricketers defeated U.
B. C. 5-4 in a strenuous game at Brockton Point.
For the first part of the initial
period play was all one way, the
Cricketers running through four goals
in rapid succession. Varsity fought
right back and tallied twice before
half time. After the half U. B. C. kept
up the pressure and tied the score
4-all on the Cricketers. In spite of
this remarkable comeback, Cricketers
won the game when Finney, who played well throughout, shot the winning
goal past Bert Smith who had no
chance to save. The U. B. C. line-up
was: Smith, Dohmi and Kania, Duncan, Hincks and Tamura, P. Wainraan,
Bhagat, C. Wainman, Masterson and
Woodman.
sity Second Teont_
Draws with Students
On Saturday the Varsity Second
Team played a 1-all draw wrtmTie
Chinese Students at Templeton Park,
-4«—ft—garmrTKaT," on the run of the
play, they should have won at least 3-0.
There could have been no more dismal spectacle on any of the soccer
fields in the city than that of the TJ.
B. C. boys going out into a downpour
of rain on a grassy, yet muddy field.
Play opened with the Chinese pressing.
In less than ten minutes their centre
forward, who throughout played a brilliant game, eluded Disney and Warden
and shot dead on at Sutherland. Sutherland saved but the ball dropped to
the ground about six inches from the
goal line. A scramble followed in
which the ball did not move but the
referee unjustly awarded the Chinese
a goal.
Varsity came back strong, Evans
and McLuckie the outside men playing
remarkably well in spite of the greasy
ball and slippery field. Their crosses
were well placed but time and again
the Varsity inside forwards failed to
score. It was not until ten minutes
from the time that Newcombe scored
on Evans well-taken corner. For Varsity, Sutherland in goal played his best
game of the season, turning aside five
dangerous shots in the last few minutes. Gibbard, Reid and Robertson
shone on the half line while Chinese
were best served by their centre and
the two fullbacks.
Varsity line-up—Sutherland, Warden
and Disney, Gibbard, Reid and Robertson, McLuckie, Newcombe, Cant, Alsbury and Evans.
^BADMINTON NOTES
The Varsity Badminton Club was
successful in its match against the
Kerrisdale Club on Saturday. Although the score (21-3) seems overwhelmingly in favor of Varsity, the
sets were keenly contested, often going
to three games. The Kerrisdale players proved excellent hosts and a delightful supper was enjoyed before the
open fire of their club-house. In the
ladies' events, Varsity was represented by Misses Creer, Creig, Keillor
and Matheson while Messers Hockin,
Hincks, Marion and Shakespeare
played in the men's events.
Fair Isle
Sweaters
As sponsored by the
Prince of Wales.
Available here in
various colors at
$17.50
-Drysdale's Spoits Shop
Third Floor.
-^
575 Granville St.
ij
P0LL|N'PIN
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for Ihe
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
Scotch
Quality !
The Basket Ball featured
at 1020 is made in Scotland, especially for us, of
tough Old Country hide,
and is built on an American
model—$10.00. This
price is exceptionally low.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1A/%A  GRANVILLE
1UZU  STREET 1/
THE   UBYSSEY
November 6th, 1924
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued   every   Thursday  by   the   Publications Board of the University of
British  Columbia.
Extra  Mural  Subscription,   $2.00 per
Session.
For  Advertising  Rates,   apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITOBI/I. STArP
Editor-in-Chief ...T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A.  Earle Birney
William C.  Murphy
Exchange  Editor John   Grace
Literary  Editor Miss  Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters—Florence Williams, Marion
Smith, Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright, G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor. T. S. Byrne, F, W. Dimmick,  Peter   Palmer.
BUSINESS   STAFF
Business  Manager H.  A.  Thompson
Circulation   Manager  E.   J.  Eades
Business  Assistants..-!!.   G.  McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
Leslie  Hardie
EDITOR   FOB   THE   WEEK
W.  C.   Murphy.
CONTRIBUTIONS
The receipt of numerous contributions from the students has been particularly gratifying to the Ubyssey this
year. Such an evidence of interest is
not only flattering, but is also encouraging. Nothing is more calculated to
deaden the enthusiasm or discourage
the efforts of the staff than a spirit of
passivity on the part of the student
body. A friendly attitude towards the
college paper is of course desirable,
but it is vastly more inspiriting when
students lend an active and definite
support.
We realize that there is much room
for improvement in the Ubyssey, but
a considerable amount could be effected by criticisms and intelligent suggestions from our readers. We have
been led to hope for this because of
the interest evinced by those who
have sent in contributions, and we are
extremely desirous of seeing this
praiseworthy practise continued. The
labor involved in publication is not
regretted, when we feel we have the
support of an interested body of students who are anxious to co-operate
with us in our efforts to make the
Ubyssey a truly representative organ.
\
THE BRITISH ELECTIONS
, At first thought, the results of the
' recent British elections may seem to
be of little practical significance to
the students of this University. The
decisive defeat of the Labor party may
appear to be merely a phenomenon of
passing, if somewhat spectacular, interest. To those, however, who are
so spendthrift as to indulge in second thoughts, something of a wider
import is apparent.
There have always been a large percentage of the thinking students within these academic walls in sympathy
with the ideals of Labor government,
and a smaller though certainly not
negligible number who champion Socialist movements. Although the interest in these social doctrines has
been on the whole sincere, there are
come enthusiasts whose zeal is for the
most part but that of the dilettante,
and it is amongst these that those
more extreme principles have found
voice, principles whose utterance apparently must be accompanied by expressions of contempt for conservatism and scornful intolerance of orthodoxy.
It is for students who fall under
this last class that the result of the
British elections should sound a note
of warning. Conservatism, it has been
made apparent, must be respected, at
the expense, no doubt, of rapid movement in Socialistic directions. It is
the general concensus of newspaper
opinion that the overwhelming defeat
of the Labor party is traceable mainly to the untimely odium arising from
the unskilful handling of the proposed
Anglo Russian treaty and, more particularly, from the rumored Soviet
plot. False or true, this scandal aroused fear and re-awakened Conservatism in the minds of a British public
not yet prepared for Socialism, let
alone Communism.
So it is that in Canada, where this
reactionary conservatism is also present, though in a less definite form,
those of us who have faith in the superior virtues of a Socialistic government should take care that, in asserting our views we look circumspected-
ly at the more radical phases of the
subject, these involving Communism
and kindred doctrines, lest we offend
this powerful tendency of the common
people to fight shy of radical changes,
and in so doing retard the movement
which we had hoped to hasten.
Socialism must evolve to some extent, and it is our part in the meantime to cultivate patience and avoid
intolerance of conservative views.
We flatter ourselves that we have
the courage to close with a platitude:
"Rome was not built in a day."
BY THE WAY
How to contribute to the Ubyssey:
write in pencil on both sides of the
tame page, contribution not less than
a thousand words, rehash last year's
smoker jokes, using dashes where convenient and at all other times, but always couching your efforts in highbrow
language, hand your little donation in
not more than two hours before the
Ubyssey is to be carried forth into
the arms of expectant students; don't
forget to remind us if your article
doesn't appear in the front page.
"And a little child shall lead us."
The class of '28 will parade down-town
Monday to initiate the great trek to
the Thanksgiving Day Rugby Game.
-0-
Lost—Purse containing Arts dance
ticket and $50.00 in cash. Never mind
money—please return ticket.
-0-
Music lovers should make an effort
to attend the Rugby game, Monday.
First appearance for the autumn season of that well-known musical corporation, the Varsity pep band.
BY-LAWS TO BE ENFORCED
The various by-laws of the Alma
Mater Society are to be more strictly
enforced by the marshal's organization, it was announced on Monday by
Mr. Taylor, Varsity Marshall. The
sub-marshals for each class have been
required to sign an oath to the effect
that they will enforce all University
regulations to the best of their ability
and uphold the University traditions
at all times.
Owing to the lack of observance,
prevalent in last few weeks it is anticipated tfcat there will be several
cases brought before the Student's
Council  in  the near future.
The chief evils to be concentrated
on are gambling, scalping on ticket-
sales and all similar breaches of University discipline. All students of the
University are earnestly requested to
co-operate with the marshal's organization to further this movement.
WHAT OTHER
EDITORS SAY
STUDENTS AND POLITICS
The unsuccessful attempt to secure
votes for out-of-town students on the
temperance plebiscite draws attention
to the attitude of LJniversity students
towards politics in general. The attitude of the average student is not a
satisfactory one. Most of us either
take little or no interest in politics
whatever, or else follow the line of
least resistance by adopting without
due consideration the view to which
we have been led by our environment,
our family traditions, or the flavour
of the society in which we have lived.
A student who attempts to get a
clear, unbiased and intelligent view of
current politics by a diligent process
of examination of facts, tracing their
causes and their results, is a rare
exception. In this respect the University of Toronto compares unfavourably with the universities of England,
by the ideals of which, in some respects, we are strongly influenced, it
would seem in everything but this. It
is not uncommon for students in the
old land to study politics from all
angles with a view to entering a
political career. How many Varsity
students would admit that they intended to enter politics later in life? We
have yet to meet one. And yet most
of us, no doubt, have in our inmost
mind a desire and a hope to do so,
which we dare not express for fear of
laughter and ridicule.
Politics seems to have fallen on evil
days and whether it is a result of a
degradation of politics itself or of an
erroneous conception which has spread
throughout the University, it is im-
po:sible at present to decide.
UNDERGRADUATE INTOLERANCE
It is generally conceded that one of
the main advantages of a university
education is its broadening effect on
the mind. Eventually, this may be
true of the individual student but is
it applicable during undergraduate
days?
We live in a sphere more or less
detached from the rest of the world
and we expect those in the outer
sphere to reverence and approve of
our University activities, while we can
see nothing of interest in the outside
world. Is this broad-mindness or intolerance?
How many Varsity students read the
morning papers for anything but news
as it applies to their university life?
How many Varsity students do any
more work outside the University than
is absolutely necessary?
We live entirely for the next Lit.
meeting, the Varsity-Queen's game,
and sometimes only for the next essay
or Lab. We move Heaven and Earth
to obtain novel favours or features for
our next dance! It is a matter big
enough to call a meeting of the League
of Nations, whether we shall have
apple or pumpkin pies at our next
hike! When we go about with a
crowd of university people, we travel
with that snug complacency of those
who know they are doing the right
thing with the right people.
The interest shown by students in
getting a vote for the coming plebiscite
is a step in the right direction. Yet
the world will seem a cold and cruel
place to the Varsity student who has
taken an active interest in his University. Let us temper our college interests with a little toleration for outsiders and their activities.
The Christmas concert of the Musical Society will be held on Saturday,
November 15 at 8.15, in the King Edward High School Auditorium. Tickets can be secured from any of the
members.
A Dainty Watch!
This dainty 14 fct. white gold
Watch, with 15-jewel movement, is one that will stand
exceptionally hard   wear.
On black silk ribbon, in
tonneau  and  octagonal
shapes,
at only
$22.50
WEAR   A   MANN'S   SHIRT
English Silk
Broadcloth
Shirts
$3.00
English Brushed
Wool Hose
These are  lite   latest   creations   in
Men's Hose
Worth $2.f)0.
Special at
$1.00
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt Specialists
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A  MANN'S SHIRT
Nothing conveys thoughtfulness and
cheer like a Christmas Portrait.
X
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hasting St., E.
(Juit Ea«t of B. C. E. Rly. and C»rr.ll St.)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Seymour Jj6<)
BREAKFAST AFTERNOON TEA
LUNCH DINNER
Phone. Seymour 8403
Open 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.    Closed Sunday
KRGYLE TEK ROOM
717 DUNSMUIR STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale's
Afternoon Tea Parties for Students
by arrangement.
Mrs. Agnes Orr Robinson, Proprietress
Home Cooking.
Entire Staff Canadian Women. November 6th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
POPULAR
FOOTWEAR
For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
$5.85
UP
Dancing Oxfords d*A   AC
or Pumps, ^Tt. %fvJ
UP
Ladies' Brogues
and Sport Oxfords,
Evening Slippers,
Satin, Patent, Suede,
Gold and Silver,    -
$5.45
$4.95
UP
WILSON'S
TWIN SHOE STORE
157-159  Hastings  St., W.
■••••MJ*
Central Public Stenographers
Foreign Translations
Miscellaneous Typewriting
Phone, Sey. 5078
414 Dominion Bldg.     207 Hastings St. W.
~«m£*
Evans & Hastings
-:-      -:-      PIONEER      -:-      -:-
BETTER QUALITY  PRINTERS
Prices Right
c®
:    34-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL    BUSINESS    CAREER
IN    VANCOUVER    PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE ARE   FAVORED   MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING PUBLIC
WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S  WORTH.
CgJ
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
y
XMAS PLAYS
Tickets for the Xmas plays will be
given out towards the end ot next
week, and full particulars concerning
the place and time of distribution will
in the next issue of the Ubyssey.
However, for the benefit of Freshman,
it must be emphasized that no one
will be admitted to the two student
nights, Thursday, 20th and Saturday,
22nd, without a ticket.
Another point to be stressed is that
none but students will be admitted on
these nights. Moreover, as the seating accommodation of the auditorium
is decidedly limited, not more than
1,100 out of the 1,400 students can be
accommodated. That means that all
who want to see the plays must be on
hand at the time and place appointed.
Rugby!    Rugby!    Rugby!
See  You  at  the  Game
Monday, 2.45.   Brockton  Point
Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep.
Correspondence
,{*••
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general Interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of  the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to aopear in the .issue
of the following   Thursday.
V
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Editor Ubyssey,
Sir:
A call has been sent out by the
Vancouver General Hospital for "blood
donors."
Under the present system a blood
test is taken and the prospective donor is graded and classified when need
for that particular grade of blood
comes, the donor is notified and transfusion takes place. Many of the students are already on the donors' list but
many more are required. The call
comes first to the University because
of the accessibility and the reliability
of the donors.
This is a means whereby a strong
healthy student can render co-operative aid to the V. G. H. and gain considerable remuneration with but slight
inconvenience or danger to himself.
Yours etc.,
Wilfred C. Kelly,
Arts 25.
y^    QUIGLEY AGAIN
Editor Ubyssey:
Is there no way by which the co-eds
of this University can study without
being subjected to the ogles and winks
of would-be male vamps amongst the
men(?) students(?).!
Almost every day that I, and several of my girl friends are attempting
to study in the reading room, we are
annoyed by the frivolous facial contortions and whispered endearments
of whatever men happen to be sitting
opposite. One does not wish to leave
the room to avoid this nonsense, and
to change one's seat avails nothing—
these pseudo-shieks are everywhere.
The strange part of it is that the
most peisistent oglers are apparently
members of the so-called dignified upper year of Arts—homely shrimps
clothed incongruously in gowns!
If these would-be vamps think that
good-looking freshettes go up to the
reading room merely to carry on flrita-
tions with them they are laboring under a misapprehension.
Yours for a more decorous atmosphere.
Old-fashioned Freshette.
DITTO
^ Vancouver, B. C,
November, 1924.
Editor, The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Have heard so many criticisms of
the Quigley letter re cigarette smoking in the halls that it seems only fair
that it should have some endorsement
as well; will therefore take the unpopular side and say that many of us
have wished the smoking might be
carried on outside of the buildings, if
a physical necessity.
We know there has been no intentional discourtesy and acknowledge
too, our own short-comings as they
were pointed out to us in the second
letter of October 23, and feel some of
us deserve the fatherly hint as .to our
"loud talking and refurbishing," and
will try to mend our ways.
Mr. Quigley deserves a certain
amount of commendation for having
the courage of his convictions although he expressed them over-forcib-
ly and in a very youthful manner. We
regret also that his criticism was not
more mildly flavored, but too many
took it home to themselves when it
evidently was intended only for inside performers.
The ''Wrigley" parody was very
clever and we are sure none appreciated it more than the cause of it, who
we strongly suspect, took up the
cudgels on behalf of some fair student who was diffident about making her
own complaint.
The first four critics expressed their
objection to the letter, also their sorrow in properly grieved and dignified
language.
We hope we will not see Mr. Quigley himself smoking like a foundry
smoke-stack before leaving our halls
of learning. We have our doubts. It
seems to be contagious.
Can the "peace-pipe' not suggest a
more tolerant criticism on the one side
and a more temperate use of the weed
on the other?
"Yours for a clean atmosphere,"
Girl Student.
A cautious young fellow was Vance,
Who never left shaving to chance.
'"Tis hard times," he said,
"So I'm keeping ahead—
"I'm shaving a week in advance."
K
AT THE  ORPHEUM
An entertaining bill of new and
amusing features opens at the Orpheum Thursday. Miss Martha Hed-
man is headlining in a comedy-drama
and thoroughly enjoying her debut in
vaudeville. "You Can't Beat Them,"
is the title of her sketch. The playlet is excellently written and capab-
ally enacted by the talented Swedish
Star and a well chosen Company.
Walter C. Kelly, "The Virginian
Judge," who is known all over the
world makes records for Masters
Voice Company, and is a humorist historian. His narratives are supposedly
the actual happenings of the little
Virginia Court House, where mostly
those called to the bar are "niggers,"
and the real Southern negro at ihat.
Henry Bergman and Co. present a
comedy sketch, which is making a
tremendous hit all over the circuit.
Benny Rubin, explains "How it Happened," with the assistance of May
Usher and a company of Broadway
Players. Benny is a well-known vaudeville and moving picture comedian and
his act is responsible for a large part
of the mirth on this week's bill.
Fred Babb, Lois Syrelland, Iris Lorraine, present a cleverly arranged assortment of dances. The men and
the two girls of this trio are said to
be all ultra steppers. "Fun in a Restaurant," as provided by the Pickfords,
is pretty hard on the restaurant but
very entertaining to the audience. McDonald and Oakes are aristocratic
steppers, and popular favorites where
ever they appear. Attractive pictures
and the Orpheum Concert Orchestra
make up a very snappy programme.
Off Again To Another
Skating Season!
Everything points to a successful Ice Skating Season, for now
we are ready with the best
quality Skates and Boots at the
most reasonable prices. We
carry .one of the largest stocks in
the city. There's an outfit here
to suit every pocketbook. Our
stock of Skates comprises all the
leading models in C. C. M. and
Starr makes, prices from $1.00
to $6.00.
Also, a complete line of Hockey
Sticks and Pucks at popular
prices.
JT
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver. B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
S
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
-OF-
C0MMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
Phones ' Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
) Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2094 Beach Avenue
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Sxreex
  Headquarters for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING - - 9.00 p.m.  to 1:0b a.m. THE   UBYSSEY
November 6th, 1924
PERSONAL CHRISTMAS
CREETINC CARDS
PHOTOGRAPH AND
AUTOGRAPH ALBUMS
X
TH E
CLARKE
AND
STUART
CO.,    LTD.
550 SEYMOUR ST.
Phone, Sey. 3000
m PI
WHY NOT PATRONIZE YOUR OWN
DISTRICT HAIRDRESSERS?
Iris Beauty Parlors
1464 Broadway, W. Phone, Bay. 5666
25c.
JUST THINK !
YOU CAN TRAVEL IN
A YELLOW CAB FOR
One-third Mile.
Each additional One-third Mile    -   -   10c.
Special rates for Shopping and
Business Calls.
Buy a book of coupons and save a further
10 per cent.
For Christmas Parties, Dances, Social
Functions—Closed Heated Cars.
Prompt, Safe and Reliable Service.
It is cheaper to ride in a Yellow Cab
than to drive your own car.
You pay only from the time you step into
the Cab until you reach your destination.
YELLOW Qm CO.
Phone. Sey. 4000
Phones: Pair. //, Fair. 5660-R
WILLOW HHLL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
«$«.»»«»».*««."«-«~.-*~.«*........«..o...-..««..«. .«.....«».««■>
The Palm Garden
....•<§>..-..
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
FRESHMEN DEFEAT
/VARSITY THIRDS
Are Now Leading Intermediate
League
At Strathcona Park on Saturday,
the Freshman Rugby Team defeated
the Varsity ~3rd tearrnr-3. The field
was very slippery and the ball greasy
but both teams dished up a very
creditable brand of rugby. Incidentally the win puts the freshmen at the
top of the intermediate league.
As neither of the Miller Cup teams
were playing, Ramsell decided to cast
in his lot with the intermediate squad,
but even his additional skill failed to
snatch victory from the tricky freshmen. In the first half, play was fairly even; the freshman scrum, however, seemed to be dominating the
play and followed up nicely. The three-
quarters found it difficult to control
the slippery ball. Davidson got the
only try of the first half for the freshman.   It was unconverted.
In the second half the intermediates
strove val.'antly for a'try. Their efforts were rewarded when Ramsell
crossed the line for their only score,
which went unconverted. The freshmen, however, added to their score
with two more unconverted tries.
Davidson scored his second and
Shields, the erstwhile tennis and soccer star, counted another. The game
ended with both teams battling hard,
the freshmen finishing on the long
end of the 9-3 score. The freshman
line-up:—Mclnnes, Eckhert, Seed,
Shields, Baton, Curry and Ball, Chap-
pell, Forester, Chamberlain, Adams,
Taylor, McMillan, Davidson and Singh.
Badminton Now a
Popular Sport
/ 	
Nobody can say that badminton
isn't a "he-man's" game after seeing
J. L. Ramsell, our star weight-thrower
and rugby forward, knocking the shuttlecock for a row of California bungalows. Whether or not Ramy has been
ARGUED into becoming a member by
the President of the club, is not clear,
but according to reports the husky
Science man plays a mean game.
All joking aside, however, badminton is a very scientific and fast game
and should not be regarded as merely
a mild form of amusement for inmates
of Old Peoples' Homes. The indoor
pastime has gained tremendous headway at TJ. B. C. and much talent is
being developed, Badminton is also
a regular event on the Governor's Cup
programme  for the first time.
Several Whitewashes
J in Inter-Class Sports
Last week inter-class basketball
commenced for another term, four
games being played. From the showing made by the winning teams the
final games this year should be extremely close.
Tuesday night Science '25 won from
Science '27 in a rough, hard checking
game, the score was 28-16. Thursday
night two games were played. In the
first Arts '28 was successful against
Science '28, and in the second the Aggies handed Science '26 a 38-10 beating. Friday evening the Sophomores
won a one-sided game from Arts '26
by the score 53-17.
Rugby!     Rugby!     Rugby!
See  You  at the  Game
Monday, 2.45.   Brockton  Point
Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep.
*...
| Literary Corner |
m*6rn
* / l
RNING
I  have  heard  the  partridge  beat  his
wings,
And   the   blue   grouse   dum   in   the
morning,
And the bracken fern were still dew-
,wet,
For the summer sun had not risen yet,
And the air was cool in the morning.
I have stood on a ridge when the rising mists
Were grey in the light of the morning,
And   I've   felt   a   Presence   I   cannot
name
As the last star died, and the first ray
came
Through   the   twilight   sky   of/the
morning. /
\%. F.
*J+.••••«•..!
CO-ED ATHLETICS
The first and second basketball
teams have been chosen, so the Club
can now go ahead with its teamwork.
The following is a list of those on
the  teams: —
/ First   Team.
Doris Shorney (Captain), Jenny
Wilkinson, Isabel Russell, Winona
Straight, Alda Moffatt, Katharine
Reid, Gay Swencisky, Flora Musgrave,
Marjorie Bell.
\ Second Team.
/ (Captain not yet selected), Jean
Gilley, Donalda Strauss, Velma Buckley, Dorothy Williams, Mary Higgin-
botham, Celie Williamson, Doris McKay, Marjorie Leeming.
On the second team there is yet one
place to be filled in. Those desirous
of getting the place should turn out
to the next practice.
It was decided, at a meeting of the
Athletic executives last Tuesday, to
draw up an inter-class basketball
schedule. It was considered that the
draw system, as practised in past
years, did not give each class as fair
a chance as will this new method. Two
points will be awarded for a win, and
one for a tie.
The Badminton Tournament will
take place next term instead of the
present one, which is already filled
with activities.
<\i
/aVsity played the Normals at the
Normal Gym. Saturday evening, and
finished with a score of 26-20 in their
favor. There was some good passing
at the first of the game, but towards
the end it became very poor. In fact
the last half of the game was noticeably weaker than the first half. Isobel
Russel and Alda Moffat played in the
places of Marge Bell and Gay Swen-
ceski.
AT  THE   DOMINION
"Monsieur Beaucaire" needs no introduction nor does the hero Rudolph
Valentino. Everyone was talking of
this production when it was shown at
the Capitol. Now the Dominion has
procured a return engagement with the
gorgeous costumes, magnificent setting, and fine acting just as it was.
Enough said.
The Dominion is showing next week
the famous "Covered Wagon." If there
is anyone in Vancouver who has not
seen this production let him see it
now or forever hide his head.
Midway <«
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
JFuntral ItmlurH
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE.  FAIRMONT  3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
are baked according
to modern standards
of quality, flavor and
purity.
DELICIOUS
ICE CREAM SODAS
and SUNDAES
AT OUR
Soda Fountain
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
The Heather
Formerly Cusick's
Try us for
FRUIT
CONFECTIONERY
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO
AFTERNOON TEAS
Phone, Fair. 2881
Cor. Broadway & Heather St. November 6th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
J.W. Foster Ltd.
7^5 Hastings Street^   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See  US Before Buying
MOUNT PLEASANT    :
METHODIST CHURCH j
10th Ave. and Ontario St. j
Minister,  REV. O. M. SANFORD
Out-of-town Students
Specially Welcome
Good Music, Interesting Sermons,
Friendly Greeting.
Georgia Loci
690 BUTE ST.
(Corner of Georgia and Bute Sts.)
ge
A very fine
BALLROOM
(newly decorated) with
accommodation for about
thirty-five couples.
For further information apply :
Mr. R. H. BATT,
Proprietor.
*
AT THE CAPITOL
Elinor Glyn's books are "different."
She can make a commonplace romance
a real thriller, and when the story is
not commonplace it blends itself in
her hands to a love story that cannot
fail to cause "a little smile, a little
pain." "His Hour" is being produced
under the direction of Miss Glyn herself and is now showing at the Capitol.
You will like it. Two comedies, News
and Magazine, and a special rendering
by the Capitol Symphony Orchestra
and Grand Organ, of the Overture,
"Morning, Noon and Night," complete
the pleasing bill.
A cast including Pauline Frederick,
May McAvoy, and Marie Prevost in
"Three Women" will be the feature
next week.
FOUND
A large sum of money,
sey Office.
Apply Ubys-
? JOKES ?
•.*..->...".■»«. ■■..■.....
••"•MJt
Wrigley and Quigley,
Smoke a cig,
Don their spats.
And go out in the corridor.
Pernicious influence!
Controversy.
•••••-§>••»•••
Two Freshettes were heard conversing—
'"If we go to the Arts Dance what
about partners?"
"They always have a draw."
Ignorance.
Advertisement—If the person who
took my phsychology notes will return
same before exam, no questions will
be unanswered.
...... j......
YOU    NEVER   CAN   TELL
She (over the telephone): "Sure,
come up about eight to-night.
There won't  be any one at home."
And he went.   And there wasn't any
one at home.
The average income of a U. B. C.
Student—2 a.m.
English Professor: "Correct this
sentence, 'The liquor what the man
brought was soon drunk.' "
Freshette: "The man what brought
the liquor was soon drunk."
THE FRENCH IRREGULAR RE-
FLEXIVE VERB
Je me grin
Tu te giggle
Ii se laugh
Nous nous crakleons
Vous vous splittiez
lis se bust
EVERYDAY   OCCURRENCIES
The man of taking ways—pickpocket.
The man of fetching manners—
waiter.
The man of winning personality
(sometimes)—gambler.
The man of striking attitudes—
pugilist.
The man of promise—debtor.
The man of sterling wealth—silversmith.
The man of decision—baseball umpire.
..-••<§-••.•.
First Shiek: "Have you seen the
new style socks?"
Second Shiek: "No. Are they
good?"
First: "Great convenience! They're
sewed right into the shoes."
Second: "But how do you change
them?"
First: - "You don't—that's the convenience!"
Dumb: "Will you give me a place
in your heart?"
Belle: "Yes, if you can pay the
rent."
Mathematics Professor: "What is
a polygon?"
Student:    "A dead parrot."
••-••*•••••■
She: "Do you know that my father
had a fever of 107 degrees when he
was  seven years  old?"
He: ''For goodness sake, did he
live?"
''What be thinkin' of, Janet?"
"Nothin', much."
"Why worn't ye thinkin' of me?"
"I were."
Wpmen's Basketball
XSchedule Announced
The Senior Girls' Basketball League
v.s drawn up is as follows: —
Nov. 12—Y.W.C.A. vs. Varsity A at
Y.W.C.A.
Nov. 14—Normal A vs. Y.W.C.A. at
Normal.
Nov. 15—Varsity A vs. Normal B
at Normal. Varsity B vs. New Westminster at Normal.
Nov. 18—Ex-Normal vs. ex-King
George at Normal.
Nov. 21—Normal B vs. ex-Normal
at Normal.
Nov. 22—New West. vs. Normal A
at New West. Y. M. Y.W.C.A. vs. ex-
Normal at Y.W.C.A.
Nov. 25—Ex-King George vs. Varsity
B at English Bay.
Nov. 28—Normal B vs. Varsity B at
Normal. New Wee*., vs. Varsity A at
New West. Y. M.
Nov. 29—Varsity B vs. Y.W.C.A. at
Normal.
Dec. 2—Ex-King G eor^e vs. Normal
A at English Bay.
Dec. 4—Ex-Normal vs. New West,
at Normal.
Dec. 5—Normal A vs. Normal B at
Normal.
Dec. 6—Varsity A vs. ex-King George
at. Normal. Y.W.C.A. vs. New West,
at  Y.W.C.A.
Dec. 9—Ex-King George vs. Normal
B at English Bay.
Dec. 11—Ex-Normal vs. Varsity A
at Normal.
Dec. 12—Normal A vs. Varsity B
at Normal. Normal B vs. Y.W.C.A. at
Normal.
Dec. 13—New West. vs. ex-King
George at New West. Y. M. Varsity
A vs. Normal A at Normal.
Dec. 16—Ex-King George vs. Y.W.
C.A. at. English Bay.
Dec. 19—New Westminster vs. Nor-
rral B at New Westminster Y. M. Normal A vs. ex-Normal at Normal.
Dec. 20—Varsity A vs. Varsity B
at Normal.
Senior.
Nov. 12—Y.W.C.A. vs. U. A. Place,
Y.  W.
Nov. 14—Normal A vs. Y. W. Place,
Normal.
Nov. 15—tin. A. vs. Normal B.
Place, Normal. Un. B. vs. New West.
Place, Normal.
Nov. 18—Ex-Normal vs. ex-King
George.    Place, Normal.
Nov. 21—Normal B vs. ex-Normal.
Place, Normal.
Nov. 22—New West. vs. Normal A.
Place, New West. Y. M.
Nov. 22—Y. W. vs. ex-Normal.
Place, Y. W.
Nov. 25—Ex-King George vs. Un. B.
Place,  English  Bay.
Nov. 28—Normal B vs. TJn. B. Place,
Normal.
Nov. 28—New West. vs. Un.A. Place,
New West. Y.M.
Nov. 29—Un. B vs. Y. W. Place,
Normal.
Dec. 2—Ex-King George vs. Normal
A. Place, English Bay.
Dec. 4—Ex-Normal vs. New West.
Place, Normal.
Dec. 5—Normal A vs. Normal B.
Place, Normal.
Dec. 6—Un. A vs. ex-King George.
Place, Normal.
Dec. 6—Y. W. vs. New West. Place,
Y. W.
Dec. 9—Ex-King George vs. Normal
B. Place, English Bay.
Dec. 11—Ex-Normal vs. Un. A. Place
Normal.
Dec. 12—Normal A vs. Un. B. Place,
Normal.
Dec. 12—Normal B vs. Y. W. Place,
Normal.
Dec. 13—New West. vs. ex-King
George.    Place, New West. Y. M.
Dec. 13—Un. A vs. Normal A. Place,
Normal.
Dec. 16—Ex-King George vs. Y. W.
Place, English Bay.
Dec. 19—New West. vs. Normal B.
Place, New West. Y. M.
Dec. 19—Normal A vs. ex-Normal.
Place, Normal.
Dec. 20—Un. A vs. Un. B. Place,
Normal.
Smart, Stylish
Young Men's
Overcoats
IN
Tweeds, Chinchillas,
Etc.
$25.00 - $29.50
$34.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
The PRESENT
The FUTURE
Your PHOTOGRAPH for
CHRISTMAS by
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
Dr. L.F. MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone, Fair. 896-Y
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Best features and artists that
can be seen or heard nowhere  else  in  Vancouver.
rJtfck
Tickets for Games to be Sold
in aid of Trust Fund
ickets admitting the bearer to any
one (the final excepted) game of the
O. B. Allan soccer series may be obtained from members of Varsity's soccer eleven. As her share towards helping the "Injured Players" Fund, Varsity has promised to sell 600 tickets at
twenty-five cents each. Here is a
chance for students to support our
athletes in a real material way. In the
first game of the series Varsity plays
B. C. Telephone, Saturday at 2.30 p.m.,
Powell Street grounds.
The Thanksgiving Day game in
which Varsity meets Sapperton at
Athletic Park in a league fixture will
commence at 2:15.
The third division squad will meet
Mac & Mac Saturday at Heather Park
at 2.30 o'clock and the S. S. Canora
squad at Sapperton, Monday at 2
o'clock. THE   UBYSSEY
feujj
MARK
r<>   IH CAN"0"
SKATESI
They are all here at
SPALDINGS'
Every model built to the
universally known
SPALDING QUALITY
Select your Skates (and
Shoes) NOW !
Skate With Spalding
*'      YV&rt.
OF CANADAVLtMITEO
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Strut
Your Stuff!
Most partners delight in
dancing something new
for a change.
You will be crazy to strut
your stuff after taking a
few lessons from US.
Have you seen the new-
Parisian Walk — straight
from Paris and New York?
Oh, Boy !
VAUGHN MOORE
For New Dancing Steps
518 HASTINGS ST., W.        Seymour 707
BAGGAGE
XO       FROM
ALU TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
DANCING
x
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
November 6th, 1924
MOUNTED POLICE
LECTURE SUBJECT
Rev. R. G., Niacbeth Addresses
Institute       fa ^jt^T
Stories of heroic self-sacrifice and
faithful devotions to duty were told by
Rev. R. G. Macbeth in his address on
"Romance of the Royal Mounted," in
the Physics building last Thursday
night.
When Canada's "Silent Service," a
body of 300 men, were given the task
of enforcing law and order throughout
300,000 square miles of territory an almost impossible situation faced them.
Liquor selling and debauching among
the Indians was rampant and a man's
six-shooter was his only guarantee of
personal protection. It is the proud
boast of Canada that not one criminal
offender hunted by the mounted police
has escaped punishment for his crime.
From the very first, the mounted
policeman has always been the Indian's best friend for he protects him
"as the feather protects the bird from
the snow"; and cattle stealers who
menaced the early homesteader always fled when faced by a ''red coat."
The speaker recalled many incidents
which be experienced when travelling
with escorts of the Royal Mounted
some forty years ago. Corporal Con-
radi on patrol from Calgary to Leth-
bridge almost gave up his life in
rescuing from a prairie fire three little
children who were trapped in a burning house. He carried them to safety
through miles of blazing grass and
stifling banks of smoke.
On another occasion four constables
with Major Fitzgerald in command,
were coming south from Herchel
Island with important mail. Blinding
snow storms met them at every turn.
Trails were covered with snow and the
Indian guide disappeared. Fort Mac-
lead their objective was still 500 miles
away and the food supply gave out.
Sleigh dogs were eaten and boots,
leather holsters and harness were used
to make soup. Weakened and frostbitten the men dropped out along the
trail and Fitzgerald himself expired
within a few miles of his destination.
Such tales of dauntless heroism are
frequent among the annals of the
mounted police whose records and
traditions are known the world over.
To-night in the physics lecture room
Mr. R. Reid, K.C, speaks on "Supreme
Court of the League of Nations."
^OUT-OF-TOWN GIRLS' TEA
A tea for the out-of-town girls of
the first and second years and also for
the third and fourth year girls who are
at university for the first time, will be
given on Wednesday afternoon, from
three to five o'clock by the Women's
Undergraduate Executive. Hallowe'en
decorations will be used to convert the
cafeteria into a lively scene of witches and pumpkins. Miss Bollert and
Mrs. Brock will preside at the tea urn.
All the out-of-town girls will be welcomed.    Come and have a good time.
^ ^     AT THE EMPRESS
~^~ (Verna Felton)
Have you ever been down to the
Mexican Border and seen some of the
queer, conglomerate intensely human
characters that are developed there.
Miss Verna Felton appears as one of
them in the Empress Theatre production, "Sonny," now playing. The Versatile Miss Felton excells herself in
characterizing ''Jaquelin" and manages to impart to the audience a great
deal of her own pep and humor. Lee
C. Millar as Bud Williams plays the
role of cowboy to perfection and Allan
Strickfaden as Kerrick Helm, an English writer, will keep you in roars of
laughter with his queer ideas In that
atmosphere.
CLEVER CHILDREN
JCLIMB CAPILANO
J. Pluvius Defied by Arts '28
Saturday     fa tjj
"—and lo, the rain fell and all became green again."
Jupiter Pluvius turned on his hose
with unusual force on Saturday afternoon last, when about three hundred
members of Arts '28 went on their
first hike of the season to the second
Capilano Canyon, but in spite of the
fact that the road was transformed
into a minature stream and that the
undaunted travellers were little better
than drowned rats,, everybody declared at the end of the day that it was
one of the finest outings ever witnessed
by the Varsity students.
The majority of hikers departed on
the 1.30 ferry for North Vancouver.
Special street Cars transported the
crowd to the terminus, and after waiting for a few late comers, the procession started up the Capilano road in a
deluge of rain and arrived at the hotel
pavilion in record time, where a
cheery fire welcomed all. The chaperone, Miss Sallee Murphy, Miss Harvey,
Dr. and Mrs. McDonald, Mr. H. Lewis,
Mr. Soward and Prof. Sedgewick fortunately escaped the wrath of Jupiter
by travelling in an automobile provided
by one of the students.
Cold feet and Wet clothes were soon
forgotten when a thoughtful individual
commenced to tap upon the piano and
set the whole gathering into motion.
The actual dance began at 4 o'clock
when Lee's famous jazz artists arrived.
Medleys, chains and yells were the
main features on the program. At 5.30
the dancers sat down to the greatest
feast ever prepared by Freshmen. Hot
coffee from the hotel kitchen was
brought in, together with every conceivable variety of sandwiches, cakes,
fruit and candy. In fact, there Was
such an abundahCe of luxurious food
that the executive decided to give the
surplus to the Children's Aid.
The dance came to an end at 7
o'clock and the merry throng emerged
to face the elements once more. But
Jupiter had finished his sprinkling by
that time, and even the sight of three
hundred Freshmen could not lure him
to action again.
Y   SWIMMING TRYOUTS
l Officials of the Men's Swimming
Club expect to get a line on the quality of their new members next Tuesday
afternoon, when the times of all swimmers will be taken over a 50-yard
course. Plunging and diving tests
will also be held. This tryout is not
in the nature of an elimination but Is
merely for the purpose of dividing
members into their respective classes.
d^^d^^d^^^^a^idji^^d^,
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
COAT
LEADERSHIP
The Coat Salon announces a most
complete and comprehensive collection of highly distinctive models.
Coats for dress, for sport, for
travel, or just for every day. Every
new model, material, fur, color and
style idea. Unusually and distinctively different.
Whether you require a twenty-
nine seventy-five model or a two
hundred and fifteen dollar model,
you'll find it here, immaculately
tailored, of the finest quality, and
you will, on inspection, appreciate
why "It costs no more to shop at
Sommers."
"// Costs No More to Shop
at SommersJ'
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
"Colloids and Emulsions" was the
subject of an address given by Dr.
Marshal before the Chemistry Society
last Tuesday at 8 p.m. Many interesting experiments with chrometic emulsions were made and the solutions produced were of various brilliant colors.
After explaining the chemical principles involved in the experiment of
recent new discoveries of the properties of colloids. The manufacture of
highly colored soaps and toilet preparations will be possible as a result
of recent successful experiments with
them. The speaker pointed out some
interesting developments of the colloidal mill. A general discussion followed and many interesting questions
were asked.
^Pl^one, Bayview 5834
Last week "somebody blundered" and omitted our
phone number from the ad., but—WE never omit
anything in our teaching—lead, time, rhythm and
gracefulness in the latest dances. Our system enables you to dance with anyone. We are particular about our teaching—it pays!
STUDIO  TO RENT FOR PARTIES
Broadway Dancing ftcademy
1400 BROADWAY, W.       (One Block East of Granville St.)
See You At The Game, Monday !

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