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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1958

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 What?
THE UBYSSEY
Me
Worry ?
VOL. XU
'Enrollment
.Now 9200
The  official  UBC   rcgisration
figure stands at 9,200. ,
Another 500 are expected to '
register this week, after paying I
the $20 late registry fee. j
J. E. A. Parnell, UBC Regis-;
trar,  believes  total  registration
will fall short of the predicted
10,000 by about 200 students.
He   suggested   the   long,   hot;
^summer was partially to blame.;
"Too many students have been
unable to find jobs as soon as
'the summer vacation began," he,'
said, "and as a result find themselves with less money than
visual." ,
*'     Record numbers   of  students
went through the new system of;
registration,   which   Parnell;
termed "definitely a   success."   '
*     Next year he hopes to eliminate the long hours of queuing by
allocating times of registration j
in places to both frosh and upperclassmen.
VANCOUVER, B.C~ TUKDAY7sEPiEMBERirCT958
THERE IS NO HOUSING SHORTAGE at UBC this year,
according to Housing Administrator A. R. Baird. But
students still have to live in cramped quarters like this. It
Students Can Expect
More Government Aid
Government aid to UBC students is expected to increase,
according to L. R. Peterson, provincial minister of education.
Peterson made the comment in a wire to AMS president
Chuck Connaghan Monday.      •
Connaghan requested the government to take steps to aid
more students this year.
In a wire to Peterson Connaghan said: "I urge the Provincial Government to provide immediate financial assistance to
UBC students who have been
unemployed  this summer."
"Unless government action is
taken it is possible lhat a high
percentage of the present enrollment will be forced to discontinue their education this
fall."
The full text of Peterson's reply stated:
"Applications for financial assistance received are being considered and processed in relation to academic standing and
financial need.
"Present indications are that
greater numbers will be assisted."
Pub Goes
Over The Top
W are going over the top this
year boys.
We have to really sell ourselves  boys.
Whal does this mean'.'
It means we need a staff —
that's what it means.
Well, let's have a meeting to
attract new members to the staff.
Run the Ubyssey up the flag
pole and see if anyone salutes.
Throw it in the lily pond and
see if ;t shrinks.
But be sure to come to the
meeting Thursday at 12:U0 in
the Ubyssey office, north basemen of the Brock and join the
family.
Yes, yes, that's the idea J.D.
This year we have to organize.
Four    New   Students
Exchanged   By   WUS
WUS, this term, welcomes four students from Germany,
Japan and Nigeria who are completing the exchange of scholars by their university and UBC.
During registration week Tsu
tomu Takeaa, a fourth year student of International Studies
from Keio University, Tokyo,
iness Administration student ar-
AMS PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN THIS WEEK
All lale registrants and
those who didn't get their
A.M.S. pictures taken in the
Armoury during registration,
may do so this week, Sepi.
22 to 27, between the hours of
12.30 and 2.30 p.m. in Room
163-A, Brock Extension,
Japan, arrived to begin research
work on Canada for his university, Friday, Miss Inga Walters,
a third year Commerce and Bus-
rived from the University of
Hamburg, Germany.
Still expected to come this
week are Michael Steinle from
Germany, and a fourth exchange
student from University College
of Ibada, Nigeria.
Earlier in the summer UBC's
WUS scholarship winners left
for their respective universities,
Stanley Sfukawa will be studying at Keio University, John
Dressier   at   the   University   of
(Continued on Page 3)
See FOUR NEW STUDENTS
Freshettes
Independent
j By JUDY FRAINE
j     "Did  you  follow  the instruc-
j tions in "Clues for Coeds" when
you dressed Monday morning?"
Nobody else did.
Freshettes interviewed Monday blushingly admitted that
they dressed themselves, thank
you. without the aid of the
"helpful" liltle booklet.
Freshmen think A-Cards are
a gyp.
"I would much rather pick out
the games I want to see and pay
full price than waste So on an
A-Card," was the opinion of
most.
Many resented the high-pressure tactics used by the "muscle-
bound young men" selling the
cards in the armories.
Some made nasty remarks
about UBC teams. We won't repeat them,
Most of the frosh interviewed
had made a trip to the library.
They found it bewildering and
big but still wondered if it could
accommodate the large enrollment.
Some think the university is
"fine", "exciting", "fun."
Others think it is "big." Their
lower lips trembled at the
thought of not possibly being
able lo know everyone.
It was very hard to get the
frosh to answer questions. They
hated to admit that they were
frosh.
I think they thought they were
going to be hurt.
The majoriy were reluctant to
answer questions with more
than a "yes" or a "no" and many
felt it would be unfair to give
opinions of the university based
on  one day of  lectures.
There was nary a frosh in the
parking lot. In former years first
year students, often lost and confused, seemed to gravitate toward the parking lots and the
privacy of their cars.
This year's crop took advantage of the weather and explored
the campus, brazenly walking
about, clutching their English
100 books in their humid little
hands,
must be very hard to study in a place like this. UBC is
the third largest university in Canada.
—Photo by Mike Sone
UBC Officials Say
No Housing Problem
There is no housing problem at UBC according to university
officials.
"Housing conditions for students are good," says A. R. Baird,
UBC housing administrator.
"We have more listings than ever," he said.    "Response ha3
been terrific — no one is without a place to live."
!     More than 9,200 students have*
! registered this year,    a    factor
! which  was expected  to  complicate the housing situation.
Construction tie-ups this summer were expected to add to the
problem.
CAN HOUSE 1,270
UBC can house 1,270 studenls
i on campus, leaving 8,900 students, including Vancouver residents, to find accommodation
outside the gates.
At present students are being
temporarily housed in the sewing and rumpus rooms at the
Youth Training Centre.
Zoning laws in the Point Grey
area have not the housing supply, according to Gerald Sutton-
Brown, chairman of the Vancouver Planning Commission.
More housing inspectors have
been added to the Point Grey
area to facilitate inspection, but
any cancellation of licences is a
result of violations of present bylaws, according to Sutton-Brown.
NO SEPARATE UNITS
Zoning laws in the Point Grey
area prohibit separate units in a
family dwelling.    Only one kitchen and one or two bathrooms
j are allowed in each house.
!     No suites are officially allow-
! ed  in the area, although housekeeping   rooms   and   room and
! board are legal.
!     Members   of   the   Vancouver
' Real Estate Board, maintain the
! rules are not rigidly enforced
In one case, the bylaw has
been officially relaxed.
Twelve students at the DK.E
fraternity house will have a
home this year because the
city's zoning appeal board relaxed the bylaw.
Said board member Fred "Cyclone" Taylor, "although the district is zoned single-family dwelling, extension of its use as a
boarding house is warranted in
view of the shortage of student
accommodation."
Administrator Baird stated he
had   received   complaints   from
people on his list because no one
(Continued on Page 3)
See UBC OFFICIALS
Tween Closses
Christians Meet
At Noon Today
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP — There will be an
important introductory meeting
at noon today, Tuesday, in Buchanan 104.
V*      ¥      H*
JAZZ SOCIETY — Jazzsoc
presents the Ray Sikora big band
Wednesday noon in the auditorium. Admission: 25c; Frosh ]5c.
"t* **t* ^r
MEN'S SKI TEAM — Meeting
for all those interested in turning out for ski team.   Room 216,
There  is  one or  more suite j Buchanan,  12.30 Thursday
in every block, on the average,"
stated one Board member.
STUDENTS NOT DISTURBED
Another member, who asked
to remain anonymous, commented, "I haven't heard of one case
where a student who is violating
the bylaw has been disturbed."
(Continued on Page  3)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
There will be a short but
sweet Ubyssey editorial board
meeting at noon today in the
usual place. Urgent matters
will  be discussed. Come, PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1958
THE UBYSSEY     international wus meeting
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook        City   Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone        Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR,    BARB BIELY
Reporters and Desk: Judy Frain, Bruce Taylor, Diane Grant,
Wayne Lamb.     SPORTS:   Allan Dafoe, Audrey Ede, Mike Sone.
Do I Really Have
To Buy All This?
It's become traditional that Alma Mater Society organizations set up headquarters in the Armoury during registration where they purvey "A" cards, club memberships, yearbooks, and other wares of questionable worth.
As a rule, however, registrants are not in the mood to
buy these things, having just finished paying out a large
chunk of their summer earnings in term fees.
This being so, the AMS' hucksters employ what is
known as the hard sell. The hard sell is particularly effective
against frosh, who do at that time realize that buying the
AMS' wares is not a compulsory part of the registration
procedure.
The uninformed frosh seek to correct their ignorance.
They ask whether they really must buy all this stuff. The
hucksters tell them they must. Since nobody else told them
any different, many frosh are taken in by these tactics and
spend money they don't want to spend and don't need to
spend
Proponents of this set-up will say it's all part of initiation
and, besides, it's in aid of the old school.
This may be true enough, but it doesn't excuse the
inclusion of high-pressure selling in the registration program
of the University, which is primarily an academic institution.
The Ubyssey is inclined to think that AMS organizations
use Armoury registration facilities less to stimulate school
spirit than to make a fast buck. We think the hucksters
could probably not sell half their goodies without the high-
pressure booths at regstration.
We think AMS activities should be made to stand on
their own feet. If the students won't voluntarily support them,
the AMS activities should be allowed to die a peaceful
death.
Newcomers to a place of learning should not be greeted
with the hard sell. Registration officials should frown upon
the presence of AMS booths in the Armoury.
AMS Bargain Day should in fact be completely disassociated from registration.
No Spirit
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
A quick shower at Saturday's Churchill Cup game
forced me to cross the field to
a drier seat. The noticeable
difference between the response to the game of bleacher
students and reserved-seat
adults was clue to more than
rain,
On the east side of the stadium, a large student crowd
contained a few bottle smashers, plus quite a few more wr.o
were just attentive enough to
know whal quarter the 'Birds
were in. The cheerleaders
made infrequent and weakly
supported appearances. No yell
sheets were distributed to aid
the Frosh,
On the west side, a group of
Redmen supporters sang the
James McGill song lustily,
roared McGill yells with gusto,
and essentially    drowned    out
e-veryone else.
Outside the stadium, long
queues formed at two west entrance wickets and thc east
gate was closed.
The whole picture presented
UBC as a school with rather
low athletic-spectator morale.
The team showed fight, but the
MAD, the Blue and Gold Society, and the student body showed feeble spirit and organization.
University pride, if nothing
else, demands some wholehearted team support. Let's have
cheers — lively, frequent, and
printed; maybe even the odd
song like: "Hail UBC" or our
own lovely Alma Mater Hymn.
Lot's increase the stadium's
inflow rate by selling tickets
al every entrance.
Let's have students that
make spectatorship mutual fun
by reacting with some spirit!
DUNCAN  BAYNES,
Civil Eng. '59.
UBC Has Important
Role In Growing WUS
Ed. Note: AMS Vice-President Jairus Mutambikwa represented UBC as a guest al lhe
International General Assembly of World University Service in Maison Montmorency,
Quebec City from August 16-
22. Here he reports on lhal
conference and its significance
lo the studenls of UBC.
By JAIRUS MUTAMBIKWA
I viewed the invitation (to
the conference) a.s an eloquent
recognition of UBC's growing
importance in WUS activities,
locally, nationally and internationally. This impression was
immediately strengthened at
the Assembly by many delegates, who in casual conversation with me, referred in warm
terms t o WUS activities on
our campus, It is, therefore,
natural lhat I should pay tribute here lo all those UBC students and staff who devoted
their energy to building our
WUS program and enabling
our University to have the good
reputation that it obviously enjoys today.
One can only hope that in
future UBC will not let go this
good reputation but rather will
participate more actively in
WUS activities to maintain it.
This will necessitate being active on all three levels, locally,
nationally and internationally.
In this respect il is gratifying
to no'e that in October this year
UBC will host the 13th National Assembly of World University Service of Canada, Let's
lake an active interest in this
Assembly and let our voice be
heard!
WUS (formerly known as International Student Service) i.s
a world wide organisation of
professors and University students working towards the
ideal of a University community transcending all barriers of
creed, race and nationality. Its
history dates back to post
World War I when many universities throughout the world
organised relief to assist their
fellow-members in thc then
war-torn Europe.
Today WUS is active in 42
countries in Europe, Africa, tho
Middle East, Asia, and North
America. Its activities are all
designed to promote inter-university and international cooperation and understanding,
and  consists of: —
1. material aid to university
communities in need through
self help and mutual assistance projects.
2. promotion of international
understanding through seminars, conferences and study
tours.
3. research into university
problems.
Over one hundred University
studenls and professors from
about thirty countries attended
Iho Assembly. The delegates
were mostly from WUS national committees but also included
Members-at-Large selected for
their knowledge and experience of Univrsity affairs, and
representatives from international organisations.
The following countries were
represented: British Guiana,
Canada, Denmark, Egypt, England, France, Ghana, Greece,
Holland, Hong Kong, India,
Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Korea,
Lebanon, Nigeria, Pakistan,
Philippines, Sierra Leone,
Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand,
Uganda, Union of Soulh Africa, United Slates of America,
Vietnam and Yugoslavia.
The Chancellor of Laval Universily, H. E. Msgr. Maurice
Roy, inaugurated the Assembly
and the following message was
delivered to the delegates by
Dr. F. Cyril James, Principal,
McGill University and National
President of WUS of Canada.
"On this occasion when the
General Assembly of World
University Service is meeting
in Canada, 1 should like to extend to each of the delegates
from Ihe other countries a sincere and cordial welcome. We
have long been looking forward
to an occasion such as this
when we might entertain the
General Assembly, reciprocating in some small measure the
generous hospitality that we
have received at the hands of
other countries,
"I hope, therefore, that your
stay in Canada may be interesting and wholly delightful. I
hope too that the deliberations
and decisions, of this Congress
may enable WUS to move
forward to a programme of
even more effective help to
students in those parts of the
world where friendship is warm
and help i.s urgently needed."
If one looks at WUS over
the past ten years, one is struck
by the fact that WUS has not
been satisfied with discussing
problems of expanding its
work but rather has cautiously
followed each step of accomplishment with a further extension of its activities. Yet as a
world organisation, WUS is
acutely aware that its operations do not yet extend to more
obviously important areas-—important in the sense of being
in a position to make significant contribution to its work
and in the sense of requiring
help and support from the University community in other
parts of the world.
In 1946 WUS activities were
centred on urgent needs of
post-war Europe with Australia, New Zealand and North
America as principal contributors. However, by 1947, WUS ,
committees were established in
seven South East Asian countries with a head office in Madras, India. By 1930 not only
were these committees able to
stand and work on their initiative but the time had come for
WUS to move into another new
area, the Middle East.
Subsequently c o m m i ttees
were established in five of the
countries o f tho Middle East,
and these committees are now
doing good work, First steps
to include Africa in WUS activities were taken in 1953 and
today WUS is actne ia five
African countries. Meanwhile
committees were established in
Hong Kong, Nepal, the Philippines,  Vietnam  and  the  West
Indies. Thus in a space of ten
years, WUS has extended its
activities to three new regions.
Such expansion naturally
creates new responsibilities.
New demands upon WUS resources without a corresponding increase in its i ncome
places problems in making the
foundations of this expansion
secure. It is for this reason that
WUS has not advanced into a
new area for the past two
years.
However, at the Assembly il
was felt that WUS was now in
a position to consider extending its operations into a number of Latin American countries and accordingly its Secretariat was instructed lo lake
immediate steps to explore the
possibilities of such an expansion. The expansion appears lo
have been long overdue and
one can only but congratulate
WUS for its decision in this
regard.
The Assembly expressed in
more ways than one, its desire
to continue maintaining and expanding, wherever this is practicable and desirable, the current, specific WUS projects
which consist of the following:
1. Studenl Lodging and Living: This includes assistance in
developing co-operative methods to help meet student welfare, and direct material aid
for the initiation and establishment of student centres, common-rooms, canteens, hostels
and shops selling articles needed by students.
2. Student Health: Basically,
this involves the establishment
of health services, particularly
with regard to promoting effective preventive measures;
clinics with out-patient facilities, student wards at general
hospitals and sanatoria and
lastly, the provision of medical
3. Educational Activities, Facilities and Equipment: This involves two aspects, namely
academic and Extra-Curricular.
The Academic aspect is concerned with need for more ar.d
better text - books reference
works, laboratory and study
material and for improved educational techniques. The Extra-Curricular, on the other
hand, is concerned with the
study of fundamental university problems of contemporary
(Continued on Page 5)
See  INTERNATIONAL  WUS
NOTICE
The Ubyssey will welcome
guest editorials and signed articles for the editorial page,
written fey UBC students ex
faculty members.
Contributions may deal with
any topic of interest to university students. They should be
typewritten, and triple-spaced
if possible.
We are particularly eager Jo
get contributions from honours
and graduate students and
from faculty members,
In no case will The Ubyssey
publish unsigned material, although pseudonyms may be
used on occasion. Tuesday, September 23, 1958
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Financiers
NeedTwoAAen
Applications will be received
by the AMS for positions on the
newly created finance committee
until Thursday.
Under the chairmanship* of
AMS treasurer John Helliwell,
the committee will consist of
AMS members Wendy Amour,
Brad Crawford and two members of the student body appointed by the above.
Purpose of the committee is to
facilitate the financial operation
of the AMS. It will also act as a
guide for club and society treasurers.
The committee will examine
the AMS annual budget and will
handle requests for extraordinary grants and supplementary
budgets by student organizations,
The students council will continue to examine and ratify the
annual AMS budget.
Applications for committee
membership should be submitted
to Helliwell by Thursday.
Helliwell stated the committee is necessary to ensure thorough investigation of all requests
for AMS funds.
"The council is too heavily
snowed under with other tasks
to undertake the investigation
necessary for arrival at an intelligent decision on financial
matters," he said.
Raven Aloft
Help It Fly
Raven, UBC's literary magazine, is one of the finest college
publications in North America,
according to Earle Birney, UBC
English department.
This year's editor, Desmond
Fitzgerald states he is going to
maintain the high standard of
the  publication.
"We want new people to write
poetry, short stories, etc. for the
two publications this year," he
said.
He urges members of all faculties to contribute.
"We don't want to give the impression that we are a clique
of long-haired artsmen," stated
Fitzgerald.
A meeting of those interested
in the Raven will be held Monday at 12:30 p.m. in the Ubyssey office, North end of the
Brock basement.
FOR SALE
Dark Brown muskrat fur
cape jacket in good condition.
Appropriate for formal, for
only $35.00.
Phone YUkon 7-2041
STUDENTS NEEDED TO
SELL ADVERTISING
Students are needed lo sell
advertising in various campus
publications. A 12% commission is paid on all local sales.
Contact BILL MILES in lhe
Publication Board business
office Room 201, North Brock.
Scholarships
Available
Applications for Rhodes Scholarships must be submitted to the
Scholarship Selection Committee
by November 1st.
The scholarship, worth £750,
and tenable at Oxford, will be
presented to one student from
UBC.
Applicants for the Rhodes
Scholarship are not required to
write an examination. Selection
is made by provincial committees after personal interviews,
and on the basis of the candidate's record.
Although scholastic ability is
of prime importance, factors
such as character, instincts to
lead and interest in outdoor
sports are considered.
Some definite quality of distinction, whether in intellect or
character, or a combination of
these, is the most important requirement.
UBC OFFICIALS
(Continued  from  Page   )
had enquired of them as to lodging.
"If any student has no place to
live, it's his own fault," he said.
If a student wishes dormitory
accommodation, he should call
at the housing office.
Several cancellations at registration time should make room
for some students in the residences," he said.
Work On Campus
Buildings Halted
The construction tie-up in B.C.
this summer halted work on five
buildings on the campus.
One unit of men's residences
was to open this term. It is noi
known wihen it will be ready
for student accommodation.
The new $140,000 International House and Faculty Club
were affected by the lock-out
and are not near completion.
The chemistry building extension has just been started, and
the Biological Sciences building
has also been affected.
COMPLIMENTS OF
D.W. Thorn son k Co. Ltd.
Mechanical Consultants
for the
ARTS GROUP
BUILDINGS
1
Frosh Hazing
Period Cut
UBC's Golden Jubilee Symposium, September 24-25, has cut
the frosh hazing period to one
day.
Both faculty and student administration are behind the
move.
Penalties for unofficial hazing on the above days will be
severe, according to a student
administration official.
One consolation is that all afternoon lectures on the two days
will be cancelled to enable the
student body to attend the Symposium.
PSPA Wants
UBC Leaders
University of B.C. student
leaders can benefit from participation in the Pacific student
Presidents' Association according to AMS vice president, Jairus Mutambikwa.
"It is desirable that our own
student officials be txposed to
the ideas of PSPA , . . and share
new ideas with their counterparts in other universities and
colleges," he said.
Mutamibikwa represented UBC
at the conference in May.
Membership in the PSPA is
open to all universities and colleges located in Washington,
Oregon, California, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and
Utah.
Universities in Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Alaska,
Hawaii, Mexico, and B.C. are
also eligible.
"There is a lot we can learn
from PSPA just as there is a
lot we can contribute to it from
our own experience," Mutambikwa said.
Four New Students
(Continued from Page 1)
Hamburg and Ann Coleman at
Nigeria.
Further participation in
WUS's programme was marked
by the recent return of Gordon
Armstrong and Paul Termansen
from the annual WUS seminar,
this year held in Yugoslavia.
Students will soon be able to
hear talks supplemented by
films on the Seminar which are
now being prepared.
FRATERNITY RUSHING
RUNS UNTIL MONDAY
Sludenis interested in join-
ing a fraternity should make
iheir decision now! Registration has already begun and
will continue until Monday.
Seplember 27. Those inter-
esled in belonging to a fraternity should register at tha
A.M.S. office in Brock Hall.
Registration closes Monday at
4.30 p.m.
EDITORS OF RAVEN,
TOTEM CONFIRMED
Council Monday approved the
appointments of Barbara Hay as
Totem editor and of Desmond
Fitzgerald as Raven editor.
Totem is the UBC yearbook
and Raven is UBC's literary
magazine.
Conference
Deadline
Monday
Deadline for acceptance of
Leadership Conference invita
tions is 4 p.m. Monday, September 29, Students' Council announced Monday.
Applications to attend the conference  must  be   submitted  to
' the Alma Mater Society office,
Brock Hall, with the $4.50 reg-
I istration fee.
More   than    150    invitations
were sent out to club and society
. leaders last month.
I     However, a majority of those
invited have not yet been heard
; from, according to Council secretary   Wendy   Amor.
Riders Wanted
NORTH VAN TO U.B.C.
PHONE MIKE
at
YUkon 7-2006
Frosh! Wear
Your Regalia
Today is "Red Sweater Day."
Frosh   are   required  to   wear
regalia all day.
Justice will be meted out by
third year law students in Kangaroo Court at 12.30 p.m. today.
Offending Frosh will be supplied
with defence counsel.
Penalties include: — one day's
hard labor sweeping the Main
Mall; dunking in the university's
septic tank; put in the stocks;
climbing greased poles; and compulsory linking (by handcuffs)
with the opposite sex.
Frosh orientation program for
this week is;
WEDNESDAY — Tea dance,
2.30 p.m., Brock Hall, Big-Little
sister banquet, caf. Big Block
Smoker, men only, 8 p.m., Arlington Hall, 1326 West Broadway.
Frosh Queen Candidates will
appear at both evening functions.
FRIDAY — Fashion Show and
Tea, Brock Hall, 2.SO p.m. Bonfire rally, sponsored by Varsity
Outdoors Club, 7.30 p.m. Splash
party and dance at War Memorial Gymnasium following tne
rally.
'Tween Classes
(Continued from Page 1)
BIG BLOCK CLUB — Frosh
Smoker, Arlington Hall, 1236
West Broadway, Wednesday,
September 24, at 8.30 p.m. All
Members and Frosh please attend.
A Pastor Talks
Of Sex
And Marriagr
"Love," says this minister,
"is as important as oxygen."
But many young people, and
adults, are confused about
the function of sex in their
lives.
Read some direct answers
bs October Reader's Digest
from a man who has listened
to the problems of all kinds
of people. Get your October
Reader's Digest today: 40
articles of lasting interest.
ENGINEERS & ARCHITECTS
of tomorrow
VISIT US TODAY!
for your
• DRAFTING SETS
• T-SQUARES
SLIDE..RULES
PROTRACTORS
SCALES
CURVES etc.
SPECIAL  PRICES TO  STUDENTS
AT
VanCal Reproductions ltd.
1170 Robson Street
AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS FOR KEUFFEL & ESSER CO.
Open Saturdays for your Convenience PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1958
Educators And Statesmen
Honored At Symposium
Academic leaders and Canadian public figures will receive
degrees at special congregations commemorating the B.C. Centennial, the UBC Jubilee and the opening of the Buchanan
building.
The first  congregation,  Wed- *>~   - 	
nesday at 2:30 p.m., in the War! ington,    Vice    Chancellor    and
Memorial Gymnasium will hon- j Principal  of  the  University  of
our academic leaders from  the j Glasgow.
sComrmonwealth and the United !
States.
Lussier Speaks
The    Right    Reverend    Monsignor Irenee Lussier Rector of
ond Special Congregation will
be held in the War Memorial
Gymnasium.
Canadian Statesmen
Six Canadian senior statesmen will receive degrees:
They are:
The Hon. Frank M. Ross,
Lieutenant-Governor of B.C.; the
Rt. Hon. John G. Diefenbaker,
prime minister of Canada; The
Hon. Lester B. Pearson, Leader
The Right Reverend Monsignor
IRENEE LUSSIER
Congregation Speaker
Wednesday
the Universily of Montreal, will
be the Congregation Speaker.
Monsignor Lussier was appointed Rector in 1956, and is
also a member of several committees in Quebec's department
of education.
***<*"
HAROLD W. DODDS
D. W. Logan, Principal of the
University of London; thc Right
Reverend Monsignor Irenee Lussier, Rector of the University of
Montreal; T. H. Matthews, Executive Secretary of the National
Conference of Canadian Universities; and R. G. Sproul, Former
New Brunswick, and was edu- [ the Hon. Sherwood Lett, the Rt,
cated at the University of Glas- Hon. John G. Diefenbaker, Dr.
gow and Morton College, Ox- A. E. Grauer, Premier Bennett,
ford. He was appointed Principal   the  Hon.  Brooke  Claxton,  and
s Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie.
A.M.S. Represented
The Alma Mater Society will
be represented at the congregations by AMS Presidenl, Chuck
Conneghan; Vice President, Jairus Mutambikwa, and Secretary,
Wend>  Amor.
Tney   have   been   invited   to
The Right Honourable
JOHN   G.   DIEFENBAKER
of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition in Canada.
The Hon. Brooke Claxton,
chairman of the Canada Council:
The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, premier of B.C.; and M. J.
Coldwell, federal leader of the
CCF.
Hetherington Speaks
Speaker at this Congregation
will be Sir Hector Hetherington.
Sir Hetherington was born in
: and vice Chancellor of the Uni-
! versity of Glasgow in   1936.
His son, Hector Allistar Hetherington is editor of the Manchester  Guardian.
At the conclusion of Thursday's Congregation, the Academic Procession will proceed
from the gymnasium to the Buchanan Building. There Premier
da
of
of
Pr
Ur
Receiving degrees on Wednes-
y are: W. C. Coslin, President
St. John's College, University
Oxford: Harold W. Dodds,
esident Emeritus of Prineeton '■ present,
riversitv:   Sir   Hector   Hether- !     Thursday at 2:30 p.m
D.   W.   LOGAN
President of the  University  of
California.
Luncheon
The congregation will be preceded by a luncheon at the Vancouver Club for the honorary
degree recipients. Host will be
U.B.C. Chancellor A. E. Grauer.
Former Chancellor, Hon. Chief
Justice   Sherwood   Lett   will   be
SPROUL
walk with members of the
ate of the University in
Chancellor's Procession.
Sen-
the
All Classes Cancelled
AU lectures and labs have
been cancelled on Wednesday
cind 'Ihuwlav afternoons, to en-
the sec-
The Honourable
BROOKE CLAXTON
Bennell  will   formally  open   the
building.
Tea Follows
A tea, in the concourse of tht
building, will follow the open
ing.
Thursday at 7:30. a formal dm
ner will be held in  Brock  Hall
SIR HECTOR HETHERINGTON   at which toasts will be proposed
Congregation Speaker and answered by: The Hon. Los-
Thursday tor B. Pearson. Dr. D. W. Logan.
The  Honourable
W. A. C. BENNETT
able  professors  and  students to
attend  the congregation-:.
Symposium  Stresses  Humanities
An academic symposium, held
jn conjunction with UBC Jubilee
congregations, starts tonight in
Brock Hall.
The symposium has been arranged especially to accompany
the opening of the Buchanan
Building, according to Malcolm
McGregor, faculty organizer.
Humanities Stressed
Since the Buchanan Building
is the centre for the Arts and
Science Faculty, and since last
year a great stress was put on
Science, the focus of this symposium will be on the Humanities and the Social Sciences, he
said.
The symposium is being held
al lhe beginning of the Fall term,
in hopes that this lime would be
the most convenient for students.
Symposium
For Students
Dr. McGregor said that the
symposium has been arranged
for the students, not the faculty.
Dr. Roy Daniels will present
the opening address in Brock
Hall, at 8,30 p.m. tonight.
ii
. Jove's Court"
His topic is "Tne Threshold of
Jove's Court."
He graduated from UBC witli
his B.A. in 1930 and received his
M.A. and Ph.D. from lhe University of Toronto.
In 1033, Dr. Daniels received
the Royal Society of Canada Fellowship and studied at King's
College, University of London.
He was appointed head of
UBC's English department in
1948.
Costin On Education
The second speaker at the
Symposium, W. C. Costin, will
speak on education and welfare
stale Wednesday in Brock Hall,
at 8.30 p.m.
Mr. Costin is president of Sl.
John's College, Oxford. He has
been a fellow of the college since
1922. In 1935 was appointed
Proctor of Oxford.
The final address of the Symposium will be Friday in the
War Memorial Gymnasium, al
12.30 p.m.
Dr. Rhys Carpenter, Professor
Emeritus of Classical Archaeology at Bryn Mawr College will
speak on humanities for the
future.
A distinguished classical scholar, Dr. Carpenter was the Sath-
er Classical lecturer at the University of California in 1930.
Classical Scholar
He i.s a director of the American  School of  Classical  Studies  ,-
at Alliens.
His publications included:
"Folk Tale, Fiction and Saga in
the Homeric Epic"; Greeks in
Spain" and "The Sculpture of
the Nike Parapet."
All Lectures Open
I     All  lectures are  open  to  th« __*
public at large. Tuesday, September 23, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Elections Near; Frosh
Told "Get Organized"
The Honourable
LESTER B. PEARSON
More than 60 class representatives and six Frosh Council
executives will be elected by the
1958-59 freshman class during
the first weeks of lectures.
Frosh    President,    Vice-President,  Treasurer,  Secretary and
Girls'  and  Boys'  Athletic  Representatives  will  be  nominated i
Monday, September 29 in Phys- i
ies 200 at 12:30. All Frosh are j
eligible for these positions and j
are urged to turn out and nonv {
inate their friends.
One representative from each '.
Frosh English 100-101 class will j
be elected to Frosh Council dur- j
ing the early weeks of lectures.   '■
Ail Frosh Council Presidential i
nominees will receive invitations i
to the annual student Leader- ;
ship Conference, Peter Meeki- j
son, Frosh Orientation Commit-1
tee Vice-President said today,     j
'Get out and get organized," !
Meekison  advised  Frosh.   "You j
can   aid   both   the  campus   and
yourself  by supporting  various
student events."
NOTICE
NURSING
The system of giving student, WUS, WAA, MAA, and Council
activity awards will be investi-'; ltself in determining which stu-
gated   by   a   Students'   Council ! . „.   „.,,,,      . „ .
_../ .        .   . . .     dents should be given awards,
committee   under  chairmanship
of UCC chairman Dave Edgar. UBC's honorary sorority and
The committee will  examine   honorary fraternity are not in-
methods   used   by   UCC,   USC. '- eluded  in  the  investigation.
M. J. COLDWELL
International WUS
(Continued from Page 2)
significance, an appreciation of
which  is  essential to the sue-1
eessful growth of inter-univer-'
sity co-operation.
4. Individual and Emergency
Aid: In this category are grants
or scholarships, as well as such
things as food, medicine, clothing and councilling services designed to assist refugee and
other students to complete their
studies. Efforts are directed to
enabling refugee students to reintegrate in a new environment
and become useful members of
society.
The highlights of the Assembly this year were, undobteclly.
the Svmposium Sessions which
enabled distinguished scholars,
educators and students from
many countries throughout the
world to discuss matters affecting the university community.
The topic of the Sessions wa.s
"The Challenge of Partnership
in Higher Education," and the
Moderator was Dean James A.
Gibson of Carleton University,
Ottawa.
It is appropriate here to mention that WUS has received a
grant from UNESCO for the
purpose of undertaking and
preparing a study, "The University Today: Its Role and
Place in Society." This study.
it is Imped, will provide various points of view on fundamental university issues expressed by eminent educationists from different types of universily milieux.
If this report has succeeded
in familiarising the reader with
what went on at the International General Assembly of
WUS in Quebec City, and more
specifically, with the nature of
WtJS itself, it has achieved its
purpose. It was never intended
to be a basis Cor specific recommendations. However, it is
in order to state in conclusion
that as WUS forges ahead with
its admirable work, we should
be aware that, its success depends almost entirely on the
overall response of University
students and professors in many
parts of the world, UBC certainly has a significant: contribution to make in this regard.
Eric Nicol
Classic
Presented
Sex, murder, laughs and an
intimate close-up of the university subculture are in store for
frosh when UBC Player's Club
presents Eric Nicol's "Her
Scienceman Lover" late this
month.
The play has been a tradition
of frosh week since time immemorial. Many upperclassmen
have seen  it every year.
Tne 1958 version, noon in the
Auditorium September 29, will
he directed oy Joan Reid, who
has jusl returned from the United Kingdom where she studied
theatre techniques.
Admission is 25c a head.
Players' Club president Bill
Gordon declined to name hi.s
east.
However, it is known that the
shy feature performer of tiie
show, hydra-headed mystery dog
Puddles, will be absent again
this year, for the fifteenth consecutive time.
The rest of the characters are
equally intriguing.
Studenls registering in First
Year Arts who are interested
in entering First Year Nursing next year are asked to report to the School of Nursing,
Wesbrook Building before
October   1,  1958.
Big Moot
Obsolete?
Controversial issue of repre-
| sentative student government at
| UBC will be investigated by a
i new Students' Council commit-
! tee.
The     representative    government system,   a method of student    government    that    would
, eliminate  the  semi-annual  gen-
| eral    meeting,    was    hotly   dis-
'■ cussed    last    year    but    never j
I brought to a general meeting for
a vote.
Council hopes the new committee will arrive at recommendations for constitutional
changes suitable to all interest
groups on the campus.
Committee will be chaired by
AMS Vice-President Jairus Mutambikwa, It is expected to submit final recommendations in
time for ihem to be discussed
at the Spring General Meeting;
in Marc!)
HELP
FILL THIS SPACE
JOIN THE UBYSSEY
>1n.V.VJOCVJs\»V»vjs.v» VSvJsSsSkNJsSS
Ship-
shapely
ROOM AND BOARD
Available October 1, 1 double
room and private washroom
for 2 male or 2 female students. Room and Board $60,
or bed and breakfast $40 a
month. Near UBC gates.
Phone ALma 3654-Y
AMS Checks
Food Service
Students' Council Monday
formed a permanent committee
to examine expansion of food
services and ether facilities in
Brock  Hall  in  future  years.
It wa.s fell that council should
arrive al some specific plan for
expansion of these services to
present to the UBC Board of
Governors when that body
meets io consider growing enrolment, j
Committee wa.s named the j
Brock Planning and Develop-'
ment Committee and will be j
chaired by AMS Co-ordinator;
Jim Horsman. !
i Xicehj nautical with a jaunty lilt in the sailor
< collar . . . jashiomn'se to jolloir this season's
h silhouette . . '. ivomh'tjul rare-free Ban-Lon iron't
/ pill . . . can't shrink or stretch . . . washes and dries
) quick as a ni)ik . . . full-jashUnicd and hand-
/t     finished as on In Kitten can.
Choose tjonr "Ship-mate" at good; ho pa erenju'here.
Sizes 4 to >>(>. Price $i)M.
#  ^^ MAN-LON
w "Ship-mate" pullover
Jaw: for the name ffflfa'
CUT COSTS:
FINALLY, an answer to
that transportation problem
for the man or women with a
limited budget,
1958 MONZA, a strong
durable .sportsmanlike motor
bike.
Up to 190 miles per gallon
at an average speed ot 50.4
miles per hour.
Full price only $288.00
Full Factory Guarantee
MAXWELL
MOTORS    LTD.
875 Kingsway
Vancouver, B.C.
A   HEARTY   WELCOME...
To all Students enrolling at  the   University   for  the
1958-59 Term
To all those interested we shall be happy to supply 'FREE" a
map of Greater Vancouver and an attractive notebook. Both
are available for the asking at the undernoted branches.
THE CANADIAN BANK of COMMERCE
57!)« University Blvd.
Vancouver 8, B.C,
10th & Sasiunat
Vancouver 8,  B.C. PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1958
SUPER
KEY-
TAB
SPORTS EDITOR, BOB BUSH
NOTICE
Students    interested    in
sports writing, reporting, or
page make-up, please drop
down to the Sports Department of The Ubyssey.
Doublc-Brcastcd Suits
roNVKHTKD   INTO   NKW
iinqlc-Brcasted Models
UNITED  TAIK
549   Granville     MU.   1-4649
The original PUNCHED and TABBED EXERCISE
BOOKS— 80 pages to book — 5 books to a Poly Protected
Package.
HANDY STUDENTS' REFILL COVERS. Punched File
Folders to hold Loose Leaf Fillers.
  Made in B. C. by 	
Smith, Davidson & Lecky
LTD.
Vancouver     -     Victoria     -     Calgary     -     Edmonton
Your Mind Plays
Tricks
Funny
Can you think better with
your feet up? .*. . Can you
learn while you sleep? . . .
What happens to your mental ability with age?
Your mind can play funny
tricks. Read "New Light on
How the Mind Works" in October Reader's Digest for
some new facts discovered by
scientific investigators who
are probing the mystery of
the human brain. Get your
October Reader's Digest today: »40 personally helpful
articles of lasting interest.
LOCATION
BROCK EXTENSION
THEY'RE HERE
THE
MELTON CLOTH
UBC JACKET
Ideal for Campus Wear
SALE:
BLAZERS made by DRAPE SHIRE
only
Reg.   35.00
\-"r
WHILE  THEY  LAST
LOST  AND  FOUND
Owned and Operated by The AMS
Many Intra-Murals
Offered On Campus
UBC has one of the most comprehensive campus-confined athletic programs in Canada.
And all you have to do to become part of it is express some
athletic interest.
Fraternities, Residences, Faculties and the majority of clubs
enter teams in a giant fun-raising intramural program.
More than 3,000 male and 800
female students participate annually in 20 sports.
Points given for each win and
each championship go to form
an aggregate team champion at
the end of the year.
Most sports are scheduled at
12:40 on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday; Wednesday
evening from 6:00 to 10:00 and
Friday from 4:30 to 6:30.
Health and desire are the only
requisites needed. Compulsory
medicals are required for students who compete in cross
country,  boxing and wrestling.
Officiating is done by student
referees who are paid for their
services from the intra mural
treasury.
All contests are covered in the
Ubyssey with league schedules
and results given each week.
Further and more detailed information can be found on the
men's locker room bulletin
board in the War Memorial
Gymnasium or in the office of
director Bob Hindmarch.
Intra mural sports include
swimming, volleyball, tennis,
bowling, ping pong, cross country, tug-of-war, golf, touch football, badminton, basketball, soccer, boxing, wrestling, track and
field and skiing.
The program provides the
Freshman with an excellent op-
| portunity to form his first uni-
j versity friendships while at the
\ same time providing excellent
! exercise.
P
I
z
z
A
at the SNACKERY Granville at 15th
EVERY SUCCESS TO THE
CLASS OF '62
Thompson, Berwick & Pratt
ARCHITECTS TO THE UNIVERSITY
PITMAN OPTICAL
LTD.
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
GLASSES FITTED
24-hour service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
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IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENT Tuesday, September 23, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
CARL HANSEN intercepts a Henwood pass in 1st (i i.nii i
asUBC's Jokanovich (78)  and end Dave Barker move in
the closely contested Churchill Cup game, 9-6.
to stop the McGill captain.
UBC Thunderbirds dropped
— Photo by Mike Sone
THUNDERBIRDS  ALMOST  WIN
IN   CHURCHILL   CUP   PLAY
Tradition almost went out of, solid front wall, sent Halfback i sistently  hit   ex-Loyola  College
the window Saturday as the UBC : Wayne   Aiken   over   from   the
three yard line, capping a march
Thunderbirds went down to a
9-6 defeat to the Redmen from
McGill.
The usually hapless and spiritless Thunderbirds fought all the
\\«ay and grudgingly conceded a
two-point safety touch late in tiie
second quarter and a major
score hy McGill's five year veteran half Wally Bulchak in the
final quarter. }
The birds, spearheaded by the j
fine two-way performance by j
QB Jackie Henwood and a big. I
which started from their own 52,
UBC made 15 first down to
McGills 12, and also outrushed
the Bruce Coulter coached Big
Red team 281  to 227.
Dick Carr, the former Columbia University quarterback con-
Trouble Writing
Essays?
Theses, manuscript, essay revision, correction & help.
Days phone MU. 1-2415
Evenings  phone AL.  0896L
end Joe Poirier with bullet
passes and showed fine mid-season form in mixing up his plays.
UBC's tremendous effort was
summed up by Jack Hcnwood's
post-game comment "—This year
we have a ball club and we're
just starting. Wait till the season
starts and we'll really show you
some goot  football."
NOTICE
Anyone who is interested in
covering sports stories for The
Ubyssey is encouraged to submit her name, address, and
phone number. Slips may be
deposited in the "Publicity"
box in the Women's Gym.
Girls are also needed to paint
posters advertising special
women's sports events.
CHILD    CARE
Conscientious care for infant
or child undertaken for University or Business couple.
5-day week.
Phone ALma 1476-L
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FRATERNITY
RUSHING
Register Now at
A.M.S. Office
Until September 2
NFORMATION BOOKLET
NO CHARGE
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WOMEN
SPORTS
NOTICE
The most noteworthy item on
the women's sports scene right
now is the formation of a Senior
"A" basketball team. This team
— the first in ten years, will be
coached by Mearnio Summers,
well-known.player and coach.
Anyone who is interested in
trying out for this team is in-
viteel to attend the first practice
to be held on September 29 from
7.30 till 9.30 p.m. in the Women's
Gym.
Girls who would like to play
boys' rules basketball, but not
necessarily for the Senior "A"
team are asked lo watch THE
UBYSSEY for notices of tryouts
for other U.B.C. teams.
GRASS HOCKEY
The first grass hockey meeting
will be held in the Women's
,Gym today at 3.30. Both new
players and former team members are encouraged to attend
this meeting. Full gym strip is
required. Practices will be decided later,
The Intramural Adminislra-
tion Board will hold an organiz-
j alional meeting on September 29
at 2.30 noon in the Common
Room in the Women's Gym. All
clubs, sororities, faculties, and
other organizations which have
not appointed a girls' sports rep.
resentative to sit on the I.A.B.
are asked to do so by Monday or
to send a representative to the
meeting.
The I.A3. Committee will
meet September 26 at 12.30 in
the office of Miss Barbara Sch-
rodt, Faculty Administrator.
All members of the Women's
Big Block Club are asked to attend a meeting at Wednesday
noon in the Women's Gym.
Skin, Like Flowers
Needs Water to
Bloom. ...    RA0ft
Cosmetics
by Esther Williams
It can truly be said
that more beauty has
died of thirst than
from any other cause.
This cream is especially formulated to aid in
overcoming dehydration and give balance
of oil and moisture to
the skin. Dehydration
can be tiie cause of
many beauty problems.
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11:30—2:30 Daily PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1958
r
The
■*& r>
WCd"
by
<§dafaji
Black suede
Brown suede
Other Jolene's Styles
The T Strap
The Skimer
and many other
new  styles  for
your Fall wardrobe.
ubcbuysmadonna' Symposium Opens
Buchanan Building
This fall, U.B.C. is commemorating three events by its
Academic Symposium and Special Congregations.
One hundred years ago, on November 19, 1858, Sir James
Douglas, speaking at Fort Langley, proclaimed the birth of the
Mainland Crown Colony of British Columbia.
tv«ns-sH€PPftRDL«
417 West Hastings Street
Victoria sculptor Alfred Carl-
sen has won the outdoor sculptor exhibit on University of B.C.
campus  with  his "Madonna  of
the Cedars" (shown above) which
I the    university    purchases   for
, $600.    Runner-up   waS   Robert
I Clothier of West Vancouver with
I "Birdies." Judges of the exhibit,
; sponsored by the B.C. Chapter
of   the   Northwest   Institute   of
I Sculpture,   were  Philip  James,
j director of art, Arts Council of
Great  Britain,   and Cyril  Richards, sculptor from the Univer-
| sity  of Manitoba.     When  they
l failed to determine which would
be   the   most  suitable  for   pur-
! chase by the university, UBC's
committee on art made the de-
: cision.   Mr.   Carlsen   is   an   instructor at Royal Roads. His 50-
inch   high   exhibit  was   carved
of red cedar,
On March 7, 1908, fifty years
ago, tho Provincial Legislature
passed the University Act,
establishing the University of
British Columbia.
This week, the Buchanan
Building, U.B.C.'s new centre
for the Facully of Arts and
Science, will be officially
opened.
This building marks the completion of the first step in
U.B.C.'s present program of expansion.
It has seating capacity for
2,953 students, houses 120 members of the Faculty, and represents  twelve   departments,
The building was named in
honor of Daniel Buchanan, who
was Dean of the Faculty of Arts
and Science for twenty years,
from 1928 to 1948.
Dean Buchanan, who started
his career at U.B.C. in 1920 as
Professor and Head of the Department of Mathematics, died
at the age of 70, in December
1950.
These three events are the occasion for this Week of Celebration: the Centenary of the
Province of British Columbia,
the Golden Jubilee of the University of British Columbia and
the Opening of the Buchanan
Building.
Treasurer
Economizing
A saving of more than $1000
has been achieved on registration photographs this term,
Council treasurer John Helliwell announced Monday.
Helliwell said the saving was
mainly due to the fact that the
Publications Board Photography
! Department was given the registration  contract.
VETERAN PUBSTERS
GET FORGOTTEN PINS
All members of the Pub Board
who feel left out because they
have not received their pins are
advised that they were not.
Barrie Cook will be glad to
welcome back all party poopers
who did not attend the presentation at the banquet. All is forgiven. He will even give them
their pins.
ROOM AND BOARD
Man to share large comfortably furnished house with
four other students. A really
attractive set-up for a serious
student.
Phone ALma 2068-M
WATCH
—     for  these  free  special  events     —
NOON  HOUR  SPECIAL  EVENTS
OCTOBER 8—Marianne Moore will give a reading of her
own poetry.
OCTOBER 17—Anthony Nutting, former British politican.
OCTOBER 30—James Laver, Victoria and Albert Museum,
London, England. "Costume and Decor of
Shakespeare, 1609-1950,' illustrated.
NOVEMBER 6—Pete Seeger, American Folk Singer.
NOVEMBER 7—Mme. Segeleke, Norway's leading actress
in excerpts from "Bergliot" by Bj. Bjornson,
"The Little Match Girl" by Hans Christian
Andersen, "The Doll's House" and "Peer
Gynt," "MacBeth" and "Medea by Anouilh.
NOVEMBER 14—Viktor Lowenfeld, Head of the Department of Education, Pennsylvania University.
"The Role of the Teacher of Art in this Time
of Decision."
DECEMBER 3—Langston Hughes, American poet, will
read his own poetry and lecture,
DECEMBER 5—Karlheintz Stockhausen, European composer exploring possibilities of electronic
music.
MUSIC   SERIES
The regular noon-hour Wednesday concerts
will continue in Buchanan 106, Instrumental
concerots by Beethoven, Stravinsky, Chopin,
Respighi, Delius and Pentland and others.
Starting middle of October.
.
ART  GALLERY
Basement of Library, Tuesday thru' Saturday
10:30 to 5:00. Tuesday eve 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 26 TO NOVEMBER 1—Painters Eleven,
Avant-garde painters from Ontario. Paul
Kane, early B. C. painter.
NOVEMBER 4 TO 29—Artist-Teachers in B. C. Exhibition
arranged in conjunction with the Canadian
Society for Education through Art.
NOVEMBER 24 TO DECEMBER 15—Annual Western
Books Show.
DECEMBER 2 TO 30—Old Masters from the collection,
of the Hammer Brothers in New York. To
mark 10th anniversary of the opening of the
Fine Arts Gallery.
THEATRE
OCTOBER 22 and 23—Montreal company "Theatre du
Nouveau Monde." Moliere's "Malade Imagin-
aire in French and Marcel Dube's Les Temps
des Lilas" in English.
OCTOBER 31 TO NOVEMBER 8—"Mrs. Warren's Profession" by George Bernard Shaw, Frederick
Wood Theatre Production.
NOVEMBER 13 TO 15—Players' Club Fall Plays. 3 One-
Act Plays.
DECEMBER 12 TO 20—"At Our Wits' End" Topical Revue with Music. Players' Club Alumni presentation.
Under the Sponsorship of - STUDENTS SPECIAL EVENTS & FINE ARTS COMMITTEE

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