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The Ubyssey Feb 18, 1955

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 i'
CHOOSE YOUR MAKE AND MODEL
Infinite Variety of Candidates Offered
The job of student
council vice president
is actually that of a
"committeeman," and
I feel Jacques Bar-
beau is highly suited
for such a position.
He has served this
year as chairman of
Open House committee, and has gained
an extensive knowledge of the campus
and its students. He
attended North Vancouver High and McGill University,
where he organized
the annual Winter
Carnival.
He has gained considerable business experience as sales agent with United Air
Lines, and waa stationed in Loi Angeles,
San Francisco and
Vancouver last summer.
Jacques will graduate next year with his
Jacques Barbeau
B.A. and L.L.B.
For these reasons I
nominate Jacques
Barbeau for vice-president.
Paul White
Since the vice-president has to provide
leadership in all phases of campus activity, a candidate must
have a background of
campus-wide experience.
John Bossons has
this experience. In
his three years on the
campus, John has
been deputy-chairman of NFCUS, vice-
president of the UN
Club, manager of the
Braves rugger team,
and has led the Economics Society. He
has also served as assistant to the co-ordinator   of    athletes
proven ability makes
and   as  chairman   of
University Week.
John's    record    of
John  Bossons
h i m the obvious
choice for vice-president.
Pat Duffy
I am seconding Jim
Craig for Vice President because both by
personal knowledge
of him and a glance
at his record assure
me of his mature outlook and fitness for
the position. His
chairmanship of NFCUS shows his willingness to undertake
onerous duties in the
students' interest, and
his varied career as
Flying Officer, RCAF
logger, managerial
trainee, Arts graduate and sportsman,
demonstrates his all
round character and
ability.
I am sure lt is in
our interest to have
Jim Craig's maturity
and abilities working
for us in the position
Jim Craig
of Vice President.
The variety of his interests assures a 11
campus groups of his
representation.
John Spencer
Continuity on Council. I believe Ron
Long staffe can provide just that. As
member at large he is
ready to step up* lo
Vice President. This
year Ron is receiving
a scholarship. Homecoming week was a
product of his labors.
The University administration is now
convinced of the need
for club facilities
through the findings
of his student facilities committee. His
Charity Drives report
was also received by
council. Through Ron
Brock got its first TV
for the World Series.
Rebuild the Brock
committee, now has
his attention. I there-
Ron  Longstaffe
fore endorse his abilities.
Albert Plant
Commerce 4.
4 Positions to Fill
UCC (LSE)  PRESIDENT
AL FORREST
Experience, energy, and enthusiasm make Al Forrest the
man for Second Member at
Large on next year's Council.
This year Al, a second year
Artsman, Is Public Relations Of-
ificer for th* Literary and Scientist Executve, as well as being
a member of the executive or
vary active in the three clubs
to which he belongs.       •
Despite his active participation in these various groups, Al
has conalstantly maintained a
high scholastic standing. Last
year he was a dynamic member of Parliamentary Forum,
Radio Society, and was, in addition, a part-time reporter for
The Ubyssey.
The position of Second Mem-
bar at Large demands an individual who is wiling to work
hard on day to day jobs that
gring little glory. Al Forrest is
perfect for the job.
JAMES SHARPS. ARTS II
|SY  WOLFE
The position of President of
the University Clubs Committee requires, above the usual
qualifications for a Student
Council position, knowledge of
the workings of that particular
organization and active participation in it.
In seconding Isy Wolfe for
this position, I put forward a
man that has both the capability
of doing an excellent job of representing the student body on
Council and a thorough knowledge of UCC operations. This
past year Isy was secretary of
UCC, chairman of the East-West
game he worked on the Special
Events Committee and was active on the High School Conference Committee.
To these qualifications I would
add that Isy possesses that attribute of being able to listen
judiciously to both sides of a
dispute before making a decision.
GERRY HOOOE
THE UBYSSEY
volume xxxvm
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1955
Plica 5c;
No. 51
SECOND MEMBER-AT-LARGE
JIM MacFARLANE
The election of Jim MacFar-
lan to council will give the student body a keen and eager
worker. This is Jim's first year
on campus. His outstanding
work in the NFCUS committee
and Social Problems Club has
shown his ability to quickly
orientate himself to new work
Jim was on the Students'
Council at high school and is
Past President of the International Sports League.
On housing, Jim feels that the
Students' Council should lead a
campaign for permanent buildings.
MacFarlan is in favour of rejoining NFCUS. He states that
the campus NFCUS representation should be elected and have
a seat on council.
Jim says the jurisdiction of
the student court should be
clearly defined by council.
For a general AMS meeting
he believes that 200 signatures
would be a more realistic figure.
I am sure that Jim MacFarlan
will make a competent and valuable member of next year's
Council.
BILL LEWIS
DON BLACKLOCK
I second Don Blacklock's nomination for the position of second member at large because 1
know that Don will work as
hard carrying out the duties of
this position as he works in the
several organizations to which
he belongs.
Don has a couple of years of
camp cooking under his belt,
and his continued existence indicates his strong moral and
physical constitution. He has a
special interest in the students
from out-of-town since he has
had first hand experience of
their problems regarding residences, finances, etc
Academically Don is a better
than average student in Third
Year Arts and has been awarded the "Summerland Scholarship" and the "Dr. A. M. Sand
ford Memorial Bursary."
Remember when you vote on
February 23; "Let Don represent
you."
BILL MARCHAK
AL EZZY
V To fulfill the duties of Sec-
ond-Member-at-Large as an active members of various committees such as Frosh Orientation and Homecoming a man
is needed with interest, vitality,
and a desire to work.
In seconding Al Ezzy, Comm.
II, I feel that a man is being
put forth with all these qualities. Al also has a keen knowledge of the campus gained
through student activities and
athletes both Varsity and intramural. He will give this position the responsibility t deserves.
JIM CARTER
MIKE  JEFFERY
It should be brought to your
attention that a member at large
requires experience, ability,
high interest and a close contact
with student affairs. I sincerely
feel that Mike Jeffery has these
qualifications and is ably suited
for the position.
Mike has been very active
this year in the Pep Club, of
which he is Special Events Chairman. Last fall he served on the
East-West game committee. He
is also a member of Mamooks
and the U.N. Club. He has played rugby for the Tommahawks
both this and last year.
May  I   recommend  Mike Jeffery to you as your choice for
second member at large.
ART HUGHES
ALLAN THACKRAY
A position of responsibility requires   an   individual   with   experience    and    ability.     Allan
Thackray has both. He is chairman   of   thc   traffic   committee
of OPEN HOUSE, a member of
the   Commerce   Liason   committee,  McGoun  Cup debater.     He
was co-chairman of Frosh Week
at  Victoria College and was on
the   Homecoming   committee   in
i his first year at UBC.    Having
I known Allan for seven years, I
lam confident of his ability and
j know that lie will make an ex-
! celtent   president   ol   UCC   and
(Council   member.
j WALTER YOUNG
(Continued   on   Page   3)
1 SEE SECONDERS
IFC Report Receives
Lukewarm  Reception
WMS WtiKBID SIT ASWl
fOR HmSTVttOUSIKSS
Long Easter weekend 'strictly for studying' is in the
offing for students through a special decision of Faculty
Councillors.
"The four-day holiday will begin Friday, April 8th
and continue to Monday April Ilth," said Dean Andrew.
"Reason for the innovation is to give students an uninterrupted weekend for purposes of studying" he added.
Students are also tp get an unanticipated holiday
Marchloth, Registrar C. B. Woods announced Wednesday.
All 1:30 meetings and labs will be cancelled to enable
the student body to attend the Spring General AMS meeting. Controversial pool issue will be one of the questions decided at the meeting.
FIFTEEN  RUN
Third Slate Opens
With the first touches of spring UBC students have turned
to running for office in place of running after co-eds.
After  four  Student  Council
AMS Discrimination
Committee Defended
Students feel that the IFC discrimination report released
yesterday is an inadequate study of fraternity discrimination,
and definitely do not agree with its proposal to abolish the AMS
discrimination committee, a Ubyssey opinion poll reveaied
yesterday.
positions were filled by acclamation in the previous «hree
slates, 15 students filed nomination papers Thursday for the
positions of Vice-President, Coordinator of Activities, Second
Member-at-Large and Chairman
of the University Clubs Committee.
Contesting the vice-presidency
are Jim Craig, defeated presidential candidate, Ron Longstaffe, John Bossons and Jacques Barbeau.
Coordinator of Activities was
practically ignored as only two
candidates, Bill Gartside and
Don McCallum, entered the race.
Second Member-at-Large appears to be the most popular
position on Council as seven hats
were thrown into the righ. Candidates are Don Blacklock,
Clive Lytle, Jim MacFarlan,
Mike Jeffery, Al Ezzy, John But-
terfield and Al Forrest.
Runnig for UCC, previously
known as the Literary and Scientific Executive, are Izzy Wolfe
and Al Thackray.
Election rally will be held in
the Auditorium Monday at noon,
and speeches will be made at
Fort and Acadia, Monday night.
Conservatives
Cop Colonies,
Clean 'Em Up
It took 180 years to do it but
the Conservative run Mock Parliament finally restored the American Colonies to Her Majesty's
Government in F.G. 100, Thursday noon.
The Speaker for the Conservative Government was enthusiastic: "Mr. Speaker, it is the
opinion of your government that
Canada has gone too long without colonies; and first things
first, the United States is closest at hand."
"We also wish," he continued,
"to export the CBC out of Canada to enable it to culturize
the people of the colonies — and
so we will be rid of it."
The Liberal opposition was indignant. They wanted no part
of the U.S.
"Do we want the gangsterism
of New York?" they asked. "We
got," said the Conservatives.
"Do we want the fleshpots of
Hollywood?" the Liberal speaker asked. The enthusiastic applause which followed answered
his question.
The LPP supported the bill
arguing that when the U.S. is
annexed, "the contemptible sex
orgies from Hollywood will be
replaced by products of the National Film Board." Also, folk
songs would take the place of
the present day "corrupt jazz."
When the issue came to a final vote, many of the opposition
Student tickets are $1.00 and ! were either at lunch or gol dis-
can be purchased al the AMS ■ gustod und left and the bill was
office or from any CLU official,   passed  by a vote of 35-3.
Sedgewick Award
Banquet   Planned
CCF M.P. Angus Maclnnis,
this year's choice for the Civil
Liberties Union Garnett Sedgwick Memorial award will receive his prize in an appropriate
.setting.
A banquet will be held at
the HO HO Cafe, Thursday, February 24 at 6:30 p.m.
Results of the IFC questionnaire showed that three out of
sixteen fraternities had discriminatory clauses in their international constitutions; nine felt
that their international fraternities were completely non-discriminatory, and two indicated
they practiced racial discrimination,
Dave Smith, Arts 4: "I think
it's an excellent contribution to
the problem of discrimination
and shows that UBC frats are
trying to get their international
conventions to wipe out discrimination."
Bob Mitton, Teacher Training:
"They didn't say anything we
didn't already know."
Ed Zilke, Teacher Training:
"The questions aren't designed
to reveal anything of much importance."
Ron Marshall, Arts 4: "The
report is all right as far as it
goes."
Following is student reaction
to IFC's proposal to abolish the
AMS discrimination committee,
which was set up at the request
of students at an AMS General
Meeting two years ago.
Ruth Summerfield, Arts 2: "I
think that the student council
should continue their study of
discrimination because they, not
IFC, are the representatives of
the student body, and are better able to voice the opinions of
all students on the campus.
Peter Meekison, Arts 1: "I
think it's a good idea; the fraternities have first-hand information. IFC did a good job and
people should wait to .see the
effect of their findings before
they judge the report."
'tween closset
USC Meeting To Be
Held Monday Noon
UNDERGRAD SOCIETIES
COMMITTEE. The unusually important meeting of the Undergraduate Societies Committee
will be held in the Men's Club
Room at noon, Monday. Will all
Undergrads Societies please be
present.
9f. 9f, ¥f,
PRE SOCIAL WORK SOCIE-
ty will present Mr. W. G. Dixon
(School of Social Work), speaking on "Community Organization," noon today in Arts 206.
flr. *r *T*
FINE ARTS COMMITTEE will
present Mr. R. W. Baldner speaking on: "Dante Today," with
notes on Ezra Pound and T. S.
Elliot, Monday noon in Arts 105.
ejft ep ep
LIBERAL CLUB will meet in
Arts 203, Tuesday noon. S.C.M.
"What Can I Believe?" series
cont. — third panel: Rev. K.
Woolard. R. Standerwick, C.
Ripley, "Christ Died For Us!",
Monday noon in Arts 100.
*r *r *T*
PRE    MED    SOCIETY    will
show a film on alcoholism noon
today,  in  Physics  200.
ef* eft ef*
S.C.M. study on "The Task
of the Christian iu the University," student led, Friday noon
in 312 Aud.
(Continued on Page 3)
See CLASSES
MALE MANNIQUINS CAPTURE
LIMELIGHT AT FASHION SHOW
Male models stole the limelight yesterday al Women's
Undergrad Society's Fashion Show.
Guffaws greeted the first man, Jerome Angel, who
strode down the aisle in a suave distinguished manner. An
all male jury awarded him top honors among the men with
Pete Gregory modelling u dashing chesterfield coat taking
second mention.
The panel hatl a tough time picking top femine model.
Most votes went to Barb Johnson described as a "second
Grace Kelly," Anne Louise Ritchie, placed second with
Sandar Sturdy third.
Sandy Ross looked ''stunning" in a ''united cocoa"
overcoat with turned up collar. As one onlooker observed,
"He looks as if the Faculty Council is still alter luin." Page Two
THE     UBYSSEIY
Friday, February 18, 1955
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorised m second class mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mall subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published In Vancouver through*
put the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 12S0
or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—-Ray Logie News  Editor—Rod Smith
CUP Editor—Jean Whitetide    . Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Copy Editor—Stanley Beck       Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
SENIOR EDITOR — BOB JOHANNES
REPORTERS — Marie Stephen, Tom Woodside, Sandy Ross, Jackie
Seale, Margo Hutton-Potts.
PHARMACY EDITORS — Patricia Burnett and John Parker.
PHARMACY REPORTERS — Gordon Davies, Ozzie LeVae, Tommy Lee, Don McDonald, Ken McDonald, Betty Mulla, Ed Nickols,
Keith Payzant, Bob Porte, Don Ross, Sonie Stuart.
Praise   Deserved
Since our editorial "Press Release" on Thursday, we
have been visited by Jim Carter, chairman of the IFC in-
veatigfiftng "committee. He was dissatisfied with the editorial's appraisal of his report.
We hope it wasn't done merely by personal magnetism,
but Mr. Carter succeeded in persuading us:
That our editorial was wrong in dismissing his committee's efforts as nought but an attempt at better public relation;
That the committee did indeed formulate some con-
etructiwe means of fighting discrimination;
And there are some fraternity members—admittedly too
few—who feel compelled to fight bigotry as hard as they
can.
We agree that the efforts of the committee are worth
noting and deserving of at least Some praise. We hope that
those recommendations which will actually help obviate
discriminatory restrictions will be followed by UBC fraternities.
These remarks are not about-face, however.
We still believe the report of the committee is inadequate
and concerned too much with whitewashing UBC fraternities.
It did not name the nine fraternities which practise discrimination as groups. Until this is dbne, no ohe will ever
believe that UBC fraternities are frankly and honestly
making an all-out effort to stamp out discrimination.
The report made no effort to determine the number of
UBC fraternity members who actually endorse religious or
racial discrimination. These people exist.
It skirted th* -question of religious discrimination, and in
fafct failed to provide any sort of definition of unfair discrimination from which answers to the committee's questions
could be guided. It would he interesting to know what some
fraternities' members regard as unfair discrimination.
Most important, it failed to investigate the possibility
and effect of UBC fraternities renouncing all clauses and gen-
tletrten's agreements.
In conclusion, until UBC fraternities indicate they are
prepared to make any sort of sacrifice, or take any sort of
risk, in riding themselves of bigoted restrictions, then their
efforts against discrimination cannot be credited with much
singlemindedness or conscientiousness.
The report succeeded but little in this respect.
The blight of unfair discrimination still exists at UBC,
and there is no sign of it being removed within the near
future. Southern U.S. fraternities are still calling the tune,
and UBC fraternities continue to dance to it.
PHARMACY   EDITORIAL
mm*tt^*mtmm**^m*~mm~.mmmmmm*tmimm—*.s^mmMmmmm.^^^—m
A   Hearty   Welcome
Term tests are upon us and aprehensive thoughts concerning the final exams are not exactly in the limbo of
forgotten things. Perhaps some of us, in the vain hope of
restoring intellectual equilibrium, seek the philosophic refuge
of poetry, deriving at least specious solace from such poigant
and fatalistic utterances as:
"Tis all a chequer-board of Nights and Days
Where Destiny with Men for Pieces plays:
Hither and thither moves, and mates and slays,
And one by one back in the Closet lays."
Omar Khayyam
Seriously, though, Pharmacy welcomes this opportunity
to say a hearty "HELLO!" to the teaching staffs and student bodies of the other faculties, and to give you a bird's-
eye view of what is occuring in the realm of the mortar and
pestle.
We specialize in keeping everybody—including you!—
alive for at least a hundred years,
Few people realize the phenomenal strides Pharmacy
has taken in the last decade, both with regard to scientific
progress and establishment of demanding educational and
ethical standards.
Primarily, the modern pharmaceutical curricula entails
a rather exhaustive study of the preparations and therapeutic usages of drugs and other relevant topics of a semi-
medical nature.
But tho Pharmacist  is also a ski Held chemist, somewhat   •
more than a tyro in Biology, and not infrequently an authority
on the use of insecticides, His pattern of service in the community is multiform.
And now that wo have told you something uIkiu! ourselves, let me express the hope that you will enjoy our
page on Pharmacy this year and that you will he entertained
as ydu read. And please accept our invitation to come over
and visit us in March during "Open House."
You will  be more than  welcome!
John Parker,
3rd Year Pharmacy.
My Dog Has
Fleas
By   ROD   SMITH
And BANDY ROSS
It seems like important
things always happen to me in
February. People Often scoff
when I tell them this but its
true. Oh sure, I once had a
date with a fish slimer from
Nomu named Elsie Mettcrnich
In mid August but the only
real result of our shoddy af
fair was that I smelled of fish
until well into October. (The
little minx had slipped a half
dozen of the candied salmon
roe she was so fond of eating
into the watch pocket of my
pants as a remembrance.) I
didn't discover what was giving me the aroma of a gill-
netter on a warm day until the
little beggars hatched and tried
to migrate to the sea, (which
was pretty difficult when you
consider that I was in Edmonton at the time and the orily
salty liquid for 800 miles was
a glass of stale Eno's my grandmother was fermenting).
But enough of Granny. As I
was Baying it's always February when my little world is
shaken by the roots. Just the
other night I was hunched over
a table in a place I know downtown that sells beer, scribbling
my memoirs on the back of a
coaster and waiting for something important to happen,
when all of a sudden it did!
MEMORIES
I had juft begun recounting
my impressions of the eighth
month of my gestation period
when a soft feminine voice inquired, "Is this seat taken sonny?".
"Why no," I replied with
suave sophistication I affect in
moments like this.
"Oh don't get up," she said
flinging herself into my lap.
"There ain't no need to pay me
tio courtesies, equality of the
sexes, that's my motto."
I took a good long look at
her hairy muscular forearms
und her bull-like neck and
thought to myself that with thfs
kid it was not only a motto
but a living reality.
"Buster," she said, "you got
a kind face."
A NEW TWIST
This was surely a new departure in my relations with
the fair sex. A purblind lady
undertaker named Madge Adjective had once (in the throes
of passion) compared my profile to that of John Gilbert
but no one had ever described
my face as kind.
Of course my mysterious
companion who had just finished tying my necktie into a
noose and was trying to attract
attention by lassoing people
at the next table hardly came
under the heading of the fair
sex. I couldn't help wondering
at this strange beauty fate had
placed in my path.
At this moment the adventuress (as I now took her to
be) placed her leg in the path
of the waiter.
"Two beers," she said grandly emptying the contents of a
rawhide sack oh the table.
Six dried peas and a quarter
dropped onto the tabk\ "Take
it all she cried, there's more
where  that  came  from."
"Deirdre," I said, "do you
want to tell me your story."
"How did you know my
name," she cried in alarm.
"Why it's written all over
your face," I said taking an
eraser from my riocket and
rubbing   it  off.
TELLS ALL
Yes I'll tell you she said—
taking a broadsword from her
stocking and beginning to clean
her nails. "I'm an orphan, but
once I had a sister, a sweet
girl with long white hair and
pink eyes. We were very devoted and went everywhere
together but alas, she was offered a high salaried position
with a firm in the north and
we were separated.
"And you never heard from
tier again'.'" I volunteered.
"But 1 did," she was a good
industrious girl who worked
hard and saved her money.
Soon she amassed ;i snial fortune.
"She sent for you?"
"No she came to town and
boozed it all away, and in doing
so  fell deeply   in   love  with  a
judruii
ERSHH>   UR<?ED
Pharmacy Organization Described
Pharmacy Article
In the summer of 1049, pharmacists from eight countries
met in London, England and
formed the International Pharmaceutical Students Federation. Their object was to study
and promote the interests of
Pharmacy students and encourage international co-operation
amongst them. They achieve
his objecive by correspondence,
periodic publication of a student magazine, annual meetings and conferences.
tries: particularly the length
of training necessary and the
courses taught. Perhaps through
its   efforts    an    international
standard will someday be adopted.
IPSF arranges for student exchange for both Working and
observing students. Students
can work In a foreign country
of their choice tor three to six
months. Observation of pharmacies or other students way of
life can be done in a short holiday of one month.
IPSF functions mainly
through its annual camps and
study tours. Each country may
send two members to the camp
which  is held  in  a  different
country each year. Activities
include general meetings, symposia, council meetings, social
programmes and _excursions.
This year's camp will be in
Vienna nt the University and
will include a visit to the Salzburg Festival.
The advantages of joining
IFSP Cannot be overly stressed.
This organization benefits the
individual at home as well as
the actual representative to the
council. Why don't WE join?
CLASSIFIED
BLUE WALLET IN BROCK
Coffee Shop noon Thursday.
Driver's licence and papers urgently needed. Please leave at
Law desk or mail to owner at
529 East 6th St., North Vancouver.
GRADUATE AND POSTGRA-
duate Students—Your work a
specialty with us. Also University typing of all kinds. Com
patent work, campus rates.
ILOfSE STREET, AL 0655-R.
Just off the campus.
MSS TYPED RATES REAS-
onable- Phone MA 0619.
¥     *     *
TUTORING     IN      ENGLISH
grammar and composition. Ph.
CH. 4668.
X        M        X
THESES ASSIGNMENTS,
neatly correctly typed by experienced typist, highly recommended by UBC faculty members, reasonable. Phone eves.
CH. 1782 (except Mondays).
ep ep ep
TYPING, ESSAYS AND
theses typed. English and
French.   AL.  0476L.
WANTED
TYPING, MIMEOGRAPHING.
Electric typewriter. Carbon
paper and ribbons generously
used. Accurate work. Mrs. F.
M. Gow, 4456 West 10th Ave.,
ALma 3682.
NOTICES
LAUNDRY PROBLEMS? SEE
the Varsity Launderlte. Up to
9 lbs. completely processed for
75c. Special student rates for
small lots. Across from Varsity
Theatre. AL. 2210.
WAY BEHIND ON YOUR
READING? Then arrange now
for Individual Skills training at
the special student rate. Double your speed of reading with
improved comprehension and
better study methods. Following the Reading Skills Survey and Optometrist's exam
you will receive 21 hours of I
individual training. For details,
phone TA. 2918 or write the
Registrar, The Western Reading Laboratory Ltd., 939 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
RELIGIOUS MEETING OF
Friends (Quakers). Meeting for
worship every Sunday 11 a.m.
All very welcome. 535 West
10th Averttie. Vancouver.
tf*     ifi     ff>
LOST
A PHI DELTA THETA FRAT-
ernity pin, between the Physics
and Eng. Bldgs. If found please
notify W. Baikie 2120 Wesbrook Crescent. Phone AL.
0061.
9p 9p 9p
ONE PAIR OF BLUE RIM-
ed glasses. Lost in thc vicinity
of the Administration Building
Please turn into AMS.
FRANCES MURPHY
DANCE SCHOOL
BAyrlew 3421
Private Instruction
Rhumba • Tango • Samba
Fox Trot • Waltz. Jive
Old Time
Beginners • Brush Up
Advanced Courses
If ne answer CEdar 1871
Alma Hall, 3678 W. Breadwsy
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MECHANICAL CKCmtfifitt
POIYPHAiE SLIDE RULES
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Complete with Sheets and
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AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
FOUNTAIN PENS
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Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS ft PRINTERS.
580 Seymour St, Vancouver
faithless gigilo, who broke her
heart. When he left her she
went back North where she
became despondent and finally in an agony of heartbreak
threw herself into a fish-gutting
machine."
ROMANCE
"She died for love," I mused
"how romantic'
"Romantic hell she didn't
look very romantic when the
big knives got through with
her, Bzzz- Snick! and she was
just another can ol No. 1 pink."
"Very interesting," I said
mopping the sweat from my
brow.
But I didn't go back. Those
wern't dried peas on the table
they were salmon roe. Besides
I don't think she wanted that
broadsword just for cleaning
her nails.
B.Comm.-CA
Interested in Commerce?
In Chartered Accountancy?
Telephone or write now to thc Secretary of The Institute
of Chartered Accountants of B.C., and ask for details of
the new B.Comm-C.A. Plan.
602 Stock Exchange Building
PA. 3264
Campus capers call for Coke
The hour hand moves fast thc night
before exams—lots of ground to cover and
panic setting in. To relax and refresh?
That's easy. Have a Coke .. . it's* delicious.
DRINK
^ Cm'QH
teaetal tenet
itCeke" b¥7i«fi7irii *ee+-mmk
C 6
tOCA-COLALTD. Friday, February 18, 1955
THE     UBYSSEY
Page Three
GORE,   GUTS.   GIZZARDS
Ancients—Odd Druggists
The Pharmacis.t of today
supplies thc populace with
many drugs that perform near
miracles in their action against certain diseases. Cortisone, Antibiotics, and Sulpha
drugs are only a few of these
amazing chemotherapeutic agents that have done so much
to keep people healthy and
happy. But treatments have
not always been wbat they are
now.
Pharmacy is an ancient pro
fession. Its first records go
back to the time of the early
Egyptians. A scroll called thc
"Ebers Papyrus" dated 1552
B.C., was found in an Egyptian tomb. It listed many drugs
which we know today, and
also many others which the
Egyptians may have found to
be beneficial — although how
much so is a question! The
li.st of animal drugs included
lizard's blood, sevines' teeth,
putrid   meat,   moisture   from
Pill Peddlers Push Dope,
Proteins, Arid Love It
Oh boy! What a profession! Trying to dig this crazy Pharmacy is driving me to Benzadrenical insanity. (That new to
you?) Well, take for instance the other day in a dispensing
lab: ♦    	
An Engineer requested somei    PI Will/*    /*%#/*! If T
FLYING CYCLIST
"shaving lotion" (150% Over-
proof).
He even wanted me to distill
lt for him.
And one Physical-Ed type
grinned sheepishly at me when
caught by his coach for attempting to make off with a bottle
of liniment!
PHARMACY
EDITION
An elderly woman was walking past a drug store when, without warning, a young man dashed out, took a flying leap in the
air with his legs astride and fell
in a heap in the gutter. The lady
hurried over to him.
"Dear, dear," she said sympathetically. "Are you hurt?"
"No," was the sharp reply.
"But I'd like to meet that sonuv-
agun who moved my bicycle."
Dressmaking and Tailoring to your own
individual suggestions.
Parisian Ladies' Dress Shop
Opposite Safeway on Tenth Avenue
"COME IN AND SEE OUR SEPARATES"
53B32S
pigs' ears, asses' hoofs, and
excreta of various animals, including human beings, dogs,
cats, donkeys and even flies.
Some of these "remedies" persisted for more than 3000
years, and were included in
Pharmacopoeias of thc 16th
and 17th centuries.
This noteworthy document
listed several recipes, among
which were two hair restorers.
One was comprised of a mixture containing equal parts of
the heel of an Abyssinian
greyhound, of date blossoms,
and of asses' hoofs, boiled in
oil. The other was composed
of a concoction of the fats of
the horse, crocodile, hippopotamus, cat, snake and ibex. Fly
specks mixed with the seeds
of an unidentified plant were
considered THE thing to prevent babies from crying. In
springtime, a tasty tonic was
recommended consisting of Assyrian plums, grapes, frankincense, cumin, wine, beer, yeast
and goose greast.
It was always the belief
that the more vile a medicine
tasted, the better it was for
you. The ancient Chinese prescribed toads' eyelids as a treatment for the common cold, and
earthworms rolled in honey
for gastritis. Centipedes were
employed in childrens' diseases.
In the 14th century, a mixture of ants' eggs, oil of scorpions, and lions' flesh was
used to treat apoplexy (or
stroke).
These types of remedies
persisted for many centuries.
In fact, it has only been within the last 100 years or so that
research has begun to dispose
of these so-called "medicines,"
and to substitute drugs tested
by lengthy and careful research.
ifi
EATON'S
There's Colour Excitement in
Sun-Bright Cottons at Eaton's
You can wear those dresses now—and far into the summer.
Visit our Second Floor today and indulge in a pick-me-up
cotton that's pretty.  Sketched a  dress  of  fresh ... washable  glazed
cotton. With bright squiggles and posies of colour
splattered all over muted grey. Vivid bands of chartreuse
accent the new lone; torso look. Full skirt whirls beneath
the lup, |g#95
Sun-Bright Cottons in sizes  10 to 20
EATON'S Women's Dresses—Second Floor
Telephone MArine 7112, West 1600
ALSO AT EATON'S NEW WESTMINSTER NW 4811
CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
HIGH    SCHOOL    CONFERENCE COMMIfTEE in the Board
Room noon today.
*r V *r
PRE LAW CLUB last general
meeting preceding the trip to
Oakalla. Those seeking transportation phone Marion at CE.
8036 or Harriet at AL 08S3L
between 7 and 9 p.m. Meet noon
today in Arts 104.
*P ep *P
MUSIC APPRECIATION Club
presents selections from Gounod's Faust, noon today in HM 5.
ep ep ep
A    BADMINTON    TOURNA-
ment open to all students starts
this.Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in the
Women's Gym. Entries will be
accepted until 2:30 p.m. Sunday.
No charge.
*r 9r T
INTERNATION HOUSE will
hold a meeting tonight in club
house L4. Films will be shown
by Carlos Kruytbosch, a relative
of the Dutch consul.
9f* 9ft 9ft
UNITED    NATIONS     CLUB
presents Professor G. Davies
speaking on "Tension in Africa," noon today in Arts 100.
9ft 9ft 9f)
HILLEL FOUNDATION invites Rabbi M. Wagner of Seattle to speak on Psychiatry and
Religion, Monday noon in Hillel
House.
Planned
Delights
Dissipation
Slashed Mice
Over in the Pharmacy Building (alias the Biological Science
Building) they have some of the happiest mice you haVe ever
seen. These debauched rodents are the willing subjects of research, which is been done to investigate effects of alchohol in
combination with certain drugs.
In the interests of science tbejmmmmm^mmm-—-■—■■■■■'■■a"**
mice are led through mild hallucinations to many a lost week-
ehd before becoming upstanding
members ol Alcoholics Annoy-
mouse.
The first step consists of establishing a dose that will render a mouse unconscious for a
measurable length of time. Like
people mice are individuals; the
dose varies. Not all are equally
affected by the injections that
are given intraperitoneally.
Some attain a state of mild self-
satisfaction, some are pleasantly
inebriated, and some are unmis-
takeably blotto.
The action which demonstrates recovery is called the "righting reflex." This is the ability
of a mouse to regain a standing position under its own steam
after been placed on its back.
While no conclusive experimental results can be expressed,
sb far the mice are not complaining.
A 6RIM FAIRY
TOLD BY AN HNOT
A lone knight in shining armour is plodding up road to
castle on a stormy night, astride a huge Saint Bernard.
As he reaches the castle he
asks the men at arms (they
are petting at the time) if
he can gain admittance. "Why
of course, Jack," they reply,
"We wouldn't turn a knight
away on a dog like this."
Pharmacist — Man
Behind  Recovery
Most people start their lives in a hospital. Some become
careless and are compelled to make occasional trips back to this
place of nascence for repairs or major overhauling.
You    know    that   you   feel
Pharmacy's
Pet Peeve
Is 'Recipe'
Whenever you arc in the vicinity of the Biological Science
and Pharmacy building, you will
probably encounter Pharmacy
students wearing grey cardigans
with an R symbol on the heart
side of the sweater.
The R does not mean that the
student is necessarily affiliated
with the Rexall Drug Company.
This is a very touchy point with
a pharmacy student and if you
wish to make a now friend do
not suggest this to him!
What docs the R mean? Perhaps you have noticed the symbol R on the top left-hand corner of a prescription and under
this symbol a list of medicinal
ingredients followed by directions to the pharmacist on the
compounding of the preparation.
When a HOME ECONOMICS
student makes a
or some cookies
the recipe in her cookbook. R
means "RECIPE" and this symbol is one of the trademarks of
the profession of Pharmacy.
"lousy" on the way in, and
"on top of the world" on
the way out, but what manner of miracle took place in between? Was it the kind young
lady in the crisp white uniform?
Was it the grey-haired man with
the ste'thescope? Or could it
have been that bottle of sweet-
tasting medicine that transformed your pain-racked body into
the smooth-running mass ot
muscle that it is now? The truth
is that they all contributed to
your recovery.
The white-clad forms of doctors and nurses are a familiar
sight to hospital patients, but
very few ever see the man responsible for the bottle of medicine that tipped the scales in
their favour. This man, the hos-
! pital pharmacist, is an indispen-
; sible link between the drug and
the doctor. He is an expert on
; drugs and their uses and in cooperation with the physician aids
in selecting from the countless
variety of efficient medicaments
the precise one suited to your
therapeutic need.
When you step out of the hospital with the feeling that it's
loaf of bread j great to be alive, remember that
she looks up; there was a man behind the
scenes who helped in the solution of your health problem.
That man was the hospital pharmacist.
UNITED   AIR   LINES
invites
the women of the University of B.C. to a showing
of a color-sound motion
picture entitled,
"Scotty Wins
Her Wings
tt
This film depicts the real
life story of a stewardess
—her selection, her training and her duties.
Stewardess Representative, Betty Hanneman, of United
Air Lines, will be on campus at the same time to discuss
a Stewardess career.
FILM: "Scotty Wins Her Wings"
Time: 12:30 noon, Friday Feb. 25
PLACE: Biology 100
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION  CALL THE
t
UBC NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
Hut M6
ALma 1101
SECONDERS
(Continued from Page 1)
CLIVE LYTLE
The position of Second Member at Large of the AMS requires a student with enthusiasm,
brdad interests, concern for student affairs, and the proven
scholastic ability to allofc him
to devote considerable time to
his office. Clive Lytle is that
student.
In high school, Clive served
on two students' councils, Wfbtfe
for the paper, and was chairman of the graduation committee. He maintained high marks,
and last year won three scholarships. He will study Law.
This year Clive is active in
the Student Liberal Club, is on
the SCM cabinet and is a member of U.N. (He also finds time
for community and church activities, has a part-time job, and
plays an occasional round of
golf.)
Clive Lytle has the ability,
the personality and the enthusiasm to make a firstoate "S,#f
ond Member."
OLEN BAKER
JOHN BUTTEEFIELD ~
WHY VOTE FOR JOHN feUT-
TERFIELD FOR 2nd MEMBER?
—because he is a Freshman leader on thc Frosh Council.
—because he lives in "Studint
Housing" and knows the pimm-
lems.
—because he is a scholarship
student.
—because he plays on the UBC
soccer team.
—because he runs for the UBC
track team.
—because he is an active member of Parliamentary Forum.
—because he was editor of his
high school annual.
—because he will make a damn
fine Councillor.
BARU NYLANDER
CO-ORDINATOft
BILL  GARTSIDE
t am seconding the nomination of Bill Gartside, 3rd YeSr
Commerce, for Co-Ordinator of
Activities because I am convinced that he will do an excellent
job. Those who know him agree
that Bill is an enthusiastic and
dependable person who will
work energetically and efficiently at any job.
Bill was vice-president of his
high school. At university he
has obtained a breadth of experience as Co-Chairman of the
Mardi Gras Committee and Co-
Chairman of Help Week, which
involve the co-ordination ot Students in aiding city charities, tte
has belonged to and worked
with various campus clubs, hai
obtained his commission With
the University Squadron of th*
RCAF, and has organized acti;
vities for the Youth Training
Camp.
I therefore sincerely urge you
to vote, and to vote Bill Gartside Co-Ordinator of Activities,
KEN FAWCUS
DON McCALLUM
I am seconding Don McCallum
for the position of AMS co-ordinator because I feel his experience in student affairs make*
him an ideal choice. Don served
on the Frosh executive in his
first year on campus; he was
Billeting and Transportation
chairman for the High Schottl
Conference in his second year;
and this year he is one of the
co-ordinators on Open House.
His demonstrated ability as an
effective organizer and vigorous
speaker make him a strong can
didatc for tiie office of co-ordinator.
TED LEE Page Four
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, February 18, 1955
FOLLOWING ITS TRADITION of presenting pictures
of drama intensified athletic events, The Ubyssey today
presents an episode from the thrilling life of a table tennis
player. Ping Pong, incidentally is a fine game. The fellows
involved are Jack Lee and Bob St. Clair-Smith.
—Brian Thomas Photo
Jayvees  Beat  Adanacs
To   Square   Semi-Finals
POWDERBOWL FAME REACHES
FAR; EVEN UNTO NEW YORK
Fame, it seems, has grown with leaps and bounds with
the advent of the newsreel.
A Mrs. McLeod, mother of a UBC grad "Tish," who
danced her way out of the Mardi Gras chorus line into
New York's choreography, phoned us the other day with
a message from her daughter.
It seems the films of the Powderbowl reached the
theatres of Gotham, where they were received with great
enthusiasm.
Reports Tish, "they brought the house down."
COLUMNS UNLIMITED
Sputa Editor—KEN LAMB
Four  Rugger
I V
Teams  See  Action
ij, This Saturday the rugged Thunderbirds play another ex-
hibition game in preparation for the southern junket to California. Victoria's James Bay XV are grist for the Varsity mill
•this time.
drubbings by Braves and Blurbs.
Kats are favored, but, like all
UBC teams, Tommies relish the
role of underdogs, and lie in
the weeds like darkhores after
applecarts to upset. Don't bet
against them, the smart money
says.
For 3rd
This will be the last opportunity to see the Birds before
they head to Berkely to beard
the hibernating Bears, and the
starting line-up should give fans
an inkling as to who coach Albert intends to use in the big
series.
NOT LIKELY
James Bay is not expected to!
beat Varsity. No team in B. C. is
these days. Yet the dogged Islanders generally play with
such enthusiam that any opposition has to function on all
cylinders in order to look good.
So 2 p.m. Saturday at the
Owen Bowl is the time for the
flashing Birds to take off against
Victoria.
In Carmichael Cup play the
red-hot Blurbs of Don Coryell
will endeavour to increase their
win skein against Ex-Prince of
Wales in Douglas Park SW at
1:15 p.m. Blurbs have the rugger fans confused.
NO  ONE  KNOWS
No one knows what to think.
They should not win, according
to the book, yet they won't lose.
Last week Tommies ought to
have beaten them by 10 points,
so Blurbs  beat  them   by  24.
At 1:15 also, the Braves take
on   North   Shore.   Braves  .share
the    spot - lifihl    with
in attention at present.
Both   arc
league play  with only  one  loss
each.  Braves  three quarter  line
is expected  to  be too  much  for; ably be seeing a lot of duty on
iNorth    Shore,    and    interest    is ^ the  forward  line.
growing for the coming clash between   Blurbs   and   Braves.
ACHING  MUSCLES
Tommies go to Douglas Park
to ' flex their aching muscles
against Kats at 1:15 p.m. Toms
arc   sore   for    two   consecutive
Birds
Still
Looking
Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds,
at any time on the verge of
breaking their own Evergreen
Conference win streak, pulled
out for Tacoma this morning
with full intentions of breaking
that record at the expense of
PLC or CPS.
With the exception of Tommy
Kendall,   Pomfret   will  dress   a
full   team.   John   McLeod,   however,   is just   recuperating  from I
a bad cold, and could be slowed ,
down  for the series.
Jack's  biggest  worry   is  CPS.
led  by  high  scoring  Bill  Medin
and   Russ   Wilkerson.   PLC  will
Blurbs I also   be   tough,   with   6'7"   Nick
jKeldcrman, and a new, even lar-
riding   the   crest   of I ger, addition, as yet unnamed.
With McLeod expected to take
easy, Ernie Nyhaug will prob-
Look  What  The
Wind   Blew  In
' By KEN LAMB
You'll have to excuse me today, but if you look at the front
page, you'irfind it's spring.
The most welcome thing of course, about all these screaming
gales we've been having is that they are drying the fields at an encouraging rate. Here's for more breezes and ball games.
Anyway, there are a few interesting tidbits to be gleaned
from the files of rival newssheets. It seems a fellow who acts as the
athletic director at McMaster, a small college back in Canada, has
come out with his idea of the ratings of the Canadian football
teams.
His list goes something like Toronto. Western Ontario,
Queens. Ontario Agricultural College. McMaster. McGifl. UBC.
Military College, Ottawa, end Dalhousie.
MAYBE HE THINKS IT WAS LUCK
Though still liking another crack at Toronto Blues, we have
to agree and give them first. At the risk of being called not only
modest, but disloyal, we'll give Western and Queens the next spots.
Now, maintaining good journalistic abstinence, 1 can't reply
as I'd like, as to the next choices and will have to leave the comments up to you. It would seem that chappy doesn't think much
of us. Anyone for a game with McMaster? We're not too elucidating
today, but then that's perhaps because it was such a flabbergasting relegation.
And moving on to that thorniest of problems, the swimming
pool. After reading the front page yesterday, I see that another
alternative has been added to the pool debate.
'NO POOL AT ALL' THE SONG SAYS
Now it is not only "to roof or to add another," but to do nothing at all about pools, and to put the money toward dormitories.
Well, after listening to the chaps I hitch rides off in the morning,
I could put forth another suggestion, which though it has little
merit, at least is fairly popular.
That would be to forget the whole blamed thing. However,
as it is a good chance to con a bit of money from the Board of
Governors, we might as well put it toward a pool.
The grapevine that wraps itself around and through the
gym also has it that the estimated costs of roofing and maintaining the big pool are still only guesses.
It would seem therefore, that the little pool, all 25 enclosed
yards of it, which is a good standard size, might be the best deal all
around.
y^1**
PRACTICAL ECONOMICS
Dr.   John   B.   Rosehorough
DENTIST
2130 Western Parkway
(Behind   Bank  of  Commerce)
Phone   AL.   3980
•t "MY BANK",
where students' accounts are
welcome. You can open an
account for as little as a
dollar.
Hank oi Montreal
WOKklNl,    WITH     (ANADIANS    IN    EVfRY     WALK     Of
MERLE C. KIRBY
Manager
Your Bank on the Campus...
In the Auditorium Building
Of
\3fARL«S\|0$DICK
P
by    AL    CAPP
CATCH
HIM-
QUICKLY.?.
FIRST-1 MUST FIX.
MY HAIR,WITH
WILDROOT CREAM
OIL.'/-REMOVES
LOOSE DANDRUFF-
Team   Struck   Fast,
Never   Looked   Back
JAYVEES 54-ADANACS 45
EILERS 45 • CLOVERDALE 32
Dick Penn's Jayvees struck early anld pulled away to
beat New Westminster Adanacs 54-45 and tie the Senior A
semi-finals at one game each Thursday night at Lord Byng
gym.
Adanacs  won  thc  first  gamef"
44-41.
LEADING
UBC was leading 10-2 at the
end of the first quarter, 21-12
at half time, and 38-24 at three
quarter time.
Dick turned a page for last
night's game. After playing
straight basketball and losing
Tuesday night, Penn decided to
pull a zone defense out of his
hat.
RAN AWAY
It worked and the Jayvees
started running away with the
ball game. They used the zone
throughout the first half.
Ken "Hooker" Wright called
on his New Westminster club to
pull a full court defense to try
and bottle the Jayvees up.
But Jayvees matched Adanacs
basket for basket in the second
half and where never in trouble.
SAUNDERS LEADS
Ted Saunders, coming back
from a long scoring slump, led
the Jayvees with 17 points.
Guard Gordie Gimple, high scorer in Tuesday's losing cause,
followed him with 11.
Third and deciding game will
be played Tuesday night at 7:15
at King Ed gym. Winner will
meet Vancouver Eilers, who won
their semi-finals with Cloverdale
last night, beating them 49-32.
Eilers at one time had a twenty point lead.
SOCCER CUT IN HALF
UBC soccer will be turning
over on only half its cylinders
this Sunday when the Chiefs
play Clarke and Buzza in a Provincial Cup game on campus at
2.
Thunderbirds fold their wing
and study this week while they
rest up for their television debut
next week and two final games
against   CPR  and Pilseners.
BRAVES HOST ROADS
INSATURDAYFIXTURE
Gerry Kenyon's Braves
play their second last game of
the season, and will try to
start the finish on a cheery
note, Saturday night when
they meet the same Royal
Roads team they licked two
weeks ago on the Island.
The 6 p.m. game in the gym
will follow a UBC-Royal
Roads volleyball game.
West Van and Chilliwack
high schools will finish the
evening's entertainment with
a game at 7:15.
WANTED
Canteen Manager—Fort Camp—Beginning '55 '56 term
Must be Married  UBC Student
Apply lo Secretary. Fort Camp Before Feb. 25, 1955 Stating
Qualification!
Ihe Day Begins Divinely i
0MV
Orion
Look  for  the  name  "Kitten'
... tight ot a feather .. •
toft as the softest cashmere ... Ik
«n exciting bouquet of new colour*
... Apiicot, Helio, Charcoal, Olive
Green, Chamois, Chartreuse, at wel
os twelve other fashion colours.
Full-fashioned, hand-finished,
shiink-proof, moth-proof ...
simple to care fori *'
At good shops everywhere.
$6.95. $7.95, $8.95.
SUNAY&

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