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The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1958

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 ■*r 7-r
THERE'S   A
GOLDMINE
THE UBYSSEY
IN
THE SKY
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958
No. 9
Salary Boost Studied
HOW UBC SALARIES RATE
COMPARED ACROSS CANADA
University Professor   Assoc. Prof.   Asst. Prof.   Lecturer
UBC (present)
* $9,000
$7,500
$5,800
$4,500
UBC (proposed)
12,000
9,000
7,000
5,500
Alberta
9,000
7,500
6,000
* *
Saskatchewan   $8,800 and
10,000
7,100
5,500
	
Manitoba
8,800
7,200
5,700
	
W. Ontario
9,000
7,500
6,500
5,000
McMaster
9,000
7,200
5,700
4,500
Toronto (present)
11,200
8,500
6,600
5,100
Toronto (1959^
12,000
9,000
7,000
5,500
Queen's
9,000
7,000
5,500
4,000
Carleton
9,000
8,000
6,000
3,500
Ottawa
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
McGill
8,000
6,500
5,000
3,500
UNB
6,500
5,700
4,500
3,500
Dalhousie
8,000
6,000
5,000
3,500
* All figures are salaries per year.
* * No fixed range.
All figures for the above table are taken from the brief
being presented today to the Faculty Association.
Op Letter To Ihe Faculty
(EDITORIAL)
The Faculty Association will hold a meeting today to
consider, approve, amend, or reject a brief to be presented
to the University Board of Governors concerning raises in
salaries totalling $1,034,100.
We are in full agreement with the principle of the
Association's brief, and the state of faculty salaries has
been a source of concern among students for the past few-
years.
In briefs presented to the Provincial Cabinet and to
the Board of Governors, succeeding Presidents of the AMS
and editors of the Ubyssey have supported the proposition
that faculty salaries at UBC should be second to no other
campus in Canada,
There  has   always   been   an   important   qualification,
however, that in previous years was  recognized by the
• Faculty Association; Students fees should be increased only
when all other sources of University revenue have been
exhausted.
It is surprising, in the light of past cooperation, to find
this issue passed over so lightly in this year's proposed
brief.
The brief states: "If public funds sufficient to meet
these increased costs are not forthcoming, it may be necessary to incur a deficit which in turn may have to be
liquidated through raising fees.
"But the disadvantage of these courses of action are,
in the opinion of the Association, less serious than the
risk of attrition of academic standards through failure to
attain parity with the highest university salary scales in
Canada."
We must ask the Faculty Association whom they mean
to help by accepting (along with so many others) the inevitability of a fee increase.
Students have been working on a scholarship and bursary plan for years. It finally looks as though it may be
implemented. The HVm .Sidney Smith promised it would
be in operation by this academic year, and there is reason
to believe it may yet come, since his other promise, the
increased operating grant to universities, has already been
fulfilled by the Diefenbaker government.
But this federal money, intended for scholarships and
bursaries, can be used by a provincial government as a
substitute for provincial funds in the University operating
(Continued on Page   2) — See OPEN LETTER
Faculty Association Votes
Today On $1 Million Plan
UBC Faculty Association will be asked today to approve, amend or reject a brief rec-
comeending increases in faculty salaries ttotailing more than one million dollars.
If the Faculty Association approves the brief, it will be submitted to the University Board
of Governors.
The proposed salary increases
would put UBC teaching salaries on a par with those presently in effect at University
of Toronto.
Clubs May
Be Ousted
Several University of B.C.
clubs may be ousted from their
club rooms today according to
Jim Horsman, Brock Management  Committee  chairman.
Clubs who have not submitted
briefs to the committee for allocation of club space in the Brock
extension are in danger of losing the space they had last year.
"As far as I can see clubs
which have not submitted briefs
by now are not interested in
having club space in the Brock
area," said Horsman.
The deadline for briefs was
Sept. 31.
Each club received a letter
from the Brock Committee dated Sept. 18.
The committee as yet has received no replies.
"They do not seem too interested at all right now — but
a huge cry will go up when
they lose their space," commented Horsman.
In order to give delinquent
clubs an opportunity to save
their club rooms, a meeting will
be held today for club representatives..
All groups interested in either
maintaining present space or
obtaining new space should
meet with the Brock Management Committee at 1 p.m. today, in the Board Room, Brock
Hall.
Horsman stated Wednesday
that clubs who do not attend
the meeting will lose their
space.
He said few club executives
pick up their mail regularly and
this could account for the apparent lack of interest.
"I sent three letters in one
and this probably was not a
good  idea,"   Horseman  said.
"It might have been thrown
out by the executive who opened the letter because it looked
like too much to read," he said.
University of Toronto now has
the highest academic salaries of
any Canadian university.
(Comparison of minimum
teching salaries at UBC and at
other major Canadian universities and of the proposed UBC
Increased minimum salaries is
contained in a table on page
one of The Ubyssey today).
The brief will be submitted to
the Faculty Association at a
special meeting at 1 p.m. today.
Main reason stated in the
brief for proposing salary increases is to maintain high academic standards,
It is felt that as UBC salaries
fall farther behind other leading universities, the quality of
teaching personnel at UBC will
decline in proportion, and academic standards will fall.
The brief suggests that if public funds to cover the proposed
salary increases are not forthcoming, the deficit will have to
be made up by an increase in
fees.
Total annual cost of the re-
comended increases in salaries,
pensions and disability insurance is $1,034,100, according to
the brief.
UBC President Norman A.
M. MacKenzie has already indicated that there will be an increase in student fees by the
1959-60 session.
Dr. MacKenzie said in his
annual address to the students
that students will have to begin
paying a higher proportion of
the   university's  costs.
The present student fees provide 17.2%  of UBC funds.
COMMITTEE CURIOUS
ABOUT INSURANCE
Leadership conference finance committee delegates
expressed a "great deal of
curiosity" about the amount
of coverage given by the student accident benefit fund.
According to chairman John
Helliwell, no one knew the
coverage of the fund policy,
which is wider than the majority  think  it.
Hill,    Tompkins
For    New    Board
Tween Classes
Sports Car Club To
Show Mille Miglii
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB —
First General Meeting in Eng.
201 today at 12.30, to be follow
ed by colour film of the 1957
Mille Miglia. Non-members 25c.
* *     *
MUSSOC — Important Gea-
eral Meeting today at 12.30 in
H. G.  14. Everybody out!
U.N. CLUB — Panel discussion on "De Gaulle and the Ml*
Republic" with Dr. Laponce,
Dr. Mark. Eastman. At 12.30 \*h
day in Buchanan 100.
* *    *
U.B.C, CREW — Recruiting
Drive 8.00 p.m. tonight in Brock
Lounge. Talk on activities,
slides, refreshments. All men on
Campus  welcome.
(Continued on Page 6)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
Don Hill and Michael Tompkins have been chosen to com-
j plete the AMS finance commit-
! tee,     stated     John     Helliwell,
chairman    of     the    committee.
Other committee members
are Councillors Wendy Amor
and Brad Crawford.
Purpose  of the committee  is; sible  for
to  facilitate the financial  operation of the AMS. It will act as, como a major field in both gov-
a  guide for club treasurers.       J eminent and industry.
The committee will handle! Professor Blackett is head of
requests for extraordinary! tiie department of physics at
grants and supplementary bud- J the Imperial College of Science
gets by student organizations and Technology, South Kensing-
as well as examining the AMS ; (Continued on Page 6)
annual  budget. See TO LECTURE
Physicist
To Lecture
Professor P. M. S. Blackett,
a distinguished experimental
physicist, will give a lecture to
students Friday at noon, in the
Auditorium.
The subject of Dr. Blacketfs
address will be "Nuclear Weapons and East-West Relations".
In his book, "Military and
Political Consequences of Atomic Energy," Professor Blackett
strongly criticised the American
Foreign policy, for not reaching
any arrangement with the Rus«
sians to stop the use of atomic
weapson in warefare. He said
that the Russians, by stalling off
any agreement with the U.S.,
are gaining prestige.
A winner of the Nobel Prize
in 1048, for his work in cosmic rays and the discovery of
the positron Dr. Blackett has
recently been working in the
physics of fundamental particles, in cosmology and in rock
magnetism.
During   World   War    II,    Dr.
Blackett, was primarily respon-
Britain's    "Operation
Research",  which has since be« PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 9, 1S58
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscript'ons $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisn Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shou.u not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
righ-- to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
recfjved. *^*m**jm**A
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook       City   Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone       Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Editor, Special Editions -—Rosemary Kent-Barber
Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR,     WAYNE LAMB
Reporters and Desk:—Kerry White, Judy Frain, Shawn
Harold, Judy Coppithorn, Helen   Sturdy and Oleg Wurm.
lsdhMu, jlosl q&L ktt&JiA.
Apathy
Apathy, the bane of the well-rounded student, has
reared its ugly head in a very strange place.
That place is the UBC club association, whose mem'
bers are usually in the front lines of the battle against the
monster apathy. Apathy, that is, towards extra-curricular
activity.
We learn from the AMS Co-ordinator of Activities, Mr.
Jim Horsman, that UBC clubs have been one week delinquent in responding to communications from him.
These are important communications, from the clubs'
point of view, as they deal with allotments for clubroom
space in the Brock Extension.
The clubs, states Mr. Horsman, are in peril of losing
their space should they not quickly make known to him
their needs.
"Then," says Mr. Horsman, "a huge cry will go up,"
No doubt. m§<
Mr. Horsman tells us also that clubs and societies have
lately often neglected to make bookings for rooms and
auditoria through him. the result of this being much const'rm ion.
Mr. Horsm-in adds that clubs have been delinquent also
in picking up their mail. This, he believes, may be in part
the reason for their delinquency in answering it.
The Ubyssey clucks its tongue at all these goings on.
We trust that apathy has not taken root in the last stronghold   of   school   spirit,   the   clubroom.
We would hate to think that the 45 inches we guarantee every day to clubs for their publicity has been to no
avail.
Crushed Bodies
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Monday noon, before and
during Jose Iturbi's concert in
the Auditorium, the south door
to the gallery was locked. It
could be opened neither from
the inside nor the outside, At
the north door, people were
piled six and seven deep.
Perhaps the officials wanted
to prevent overcrowding, but
what would have happened in
case of fire or other panic-
causing emergency?
The fire chief is so concerned
about this possibility that he
has prohibited smoking anywhere in the upper part of the
building.
You can imagine for yourself the heap of crushed bodies
in that one, narrow doorway,
growing higher and higher and
finally blocking all means of
escape for the hundred-odd
people left.
Perhaps the other people in
the gallery would prefer roasting   to   overcrowding;   personally, I prefer to do any necessary roasting in the hereafter.
Yours sincerely,
BEVERLY GREEN,
Arts III
Damn Proud
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am a Freshman, and damn
proud of it. I was dunked on
Hazing Day, and thrown out of
the jeep, too. What's more,
I've got the bruises to prove it.
But I was under the mistaken impression that the Hazing Day hatchet had been buried. That is, until what to my
wondering eyes did appear, but
a snide, back-stabbing report
of Freshman apathy on tho day
in question.
Mr. Lamb's account must
have been written from a rooftop hi,i>h above the campus and
far from any mud. harsh facts,
or ••sportsmanlike" Freshmen.
I say ■•botrer!" to both Mr.
Lamb and his opinions.
Your senior editor suggests
that the Frosh lacked spunk
on  Hazing  Day.    Tell  that  to
Recognition Of Red China
Does Not Imply Support
Editor,   The  Ubyssey
Dear Sir:
I should like to answer the
somewhat confused arguments against the recognition
of Reel China which appeared
in a letter on your October
7 issue. The letter to which
I refer had been prompted
by its author's reading of the
SCM's resolution for recognition of Red China.
The letter stater! that "we
are passing a resolution M
our government nqpport mc
the al lacker in the name ot
peace." Now this i« not; exactly true. The resolution does
not "support" Red China but
only wishes to recognize the
existence of the state and to
give her an official position,
among  th*  united  nations  of
the  world.
The letter asked "whether
it would be rightful to expel
the representative of a country, which was fighting for
us, from the Security Council and put an aggressor in
it instead of him."
I should like to know how
th author of that letter reached the conclusion that admission of Red China fo the UN
would necessarily expel Nationalist China from the- Security Council. Also, does he
ivit realize that the Chinese
Communists buried their differences with the Nationalists
during the war to fight side
by side against the Japanese
"for us"?
The letter further asked
"may a government represent
a nation wihich oppresses it?'
, . . I will counter with the
following: Should we refuse
to recognize a government
that controls the lives and
fates of millions simply because the millions have not
elected that government?
I believe that Communist
China cannot be ignored on
the grounds that it does not
represent, the wishes of the
■Chinese people. I believe that
it must be recognized as the
nutj.or power it is and be admitted  to  the   UN.
Until I hear some more logical arguments to the contrary
in.-iu u.oko presented in the
referred letter, I shall continue to  hold  this  belief.
WAYNE R. TAYLOR
Arts   II.
the grounps of ten to twelve
Engineers needed to drag one
lonely Frosh to the dunk; tell
it to the motley mass of Redshirts and Aggies who had to
make a special trip to the Buchanan Building to recover their
Frosh-stolen greased pole and
other necessities. Tell it to the
few upperclassmen that unaccountably were separated
from the mob and almost pulled to pieces by Frosh; and tell
it to some ot the "muddy", bedraggled, shivering" Engineers
who were dragged through the
same mud as the Frosh.
When you have digested that,
consider that hazing was limited to only one day this year.
1400 strangers had one day to
organize and prepare for the
onslaught of the rest of the
campus.
I make no excuse for those
"great unwashed" who did not
dress in full regalia, but for
those gallant few, those unsung
heroes of the great haze who
fought so bravely and well
against overwhelming odds, I
take off my beanie.
Hazily yours,
PAT GLENN
Frosh Spirit
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
After seeing the game on
Saturday, we (some freshettes)
feel there are several matters
that should be cleared up.
First: — With better advertising, we would have a better
crowd. So thc Pep Club could
meet a couple of days before
the game and distribute handbills or posters. Until the Friday edition of The Ubyssey,
few knew the details of Saturday's game. Perhaps this information should have been
published Thursday to get results—but why blame the frosh
for lack of spirit?
There were as many Frosh
a I lhe game as Upperclassmen
and vve were certainly cheering as hard as anybody!
And another thing — why
don't we sing our campus song:
"Hail UBC". instead of clapping our hands to the music of
our Pep Band'1 Maybe we
could get some fans to go to
lhe '-away" games at Victoria?
Or have a contest for some new
"yells" or ?
The Thunderbirds played exceptionally well, considering
what they were up against, and
we've got a good team, Now
we need supporters, and we
can only get them if the games
are advertised in advance! We
were out there rooting for out-
team — let's get others out!
The Ubyssey should continue
to print thumbnail sketches of
our team as in Friday's edition.
Also — where are the papers
distributed around the campus?
Yours for more spirit,
Gay Spencer, 1st Educ.
Anne Wallace, 1st Arts
Samuel Bernard, Arts 1
Anne Mather, Arts 1
(Ed. Note: —The Ubysseys
distribution points are: Quad.
Brock (south side), Library,
Bus Stop, Buchanan Bldg.
(main mall door), Wesbrook,
Commerce Huts, Education
Bldg. and Gym).
Deplorable
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The Leadership Conference
Committee wishes to protest
the poor and inaccurate coverage of the Conference in October 7th edition of The Ubyssey.
To begin with the students
at the conference did not endorse in its entirety the form
of student government as reported in The Ubyssey. What
they did approve was the theory contained in the idea of
representative government.
The delegates were in favor
of a change, not necessarily to
the entirety of the "Brawner
eport." Whether this change
would be for Representative
government or Responsible
government was definitely not
a cut and dried conclusion
This topic was chosen for the
conference on the grounds that
it would provide an opportunity for the student body to
express their views on any
change of student government
in lieu of a proposed change
at the spring general meeting.
The coverage of the remainder of the Conference was deplorable! It is indeed imfm--
tunate that the only mention
of the conference apart from
representative government ar.:!
thc Frosh retreat was a caption under a picture on pace 5
that was written on a grade
school level.
The commiltee felt that 'he
topics discussed were of major
importance to the campus and
that the students should have
had (he opportunity to rer.d
the full scope and conclusions
arrived at in each topic.
All  in all  we  feel that  the
importance   of   the   conference
was greatly neglected.
Yours truly,
PETER MEEKISON,
Conference Chairman
P.S.—The gong mentioned in
the   -Bird    Watcher's    column
cannot be "patched up" — IT
must be replaced.
OPEN LETTER —       (Continued from Page 1)
grant by the simple procedure of withholding or cutting
back a necessary increase in the operating grant, so that
the University must turn to the students for more bread-
and-butter moneey.
In the meantime, years of student work, and much • f
the impact of the Massey Commission's recommendation.-,
and all of the work in the NFCUS brief falls by the wi,y~
side.
Let's not be misunderstood.
We want the best that can be had tor our facully. Wo
want high academic standards, We want our degree;- to
mean something.
But we do not want the raising of fees to bo passml
over so lightly when a strong stand by students, faculty,
administration, and the board of governors may yet place
the responsibility for the operating grant where it should
lie most heavily—in the lap of the provincial government. Thursday, October 9, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
QUEBEC STUDENTS GIVEN AUDIENCE
MONTREAL — The wildcat University Action League is on the move here. After one triumph over the elected
student presidents of the province's six universities, the League is reportedly trying to set up organizations on all campuses in
the province.
The triumph came when the League was invited by Quebec Premier Maurice Duplessis to discuss the province's
educational problems at a private audience. The Quebec Association of Universities — made up of six student presidents —
had tried for eight months to gain a similar interview.
The  Association  had  prepar- \ not    mention    anything    about
ed a detailed brief outlining the | statutory grants — which were
financial problems  of the universities.
They had asked since January for an interview with the
Premier to discuss the findings
and recommendations of the
brief. They were virtually ignored.
PREMIER REFUSED
Refusal   by   the   Premier   to
recommended by the elected
student leaders. The Association said the existing grant system was irregular and erratic
and inadequate.
Two weeks after the League's brief to the Premier had
been sent. League members announced the Premier had asked to see them — even though
they had not asked for an inter-
see the elected presidents touch
ed  off  a   one-day   boycott   of j view.
classes in five of the province's! VIGOROUS PROTEST
six  universities
the   League   should    meet    the
Premier.
The League did not attend
the meeting. They were unable
to raise a quorum — precentage
of their number necessary before any decision could be
reached.
SOLIDIFY POSITION
Reports here indicate the League is now trying to solidify
their position on campuses
across the province.
In   August   there   were  only
tical party. That many of their
members are connected with
the Duplessis Union Nationale
is "not important" they said.
Said McGill Student Union
President Nick Asimakopulos:
"We may quite readily infer a
singular sympathy between the
Union Nationale and the University Action League."
FOR POLITICIANS
Said Sir George Williams'
Marvin Jay: "That's a question
for the politicans, but it would
80  League  members  —   50  of i be a  pity  lf this sort of th
ing
Three University of Montreal I The Association protested them from the University of had any bearing on the educa-
students went to Quebec City to ! "8°™^ aSainst the Premier's Montreal. They said they would j tional poJicies of the province."
protest in person. Thev tried to | action' Xt charged there was col- send a representative from ev- The Duplessis—University
see the Premier. He did not luslon between the League and; ery faculty in the university Action League interview was
acknowledge their presence. Duplessis's Union Nationale.       ; to meet the Premier. These pro-, the   final  straw  for  many   As-
They   stayed   in   Quebec  for      The  Association  pointed   out   mised  delegates  were not  pre-  socjatjon members.
eight  weeks,  calling at Duples-   that the brother oi one Cabinet   sent at the meeting. j     Their  battle  to  try  to  solve
sis's office every morning. I Mlnlster-  the   brother-in-law of;     The Association  charged  the i the   universities'   problems   has
The Premier called them "ill-' anotlier Minister, and thc Union , League   was   in   no  way   repre-; been an uphm struggle. Duples-
Nationale   organizer   in   Bagot; senlalive of the student bodies, ■ sis took more than a month to
mannered children."
Last spring following failure
of the student presidents tomake
headway in their campaign, a
group sprang up calling themselves the University Action
League.
IMPROVE CONDITIONS
They said in their manifesto
they were anxious 'to improve
student conditions with respect
to the rights and duties of each
and every one."
The newly-formed League
drew up a brief on education
which members of the Association claimed closely  followed
were among League members.     • that   it   had   no   right   to   meet
League     president      Ca mille   on the students' behalf.
Moreau,  they charged,  was an       Until a few days  before the
Duplessis-party organizer in Ba-   Duplessis meeting, it was charg-
got  and also  a  regional  presi-' ed,   the   League   president   had
answer their requests for an
interview. He said he would
study   the  brief.
He  would not   have time  to
grant   the   interview,   however,
dent of Jeunesse de l'Union Na-   never heard of Sir George Wil-   because  0f   -parliamentary   du-
tionale — a party youth group. > Hams   College   in  Montreal.
PROMISED AID NOT ELECTED
Despite protests the Premier
ties"  and heavy duties "in the
administration of our immense
province."
Further requests for an inter-
The League at no time claim
saw the group. He promised a j ed to be elected student repre
loan   system  for   students,   but j sentatives.      They      identified   view   failed   and   the   one-day
miade no  promise of increased j themselves  as   a   "social   club" i boycott of classes was held,
scholarships    recommended    in j trying  to help students. j     Association    members    were
the brief. j     There   was    no    reason    the; "astonished"   to  learn    of   the
Before   the   Duplessis   inter-1 premier    shouldn't    see    them, j proposed  meeting  between  the
view,      Association      secretary   they said. They had just as much j League and Duplessis.
that submitted originally by the   Bruno Meloche, invited the Lea-   right to see the Premier as any ,     Before it took place they pre-
presidents  last  January, < gue to attend a meeting of tiie   other group. dieted  some  concessions  would
The League brief however did   Association   to  discuss  whether.     The League charter does not (Continued on Page 6)
  - -- -■■■■ --                                  - -          -      align   members   with   any   poli-        See QUEBEC STUDENTS
P*?ft*#
thi MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarbttb
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
HOURS:      -
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. lo 5 p.m.
•   9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS  and  SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER,    BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS,   FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
THE   U.B.C.   FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS . . .
MARLENE DIETRICH
in Josef von Sternberg's
THE BLUE ANGEL
TODAY at  12.30  in the  AUDITORIUM
Admission:  35c
NOTE:—-We are still cutting red tape on the NAZI
PROPAGANDA FILMS originally scheduled for
next Tuesday noon, They will now be shown
Tuesday   noon,   November   18.     No  show   Oct.   14.
NEXT WEEK — The greatest of all films . . .
THE BIRTH OF A NATION
.    .    .    THURSDAY  and FRIDAY
2
I
I
I
■
1
I
Ed. Note:—The following is
printed to give UBC students
a clearer understanding of the
situation studenis face in Quebec. A.M.S. president, Chuck
Connaghan, is at present in
Ottawa and has asked all
Canadian universities to support the French students in
their bid for autonomy).
Diefenbaker
Campaign
Blasted
Carl Hamilton, National Secretary of the CCF spoke to an
audience of over a hundred in
Buchanan  104   on  Tuesday.
He discussed two aspects of
the current political situation.
One he found encouraging, the
other   "downright   frightening."
He viewed the willingness of
the Canadian voters to discard
"rock-ribbed traditionalists" as
an encouraging sign.
However, their acceptance of
"a political party that is willing
to use mass media as a weapon
. . . not to clarify issues but to
blow up one individual'' wa3
to him a frightening situation.
The alignment of the CCF
party with the CLC Hamilton
thought was "the first major
step in the re-alignment in the
political scene since the establishment of the CCF party"
in the thirties.
'We finally have a concentration of votes on the right,"
he said, referring to their union
with the CLC. "With their fi-
nancial support" both labor and
farm interests "will be served.'
Hamilton is a graduate of the
University of Saskatchewan and
completed his master's degree in
Queen's  University,
He spoke on the campus last
January under the sponsorship
of the CCF club.
VARSITY
THEATRE
AL. 0345
Thurs.   Fri.     Sat.
ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
ALEC GUINNESS
"The Bridge on the
River Kwoi"
One Complete Performance
Commencing at 7,30 p.m.
Coming' Soon
The  Year's  Mi ml   Ilunoured
Picture
"The Cranes Are
Flying" PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 9, 1958
Damn Yankees Colourful
Damn Yankees, now playing
downtown, can be aptly compared with George Abbott's earlier
success of both stage and screen,
Pajama Game. Once again Abbott is assisted by Stanley Donen
as director, and once again he
has utilized almost the entire
Broadway cast — at least so
far as the speaking parts are
concerned. He has even gotten
away with using Tab Hunter in
a lead role, and Tab gives a
notable performance, in fact,
a movie "first" — first actor-
cum-ball player who knows how
a baseball bat is swung.
I think that we can also assume that Abbott has with his
traditional fast pace and split-
second timing captured, in Damn
Yankees as in Pajama Game,
much of the verve and bounce
of the original stage production.
Unfortunately both of these
filmed plays are in a horrible
"natural" color process which
gives everyone yellow and purple skin. Now if you take a
normally sallow redhead like
Gwen Verdon and give her yellow and purple tones to boot
— well, it's just not very pleasant to look at. They are calling this process Techniclor, but
they don't fool me. It's Ansc-
chrome.
Damn Yankees is encumbered with two or three of the
I'jaggiest ballads extant, but
it also boasts choreography by
Bob Fosse and this adds immeasurably to the appeal of
songs such as "Whatever Lola
Wants" and "Shoeless Joe" and
"Two Lost Souls", which was,
for me, an enjoyable but unfathomable production number.
Fosse   also   dances   "Who's   Got
COLE FACTS
About-. . .
NFCUS LIFE
Q.—Do I have to accept a non
participating policy?
A.—No! On conversion you
may select either a partici
paling or non-participating
permanent plan.
MANSE SCHMIDT
me of our representatives, is
Iwell qualified    to    give  you
personalized service and ad
(vice on your insurance and
|eslale  programme  plans.
CANADIAN
PREMIER LIFE
779 W. 9th
EX. 2924
S. K. COLE, CLU
Branch Manager
The Pain" with Gwen Verdon
and this alone is, to use one of
the most disgusting of all
cliches, worth the price of admission. For sheer talent and
gusto, this team makes Astaire-
Rogers, Kelly-Charisse, the
Champions etc., look sick.
But the stellar attraction (my
but aren't we inventive today!) is Ray Walston slithering
and sneering his way through
the part of Applegate-Satan. He
plays it twenty different ways,
but all evil and funny, and takes
full advantage of the superb
gagwriting of Abbott and Douglas Wallopp, from whose novel
"The Year The Yankees Lost
The Pennant" the show was
adapted.
So go see it. If you can sit
through five minutes of the ear-
splitting and tedious song that
gave that slimy little Eddy Fisher his start, you'll enjoy the
movie.
— M.  M.
CRITICISM
EDITOR,
Helping, along with "Damn
Yankees," to break this fall's
dearth of good movies in Vancouver, are "Orders to Kill" and
"The Last Bridge," both starting
this week.
"Orders To Kill" was the
British entry in the Cannes 1958
Festival and was shown in Canada's two film festivals — Stratford and Vancouver — this summer. A Canadian, Paul Massie,
has the lead.
"The Last Bridge" is a European war movie with a strong
anti-war message. Marie Schell
plays a nurse torn between opposing forces.
Albert Camus: C
A Man And A Donkey
"Platero and I" is a small,
incomparable book which comes
as a surprise, and a very welcome one, to one raised in the
American literary stream of violence and disillusionment.
It was written in Spanish
about thirty years ago by Juan
Ramon Jimenez. Although an
English translation was made
shortly afterwards it was not
until this year, after its author
had won the Nobel Prize and
thereby attracted some attention here, that it was published in  North America.
The Platero of "Platero and
I" is a small donkey, soft and
hairy, with large black eyes.
The story is told by his friend,
his "owner," wiho says of Platero:
"Oh you, so intellectual,
friend of old men and children,
of brook and butterfly, of the
sun, of the dog, of the flower
and the moon; patient, thoughtful, loving, Marcus Aurelius of
the meadows  ..."
The donkey and his friend
share experiences which are recounted in a series of vignettes
and mood pieces. There are
many things which the man
loves — brooks, trees, meadows — and some he hates —
priests and cock-fights.
Incidents  such  as   that  of   a
consumptive girl being given a
ride into the country by Platero and how happy she becomes
for a while are things which
American writers avoid as
banal, and which some Canadian
writers should avoid but don't,
Although the danger is there,
Jimenez is never banal or sentimental. This is due to the newness and ardour of his images,
and the deep realism which
underlies his romanticism.
Rather than carefully avoiding
unpleasant things, Jimenez includes and transcends them.
One day children throw a ring
of bellflowers around Platero's
neck and dancing lead him to
the old man; another day children cause a horse to die by stoning it as it lies in a street. Of
such strands is made this poem
of love.
— RUPERT BUCHANAN
Raven
There is still time to submit
stories, poems or articles to The
Raven. Deadline for the Christmas issue is October 20, Stories,
etc., should be left at the office
of the Co-ordinator of Publications in Brock Hall some time
before then.
Several studies of the work of
Albert Camus have appeared
since he won the Nobel Prize for
Literature in  1957.
"Albert Camus: The Invincible
Summer," by Albert Maquet,
translated by Herma Briffault,
begins with the words:
"The work of Albert Camus is
of the kind that requires us to
be worthy of it,"
Thus giving warning that
what is to follow will be a high-
flown, uncritical account of
Camus' writings. And so it turns
out to be.
On the other hand "Albert
Camus; A Study of His Work"
by Philip Thody, assistant lecturer in French at Queen's, University of Belfast, is a sober,
critical and extremely perceptive appraisal. It makes a perfect introduction to the forty-
three-year-old French writer
who had made little impression
in North America before the
Nobel Committee recognized
him.
Camus sprang into European
prominence in 1941 with a treatise called "The Myth of Sisyphus" and its dramatic companion-piece, a short novel, or re-
cit, "The Stranger," about a man
whose life is untouched by love
or hate and who displays none
of the expected reactions or emotions. The aim of "The Myth of
Sisyphus" was, as Camus said,
to explain the feeling of absurdity "which prevailed in the
world."
("The world" did not of course
include North America, where
people, secure in their industrial
musculature and their stock
faiths, scarcely thought about
what is known as "the human
predicament." Where t o d a y
"philosopers" like Mortimer Adler angrily pound te lectern
over, of all things, his particular
definition of the phrase "lei
ure time," and where even tH
Great Depression producel
nothing more in the way of i|
tellectual self-examination ths
a mass leaping of intellectual
into the arms of Communism.)
Camus worked for the Frenc
Resistance during the War.
did not, could not, ignore tl
feeling of deep, underlying al
surdity that troubled him, bj
he spent his efforts combattir
mian-made, unmetaphysical al
surdities. This brought him inl|
contact with new problems, deal
with in a novel, "The PlagueJ
and a treatise, "The Rebel."
His next recit, "The Fall," il
1956, concerned a lawyer haunj
ed by a pervasive, largely irratio
nal feeling of guilt. Critics wer|
hard put to decide whethe
Camus was making fun of thi
protagonist, or whether hi
had in fact come to a convictioj
of original sin. This year Cami
published six  short  stories ur
Poetrl
"Poetry is character, not or
nament". Perhaps that is thd
key to the art of Mariann*
Moore. She stressed that hei
poetry is for the milkman tJ
be confronted with as he del
livers your bottles at your doo^
, . . that it is part of life, anc
not a diversion from it,
P<
CAMBIE
Broadway at Ash
EM. 9515
Doors 6.30
Two Shows: 7 and 9
Painless   absorbtion   of
learning  until  Oct.   1,1.
The   Sir   Alexander   Korcla
production of
The  Private  Life of
Henry VIII
Starring
CHARLIE LAUGHTON
(no slouch he!) in the lead.
Heads  of  egg,  hairs  of  long,
players club, English students
are alerted.
No Engineers
need apply
Disney's Melody
Time
FOR   ADDED   ENJOYMENT
French    Theatre
Top theatre on tour comes
to the campus October 22, and
23, when Montreal's "Theatre
de Nouveau Monde" or just
TNM plays Moliere's "Le
Malade Imaginaire" and Canadian Marcel Dube's "The time
of the Lilges" in the auditorium,
This group, which had the
audacity lo play Moliere to
Paris audiences last year, made
a hit with them, as with au
dienees in Belgium, and New
York.
In I'),ifi, the players were al
Stratford festival, where- again
Ihey impressed audiences with
their imaginative and rollicking interprelation of Moliere,
although many spectators did
not understand a word of
French.
For the company will produce "Le Malade Imaginaire"
in French (en francais), although their program will have
a detailed and succinct outline
of the plot of this famous comedy.
"The Time of the Lilies" is
a   French   Canadian   play,   and
has been praised as "a play
that goes far into analysis of
solitude", and as a play which
emanates at times, a Tchekov-
ian perfume." It will be Thursday's presentation and will be
done   in   English,
Many of Ihe cast of these plays
have been seen as regulars of
the Plouffe family of television
fame. Fans will be able to see
their favourites again, and
those others of us will be ahle
lo see these- actors on a perhaps   less   controversial   basis.
The group will be sponsored
by the Universily Special
Events Committee and lhe Fine
Arls Commiltee combined.
Tickets can be had at University
Theatre reservations.
"La Malade Imaginaire" will,
be played Wednesday night,
October 22, and "The Time of
the Lilacs" on Thursday night,
October 23.
Other theatre fare for the fall
season are the Players' Club's
three plays in November, and a
production of Bernard Shaw's
"Mrs.  Warren's Profession.''
; ,: ,."V     i*.-.
And Wednesday gave Marianne Moore a chance lo prove
her point, for all during her
reading and discussion of her
work at noon in the auditorium,
warring automobiles ( or per-l
haps they were aeroplanes) went[
round and round the auditorium,
honking horns, squealing tires,
and   emitting    rabid   ilesh-hun- rsday, October 9, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
five
PAGE
Warm, Witty Canadian Novel
BUCHANAN
ientious Atheist
|e   title   "Exile   and   The
•m."
lp Thody's explanation of
fall" is that it is purposely
(ous, which strikes me as
Camus wanted to correct
^gianism   in   his   earlier
In "The Rebel" he had
(the impression that men
porrupted  by false  ideas
than by anything inher-
|vil in themselves; he had
blame for the horrors of
htury on Hegal, Nietzsche
Irx, And in "The Plague"
pi that the man-without-
|ro is represented as fight-
Jtinst is very much exter-
|t at the same time Camus
to suggest in "The Fall"
ie   "I'm   guilty,   you're
I we're all filthy sinners"
kpation   can   drag    man
(providing him a certain
|e satisfaction and ration-
inaction.
also   points   out   that
stands    almost    alone
among the giants of literature
in this century in that he champions democratic liberalism in
the realm of politics. Thus it is
that the Roman Catholic Church,
always alert to tick off "bad"
writers, has smiled with favor
on Camus, the troubled atheist.
Camus does not attack religion.
For him, the death of God is
something taken for granted, as
it is by his contemporaries
Andre Malraux and Jean-Paul
Sartre. (It is perhaps something
more than coincidence that these
three writers have all been
struck by a feeling of absurdity,
even though they maintain that
the feeling is something much
more complicated and sophisticated than simply being ill at
ease in a neutral universe). At
any rate the Church likes him
because it can be sure that he
will always come up with, despite exciting Godless gyrations,
the good old truths of freedom
and neighbourly love.
— RUPERT BUCHANAN
"A Mixture of Frailties," by
Robertson Davies, must be one of
the most delightful books
of the Canadian publishing year. It is a book crowded
with shrewd glances at our human frailties, our absurdities
and self-deceptions.
Much like Max Shulman's
"Rally 'Round the Flag," this
book has most of the penetrating,
keen style, although perhaps
lacking the fast pace and some
of the "niceness" of Shulman.
But it has much more to
offer than has "Rally 'Round
the Flag." There is a depth here,
and a much richer character
sense. One can watch the devel-
omes To Life
;ineer cries.
iMoore, in the middle of
»t the heart of a phrase,
lifted her head, seem-
|take   in   the   noise,   and
have arrived."
| "Here is a new develop-
fe've had poetry to jazz;
honking horns."
selections were from
ii Id and new. "What are
I, one of her more fam-
Hcs, she read carefully,
| out that hen- she was
earnest.
read enthusiastically,
[ing and explaining the
L'es, her new poem about
lisk-ox   ventyre   of   Ver
mont's John Teale. She stressed again that she is an eclectic
poet, taking wshole phrases
from things she is reading, and
yet stressing that in doing so
she adds her personal rhythm
and interpretation to these quotations, thus making them net-
own.
Criticism, she explained, has
been of a great service to her,
but not the almost esoteric
driticism of many University
publications.
Are you busy? she was asked. Busy! At seventy-two, this
remarkable woman of letters is
just finishing a translation of
the fables of Lafontaine from
the French, new poems, a John
Hopkins lecture, and keeping
up a voluminous corespondence
with literary figures, campus
magazine editors, and hopeful
authors.
And she has time lo follow
the  fortunes  of  the   Dodgers.
Why do no two of your poems
have the same rhythm? she has
been asked. Because- no iwo
times does she say the same
thing. The words, the sense, the
rhythm, all belong together.
You cannot impose words upon
a  form, or form  upon words.
She wants the reader to do
his reading. Poetry should not
say bluntly, unsublly what, it
has lo say. The reader should
be able lo read, discover the
meanings he can find there.
Miss Moore remarked thai she
is probably the most often misunderstood poetess alive.
The future? Alter two more
University engagements, she
will return lo her Brooklyn
home to pick up all the work
that wiill have piled up during
her absence,
One student quite unsubtly
bul. truthfully remarked, that
Marianne Moore is an inspiration to anyone reading or
writing or even listening today, ,., ,    ~r SHAWN HAROLD
opment of Monica, in her amusing journey from soprano in
the Heart and Hope Gospel
(every Sunday, friends, gather
'round your radio an' feel it
heal) to a fairly cosmopolitan
opera singer, via a love affair
in the shape of a voice instructor who appears naked for the
first lesson.
The other characters in this
book are all as human and as
frail as in Monica, Their vanities and idiosyncracies are neatly and painlessly punctured by
Mr, Davies in such a manner
that one may espy an acquaintance of his own in this book.
(Usually one with whom one has
had   a   faintly   unpleasant   experience.)
The episodes of Monica's rise
offer Mr, Davies many opportunities for humour, and he
makes the best of them. Although his characters are pompous, greedy, or mildly bloated
with conceit, Mr. Davies does
not lack kindliness toward them.
Nor will the reader.
The end result of this combination of wit, knowledge of
the world of music and its environs is a truly humorous
absorbing novel, alternately
moving and shrewdly witty.
— KERRY FELTHAM
how he judged a film, was reputed to say, "On how hard the
seat becomes."
Dublin's Wild Life
"THE GINGER MAN,"    a novel by J. P. Donleovy.
Neville Spearman.     (292 pages).
One film critic, when asked      He lives in a haunted house  his past, he becomes penniless
with his unloved English wife and possessionless. Yet as he
and child, and down a ladder of lives by Lady Luck she does not
drunks and seductions he slips desert him.
I have been trying for some into complete degradation. His
time to work out a formula as attitude of don't careism is
simple and as conclusive for complete down to wanting no-
judging a book. I thought I had thing but "quids" for drunks,
one, based on the amount of He doesn't search for women,
cigarettes I smoked and the he just takes those that fall for
amount of noise I could ignore, the complete charm that is pos- money as well. There with
but Mr. Donleavy's, "The Gin- sessed by all rogues that live ^^ who *oins him he Prepares
ger Man" tore my theory to live by chance. His friends are to wait for twenty years till
shreds. But did I enjoy the Kenneth O'Keefe and the dowm
book? I found it fascinating.      and outs of Dublin.
"Comic, dirty and delightful,"       Kenneth who is obsessed by
is  how  the   Listener   described his years of  virginity,  and the
the book, and how I envy  the others   who    like    Dangerfield,
man   who   could   describe   the dream of a wealthy future and  reading is Mr. Donleavy's great
book so perfectly, so concisely, do  no  more towards  attaining  ability  as  a  story  teller.    His
The Ginger Man  is an  Irish   that future than hockinS everV "l^'    ab™Pt  (sentences  ,that
American  who is studying law   thing possible even down to the change    without warning   from
' lavatory in a rented house that third  to  first  Person   have  the
they  rap  in  a  blanket  disguis- ability to create in the mind a
He runs across Mary, who
falls under his spell and gives
him £15 to go to London. There
he finds friends who not only
welcome   him    but    give   him
the money, that is left to him in
his father's will, comes into his
control.
There is no real  plot to  the
story, but what makes it worth
at Trinity College, Dublin, under the G.I, Bill. His name is
Sebastian Dangerfield. the most
nuamerican of Americans, even
those speaking with a British
accent. His attitude to life is
lhat of youth thrown into a
strange world without rhyme or
reason, youth that has no ability and even no desire to find
a reason.
ed with a pink
transport to the
in a baby carriage
ribbon    and
pawnbrokers
Dangerfield. of whose pasl
we know little more than that
he is from a wealthy family in
the States, is left by his wife
and child, for they have become
no   more   than   an   interlude   in
vivid and strong picture. The
theme could said to be sex and
to some may be considered revolting, but then maybe Mr.
Donleavy wishes to open the
eyes of those who are like the
67 "'i of Ireland, and have never
been   completely   undressed.
— TONY SHERIDAN
MENS SUITS
WE HAVE HUNDREDS TO CHOOSE FROM.    FINE,
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in stripes, checks, solids, ®m M   fff|
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G
C
RANVILLE V-REDIT V-LOTHIERS
Phone MU. 1-4041 855 Granville (next to Paradise Theatre)
C PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 9, 1958
Study Aid
For Japan
Through WUSC,  one  Canadian  University  student  will
study for two years in Japan beginning in April, 1959.
The deadline for applications is November 1, 1958.
 .     Application    forms    may    be
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
PHILOSOPHY CLUB — Dis
cussion in Buchanan 106 at noon
today, "Philosophy and Poetry
—the statement of existence",
Dr. A. Stroll and Mr. J. Zilber.
obtained from the Consulate of
Japan, Room 1401, Standard
Building, 501 W. Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
A monthly allowance of 20,-
000 yen ($60) will be paid, as
well as exemption from tuition,
matriculation and examination
fees.
*    *     * I     Applicants   must   have   been
TOTEM  — Meeting at noon   born on  or after April  x< 1924
today for all interested in work-1 and mist  be  University  Grading on the annual — this meet-   Liates
ing is important.
OUT FOR BLOOD are thousands of nurses just as winsome^as these in the■ Amjoury^today
and Friday. UBC is far behind its blood-donations quota and students have only these two
days to catch up. _____ -———	
Anaemic Frosh Trailing
In Bloodless Blood Drive
At   the   close   of    the    blood   sports car club paraded over the ; without any appreciable results,
drive's   third   clay,   Wednesday,   campus in an effort to raise po- : according  to  one  official.
officials staled that UBC  is go-   tential  donors, j (Continued on Page 8)
They made a lot of noise, but ' See ANAEMIC FROSH
Conference: We Need
Frosh Orientation
ing to fall far behind the quota
"unless something drastic happens."
The quota for 1958 is 3,000
pints.
To date only 864 pints have
been donated. The quota for
cacli day is 600 pints.
Monday yielded a bare 258
pints. Tuesday 336 pints, and
Wednesday  270   pints.
This leaves a total of 2136
pints to  be donated by Friday.
Up until Wednesday, forestry
led the pack vvith 126^ , followed by theology with 95rJ , and
the nursing with 70%. All remaining faculties were far behind with tho frosh bringing up
•the rear.
Wednesday noon, the nurses
along    with    members    of    the
The main problem of student
apathy   is  lack  of  frosh  orientation,   according   to   a   leader-;
ship   conference   apathy   study
group general opinion.
Apathy,   which   was   defined
as   "a   lack   of  participation   in
UCC  and USC,  could  be elim-1
inated   by   a   large-scale   orientation   programme,   they  felt.
Education in the fields of
clubs and student government
hierarchy  was  deemed   partieu-
lary necessary.
General opinion was the once
the frosh got the knowledge of
these valuable adjuncts to "university life", they would participate.
Clubs themselves were held
partly responsible for the lack
of participation. It was felt
they should set up individual
orientation programmes in order
to get new members to participate   fully,
Campus    Problems    Aired
At Leadership Conference
Leadership conference study groups on campus problem-; suggested that immediate
actiou be taken lo increase parking area on campus, and appointed a committee to investigate
lhe parking problem.
<■'."'"*' "r "'" »»■»<-■ ;'-s,,|,,,Ia,:;|,,imsni,Iilllli ;,s umll as mmsi ai,d"'°£ the term was fell lo be avoid-
shin      io    the   name   "bursars    ! ,
. ,   ,.                      ,,   ,|       wages, able   bs-   the   group.   Liason   bo-
was   -mggestd   ior   most   ol    the
>4ov< rnmeiil   granls.                                 More  allraclive  garbage   can-; tween  professors  and  bookstore
!•'" id   sei'viees   eommilleo   pnl-    wore  suggested   to  alleviate  the was   fell   lo  be  a   good   idea,
ies   sss.s  also  questioned  by   lhe    litter   problem. Library   lighting  and  noise  is
group.   A   recommendation   that        r>, ,-,,.i.,. ,i; .i,ii,„i„fi  ii,,i,i;,-,< m, .     •     ,,      ,.
  , I\).oil,\   cit.-.It ibufod lighting on    undesirable,  the   grout)  thought.
hie   vv. leteria   be   let   open   cur-   ,„,,,,,,,,    .,.„■.,,., ,i s„ ,m i
f com pus ss as castigated. plKh,.,,   ,.m.:...,   is,,.   ,,,,:,,i   ,,.,-,,.,,
uu'use dinner hour was passed, toMets.   asking   lot   quiet   ueto
Poor quality of food, services       Homecoming queen should be   thought  to he an effective way
sf'Hicl was questioned. Some dele-   "'wnocl   at   the   dance,   accord-    [0  cut down noise.
"ales  1hou«'h!   that   lhe  problem   in£   l:o   general   opinion   of   the        c ,
...an s  iti(iiiniii   ittai  uu   pioou.m Studv halls  tn all new build-
lay   in   Ihe   fact   that   the   com-, 8«>iip. ,  .^   ^^  lvcommonded   unani..
mil.ee   had   o   pay   for   building       Textbook scarcity at the first   mously by the committee.
* *     *
PHYSICS SOCIETY — First
meeting today — P. 201 at 12,30.
* *     *
DANCE  CLUB  — Advanced
ballroom instruction begins in
the Clubroom Thursday, October  9th at 7.30  p.m.
* *     *
FINE   ARTS   GALLERY   —
Louis Kahn (Professor of Advanced Design, Yale) on "The
Role of Advanced Structural
Techniques in the Forms of
Contemporary Architecture",
12.30 noon, Thursday, 9th October in Buchanan 102.
* *     *
BIOLOGY CLUB  — Dr, W.
F, Bendell to introduce film
"World in a Marsh" (in colour)
and discuss Ecology. Bio. Sci.
Building Room 100 Thursday,
9th October at 12.30.
■k *k *k
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
CLUB — General Meeting in
Arts 100 at 12.30 toclav. All
members  must  attend.
' *k      *k      *k
NEWMAN    CLUB    -
| General Meeting at 12.40 in St.
Mark's College. All Catholics
are urged to attend.
i *k       *k       *k
!     BADMINTON CLUB — General Meeting tonight at 8.30 in
Men's   Gym.   Election   of   officers and passing of constitution.
•k      *k       *k
! NISEI VARSITY CLUB —
will hold first General Meeting
i at 12.30 today in Buchanan 203.
All  members,  especially  Frosh,
j invited  to  attend.
i *     *     *
UNDERGRADUATE      WRIT-
\ ERS' WORKSHOP — Organizational meeting today at 12.30
! in Buchanan 212. Members and
others    interested    in    creative
; writing are urged to attend.
: UBC    MENS'   GRASSHOCKEY
J CLUB — Practice 12.30 today,
all  players  turn  out,
(Continued on  Page  7)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
TO LECTURE
(Continued  from   Page   1)
Ion, London, England; and is
speaking lo universily groups in
Canada, under lhe auspices <>('
the oval  SRociely in  Britain,
Ilis appearance al UBC is
jointly sponsored by the UBC
Fine Arts Commiltee and the
Studenls' Special Events Corn-
mil lee.
Professor  Blackello  will also
give    a    technical    lecture,    on
"Fundamental   1'arteiles  of   Nature",   Friday,   in   Physics    200 \
from 4-5 p.m.
Students may do research in
any field, but preference will
be given to those studying
Japanese culture and science.
Students must speak and
write Japanese or take language lessons.
I Applicants can give preference    but    the    University    at
s which the student studies will
be chosen by the Japanese government.
The student will pay his own
travelling   expenses.
Faculty To Advise
Leadership conference faculty-
student committee suggested
last weekend that each member
of the faculty be an advisor for
10-20 frosh each year.
The group felt that students
in first and second years are
reluctant to take their problems
to advisors they way the system now works, and, in consequence,  left   the  university.
Student   advisory   committee
First   *° *'ie  Acuity  regarding  foods
committee  was   also   discussed.
QUEBEC STUDENTS
(Continued from Page 3)
be granted by Duplessis. Granting the League's fewer requests
would allow Duplessis to "take
the easy way out," they said.
BOWING  TO  OPINION
His action is asking the League to Quebec was "bowing to
public opinion to give help to
universities." Failure to concede statutory grants would still
allow the government to keep
firm control of university finances, the student presidents
said privately.
Exact details of the loan system to students promised by
the Premier is not known. It
will be part of the government's
legislation litis fall, it is believed.
the League's plans to
may mean is also not
One source said they
were trying to set up branches
on   every   campus.
II is also believed League
members may try to set up a
student paper. The existing
student- papers in Iho province
are not I'smorable lo Duplessis
or t he Union  Nationale.
What
expand
known.
BED-SITTING ROOM
with   kite
hen
privileges near
UBC    ga
es
for
quiet,   male
studenl,
AL
ma
1746-M. Thursday, October 9, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Ubyssey Evaluated
Dull But Adequate
The Ubyssey has been termed
"dull but adequate" by the majority of a leadership conference
Communications and Publicity
study group.
There was disagreement, but
no final opinion on the function
of a student newspaper.
Half the group thought the
paper should be a bulletin
<board, but the other half felt
it should be "something more".
No concrete opinion was
reached on either the sports page
or the Critic's page.
General disapproval of programmes on Radsoc was voiced. Many felt more classical
musia should be played, as well
as jazz.
Feature programmes were not
frequent enough, the group
thought.
Hamlet and similar plays
should be broadcast at regular
times, they stated.
The  soundcar  was  hated  by
t-
Your Mind Plays
Funny Tricks
Can you think better with
your feet up? .". . Can you
learn while you sleep? . . .
What happens to your mental ability with age?
Your mind can play ftinny
tricks. Read "New Light on
How the Mind Works" in October Reader's Digest for
some new facts discovered by
scientific- investigators who
are probing the mystery of
the human brain. Get your
October Reader's Digest today: 40 personally helpful
articles of lasting interest.
one and all, but no one thought
that it should be abolished.
A permanent public address
system with loudspeakers placed
all over the campus was suggested.
A two minute maximum
broadcasting time per day for
the system was also suggested.
TRACK AND FIELD
MEET TODAY IN GYM
There will be a track and
field meeting today at noon
in Room 217 of the War
Memorial Gymnasium.
All those interested in
this activity have been asked to please turn out to this
meeting.
TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 6)
CARIBBEAN       STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION    —    Important
General Meeting today in Buchanan 104.
* *     *
AQUA-SOC — Meeting today
in A. 206. Pool training tonight
in Emipire Pool 6.00 to 7.30.
Bring mask,  fins and  snorkle.
* *     *
Functions: October 10
SLAVONIC CLUB — First
Friday 10 October in Buchanan
organizational meeting 12.30
212.
* *     *
ARCHAEOLOGY    CLUB    —
Introductory meeting Friday
noon in Arts 102. All interested,
please come.
* *     *
LUTHERAN STUD E N T S'
ASSOCIATION — Regular
meetings changed to Friday
noons in H.L. 3. Panel discussion on "What do you expect
from University" with two students  and  two ministers.
* *     *
THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER
CLUB — First meeting Friday
12.30 in Buchanan 104. Members, Majorettes, Cheerleaders
and Band Members please attend.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB — Pre
sents Mr. Cox speaking on "Job
Opportunities    in    Psychology'
Friday 12.30 in HM. 2.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
— Dr. Lew speaks on "China
in the World Today", Friday.
12,30 noon in Muchanan 106.
MUSIC CIRCLE — First
meeting Friday, 10th at 12.30 in
Music Room, Brock Hall. G.
Green will introduce 2 Mozart
Horn Concertos.
RAMBLERS' A'THL E T I C
CLUB —■* General Meeting in
Physics 301 at 12.30 Friday for
election of officers.
Functions on Oct. 11
EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY _ -Getting to
Know You" on Saturday, 11
October from 9 to 1 at the Arlington Hall, 1236 W. Broadway. Girls 50c, Boys 75c.
Couples $1.00.
' v        *r        *p
Functions on Oct. 12
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION — Thanksgiving
Retreat at Lake Hatzic. Leave
here Sunday noon, back on
Monday. Airmin Mohr of Edmonton in charge. Enquire at
361 Brock Extension or call
Jack at ELgin 6115.
Reactions Towards AMS
''Package"   Deal   Split
Student response to the Leadership Conference proposed
"package deal" Totem. Handbook and A card has been divided.
The "package" cost would be
added to the S246 annual fees
to bring them to $251.
Barry Tyldesley, Arts 1, said:
'What the heck do I want all
that jazz for? It's just more
money I'd have to pay,"
A similar response came from*
Marlene Bradley, Arts  1.
"Goodness," she stated," I.
don't want all that stuff. There
are better things to spend
money on."
Some students thought the
■ idea good.
"It sounds great lo me," said
I Ron Reimer, Arts 2. "I could
I save half the money I'd ordinarily spend."
Tom Peacock, Arts 2, agreed.
"This represents  a saving of
| five dollars," he stated, "which
I can use to buy something else."
2-PANT SUITS
$75.00
TAILORED TO MEASURE
UNITED  TAILORS
549 Granville     MU. 1-4649
*&S
■$$$$■'•*■■'•■> ;•;•&
■ flbf
"
■
■Twb.     1
•> j^|
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&3k
*V4^H
Wjk
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■ '
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wm ■
vflii
*
* S^H
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; *n
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%, Jl
r. '':■ '.&
<f.*j«i
DON'T FORGET
THE
MODERN
QUARTET
Friday, October 10, 8:30 p.m.
GEORGIA   AUDITORIUM
TICKETS:      MODERN MUSIC
$1.75,    $2.25,    $2.50    and    $3:00 — Tax Included
"TEASER"
White  *  Block Elk
All While Buck
(Crepe Sole)
7.95
going steady
"PONY GlSt.'
Black  Glove
Tan  Gfove
Red G/ove
Black  Suede
7.95
f\
VAGABOND
while buck
(Red Rubber Sole)
WALK DOWN AND SAVE
^W^ ^#
"The Greatest  Discovery   for Girls...   Since Boys"
All Styles Available In "AA"     and "B" widths, 4-10
; ^i^fr^'
CORNER CAMBIE & HASTINGS PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 9, 195J
CLUB NOTES:
Still  Vacancies  For Spanish  Weekend
There are still vacancies for
El Circulo's Spanish weekend
according to club officials.
Those interested should register in the El Circulo club-room.
Brock Extension 363, before
Friday noon.
The registration fee is $5
for the wshole week-end, or
$3 for half the week-end.
The entertainment will include a Peruvian accordianist,
and Don Jose, Mexican Mari-
achi singer, presently MC at
the Cave Supper Club.
There will be a meeting noon
Friday, in the clubroom, to
arrange for transportation.
Further information may be
•obtained by phoning AL
1427M or AL 3513M.
THANKSGIVING HIKE
The annual VOC Thanksgiving Longhike is also taking
place this week-end. The hike
will be up Mount Rainy, 5740
feet, near Port Mellon, B.C.
The boat will leave the Harbour Navigation Wharf at 2:00
p.m., Saturday.
Boots are compulsory for
this hike, as well as a sleeping bag. a change of clothing,
a waterproof jacket, a knife,
fork, spoon, plate, and cup and
toothpick.
The hike will go on, rain
or srtiine.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
The Chinese Varsity Club is
presenting Dr, Daniel Lew, the
Consul-Getieral of the Republic
of China to Western Canada,
Friday afternoon in Buchanan
106.
Dr. Lew will speak on
"China in the World  Today",
Dr. Lew received his PhD1
in Government from the University of Harvard in 1941.
Since then he has held many
offices, including Secretary to
the Chinese Ambassador in
Wishington, D.C. during World
War Two.
He was the secretary to the
Prime Minister of China in
1946-1947, and a member of
the Chinese delegation to the
United Nations in 1956.
LUTHERANS RETREAT
The campus Lutheran Student Association is sponsoring their first retreat this
week-end.
The retreat will be held at
Camp Luther on Lake Hatzic.
The Canadian Regional
President of the LSA, Armin
Mohr, will be handling the
program and helping with discussions about a Christain Organization on the campus.
Further information may be
had by calling in at the LSA
office, room 361 in the Brock
extension.
PANEL DISCUSSION
The United Nations Club is
presenting,    for    their    first
meeting of the  year,  a panel     the UBC  History  Department     in the political science depart-l
discussion   on  De  Gaulle  and
the Fifth Republic.
The Panel Members are: Dr.
Mach Eastman, former head of
and a member of the International Labour Organization
under the League of Nations;
Dr. Jean Laponce, a professor
ment at UBC; and Yves Bled,
a student at UBC from France.
This meeting will be held in
Buchanan 100, Friday at 12:30.
FOR RENT
Self    contained    furnished
suite, very close to UBC.
Call ALma 0695-R
ROOM AND BOARD
or room only, for one male
student in comfortable house
West 43rd and Elm. Call
KE. 0461-Y after 6 p.m., or
apply Publications office,
Brock 201.
5-10 S
MMNUNNMM
With a glance at the '„V)V
Shetlante.r sireaters by Kitten
dramotiw the Foil fashion scene
. . . shmjijii-knit and biilkg-looking in a blend
of imparted merino wools and kid mohair,
blended with pine Shetland wools full-
fashioned ond hand-finished. In beautiful soft
heather-toned colours . . . at good shops everywhere! Si:es ill* to J,(). Pullover, price $t(UK.
Cardigan, price $UM.
Look for the name j0B^
ANAEMIC FROSH !
(Continued from Page 6)
Rosemary     Hambrook,      co- j
chairman of the drifre said, "The !
results   are   very   disappointing
to date,  but we are hoping for
better results in the  next  two
days."
There are some 1500 frosh
on the campus, and of these only 138 have donated.
Only one-third of the members of each faculty needs to
donate  to  reach the quota.
Don't leave it to George —
he hasn't any.
FOR RENT
Pleasant, private room in a
modern home available immediately. Kitchen privileges. Female student preferred. $35.00 per month. Phone
ALma 1299-Y.
FOR RENT
Sleeping room for male student, one block from UBC
gates. Call ALma 2628-Y
after 9 p.m.
WANTED
Typing, shorthand and dictaphone transcribing from my
own machine done at home.
Reasonable rates to UBC students.    Call CEdar 9498.
Pleasant double bedroom in
basement available immediately for two male students.
Own toilet, cooking facilities,
private entrance. Call Andrea
Foxwell, 4463 W. 15th Ave.,
ALma 4339-L after 6 p.m.
TO  SHARE  ROOM
Girl wanted to share apartment with three. Rent $37.50
per month. Phone ALma 4687-
L after 5 p.m. Located at
4326 West 10th.
Matz and Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU.3-4715
Custom Tailored  Suits
for Ladies and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single    breasted    styles.
Special  Student   Rates
COLLEGE SHOP
THEY'RE   HERE
THE
NEW
POPOLIN
JACKET
ALSO:
UMBRELLAS:
Women's - Men's -
Standard   -   Push    Button
UBC   STATIONARY
STAH PS
DONT  FORGET  TO   GET
YOUR AMS & LIBRARY CARD
PLASTICIZED
LOST   &    FOUND    DEPARTMENT
Location: Brock Extension        Hours: 11:30-2:30
OWNED   &OPERATED   BY   AMS

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